Date   

ViewMate translation request - Polish #general

Barbara Ellman
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation.
This is a birth record for Moses Mendel JOSEFSBERG on which there is
supplemental writing. I know that he later went by the name Max FURST
and this name can be seen on the record. It is of the later writing
that I need a translation.

I believe that this will give information of his later life.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61336

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Barbara Ellman
Drohobych - Hassman, Furst, Sonenthaler +


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Polish #general

Barbara Ellman
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation.
This is a birth record for Moses Mendel JOSEFSBERG on which there is
supplemental writing. I know that he later went by the name Max FURST
and this name can be seen on the record. It is of the later writing
that I need a translation.

I believe that this will give information of his later life.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61336

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Barbara Ellman
Drohobych - Hassman, Furst, Sonenthaler +


ROTTERSMAN Family, Bochnia, Poland #general

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@...>
 

I am researching my mother's family in Galicia. My grandfather was Samuel
ROTTERSMAN (1895-1947), who was the son of Isaac Rottersman (1861-1931) and
Malka (Mishket) BLONSKI (1860-1906). Isaac lived in Bochnia, Poland (some
of the records mention Stanislawice). I knew of two sisters of my
grandfather, Sadie (1889-1965) and Esther (1897-1964). Isaac had a second
family with his second wife, Itel LANDWIRTH (1881-1939), of which the only
one I had heard of was Nathan (Nutke) (1915-1996).

When I began research into the Rottersman family, I discovered that there
were more branches of the family. I learned >from other researchers that
there were other Rottersmans in Bochnia. One of my cousins mentioned a
number of Rottersmans in the Bochnia cemetery.

I would like to find out whether some of these other branches are connected
to my family. My grandfather's father Isaac was the son of Samuel (or Szmuel
in Polish). I found another Szmuel Rottersman who died in Bochnia in 1897,
but I do not think he was the Szmuel who was my grandfather's grandfather.
Among this Szmuel's children was Yussel Leib Rottersman (1852-1917), of whom
two children, Regina (1875-1956) and Chaim Baruch (1878-1953), immigrated
to the United States. I think the children of another, Elimelech (1880-1931),
remained in Europe and may have died in the Shoah.

There are also a number of other Rottersmans who lived in the general area,
although not necessarily near Bochnia. I have been able to use various
sources to link the various records to obtain the branches of the family.

If anyone can help with suggestions, please let me know.

Sheldon Dan
sheldan1955@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROTTERSMAN Family, Bochnia, Poland #general

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@...>
 

I am researching my mother's family in Galicia. My grandfather was Samuel
ROTTERSMAN (1895-1947), who was the son of Isaac Rottersman (1861-1931) and
Malka (Mishket) BLONSKI (1860-1906). Isaac lived in Bochnia, Poland (some
of the records mention Stanislawice). I knew of two sisters of my
grandfather, Sadie (1889-1965) and Esther (1897-1964). Isaac had a second
family with his second wife, Itel LANDWIRTH (1881-1939), of which the only
one I had heard of was Nathan (Nutke) (1915-1996).

When I began research into the Rottersman family, I discovered that there
were more branches of the family. I learned >from other researchers that
there were other Rottersmans in Bochnia. One of my cousins mentioned a
number of Rottersmans in the Bochnia cemetery.

I would like to find out whether some of these other branches are connected
to my family. My grandfather's father Isaac was the son of Samuel (or Szmuel
in Polish). I found another Szmuel Rottersman who died in Bochnia in 1897,
but I do not think he was the Szmuel who was my grandfather's grandfather.
Among this Szmuel's children was Yussel Leib Rottersman (1852-1917), of whom
two children, Regina (1875-1956) and Chaim Baruch (1878-1953), immigrated
to the United States. I think the children of another, Elimelech (1880-1931),
remained in Europe and may have died in the Shoah.

There are also a number of other Rottersmans who lived in the general area,
although not necessarily near Bochnia. I have been able to use various
sources to link the various records to obtain the branches of the family.

If anyone can help with suggestions, please let me know.

Sheldon Dan
sheldan1955@bellsouth.net


Yizkor Book Project, October 2017 #subcarpathia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

As always, quite a lot has happened over the last month and a witness to
this, is the impressive list of projects below of those that were dealt
with during October.

For a start, another book has now been completed online - "Memories of
Ozarow" which was generously donated to the Yizkor Book Project by the
translator, William Fraiberg, who carried out the English translation of
the original book in French by the late Hillel Adler. We now have 140
complete books online and we continue the challenge of translating as
much of the Yizkor books to make them available to a wide public.

Last month, we were also pleased to see the addition of a new project for
Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania - a book about the Schwabe Gymnasion that
existed there. It's importance is that it covers the lives of family
members who were students and teachers at the Gymnasion (high school).
The first sections are now online graciously translated by Rabbi Shalom
Bronstein and there are plans to set up a dedicated translations fund for
this book in order to facilitate the translation of its entirety.

I was pleased, this past month, to receive >from various people, the
sponsored translation of a number of entries on communities that are to
be found in the Yad Vashem Pinkasim (Encyclopedias of the Jewish
communities) and also the Marmaros Book. The communities covered in these
books are, particularly for the smaller ones, don't generally have their
own specific Yizkor book and the information covered by these entries is
truly unparalleled. If your predecessors came >from a community that, as
yet, you haven't found information on, please contact me and I'll assist
in seeing if an entry does exist in one of the aforementioned volumes.

The Yizkor Book in Print continues to plough ahead and more new books are
currently in the works. I, together with the people involved in this
project were very gratified to see that a book that they recently
published "A Memorial Book for Rokiskis and its Environs" saw a mention
in the local paper Rokiskis "Sirena". The article noted that the Rokiskis
Regional Museum had been delighted to receive a copy of the English
translation of this book and the paper outlined the Yizkor Book Project's
aim of translating yizkor books into English is making the history of the
Jewish communities is more accessible to Lithuanians. Truly wonderful to
learn about the impact the YBIP Project and the YB Project, in general, is
having around the globe.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried out
in the Yizkor Book Project in October.

We have added in one new book:

- Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania (A Palace That Sank)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaunas1/Kaunas1.html


And added in 6 new entries:

- Craciunesti, Romania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00256.html

- Izabelin, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00123.html

- Kamyanka Buzka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow et al) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dzi158.html

- Knyszyn, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol8_00561.html

- Pryborzhavske, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar241.html

- Zolotar'ovo, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar242.html

And we have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Didyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow, Winniki, Barszczowice, Pidelisek, Pidbaritz, Kukizov, Old
Jarczow, Pekalowice, Kamenopole & Nowy Jarczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dziedzilow.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kosava, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kosava/Kosava.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ozarow, Poland (Memories of Ozarow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozarow/Ozarow.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Pan Kapitan of Jordanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jordanow/Jordanow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the
Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Yizkor Book Project, October 2017 #subcarpathia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

As always, quite a lot has happened over the last month and a witness to
this, is the impressive list of projects below of those that were dealt
with during October.

For a start, another book has now been completed online - "Memories of
Ozarow" which was generously donated to the Yizkor Book Project by the
translator, William Fraiberg, who carried out the English translation of
the original book in French by the late Hillel Adler. We now have 140
complete books online and we continue the challenge of translating as
much of the Yizkor books to make them available to a wide public.

Last month, we were also pleased to see the addition of a new project for
Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania - a book about the Schwabe Gymnasion that
existed there. It's importance is that it covers the lives of family
members who were students and teachers at the Gymnasion (high school).
The first sections are now online graciously translated by Rabbi Shalom
Bronstein and there are plans to set up a dedicated translations fund for
this book in order to facilitate the translation of its entirety.

I was pleased, this past month, to receive >from various people, the
sponsored translation of a number of entries on communities that are to
be found in the Yad Vashem Pinkasim (Encyclopedias of the Jewish
communities) and also the Marmaros Book. The communities covered in these
books are, particularly for the smaller ones, don't generally have their
own specific Yizkor book and the information covered by these entries is
truly unparalleled. If your predecessors came >from a community that, as
yet, you haven't found information on, please contact me and I'll assist
in seeing if an entry does exist in one of the aforementioned volumes.

The Yizkor Book in Print continues to plough ahead and more new books are
currently in the works. I, together with the people involved in this
project were very gratified to see that a book that they recently
published "A Memorial Book for Rokiskis and its Environs" saw a mention
in the local paper Rokiskis "Sirena". The article noted that the Rokiskis
Regional Museum had been delighted to receive a copy of the English
translation of this book and the paper outlined the Yizkor Book Project's
aim of translating yizkor books into English is making the history of the
Jewish communities is more accessible to Lithuanians. Truly wonderful to
learn about the impact the YBIP Project and the YB Project, in general, is
having around the globe.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried out
in the Yizkor Book Project in October.

We have added in one new book:

- Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania (A Palace That Sank)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaunas1/Kaunas1.html


And added in 6 new entries:

- Craciunesti, Romania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00256.html

- Izabelin, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00123.html

- Kamyanka Buzka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow et al) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dzi158.html

- Knyszyn, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol8_00561.html

- Pryborzhavske, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar241.html

- Zolotar'ovo, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar242.html

And we have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Didyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow, Winniki, Barszczowice, Pidelisek, Pidbaritz, Kukizov, Old
Jarczow, Pekalowice, Kamenopole & Nowy Jarczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dziedzilow.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kosava, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kosava/Kosava.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ozarow, Poland (Memories of Ozarow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozarow/Ozarow.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Pan Kapitan of Jordanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jordanow/Jordanow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the
Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yiddish to Hebrew names #general

George J. Fogelson
 

What are the Hebrew equivalents of the Yiddish names Mortek and Etka?
Thanks,

George FOGELSON
Redondo Beach, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish to Hebrew names #general

George J. Fogelson
 

What are the Hebrew equivalents of the Yiddish names Mortek and Etka?
Thanks,

George FOGELSON
Redondo Beach, CA


Re: Researching DINNERSTEIN family #general

Avrohom Krauss
 

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@bellsouth.net> wrote:

<I am looking for any connection between two branches of a family tree I have
been researching.

My wife's grandmother was Gussie DINNERSTEIN (1892-1968), who was born in Vilna
(Vilnius), Lithuania�.

The Avrum Yaakov Dinnerstein family apparently originated in Ilya, Lithuania
(later in Poland and now in Belarus). I think that Ilya was somewhat close to
Vilna, so it is possible that the two families were in the same general region.>

'Ilya, Lithuania' is today Ilya, Belarus. It was formerly located in Vilna
Gubernia (province) in the Russian Empire. Consider "born in Vilna" -is a
reference to Vilna Gubernia-not the city of Vilna. The Dinnerstein family was
indeed >from Ilya and surrounding villages. My ROGOZIN (ROGOSIN) family >from
nearby Vyazyn (and Ilya) married members of the DINNERSTEIN family.

Avrohom Krauss
Tell-Stone Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Researching DINNERSTEIN family #general

Avrohom Krauss
 

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@bellsouth.net> wrote:

<I am looking for any connection between two branches of a family tree I have
been researching.

My wife's grandmother was Gussie DINNERSTEIN (1892-1968), who was born in Vilna
(Vilnius), Lithuania�.

The Avrum Yaakov Dinnerstein family apparently originated in Ilya, Lithuania
(later in Poland and now in Belarus). I think that Ilya was somewhat close to
Vilna, so it is possible that the two families were in the same general region.>

'Ilya, Lithuania' is today Ilya, Belarus. It was formerly located in Vilna
Gubernia (province) in the Russian Empire. Consider "born in Vilna" -is a
reference to Vilna Gubernia-not the city of Vilna. The Dinnerstein family was
indeed >from Ilya and surrounding villages. My ROGOZIN (ROGOSIN) family >from
nearby Vyazyn (and Ilya) married members of the DINNERSTEIN family.

Avrohom Krauss
Tell-Stone Israel


Findmypast All Military Records Free Access Through 12 November 2017 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In honor of Veterans Day Findmypast is offering free access to all their
military records all 80 million records within their "Military, Armed Forces
and Conflict" see: http://tinyurl.com/ya35h9bg
Original url:

https://search.findmypast.com/search-world-records-in-military-service-and-conflict

This includes military records >from the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia,
Canada and United States >from November 8 through November 12 midnight ( the
notice did not state which time zone BST, EST etc.).
Go to: https://www.findmypast.com/military-records/ . You will be required
to register with your name, email address and password.

Findmypast is also hosting a free live webinar on Thursday November 9th. 11
AM EST on YouTube Live. Viewers will receive expert tips for using
Findmypast' s collection of military records and historical newspapers to
create detailed profiles of their military ancestor's lives. UK National
Archives record specialist Audrey Collins will be taking a detailed look at
how the 1939 Register can be an invaluable tool for tracing British
relatives at the outbreak of World War 2. The Webinar will also include a
live Q&A session in which viewers will be invited to submit their questions
to the hosts as well as Findmypast' s team of experts. Registration is
required for this free webinar. To register and learn more go to:
https://www.findmypast.com/webinar-registration

I have no affiliation with Findmypast and am posting this solely for the
readers' information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Findmypast All Military Records Free Access Through 12 November 2017 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In honor of Veterans Day Findmypast is offering free access to all their
military records all 80 million records within their "Military, Armed Forces
and Conflict" see: http://tinyurl.com/ya35h9bg
Original url:

https://search.findmypast.com/search-world-records-in-military-service-and-conflict

This includes military records >from the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia,
Canada and United States >from November 8 through November 12 midnight ( the
notice did not state which time zone BST, EST etc.).
Go to: https://www.findmypast.com/military-records/ . You will be required
to register with your name, email address and password.

Findmypast is also hosting a free live webinar on Thursday November 9th. 11
AM EST on YouTube Live. Viewers will receive expert tips for using
Findmypast' s collection of military records and historical newspapers to
create detailed profiles of their military ancestor's lives. UK National
Archives record specialist Audrey Collins will be taking a detailed look at
how the 1939 Register can be an invaluable tool for tracing British
relatives at the outbreak of World War 2. The Webinar will also include a
live Q&A session in which viewers will be invited to submit their questions
to the hosts as well as Findmypast' s team of experts. Registration is
required for this free webinar. To register and learn more go to:
https://www.findmypast.com/webinar-registration

I have no affiliation with Findmypast and am posting this solely for the
readers' information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Halpert & Salomon families in Ramat Gan #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with Mordecai and Naava Salomon. She was bornn
in 1954, daughter of Yitzchak Yaakov Bistritzer and Tova Tereza,
daughter of Rabbi Joseph Zvi Heilprin-Halpert, born in 1879/85 and
perished in Auschwitz in May 1944, Rabbi of Nagysomkut (Shomkut),

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with contact information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Halpert & Salomon families in Ramat Gan #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with Mordecai and Naava Salomon. She was bornn
in 1954, daughter of Yitzchak Yaakov Bistritzer and Tova Tereza,
daughter of Rabbi Joseph Zvi Heilprin-Halpert, born in 1879/85 and
perished in Auschwitz in May 1944, Rabbi of Nagysomkut (Shomkut),

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with contact information.


(UK) Weiner Library Catalogues 356 Kristallnacht Testimonies and Translates Them Into English #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On November 9-10, 1938 Nazis conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms
throughout Germany, annexed Austria and areas of the Sudetenland in
Czechoslovakia.it is known as Kristallnacht. "The Night of Broken Glass",
stems >from the broken windows of 267 synagogues, homes and 7,500
Jewish-owned businesses destroyed during the action, as well as the deaths
of 91 Jews. Up to 30,000 Jewish males were arrested and transferred to
concentration camps. Kristallnacht was the turning point in Nazi's
anti-Semitic policy and persecution of the Jews.

The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide in the United
Kingdom announced they completed their project to catalogue their collection
of 356 testimonies >from eye witnesses to Kristallnacht. For the first time
full-text transcriptions of the original documents in German, French and
Dutch are available in English

To access the testimonies see:
http://wienerlibrarycollections.co.uk/novemberpogrom/testimonies-and-reports/overview
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/JJGfAf ]
and scroll down to the Testimonies and Reports Section. The testimonies were
done in November and December 1938 and January and February 1939, close to the
actual Kristallnacht when the memories were "fresh".

To learn more about the testimonies, see Pogrom: November 1938
http://wienerlibrarycollections.co.uk/novemberpogrom/home

To learn more about Kristallnacht, see the United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum article at:
https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005201

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) Weiner Library Catalogues 356 Kristallnacht Testimonies and Translates Them Into English #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On November 9-10, 1938 Nazis conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms
throughout Germany, annexed Austria and areas of the Sudetenland in
Czechoslovakia.it is known as Kristallnacht. "The Night of Broken Glass",
stems >from the broken windows of 267 synagogues, homes and 7,500
Jewish-owned businesses destroyed during the action, as well as the deaths
of 91 Jews. Up to 30,000 Jewish males were arrested and transferred to
concentration camps. Kristallnacht was the turning point in Nazi's
anti-Semitic policy and persecution of the Jews.

The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide in the United
Kingdom announced they completed their project to catalogue their collection
of 356 testimonies >from eye witnesses to Kristallnacht. For the first time
full-text transcriptions of the original documents in German, French and
Dutch are available in English

To access the testimonies see:
http://wienerlibrarycollections.co.uk/novemberpogrom/testimonies-and-reports/overview
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/JJGfAf ]
and scroll down to the Testimonies and Reports Section. The testimonies were
done in November and December 1938 and January and February 1939, close to the
actual Kristallnacht when the memories were "fresh".

To learn more about the testimonies, see Pogrom: November 1938
http://wienerlibrarycollections.co.uk/novemberpogrom/home

To learn more about Kristallnacht, see the United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum article at:
https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005201

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Question: records from Iasi #romania

mforster3054@...
 

Hi group my name is Michael Forster I'm doing research on my maternal
great grand father Michael Kovit (Itzkovitz) >from Iasi Romania his parents are
Hyman Itzkovitz and Eva nee Schein they immigrated to NY in 1898 when Michael was
three. How can I find records for Iasi for Michael and Family?
Any help is greatly appreciated. I can attach or send a picture of the headstone
if that would be of any help.


Regards

Michael Forster
mforster3054@yahoo.com


Romania SIG #Romania Question: records from Iasi #romania

mforster3054@...
 

Hi group my name is Michael Forster I'm doing research on my maternal
great grand father Michael Kovit (Itzkovitz) >from Iasi Romania his parents are
Hyman Itzkovitz and Eva nee Schein they immigrated to NY in 1898 when Michael was
three. How can I find records for Iasi for Michael and Family?
Any help is greatly appreciated. I can attach or send a picture of the headstone
if that would be of any help.


Regards

Michael Forster
mforster3054@yahoo.com


Announcing a cooperation between Steve Weil and the Leo Baeck Institute - Jebenhausen & Goeppingen community history translation #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Steve Weil of Chicago Illinois is a charter member of GerSIG who was
active in German Jewish research long before our SIG was
organized in 1998.

Mr Weil has spearheaded and supported a complete translation of Dr.
Aron Tenzer's 1927 History of the Jewish Community of
Jebenhausen and Goeppingen (updated in 1988).

The translation will soon be available online on the Leo Baeck
Institute's Digibaeck. Steve's single handed oversight and funding
of the project is an important contribution to the genealogy field,
and good example for us all. I join Karen Franklin at LBI in thanking
Steve for his contribution of work and financing to this endeavor.

When the English translation is completed and becomes available on
line via Digibaeck it will be announced here.

Until then, 3 German language editions of the book are available at
The Leo Baeck Institute. Search for them via:
https://www.lbi.org/

The German version of the book is listed in the GerSIG Community
Histories bibliography at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities-g.htm

Die Geschichte der Juden in Jebenhausen und Goeppingen

Aron Taenzer 1871-1937. (Tanzer A umlaut)

Berlin : W. Kohlhammer, 1927. 1927 573 pages

Available at Leo Baeck Institute Library (DS 135 G4 J4 T3 / Copy 2)

With thanks to our friend Steve,

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC, GerSIG Director


German SIG #Germany Announcing a cooperation between Steve Weil and the Leo Baeck Institute - Jebenhausen & Goeppingen community history translation #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Steve Weil of Chicago Illinois is a charter member of GerSIG who was
active in German Jewish research long before our SIG was
organized in 1998.

Mr Weil has spearheaded and supported a complete translation of Dr.
Aron Tenzer's 1927 History of the Jewish Community of
Jebenhausen and Goeppingen (updated in 1988).

The translation will soon be available online on the Leo Baeck
Institute's Digibaeck. Steve's single handed oversight and funding
of the project is an important contribution to the genealogy field,
and good example for us all. I join Karen Franklin at LBI in thanking
Steve for his contribution of work and financing to this endeavor.

When the English translation is completed and becomes available on
line via Digibaeck it will be announced here.

Until then, 3 German language editions of the book are available at
The Leo Baeck Institute. Search for them via:
https://www.lbi.org/

The German version of the book is listed in the GerSIG Community
Histories bibliography at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities-g.htm

Die Geschichte der Juden in Jebenhausen und Goeppingen

Aron Taenzer 1871-1937. (Tanzer A umlaut)

Berlin : W. Kohlhammer, 1927. 1927 573 pages

Available at Leo Baeck Institute Library (DS 135 G4 J4 T3 / Copy 2)

With thanks to our friend Steve,

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC, GerSIG Director

49161 - 49180 of 659893