Date   

Reclaim The Records wins and publishes the New Jersey Death Index, now online and free! #general

Asparagirl
 

Hi everyone,

I'm happy to announce that Reclaim The Records has won the Open Public
Records Act (OPRA) request we filed with the New Jersey Department of
Health a few weeks ago, asking for the first-ever public copy of the
New Jersey death index! This is just the index, not actual death
certificates, but at least now we can do look-ups >from home quickly
and find out if a record even exists in the first place.

We asked them for the full index for 1904-2017. (We already acquired
and published the images for 1901-1903 two years ago, and they've been
online for a while now. Transcribed versions are now online at
MyHeritage, FamilySearch, and Ancestry.)

We got whatever index records the DOH had, which was:
- half of the data for 1920-1924
- all of 1925-1929
- all of 1949-2017

The 1920-1929 data is broken down into five-year chunks, and each
chunk is then broken down into locations (counties or major cities),
and then by year, and then alphabetical within that year. The
1949-2000 data was delivered as scanned images in PDF's, usually two
or three files per calendar year, alphabetical by surname, easy to
use. Collectively, this represents over 500,000 images.

The 2001-2017 data was delivered as two text spreadsheets exported
from the state's own database, with about 1.2 million names. The
2006-2017 data includes the place of birth, too.

So we took that all this data and made a new website, with a
searchable database on it, and links to all the images, and
information about how to order certificate copies. And it's totally
free! Introducing:

https://www.NewJerseyDeathIndex.com/

We're still working on getting the missing years sourced from
microfilms at the New Jersey State Archives, but they might only have
copies of some of the earlier years. For the missing 1930-1948 part of
the index, we're going to try to see if we can somehow legally force
the state DOH to re-create the missing years, working >from the
microfilm copies of the actual certificates, since it's really
supposed to be their job to have these index records. (This might not
work, but we figured it was worth a try.)

Details on how we accomplished this are explained in our latest
newsletter issue:

https://tinyurl.com/RTR-NJDI

Enjoy the new data!

(And since this is a Jewish genealogy listserve, I should also point
out that New Jersey has the second-highest percentage of Jewish
residents in the US, 6.1% of the state as of 2017.)

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
President and Founder, Reclaim The Records
https://www.ReclaimTheRecords.org/
Mill Valley, California


Reclaim The Records wins and publishes the New Jersey Death Index, now online and free! #general

Asparagirl
 

Hi everyone,

I'm happy to announce that Reclaim The Records has won the Open Public
Records Act (OPRA) request we filed with the New Jersey Department of
Health a few weeks ago, asking for the first-ever public copy of the
New Jersey death index! This is just the index, not actual death
certificates, but at least now we can do look-ups >from home quickly
and find out if a record even exists in the first place.

We asked them for the full index for 1904-2017. (We already acquired
and published the images for 1901-1903 two years ago, and they've been
online for a while now. Transcribed versions are now online at
MyHeritage, FamilySearch, and Ancestry.)

We got whatever index records the DOH had, which was:
- half of the data for 1920-1924
- all of 1925-1929
- all of 1949-2017

The 1920-1929 data is broken down into five-year chunks, and each
chunk is then broken down into locations (counties or major cities),
and then by year, and then alphabetical within that year. The
1949-2000 data was delivered as scanned images in PDF's, usually two
or three files per calendar year, alphabetical by surname, easy to
use. Collectively, this represents over 500,000 images.

The 2001-2017 data was delivered as two text spreadsheets exported
from the state's own database, with about 1.2 million names. The
2006-2017 data includes the place of birth, too.

So we took that all this data and made a new website, with a
searchable database on it, and links to all the images, and
information about how to order certificate copies. And it's totally
free! Introducing:

https://www.NewJerseyDeathIndex.com/

We're still working on getting the missing years sourced from
microfilms at the New Jersey State Archives, but they might only have
copies of some of the earlier years. For the missing 1930-1948 part of
the index, we're going to try to see if we can somehow legally force
the state DOH to re-create the missing years, working >from the
microfilm copies of the actual certificates, since it's really
supposed to be their job to have these index records. (This might not
work, but we figured it was worth a try.)

Details on how we accomplished this are explained in our latest
newsletter issue:

https://tinyurl.com/RTR-NJDI

Enjoy the new data!

(And since this is a Jewish genealogy listserve, I should also point
out that New Jersey has the second-highest percentage of Jewish
residents in the US, 6.1% of the state as of 2017.)


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
President and Founder, Reclaim The Records
https://www.ReclaimTheRecords.org/
Mill Valley, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reclaim The Records wins and publishes the New Jersey Death Index, now online and free! #general

Asparagirl
 

Hi everyone,

I'm happy to announce that Reclaim The Records has won the Open Public
Records Act (OPRA) request we filed with the New Jersey Department of
Health a few weeks ago, asking for the first-ever public copy of the
New Jersey death index! This is just the index, not actual death
certificates, but at least now we can do look-ups >from home quickly
and find out if a record even exists in the first place.

We asked them for the full index for 1904-2017. (We already acquired
and published the images for 1901-1903 two years ago, and they've been
online for a while now. Transcribed versions are now online at
MyHeritage, FamilySearch, and Ancestry.)

We got whatever index records the DOH had, which was:
- half of the data for 1920-1924
- all of 1925-1929
- all of 1949-2017

The 1920-1929 data is broken down into five-year chunks, and each
chunk is then broken down into locations (counties or major cities),
and then by year, and then alphabetical within that year. The
1949-2000 data was delivered as scanned images in PDF's, usually two
or three files per calendar year, alphabetical by surname, easy to
use. Collectively, this represents over 500,000 images.

The 2001-2017 data was delivered as two text spreadsheets exported
from the state's own database, with about 1.2 million names. The
2006-2017 data includes the place of birth, too.

So we took that all this data and made a new website, with a
searchable database on it, and links to all the images, and
information about how to order certificate copies. And it's totally
free! Introducing:

https://www.NewJerseyDeathIndex.com/

We're still working on getting the missing years sourced from
microfilms at the New Jersey State Archives, but they might only have
copies of some of the earlier years. For the missing 1930-1948 part of
the index, we're going to try to see if we can somehow legally force
the state DOH to re-create the missing years, working >from the
microfilm copies of the actual certificates, since it's really
supposed to be their job to have these index records. (This might not
work, but we figured it was worth a try.)

Details on how we accomplished this are explained in our latest
newsletter issue:

https://tinyurl.com/RTR-NJDI

Enjoy the new data!

(And since this is a Jewish genealogy listserve, I should also point
out that New Jersey has the second-highest percentage of Jewish
residents in the US, 6.1% of the state as of 2017.)

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
President and Founder, Reclaim The Records
https://www.ReclaimTheRecords.org/
Mill Valley, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reclaim The Records wins and publishes the New Jersey Death Index, now online and free! #general

Asparagirl
 

Hi everyone,

I'm happy to announce that Reclaim The Records has won the Open Public
Records Act (OPRA) request we filed with the New Jersey Department of
Health a few weeks ago, asking for the first-ever public copy of the
New Jersey death index! This is just the index, not actual death
certificates, but at least now we can do look-ups >from home quickly
and find out if a record even exists in the first place.

We asked them for the full index for 1904-2017. (We already acquired
and published the images for 1901-1903 two years ago, and they've been
online for a while now. Transcribed versions are now online at
MyHeritage, FamilySearch, and Ancestry.)

We got whatever index records the DOH had, which was:
- half of the data for 1920-1924
- all of 1925-1929
- all of 1949-2017

The 1920-1929 data is broken down into five-year chunks, and each
chunk is then broken down into locations (counties or major cities),
and then by year, and then alphabetical within that year. The
1949-2000 data was delivered as scanned images in PDF's, usually two
or three files per calendar year, alphabetical by surname, easy to
use. Collectively, this represents over 500,000 images.

The 2001-2017 data was delivered as two text spreadsheets exported
from the state's own database, with about 1.2 million names. The
2006-2017 data includes the place of birth, too.

So we took that all this data and made a new website, with a
searchable database on it, and links to all the images, and
information about how to order certificate copies. And it's totally
free! Introducing:

https://www.NewJerseyDeathIndex.com/

We're still working on getting the missing years sourced from
microfilms at the New Jersey State Archives, but they might only have
copies of some of the earlier years. For the missing 1930-1948 part of
the index, we're going to try to see if we can somehow legally force
the state DOH to re-create the missing years, working >from the
microfilm copies of the actual certificates, since it's really
supposed to be their job to have these index records. (This might not
work, but we figured it was worth a try.)

Details on how we accomplished this are explained in our latest
newsletter issue:

https://tinyurl.com/RTR-NJDI

Enjoy the new data!

(And since this is a Jewish genealogy listserve, I should also point
out that New Jersey has the second-highest percentage of Jewish
residents in the US, 6.1% of the state as of 2017.)


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
President and Founder, Reclaim The Records
https://www.ReclaimTheRecords.org/
Mill Valley, California


my grandparents' town #general

Ben and Joyce <benandjoyce@...>
 

My grandparents (Weinstein-Malsman) came >from a small town in Russia (what is now
Ukraine). The Russian name of the town is Krevye Ozero. The name I grew up knowing
was Krevozer. Is there anyone out there who has some relatives that came >from that
town? If there is a list someplace, I would appreciate knowing about it so I can
possibly trace some relatives. Is there a burial society list available? Any
information will be much appreciated.
Thank you.
Joyce Weiss
Wynnewood, PA 19096

MODERATOR: Have you listed your family on the JGFF (JewishGen Family Finder)?
That wonderful tool will allow you to find others searching for the same town
or even for relatives with the same surname.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen my grandparents' town #general

Ben and Joyce <benandjoyce@...>
 

My grandparents (Weinstein-Malsman) came >from a small town in Russia (what is now
Ukraine). The Russian name of the town is Krevye Ozero. The name I grew up knowing
was Krevozer. Is there anyone out there who has some relatives that came >from that
town? If there is a list someplace, I would appreciate knowing about it so I can
possibly trace some relatives. Is there a burial society list available? Any
information will be much appreciated.
Thank you.
Joyce Weiss
Wynnewood, PA 19096

MODERATOR: Have you listed your family on the JGFF (JewishGen Family Finder)?
That wonderful tool will allow you to find others searching for the same town
or even for relatives with the same surname.


Need help with STOLZENBERG family from Koenigsberg and Guttstadt, Germany #germany

Marion Bank <mb.shop15@...>
 

Dear fellow genealogists,

I have been doing research on my father's family, surname STOLZENBERG,
originally >from Koenigsberg and Guttstad, Germany. My father, Kurt
STOLZENBERG, later moved to Berlin. He and my mother, Ilse
GOLDSCHMIDT, escaped Germany in 1939 and eventually ended up in
Santiago, Chile. Much of the family perished in the Holocaust. They
moved to the United States in the early 1960s.

My problem has been three-fold:

1. I have very little information about my grandparents: Adolf
STOLZENBERG and Rosette ROSENSTEIN.
My great grandparents were Moritz (Moses?)STOLZENBERG and Bertha
SOMMERFELD >from Koenigsberg.

2. My other great grandparents were Caspar (Kasper) ROSENSTEIN and
Henriette BRATT >from Guttstadt.
I have NO reliable information, not even dates of birth or death.

3. There is another STOZENBERG family >from Koenigsberg (possibly
Lutheran) which seems to be unrelated. Or not? I am very confused....

Any help, with any of the above names, would we extremely helpful.
Thank you in advance.

Marion STOLZENBERG Bank, Framingham, Massachusett mb.shop15@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Need help with STOLZENBERG family from Koenigsberg and Guttstadt, Germany #germany

Marion Bank <mb.shop15@...>
 

Dear fellow genealogists,

I have been doing research on my father's family, surname STOLZENBERG,
originally >from Koenigsberg and Guttstad, Germany. My father, Kurt
STOLZENBERG, later moved to Berlin. He and my mother, Ilse
GOLDSCHMIDT, escaped Germany in 1939 and eventually ended up in
Santiago, Chile. Much of the family perished in the Holocaust. They
moved to the United States in the early 1960s.

My problem has been three-fold:

1. I have very little information about my grandparents: Adolf
STOLZENBERG and Rosette ROSENSTEIN.
My great grandparents were Moritz (Moses?)STOLZENBERG and Bertha
SOMMERFELD >from Koenigsberg.

2. My other great grandparents were Caspar (Kasper) ROSENSTEIN and
Henriette BRATT >from Guttstadt.
I have NO reliable information, not even dates of birth or death.

3. There is another STOZENBERG family >from Koenigsberg (possibly
Lutheran) which seems to be unrelated. Or not? I am very confused....

Any help, with any of the above names, would we extremely helpful.
Thank you in advance.

Marion STOLZENBERG Bank, Framingham, Massachusett mb.shop15@gmail.com


Jewishgen events at the Conference #romania

barbara.hershey@...
 

Jewishgen is sponsoring the Meet and Greet reception (with treats) on Wednesday
August 8 at 5 prior to the Annual Meeting at 6. All of you are invited to attend
the meeting to hear the exciting announcements >from Jewishgen about their latest
improvements.


Romania SIG #Romania Jewishgen events at the Conference #romania

barbara.hershey@...
 

Jewishgen is sponsoring the Meet and Greet reception (with treats) on Wednesday
August 8 at 5 prior to the Annual Meeting at 6. All of you are invited to attend
the meeting to hear the exciting announcements >from Jewishgen about their latest
improvements.


Rutka Laskier's Diary - video about discovery of new information #general

Mark Halpern
 

Dear friends,

On 13th June, I posted the following message about JRI-Poland's role in
uncovering new information about the origins of Rutka Laskier, who like
Anne Frank, wrote a diary of historical importance.

Since that time, Rutka Laskier's Wikipedia entry has been modified to
correct her place of birth >from Gdansk to Krakow. In addition, we are
proud that JRI-Poland is mentioned as the source of the new information.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutka_Laskier

A short video describing the discovery along with photos of the records
can now be seen at: http://images.jri-poland.org/e6d259ab8a35/Rutka.mp4

Mark Halpern
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland

Original Message:
From: Mark Halpern <mark@halpern.com>
Rutka Laskier was a 13 year old Jewish girl when she kept a diary
chronicling the three months of her life in Bedzin, Poland, while under
Nazi German occupation -- >from January 19, 1943 to April 24, 1943. Her
dairy was published for first time in 2006, drawing comparisons to the
diary of Anne Frank instantly. In fact, Anne Frank was born on the very
same day and year as Rutka Laskier - June 12, 1929. Rutka's diary has
since been released in numerous translations.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rutka Laskier's Diary - video about discovery of new information #general

Mark Halpern
 

Dear friends,

On 13th June, I posted the following message about JRI-Poland's role in
uncovering new information about the origins of Rutka Laskier, who like
Anne Frank, wrote a diary of historical importance.

Since that time, Rutka Laskier's Wikipedia entry has been modified to
correct her place of birth >from Gdansk to Krakow. In addition, we are
proud that JRI-Poland is mentioned as the source of the new information.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutka_Laskier

A short video describing the discovery along with photos of the records
can now be seen at: http://images.jri-poland.org/e6d259ab8a35/Rutka.mp4

Mark Halpern
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland

Original Message:
From: Mark Halpern <mark@halpern.com>
Rutka Laskier was a 13 year old Jewish girl when she kept a diary
chronicling the three months of her life in Bedzin, Poland, while under
Nazi German occupation -- >from January 19, 1943 to April 24, 1943. Her
dairy was published for first time in 2006, drawing comparisons to the
diary of Anne Frank instantly. In fact, Anne Frank was born on the very
same day and year as Rutka Laskier - June 12, 1929. Rutka's diary has
since been released in numerous translations.


new and updated databases on IGRA website #general

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new
and updated databases on its website. These databases cover a time
span >from 1916 to 1963 and include areas of Israel >from the north to
the south. As always, we are most grateful to all of our volunteers.

Please check the preview for additional details about these databases.

https://www.slideshare.net/igra3/jul-2018-igrarelease

New Databases

Rehovot Census 1916 624 listings
This database is handwritten in Hebrew. The information is presented
according to families. There is a “head” of household and then a
notation is made for the other family members. The columns show the
name, occupation, name of father, name of mother, year of birth and
place of birth. The material is >from the Israel State Archives. This
census took place during the Ottoman Empire. A different calendar was
used. Steve Morse has a calendar converter that helps to quickly
determine the date according to our current calendar. (Images
available)

Safed Census 1931 2,565 listings
This database is handwritten. The following information is available:
name, place of birth, age, language spoken, occupation, can they
write, and nationality. Most of this information is available in the
listings. The material is >from the Israel State Archives. (Images available)

Voters’ List Knesset Israel, Tel Aviv 1936 12,593 listings
This release includes the last names beginning with the letters Mem,
Nun, Samech, Ayin and Peh. The listing may include the name, father’s
name, gender, age, community and the address they reported. The material is
from the Historical Municipal Archives of Tel Aviv-Yaffo. (Images available)
Kefar Sava Local Council Elections 1939 1,197 listings
The information includes the name, street or name of the house and the
city. The material is >from the Israel State Archives. (Images available)

Jerusalem Heads of Households 1939 4,649 listings

Mathilde Tagger z”l worked on many, many projects including this one.
The data is typed and includes name, father’s name, age, country lived
in prior to coming to Israel, marital status, occupation, neighborhood
and the pages to identify where the full family information can be
located. The material is >from the Matilde Tagger Collection and based
on information >from the Central Zionist Archives. (Images available)

Immigrants 1945 3,822 listings
These lists represent people coming into Israel with a visa organized
by the Aliyah Department of the Jewish Agency. The information on the
typed pages includes: the name and age, the country they came from,
the kind of visa issued, if they were going to family (the family’s
names and where they lived) or if the immigrant was considered Youth
Aliyah (going to a kibbutz or other arrangement). There are also some
additional comments. The material is >from the Israel State Archives.
(Images available)


Updated Databases

Palestine Marriage/Divorce Certificates 12,630 listings
Additional marriage/divorce certificates have been added to this
impressive database. These certificates may be typed or handwritten
and include names of the bride and groom, their residence, the
community they belong to, their age and their occupation. It also
includes information names of the parents, their occupation and where
they live. The material is >from the Israel State Archives (Images available)

“Operation on Eagles Wings”, November 1949 5,098 Listings
The names of the individuals participating in this extraordinary
Aliyah are available and there is information about where they came
from, the camp they were in, and some identifying information. There
is a link at the bottom of the page which will take you to the pages
with much more additional data. The material is >from the JDC Archives.


1963 Telephone Directory, Letters C, D and M 5,432 Listings
The phone book is in English and the available information includes
the name, address and phone number and possibly more. The material is
from the Library of Congress. (Images available)
Please note, the IGRA databases are now searchable to all registrants.
The search results page is also available to all registrants.
Additional details regarding most databases are available only to paid
IGRA members. Certain exceptions exist due to requests of the specific archives.

Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

To view the databases, go to

https://genealogy.org.il/2018/07/24/time-to-check-our-aid-collection-again/


Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chair


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen new and updated databases on IGRA website #general

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new
and updated databases on its website. These databases cover a time
span >from 1916 to 1963 and include areas of Israel >from the north to
the south. As always, we are most grateful to all of our volunteers.

Please check the preview for additional details about these databases.

https://www.slideshare.net/igra3/jul-2018-igrarelease

New Databases

Rehovot Census 1916 624 listings
This database is handwritten in Hebrew. The information is presented
according to families. There is a “head” of household and then a
notation is made for the other family members. The columns show the
name, occupation, name of father, name of mother, year of birth and
place of birth. The material is >from the Israel State Archives. This
census took place during the Ottoman Empire. A different calendar was
used. Steve Morse has a calendar converter that helps to quickly
determine the date according to our current calendar. (Images
available)

Safed Census 1931 2,565 listings
This database is handwritten. The following information is available:
name, place of birth, age, language spoken, occupation, can they
write, and nationality. Most of this information is available in the
listings. The material is >from the Israel State Archives. (Images available)

Voters’ List Knesset Israel, Tel Aviv 1936 12,593 listings
This release includes the last names beginning with the letters Mem,
Nun, Samech, Ayin and Peh. The listing may include the name, father’s
name, gender, age, community and the address they reported. The material is
from the Historical Municipal Archives of Tel Aviv-Yaffo. (Images available)
Kefar Sava Local Council Elections 1939 1,197 listings
The information includes the name, street or name of the house and the
city. The material is >from the Israel State Archives. (Images available)

Jerusalem Heads of Households 1939 4,649 listings

Mathilde Tagger z”l worked on many, many projects including this one.
The data is typed and includes name, father’s name, age, country lived
in prior to coming to Israel, marital status, occupation, neighborhood
and the pages to identify where the full family information can be
located. The material is >from the Matilde Tagger Collection and based
on information >from the Central Zionist Archives. (Images available)

Immigrants 1945 3,822 listings
These lists represent people coming into Israel with a visa organized
by the Aliyah Department of the Jewish Agency. The information on the
typed pages includes: the name and age, the country they came from,
the kind of visa issued, if they were going to family (the family’s
names and where they lived) or if the immigrant was considered Youth
Aliyah (going to a kibbutz or other arrangement). There are also some
additional comments. The material is >from the Israel State Archives.
(Images available)


Updated Databases

Palestine Marriage/Divorce Certificates 12,630 listings
Additional marriage/divorce certificates have been added to this
impressive database. These certificates may be typed or handwritten
and include names of the bride and groom, their residence, the
community they belong to, their age and their occupation. It also
includes information names of the parents, their occupation and where
they live. The material is >from the Israel State Archives (Images available)

“Operation on Eagles Wings”, November 1949 5,098 Listings
The names of the individuals participating in this extraordinary
Aliyah are available and there is information about where they came
from, the camp they were in, and some identifying information. There
is a link at the bottom of the page which will take you to the pages
with much more additional data. The material is >from the JDC Archives.


1963 Telephone Directory, Letters C, D and M 5,432 Listings
The phone book is in English and the available information includes
the name, address and phone number and possibly more. The material is
from the Library of Congress. (Images available)
Please note, the IGRA databases are now searchable to all registrants.
The search results page is also available to all registrants.
Additional details regarding most databases are available only to paid
IGRA members. Certain exceptions exist due to requests of the specific archives.

Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

To view the databases, go to

https://genealogy.org.il/2018/07/24/time-to-check-our-aid-collection-again/


Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chair


Genie Milgrom Receives the Four Sephardic Synagogues of Jerusalem Award #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Recently, Genie Milgrom was awarded the Four Sephardic Synagogues of
Jerusalem award for her efforts in promoting the Iberian Peninsula's Jewish
heritage.

Many of us have heard Genie's fascinating story at IAJGS conferences or at
our local JGSs, of being born Catholic in Cuba and her journey to find her
Jewish roots taking her back 22 generations beyond 1492 to the village of
Fermoselle (Spain) in the hills of Zamora and later to the Inquisition.
Her story depicted in her book, My 15 Grandmothers and her follow-up How I
Found My 15 Grandmothers used genealogy methodology. Genie is the past
president of the JGS of Greater Miami.

To read about the award see: https://tinyurl.com/y7d7zv7x
Original url:
http://jpost.newspaperdirect.com/epaper/iphone/homepage.aspx#_article1c14bc1d-4c7f-4133-8630-1ee4426190a5

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genie Milgrom Receives the Four Sephardic Synagogues of Jerusalem Award #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Recently, Genie Milgrom was awarded the Four Sephardic Synagogues of
Jerusalem award for her efforts in promoting the Iberian Peninsula's Jewish
heritage.

Many of us have heard Genie's fascinating story at IAJGS conferences or at
our local JGSs, of being born Catholic in Cuba and her journey to find her
Jewish roots taking her back 22 generations beyond 1492 to the village of
Fermoselle (Spain) in the hills of Zamora and later to the Inquisition.
Her story depicted in her book, My 15 Grandmothers and her follow-up How I
Found My 15 Grandmothers used genealogy methodology. Genie is the past
president of the JGS of Greater Miami.

To read about the award see: https://tinyurl.com/y7d7zv7x
Original url:
http://jpost.newspaperdirect.com/epaper/iphone/homepage.aspx#_article1c14bc1d-4c7f-4133-8630-1ee4426190a5

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Ancestor Hunt Updates Its Online Jewish American Newspapers #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Ancestor Hunt has published an updated version of its online Jewish
American Newspapers. Most are free and some require a subscription or a
login >from a university library. Some are indexed but not all. The ones that
recently added links are in bold. Not all are in English, many are in
Hebrew or Yiddish. A number of the newspapers are >from the National Library
of Israel, Tel-Aviv University.

See:
http://www.theancestorhunt.com/blog/historic-jewish-american-newspapers-online

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestor Hunt Updates Its Online Jewish American Newspapers #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Ancestor Hunt has published an updated version of its online Jewish
American Newspapers. Most are free and some require a subscription or a
login >from a university library. Some are indexed but not all. The ones that
recently added links are in bold. Not all are in English, many are in
Hebrew or Yiddish. A number of the newspapers are >from the National Library
of Israel, Tel-Aviv University.

See:
http://www.theancestorhunt.com/blog/historic-jewish-american-newspapers-online

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Jewish Holocaust Refugees in Italy #general

Lande
 

In the 1930s and early 1940s thousands of Jews >from all over Europe fled to
Italy, both because conditions were better there and the hope that they
could flee further to Palestine or elsewhere. For example, there were well
over a hundred Jews who had been born in Berlin. Ultimately, foreign Jews
had to register and these registrations provide the information gathered by
Anna Pizzuti and made available at www.annapizzuti.it. On this website go
to Database and then La pagina della ricersa. Each listing includes
information on family members and place where they were registered/imprisoned.

While this website does not usually include the fate of these individuals,
in fact. relatively few were deported to German death camps and in most
cases it is possible to determine what happened both to deportees and
survivors >from International Tracing Service files.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Holocaust Refugees in Italy #general

Lande
 

In the 1930s and early 1940s thousands of Jews >from all over Europe fled to
Italy, both because conditions were better there and the hope that they
could flee further to Palestine or elsewhere. For example, there were well
over a hundred Jews who had been born in Berlin. Ultimately, foreign Jews
had to register and these registrations provide the information gathered by
Anna Pizzuti and made available at www.annapizzuti.it. On this website go
to Database and then La pagina della ricersa. Each listing includes
information on family members and place where they were registered/imprisoned.

While this website does not usually include the fate of these individuals,
in fact. relatively few were deported to German death camps and in most
cases it is possible to determine what happened both to deportees and
survivors >from International Tracing Service files.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

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