Date   

KIZNER/POPOVSKY of Dzygovka/Dzyhivka, Podolia #ukraine

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

I am in the early stages of trying to trace my KIZNER ancestry. My mother's father was Peter KIZNER of Dzygovka/Dzyhivka, Podolia province. He left Russia in 1913 and went to Argentina. In 1922, he came to the United States. He married Yenta (later Esther) MARCUS in 1926 in Los Angeles. They had two children, my mother Beatrice and my uncle Maurice. Peter abandoned his family in Los Angeles in about 1932 and eventually returned to Argentina in about 1940.

An important detail is that Peter became an evangelical Christian at some point in time. In Argentina, he was a missionary trying to convert Jews to Christianity. He was trained as a missionary at the Open Bible Institute in Des Moines, Iowa, USA. A publication >from this institute states that he became an orphan at the age of 11; I have no idea as to the correctness of that statement.

An Argentine document I have seen gives the names of Peter's parents as Bertha POPOVSKY and Santiago KIZNER. Santiago is the Spanish equivalent of James or Jacob.

The passenger manifest for the ship that Peter took to the US in 1922 states that he had a sister Ana in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Joseph WALDER

Portland, Oregon, USA


MURAKHOVSKY family of Koshevatoye, Tarashcha, Ukraine #ukraine

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

I am looking for any information about my MURAKHOVSKY ancestors of Koshevatoye, Tarashcha, Ukraine. My maternal grandmother Yenta MURAKHOVSKAYA was the youngest of 10 children of Moshe Avram MURAKHOVSKY (1853-1916) and Krenie LUCHANSKAYA (1856-1919) and came to the United States in 1923, taking the name Esther MARCUS. Quite a bit is known about the LUCHANSKY clan thanks to previous genealogical research, but I know absolutely nothing about the parents or siblings of Moshe Avram MURAKHOVSKY. Records >from Koshevatoye have yet to be translated and indexed, as far as I know. Any information of suggestions would be gratefully received. To be clear, I have a general idea how to transliterate Russian names, but I do not read Russian at all.

Joseph Walder

Portland, Oregon, USA

MODER4ATOR'S NOTE: Hebrew and Russian characters are not compatible with our
mailing system.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine KIZNER/POPOVSKY of Dzygovka/Dzyhivka, Podolia #ukraine

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

I am in the early stages of trying to trace my KIZNER ancestry. My mother's father was Peter KIZNER of Dzygovka/Dzyhivka, Podolia province. He left Russia in 1913 and went to Argentina. In 1922, he came to the United States. He married Yenta (later Esther) MARCUS in 1926 in Los Angeles. They had two children, my mother Beatrice and my uncle Maurice. Peter abandoned his family in Los Angeles in about 1932 and eventually returned to Argentina in about 1940.

An important detail is that Peter became an evangelical Christian at some point in time. In Argentina, he was a missionary trying to convert Jews to Christianity. He was trained as a missionary at the Open Bible Institute in Des Moines, Iowa, USA. A publication >from this institute states that he became an orphan at the age of 11; I have no idea as to the correctness of that statement.

An Argentine document I have seen gives the names of Peter's parents as Bertha POPOVSKY and Santiago KIZNER. Santiago is the Spanish equivalent of James or Jacob.

The passenger manifest for the ship that Peter took to the US in 1922 states that he had a sister Ana in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Joseph WALDER

Portland, Oregon, USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine MURAKHOVSKY family of Koshevatoye, Tarashcha, Ukraine #ukraine

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

I am looking for any information about my MURAKHOVSKY ancestors of Koshevatoye, Tarashcha, Ukraine. My maternal grandmother Yenta MURAKHOVSKAYA was the youngest of 10 children of Moshe Avram MURAKHOVSKY (1853-1916) and Krenie LUCHANSKAYA (1856-1919) and came to the United States in 1923, taking the name Esther MARCUS. Quite a bit is known about the LUCHANSKY clan thanks to previous genealogical research, but I know absolutely nothing about the parents or siblings of Moshe Avram MURAKHOVSKY. Records >from Koshevatoye have yet to be translated and indexed, as far as I know. Any information of suggestions would be gratefully received. To be clear, I have a general idea how to transliterate Russian names, but I do not read Russian at all.

Joseph Walder

Portland, Oregon, USA

MODER4ATOR'S NOTE: Hebrew and Russian characters are not compatible with our
mailing system.


YUDIN--**Breakthrough!** #general

Marilyn Robinson <jewishgemblog@...>
 

I have been researching my paternal family, YUDIN (IUDIN) for nine
years, but have been unable to find any information about my father's
line. The other day I went back to Ancestry.com & to Jewishgen,
reviewing the 1834, 1850, 1888 All Lithuania Revision lists, as well
as the Lithuania 1875 Tax & Voters lists. I checked for my paternal
name, YUDIN (IUDIN) >from the Sharkovshchina, Disna, Vilnius area of
what had been Lithuania (presently Belarus). I hadn't looked at the
listings for a couple of years but something has always made me feel
that some of the names were my relatives, I just was not seeing the
connections----yet!

My great grandfather was Yehudah Lieb, referred to by my family as
Leyb; his common usage U.S. name was Louis. He was married to Malka
(nee SHAPIRO), known as Molly. On the Lithuania list there was a Leiba
married to a Malka, with his father listed as Mendel. That was my
starting point.

My father's birth name was Emanuel & I had often wondered who he was
named after. My uncle, his brother--Leo Marvin--, said that as kids,
they would singsong Mendrick/Shmendrik, Mendel/Shmendl, but I saw no
connection between the childish words & my father's name. I decided to
look at Ancestry's "Jewish Names Variations" list for alternate U.S.
names for "Mendel"----there it was--my connection! One of the US
alternate names for Mendel was----Emanuel! So, evidently my father was
named after his great grandfather (my gggrandfather), Mendel!! My
grandfather, Sam, was listed--as Simon (I knew his Hebrew name was
Shimon), his brother Israel was identified as Srol, his sister, Jenny,
was Zlata, etc. By checking other fathers' names I was able to trace
back to my 4th ggrandfather,Iudel/Iuda, earlier than 1797! I was also
able to identify many approximate birth years and the names of some of
the wives & children of each of the men, back through the generations.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen YUDIN--**Breakthrough!** #general

Marilyn Robinson <jewishgemblog@...>
 

I have been researching my paternal family, YUDIN (IUDIN) for nine
years, but have been unable to find any information about my father's
line. The other day I went back to Ancestry.com & to Jewishgen,
reviewing the 1834, 1850, 1888 All Lithuania Revision lists, as well
as the Lithuania 1875 Tax & Voters lists. I checked for my paternal
name, YUDIN (IUDIN) >from the Sharkovshchina, Disna, Vilnius area of
what had been Lithuania (presently Belarus). I hadn't looked at the
listings for a couple of years but something has always made me feel
that some of the names were my relatives, I just was not seeing the
connections----yet!

My great grandfather was Yehudah Lieb, referred to by my family as
Leyb; his common usage U.S. name was Louis. He was married to Malka
(nee SHAPIRO), known as Molly. On the Lithuania list there was a Leiba
married to a Malka, with his father listed as Mendel. That was my
starting point.

My father's birth name was Emanuel & I had often wondered who he was
named after. My uncle, his brother--Leo Marvin--, said that as kids,
they would singsong Mendrick/Shmendrik, Mendel/Shmendl, but I saw no
connection between the childish words & my father's name. I decided to
look at Ancestry's "Jewish Names Variations" list for alternate U.S.
names for "Mendel"----there it was--my connection! One of the US
alternate names for Mendel was----Emanuel! So, evidently my father was
named after his great grandfather (my gggrandfather), Mendel!! My
grandfather, Sam, was listed--as Simon (I knew his Hebrew name was
Shimon), his brother Israel was identified as Srol, his sister, Jenny,
was Zlata, etc. By checking other fathers' names I was able to trace
back to my 4th ggrandfather,Iudel/Iuda, earlier than 1797! I was also
able to identify many approximate birth years and the names of some of
the wives & children of each of the men, back through the generations.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Re: Restrictions on Mailing Letters in Nazi-occupied Poland #general

Peter Lebensold
 

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 2:04 AM, Carol Arshoff <carol.arshoff@sympatico.ca> wrote:
Does anyone know if there were restrictions on writing letters when Poland was
occupied by the Nazis? If so, what were they? I have a translation of a
postcard/letter written in 1941 >from Plonsk where my aunt has written that they
were limited to 1 page. In another postcard, written in 1940 >from Plonsk the
stamped portion where one would write a return address is written in German.
Hi Carol:

When my aunt in the U.K. passed away several years ago, her son (my cousin)
found a cache of letters that she'd received >from her parents (my grandparents)
while they were confined within the Warsaw ghetto (and before they were
transported and never heard >from again).

The first restriction seems to have been that of paper: The letters are written
on both sides of a single sheet of thin airmail paper, with the text sometimes
continuing up the sides and even running upside down - covering every square
millimeter of available space.

With the multiple directions, the tiny handwriting and the bleed-through >from
one side of the paper to the other, they are very difficult to read, let alone
translate. No letter is more than a single sheet. (There are postcards as well.)

It's also clear that the letters were censored: Several are rubber-stamped with
swastikas.

And, finally, yes, there appear to have been restrictions (implicit or explicit)
on what information could be shared: There is no mention of conditions within
the ghetto, there is no explanation when my grandparents changed return address
(having had to move out of their home when the ghetto started being shrunk), and
my grandmother seems to show an unusual concern that her three children - safe
outside Poland - have enough "socks". She mentions "socks" several times in
multiple letters, with the clear (to her grandchildren, at least) implication
that she's writing in code: "Socks" = money.

A great deal remains to be imagined.

Peter Lebensold
Toronto


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Restrictions on Mailing Letters in Nazi-occupied Poland #general

Peter Lebensold
 

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 2:04 AM, Carol Arshoff <carol.arshoff@sympatico.ca> wrote:
Does anyone know if there were restrictions on writing letters when Poland was
occupied by the Nazis? If so, what were they? I have a translation of a
postcard/letter written in 1941 >from Plonsk where my aunt has written that they
were limited to 1 page. In another postcard, written in 1940 >from Plonsk the
stamped portion where one would write a return address is written in German.
Hi Carol:

When my aunt in the U.K. passed away several years ago, her son (my cousin)
found a cache of letters that she'd received >from her parents (my grandparents)
while they were confined within the Warsaw ghetto (and before they were
transported and never heard >from again).

The first restriction seems to have been that of paper: The letters are written
on both sides of a single sheet of thin airmail paper, with the text sometimes
continuing up the sides and even running upside down - covering every square
millimeter of available space.

With the multiple directions, the tiny handwriting and the bleed-through >from
one side of the paper to the other, they are very difficult to read, let alone
translate. No letter is more than a single sheet. (There are postcards as well.)

It's also clear that the letters were censored: Several are rubber-stamped with
swastikas.

And, finally, yes, there appear to have been restrictions (implicit or explicit)
on what information could be shared: There is no mention of conditions within
the ghetto, there is no explanation when my grandparents changed return address
(having had to move out of their home when the ghetto started being shrunk), and
my grandmother seems to show an unusual concern that her three children - safe
outside Poland - have enough "socks". She mentions "socks" several times in
multiple letters, with the clear (to her grandchildren, at least) implication
that she's writing in code: "Socks" = money.

A great deal remains to be imagined.

Peter Lebensold
Toronto


Re: Where is "Reslawa", Russia? #general

Emily Garber
 

**Emily Garber wrote:
"Perhaps, after the JewishGen Discussion Group has posted several
alternative notions regarding the location of a place identified as
"Reslawa" in an emigrant's passenger manifest, it is time to talk
methodology.

"It is never good to rely on only one record to "prove" something
about one's ancestors. Consider each piece of evidence as a clue.
Search high and wide for other records."

**Alexander Sharon responded:
"It is always a good idea to talk about a methodology. But before one
has committed efforts to search through other documents, have anyone
review manifest record for the elusive town Reslawa."

If I understand Alex Sharon's comment correctly, we are in agreement.
My comment on methods for locating one's ancestral community did not
include a comprehensive list everything a researcher should consider.
I am glad Alex reminded us that we must squeeze as much information
out the manifest as we can.

Handwriting on manifests can be a challenge. It is possible that the
town name "Reslawa" had been misconstrued by the clerk who wrote it on
the passenger manifest page, by the person who indexed the entry for
whichever company placed the index online, or by the researcher,
herself. In addition, there may be other information on a manifest
that may provide more clues to community location. These could include
location of family member left behind, birth place of passenger,
country of origin, etc. These should be reviewed in light of
historical and political context at the time of emigration.

JewishGen, of course, provides ViewMate, a wonderful resource for
sharing images of records in question. It would be another good piece
of information if those posting town name questions would place an
image of the record online for all helpful JewishGen Discussion Group
participants to examine.

In addition, JewishGen has a nice write-up on "Finding Your Ancestral
Town." It should be required reading for those trying to pin down
family origins in the Old Country. Go to Get Started > Frequently
Asked Questions > 11. Finding Your Ancestral Town. The direct URL is
https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/faq.html#Towns

Those who know my work also know that I have taken the above process
several steps further, suggesting that researchers check additional
records for an immigrant's family, friends, neighbors (and especially
landsman), that may provide information bearing on the questions at
hand. I also suggest researching origins of information found in some
of the most useful compiled works, such as the comprehensive
gazetteer, "Where Once We Walked." My most recent article on this
topic appeared in Avotaynu 32:3 (Fall 2016): "Beyond the Manifest:
Applying the Genealogical Proof Standard to Confirm One's Ancestral
Origins."

Genealogy is a research discipline. All of us, those new to the field
and those experienced, should push ourselves beyond only one record as
a source of information. If we select one location >from among several
possibilities, we need to understand and document the reasons we made
that decision. The question of one's family origin is to too important
a way-point in one's research to risk getting it wrong.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Where is "Reslawa", Russia? #general

Emily Garber
 

**Emily Garber wrote:
"Perhaps, after the JewishGen Discussion Group has posted several
alternative notions regarding the location of a place identified as
"Reslawa" in an emigrant's passenger manifest, it is time to talk
methodology.

"It is never good to rely on only one record to "prove" something
about one's ancestors. Consider each piece of evidence as a clue.
Search high and wide for other records."

**Alexander Sharon responded:
"It is always a good idea to talk about a methodology. But before one
has committed efforts to search through other documents, have anyone
review manifest record for the elusive town Reslawa."

If I understand Alex Sharon's comment correctly, we are in agreement.
My comment on methods for locating one's ancestral community did not
include a comprehensive list everything a researcher should consider.
I am glad Alex reminded us that we must squeeze as much information
out the manifest as we can.

Handwriting on manifests can be a challenge. It is possible that the
town name "Reslawa" had been misconstrued by the clerk who wrote it on
the passenger manifest page, by the person who indexed the entry for
whichever company placed the index online, or by the researcher,
herself. In addition, there may be other information on a manifest
that may provide more clues to community location. These could include
location of family member left behind, birth place of passenger,
country of origin, etc. These should be reviewed in light of
historical and political context at the time of emigration.

JewishGen, of course, provides ViewMate, a wonderful resource for
sharing images of records in question. It would be another good piece
of information if those posting town name questions would place an
image of the record online for all helpful JewishGen Discussion Group
participants to examine.

In addition, JewishGen has a nice write-up on "Finding Your Ancestral
Town." It should be required reading for those trying to pin down
family origins in the Old Country. Go to Get Started > Frequently
Asked Questions > 11. Finding Your Ancestral Town. The direct URL is
https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/faq.html#Towns

Those who know my work also know that I have taken the above process
several steps further, suggesting that researchers check additional
records for an immigrant's family, friends, neighbors (and especially
landsman), that may provide information bearing on the questions at
hand. I also suggest researching origins of information found in some
of the most useful compiled works, such as the comprehensive
gazetteer, "Where Once We Walked." My most recent article on this
topic appeared in Avotaynu 32:3 (Fall 2016): "Beyond the Manifest:
Applying the Genealogical Proof Standard to Confirm One's Ancestral
Origins."

Genealogy is a research discipline. All of us, those new to the field
and those experienced, should push ourselves beyond only one record as
a source of information. If we select one location >from among several
possibilities, we need to understand and document the reasons we made
that decision. The question of one's family origin is to too important
a way-point in one's research to risk getting it wrong.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ


Re: FUCHS Israel & his wife Rivka #hungary

david@...
 

The FUCHS family >from Senta is actually close to my family, so this
thread
is quite intriguing for me!!!

My grandfather, Alter David Tzvi DEUTSCH married his first wife,
Tscharna
FUCHS, who died tragically in what appears to have been the Spanish
Inflenza
epidemic. After the death of his wife, my grandfather sent all his
daughters
to live with his dead wife's wealthy FUCHS brothers who lived in Senta.
These DEUTSCH sisters (my aunts) all essentially finished growing up in
Senta (all their teen years).

A year or so after Tscharna's death, my Grandfather remarried to my a
second
wife (my Grandmother), who had other children (including my father).

As far as I have been able to dig up, Tscharna and her brothers were
**all**
born in Sub-Carpathia where my grandfather was born, and where he
married
Tscharna. Tscharna was born in Munkacs (Mukachevo), along with her
brothers.
I am not sure why some of them  moved to Senta, and it is very odd to
read
this thread. I have tried to start at the beginning (I missed the
beginning,
and I can't seem to figure out how to make the listserv archive search
find
the thread for me . . . frustrating, as I would like to read the thread
from
the start).


Anyhow, perhaps there were two unrelated FUCHS families >from Senta . . .
one
from Moravia, and one >from Munkacs.
Regards to all,

David Deutsch

Searching:

DEUTSCH: >from Sub-Carpathia, but ideally near the Galician border (i.e.
Alsohidegpatak).
SAFAR/SCHAFAR/SCHOFFAR: >from Sub-Carpathia, but ideally near the
Galician
border (i.e. Alsohidegpatak).
SCHNEIDER: >from Sub-Carpathia, but ideally near the Galician border
(i.e.
Alsohidegpatak).
GROSZ: Piricse, Tiszkerecseny, and Aranyosapati,  Northeast Hungary
WINKLER: Tiszakerecseny, Northeast Hungary
WEISZ: Ramocsahaza and Senyo, Northeast Hungary
HIRSCHBERG: All
FRISCH: Alsopeteny, Nograd, Hungary
FURST: SW Slovakia and Vienna
FELDBAUER: SW SLovakia
MAYER: SW Slovakia and Vienna


On 2018-02-08 23:51, Abraham Fuchs abrahamfuchs@gmail.com wrote:

According to the Jewish lexicon published in Budapest in 1929.the
Fuchs family >from Senta comes >from Moravia.

Abraham Fuchs


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: FUCHS Israel & his wife Rivka #hungary

david@...
 

The FUCHS family >from Senta is actually close to my family, so this
thread
is quite intriguing for me!!!

My grandfather, Alter David Tzvi DEUTSCH married his first wife,
Tscharna
FUCHS, who died tragically in what appears to have been the Spanish
Inflenza
epidemic. After the death of his wife, my grandfather sent all his
daughters
to live with his dead wife's wealthy FUCHS brothers who lived in Senta.
These DEUTSCH sisters (my aunts) all essentially finished growing up in
Senta (all their teen years).

A year or so after Tscharna's death, my Grandfather remarried to my a
second
wife (my Grandmother), who had other children (including my father).

As far as I have been able to dig up, Tscharna and her brothers were
**all**
born in Sub-Carpathia where my grandfather was born, and where he
married
Tscharna. Tscharna was born in Munkacs (Mukachevo), along with her
brothers.
I am not sure why some of them  moved to Senta, and it is very odd to
read
this thread. I have tried to start at the beginning (I missed the
beginning,
and I can't seem to figure out how to make the listserv archive search
find
the thread for me . . . frustrating, as I would like to read the thread
from
the start).


Anyhow, perhaps there were two unrelated FUCHS families >from Senta . . .
one
from Moravia, and one >from Munkacs.
Regards to all,

David Deutsch

Searching:

DEUTSCH: >from Sub-Carpathia, but ideally near the Galician border (i.e.
Alsohidegpatak).
SAFAR/SCHAFAR/SCHOFFAR: >from Sub-Carpathia, but ideally near the
Galician
border (i.e. Alsohidegpatak).
SCHNEIDER: >from Sub-Carpathia, but ideally near the Galician border
(i.e.
Alsohidegpatak).
GROSZ: Piricse, Tiszkerecseny, and Aranyosapati,  Northeast Hungary
WINKLER: Tiszakerecseny, Northeast Hungary
WEISZ: Ramocsahaza and Senyo, Northeast Hungary
HIRSCHBERG: All
FRISCH: Alsopeteny, Nograd, Hungary
FURST: SW Slovakia and Vienna
FELDBAUER: SW SLovakia
MAYER: SW Slovakia and Vienna


On 2018-02-08 23:51, Abraham Fuchs abrahamfuchs@gmail.com wrote:

According to the Jewish lexicon published in Budapest in 1929.the
Fuchs family >from Senta comes >from Moravia.

Abraham Fuchs


Re: Weissensee cemetery - Correction [and SITE CITE] #germany

Judith Elam
 

Vivian Salama writes " The Weissensee Cemetery has all the documents of
people buried there. One can contact them for information." Actually this
is no longer the case. They are no longer researching email enquiries.
They will tell you to contact the Centrum Judaicum.
info@centrumjudaicum.de.

Judith Elam, Kihei, HI elamj@hawaii.rr.com

Moderator Note:
A searchable database containing thousands of gravestone photos
and burial data is available at JOWBR ( JewishGen Online Worldwide
Burial Registry ).

This page gives a summary including a link to the cemetery map:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/jowbrshow.php?ID=GERM-04140

Most of the photographs and data were donated by GerSIG friend
Bert de Jong.

Log in to JewishGen with your user ID and password then
Search JOWBR's Weissensee database at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

(Select Geographical Region Germany) Mod1


German SIG #Germany Re: Weissensee cemetery - Correction [and SITE CITE] #germany

Judith Elam
 

Vivian Salama writes " The Weissensee Cemetery has all the documents of
people buried there. One can contact them for information." Actually this
is no longer the case. They are no longer researching email enquiries.
They will tell you to contact the Centrum Judaicum.
info@centrumjudaicum.de.

Judith Elam, Kihei, HI elamj@hawaii.rr.com

Moderator Note:
A searchable database containing thousands of gravestone photos
and burial data is available at JOWBR ( JewishGen Online Worldwide
Burial Registry ).

This page gives a summary including a link to the cemetery map:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/jowbrshow.php?ID=GERM-04140

Most of the photographs and data were donated by GerSIG friend
Bert de Jong.

Log in to JewishGen with your user ID and password then
Search JOWBR's Weissensee database at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

(Select Geographical Region Germany) Mod1


ViewMate translation request - Russian from Krasnystaw, Poland #general

Sonny Putter <sonny_putter@...>
 

I would appreciate a translation of the Russian text of the 1875 Krasnystaw,
Poland birth record of Calel DRESZER, Akta 16. I would like a translation
of the genealogically significant information, especially the names, ages
and places of birth of the parents, the actual date of the birth, the names
of the witnesses and the notation in the margin.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64295

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.
Thank you very much.

Sinai (Sonny) PUTTER
Newcastle, Washington U.S.A.
sonny_putter@prodigy.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian from Krasnystaw, Poland #general

Sonny Putter <sonny_putter@...>
 

I would appreciate a translation of the Russian text of the 1875 Krasnystaw,
Poland birth record of Calel DRESZER, Akta 16. I would like a translation
of the genealogically significant information, especially the names, ages
and places of birth of the parents, the actual date of the birth, the names
of the witnesses and the notation in the margin.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64295

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.
Thank you very much.

Sinai (Sonny) PUTTER
Newcastle, Washington U.S.A.
sonny_putter@prodigy.net


Anna Pizzuti #general

Lande
 

Does anyone have an email or other address for Anna Pizzutti, who has
prepared an excellent database of foreigners arrested/held in Italy in the
early 1940s.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please provide contact information privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anna Pizzuti #general

Lande
 

Does anyone have an email or other address for Anna Pizzutti, who has
prepared an excellent database of foreigners arrested/held in Italy in the
early 1940s.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please provide contact information privately.


Family KELLER from England #general

Daniel Gleek
 

I am looking for the descendants of the KELLER siblings in England.

These included: Loraine (Julie?), Susan, Renee, Manny, Sam (who was
killed in a road accident as a child) and Sheila (who emigrated to Canada).
They were born in the 1920s/1930s, mainly in London.

The father of the children was Alf (Abraham) KELLER (1902-1975)
and the mother was Celia (nee Richardson).

I am also searching for descendants of David KELLER, b about 1870.

He was most likely >from Plotosk (Plinsk/Plock/Plotz), near Warsaw, Russia
(now Poland). It is unknown where he died.

His siblings were Sam (London, England) and Rachel (Glasgow, Scotland).

Please reply privately if you have information about them on your tree!

Thank you.
Daniel Gleek in London
daniel@lobbus.co.uk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family KELLER from England #general

Daniel Gleek
 

I am looking for the descendants of the KELLER siblings in England.

These included: Loraine (Julie?), Susan, Renee, Manny, Sam (who was
killed in a road accident as a child) and Sheila (who emigrated to Canada).
They were born in the 1920s/1930s, mainly in London.

The father of the children was Alf (Abraham) KELLER (1902-1975)
and the mother was Celia (nee Richardson).

I am also searching for descendants of David KELLER, b about 1870.

He was most likely >from Plotosk (Plinsk/Plock/Plotz), near Warsaw, Russia
(now Poland). It is unknown where he died.

His siblings were Sam (London, England) and Rachel (Glasgow, Scotland).

Please reply privately if you have information about them on your tree!

Thank you.
Daniel Gleek in London
daniel@lobbus.co.uk

40281 - 40300 of 654869