Date   

Weissbrod from Tomaszow Lubelski #poland

Beverley Davis
 

Having looked through the JRI-Poland and JewishGen databases with no
luck, I am hoping that someone might be able to help me with my research
into Avigdor Weissbrod (born ca 1866; died after 1926 possibly in Haifa),
his first wife Beila (possibly Lieberman), and their children: Esther,
Leah, Minche (?? male or female), Tobiasz/Tuvye (born ca 1898, who went
to "Palestine", returned to Poland, and was killed by Nazis in 1942).
Avigdor married a second time, to Rose (surname unknown), and had a son,
and a daughter born ca 1911.

I have been very successful in researching the families of two other
siblings, Henoch (Israel) and also Jacob (Israel and Australia ) (the
latter being my daughter-in-law's grandfather).

Of course, the family name has a number of different spellings -
Weisbrod, Vaysbrod, Wajsbrod/t ...

Beverley Davis in Melbourne, Australia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


JRI Poland #Poland Weissbrod from Tomaszow Lubelski #poland

Beverley Davis
 

Having looked through the JRI-Poland and JewishGen databases with no
luck, I am hoping that someone might be able to help me with my research
into Avigdor Weissbrod (born ca 1866; died after 1926 possibly in Haifa),
his first wife Beila (possibly Lieberman), and their children: Esther,
Leah, Minche (?? male or female), Tobiasz/Tuvye (born ca 1898, who went
to "Palestine", returned to Poland, and was killed by Nazis in 1942).
Avigdor married a second time, to Rose (surname unknown), and had a son,
and a daughter born ca 1911.

I have been very successful in researching the families of two other
siblings, Henoch (Israel) and also Jacob (Israel and Australia ) (the
latter being my daughter-in-law's grandfather).

Of course, the family name has a number of different spellings -
Weisbrod, Vaysbrod, Wajsbrod/t ...

Beverley Davis in Melbourne, Australia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


Zagreb, Croatia #general

Merle Kastner <merlebk18@...>
 

Hello,

I have a research question - where would I look for research resources for
Zagreb, Croatia (formerly in Yugoslavia) prior to WWII?

Merle Kastner
JGS of Montreal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Zagreb, Croatia #general

Merle Kastner <merlebk18@...>
 

Hello,

I have a research question - where would I look for research resources for
Zagreb, Croatia (formerly in Yugoslavia) prior to WWII?

Merle Kastner
JGS of Montreal


Re: Los Angeles marriage query #general

Diana da Costa
 

A huge "thank-you" to all those who responded to our request for information
on the Sinai Synagogue in Los Angeles together with the officiating Rabbi,
Rabbi Dr. Rudolph FARBER, at the marriage of my husband's grandparents in
1913. Most of the responses were emailed to us privately and I thought a
summary of the findings might be helpful to others researching Sinai
Synagogue and/or Rabbi Farber:

Sinai Temple in Los Angeles was founded in 1906, a Conservative Synagogue,
and was then located at 12th and Valencia Street but in 1961 it moved to
Westwood. It is now one of the largest congregations in Los Angeles. The
original buildings now house a multi-cultural centre, the Pico Union
Project, where religious services are also held. At the outset, the
congregation operated >from a number of different locations. Rabbi Dr.
Rudolph Farber joined the congregation around 1913, succeeding Rabbi Isadore
Myers who had been the Congregation's first Minister, but Rabbi Farber only
stayed for three years, leaving on the grounds of ill-health.

Rabbi Farber was born 5th April 1865 in Hungary and emigrated to the US in
1883. He seemed to have had a variety of positions over the years, in 1898
he had been appointed Rabbi to the Temple Israel in Stockton California and
subsequently lived in Denver Colorado, des Moines Iowa, Texarkana Arkansas
and died on 11th August 1930 in Chicago. Rabbi Farber married for the
second time, Etta Crocker, on the 10th of March 1896 in Spokane Washington,
and they had five children.

We also received lots of links. If anyone would like to receive the list,
please email me privately.

Individual emails have been sent to all private messages hitherto received.
With renewed thanks once again,

Diana (Mohr) Gomes da Costa, Kent UK - formerly >from London. Researcher
number: 166938. email address: dianadacosta@btinternet.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Los Angeles marriage query #general

Diana da Costa
 

A huge "thank-you" to all those who responded to our request for information
on the Sinai Synagogue in Los Angeles together with the officiating Rabbi,
Rabbi Dr. Rudolph FARBER, at the marriage of my husband's grandparents in
1913. Most of the responses were emailed to us privately and I thought a
summary of the findings might be helpful to others researching Sinai
Synagogue and/or Rabbi Farber:

Sinai Temple in Los Angeles was founded in 1906, a Conservative Synagogue,
and was then located at 12th and Valencia Street but in 1961 it moved to
Westwood. It is now one of the largest congregations in Los Angeles. The
original buildings now house a multi-cultural centre, the Pico Union
Project, where religious services are also held. At the outset, the
congregation operated >from a number of different locations. Rabbi Dr.
Rudolph Farber joined the congregation around 1913, succeeding Rabbi Isadore
Myers who had been the Congregation's first Minister, but Rabbi Farber only
stayed for three years, leaving on the grounds of ill-health.

Rabbi Farber was born 5th April 1865 in Hungary and emigrated to the US in
1883. He seemed to have had a variety of positions over the years, in 1898
he had been appointed Rabbi to the Temple Israel in Stockton California and
subsequently lived in Denver Colorado, des Moines Iowa, Texarkana Arkansas
and died on 11th August 1930 in Chicago. Rabbi Farber married for the
second time, Etta Crocker, on the 10th of March 1896 in Spokane Washington,
and they had five children.

We also received lots of links. If anyone would like to receive the list,
please email me privately.

Individual emails have been sent to all private messages hitherto received.
With renewed thanks once again,

Diana (Mohr) Gomes da Costa, Kent UK - formerly >from London. Researcher
number: 166938. email address: dianadacosta@btinternet.com


Re: My Grandparents Town #general

Joy Kestenbaum
 

As a follow up to Joyce Weiss's email of 25 July about her grandparents town of
Krevye Ozero - Krevozer - now in the Ukraine -and her questions about whether there
are lists, so that she can trace relatives, I can add that YIVO Institute for
Jewish Research at the Center for Jewish History in New York has landsmanschaft
records: Krivozer Fraternal Society of Greater New York, 1927-1961, which include
minutes, 1933-1947, an anniversary journal and other records.(There were affiliated
societies in other cities, including Philadelphia.) While I have not reviewed these
records, Additionally, Krivozer Fraternal Society has a plot in (Old) Montefiore
Cemetery in Spring Gardens, Queens and the cemetery has an online database. I have
visited this plot for a client who has family buried there. We were able to
determine that his paternal grandfather and his extended family came >from Kryve
Ozero through ship manifests, which gave it as their place of birth and/or last
permanent residence.

Joy Kestenbaum
New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: My Grandparents Town #general

Joy Kestenbaum
 

As a follow up to Joyce Weiss's email of 25 July about her grandparents town of
Krevye Ozero - Krevozer - now in the Ukraine -and her questions about whether there
are lists, so that she can trace relatives, I can add that YIVO Institute for
Jewish Research at the Center for Jewish History in New York has landsmanschaft
records: Krivozer Fraternal Society of Greater New York, 1927-1961, which include
minutes, 1933-1947, an anniversary journal and other records.(There were affiliated
societies in other cities, including Philadelphia.) While I have not reviewed these
records, Additionally, Krivozer Fraternal Society has a plot in (Old) Montefiore
Cemetery in Spring Gardens, Queens and the cemetery has an online database. I have
visited this plot for a client who has family buried there. We were able to
determine that his paternal grandfather and his extended family came >from Kryve
Ozero through ship manifests, which gave it as their place of birth and/or last
permanent residence.

Joy Kestenbaum
New York City


Re: (Australia and New Zealand) Free Research Sites #general

Robyn Dryen
 

If you are looking for free sites to research Jewish ancestors in
Australian and/or New Zealand, I am happy to share the handout I prepared for my
session at the 2016 Seattle conference. It has many more relevant sites and leads
than Family History Daily.

Email me at <songlines@ksa1.com.au>

Family History Daily has published a list of 12 free research sites
for Australia and New Zealand.
Robyn Dryen
Sydney, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: (Australia and New Zealand) Free Research Sites #general

Robyn Dryen
 

If you are looking for free sites to research Jewish ancestors in
Australian and/or New Zealand, I am happy to share the handout I prepared for my
session at the 2016 Seattle conference. It has many more relevant sites and leads
than Family History Daily.

Email me at <songlines@ksa1.com.au>

Family History Daily has published a list of 12 free research sites
for Australia and New Zealand.
Robyn Dryen
Sydney, Australia


GROSSMAN, Riga #latvia

Elaine King
 

My mother always said that my father's family came here >from Riga, and
that they were Prussian Jews. When I look at historical records, such as
the census from1900, they are listed as coming >from either Lithuania or
Russia. I know that Riga at various times was part of each, but I would
like to know if her information is accurate, and how to find out more
about his family. My father's name was Nathan GROSSMAN; his parents were
Ella and Joseph Grossman. That's as far back as I have been able to go.
I have emailed with someone in Riga, who says there are no records of
their being members of a synagogue, but I would guess they would have
belonged to an Orthodox one if they did, and it one existed. Any help
would be appreciated. Thank you.

Elaine King
EGKing79@gmail.com


Latvia SIG #Latvia GROSSMAN, Riga #latvia

Elaine King
 

My mother always said that my father's family came here >from Riga, and
that they were Prussian Jews. When I look at historical records, such as
the census from1900, they are listed as coming >from either Lithuania or
Russia. I know that Riga at various times was part of each, but I would
like to know if her information is accurate, and how to find out more
about his family. My father's name was Nathan GROSSMAN; his parents were
Ella and Joseph Grossman. That's as far back as I have been able to go.
I have emailed with someone in Riga, who says there are no records of
their being members of a synagogue, but I would guess they would have
belonged to an Orthodox one if they did, and it one existed. Any help
would be appreciated. Thank you.

Elaine King
EGKing79@gmail.com


Jewish records of Varpalota in Veszprem County #hungary

vdw_jonathan@...
 

Hello,


Thank you all for your help concerning the marriage records of Ziar nad Hronom (formerly Garamszentkereszt), I managed to contact the State Archives of the area and hopefully I will find what I'm looking for.
I have a similar question concerning the pre-1895 Jewish records of Varpalota (in Veszprem County). I am interested in looking for the Pfeifer families that lived in the area but I can't find these records on Familysearch. Does anyone know if they are available somehow or if they are compiled with the records of another town?

Thank you!

Jonathan Vandewiele


Hungary SIG #Hungary Jewish records of Varpalota in Veszprem County #hungary

vdw_jonathan@...
 

Hello,


Thank you all for your help concerning the marriage records of Ziar nad Hronom (formerly Garamszentkereszt), I managed to contact the State Archives of the area and hopefully I will find what I'm looking for.
I have a similar question concerning the pre-1895 Jewish records of Varpalota (in Veszprem County). I am interested in looking for the Pfeifer families that lived in the area but I can't find these records on Familysearch. Does anyone know if they are available somehow or if they are compiled with the records of another town?

Thank you!

Jonathan Vandewiele


Shlomo Zalman ben Shmuel BARASZ/BRASZ #rabbinic

sbloom@...
 

Hello all,

I would appreciate if anyone could tell me any of the details of the
life or genealogy of Shlomo Zalman BARASZ/BRASZ. His grave in Warsaw
says that he died in 1879 in Warsaw and was known as Shlomo Czyzewer
(because he was >from Czyzew, a small town north of Warsaw). No age is
given, but he lived to be a known rabbi, so I doubt he was born after
1840, but could have been more like 1800.

His father, Shmuel, was >from Myszynca, a nearby town. I'm afraid I know
nothing else about them. I do know that the surname essentially means
"Ben Reb/Rav [Hebrew give name with Sh blend]", so this seems to be
referring to Shlomo's father, Shmuel. Or, it could refer to some further
back ancestor.

I'm interested because I descend >from Iztik ben Shmuel BRASZ (sometimes
spelled BARASZ) of Ciechanow. Itzik was likely born in the late 1700's,
and probably Shmuel was born around 1770. I do not know of any connection
between this family and the rabbi mentioned in the previous paragraph,
but I thought I'd check it out to see if there is any connection.

Please reply to me privately with genealogical specifics, but you can
reply to the group if you have some general suggestions.

Thank you.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Shlomo Zalman ben Shmuel BARASZ/BRASZ #rabbinic

sbloom@...
 

Hello all,

I would appreciate if anyone could tell me any of the details of the
life or genealogy of Shlomo Zalman BARASZ/BRASZ. His grave in Warsaw
says that he died in 1879 in Warsaw and was known as Shlomo Czyzewer
(because he was >from Czyzew, a small town north of Warsaw). No age is
given, but he lived to be a known rabbi, so I doubt he was born after
1840, but could have been more like 1800.

His father, Shmuel, was >from Myszynca, a nearby town. I'm afraid I know
nothing else about them. I do know that the surname essentially means
"Ben Reb/Rav [Hebrew give name with Sh blend]", so this seems to be
referring to Shlomo's father, Shmuel. Or, it could refer to some further
back ancestor.

I'm interested because I descend >from Iztik ben Shmuel BRASZ (sometimes
spelled BARASZ) of Ciechanow. Itzik was likely born in the late 1700's,
and probably Shmuel was born around 1770. I do not know of any connection
between this family and the rabbi mentioned in the previous paragraph,
but I thought I'd check it out to see if there is any connection.

Please reply to me privately with genealogical specifics, but you can
reply to the group if you have some general suggestions.

Thank you.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


(Lithuania) Archaeologists Unearthed the Bimah of the Great Synagogue of Vilnius #lithuania

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An International team of archeologists unearthed the bimah of the Great
Synagogue of Vilnius. The bimah is the synagogue's central prayer platform.
The Great Synagogue of Vilnius was a 17th-century building that was
destroyed by the Nazis and Soviets during World War II. The synagogue was
built in 1630 on a site that has been used as a synagogue beginning in 1440.

A school was built by the Soviets' over the Grand Synagogue in 1950's. They
were tearing down the school when they found it under the office of the
principal of a kindergarten.

The Nazis burned down the synagogue and the remains were later demolished by
the Soviet regime that built a kindergarten, later turned into the primary
school, on the property.

Before the war, Jews accounted for around one-third of the city's then
60,000 residents, but most of them perished under Nazi Germany's 1941-1944
occupation.

To read more see:
https://eurojewcong.org/news/communities-news/lithuania/archeologists-find-b
imah-of-historic-synagogue-in-vilnius-destroyed-by-nazis-and-soviets/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania (Lithuania) Archaeologists Unearthed the Bimah of the Great Synagogue of Vilnius #lithuania

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An International team of archeologists unearthed the bimah of the Great
Synagogue of Vilnius. The bimah is the synagogue's central prayer platform.
The Great Synagogue of Vilnius was a 17th-century building that was
destroyed by the Nazis and Soviets during World War II. The synagogue was
built in 1630 on a site that has been used as a synagogue beginning in 1440.

A school was built by the Soviets' over the Grand Synagogue in 1950's. They
were tearing down the school when they found it under the office of the
principal of a kindergarten.

The Nazis burned down the synagogue and the remains were later demolished by
the Soviet regime that built a kindergarten, later turned into the primary
school, on the property.

Before the war, Jews accounted for around one-third of the city's then
60,000 residents, but most of them perished under Nazi Germany's 1941-1944
occupation.

To read more see:
https://eurojewcong.org/news/communities-news/lithuania/archeologists-find-b
imah-of-historic-synagogue-in-vilnius-destroyed-by-nazis-and-soviets/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


"Documenting the Vilna Ghetto Library," Monday, August 6 at the Warsaw Conference #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

I invite those of you who will be at the conference in Warsaw -
and who have a connection with Vilna, or an interest in the
cultural and reading patterns of Jews during the Shoah - to
attend my presentation, "Documenting the Vilna Ghetto Library,"
Monday, August 6, >from 2:45-3:45 p.m. in the Lublin-HM-1 Room
at the Conference Hotel.

Vilna - known as the Jerusalem of Lithuania - had a strong
cultural tradition that endured and flourished even after
the Vilna Ghetto was established in 1941. Perhaps the most
important cultural institution in the Ghetto was the Vilna
Ghetto Library.

The Vilna Ghetto was the only ghetto to have a fully
functioning library. In many ways this Library was unique,
but the reading patterns of its patrons can be seen to reflect
those of Jews in other ghettos throughout Eastern Europe.

After I discovered that my three young cousins in the Vilna
Ghetto had been on the list of Ghetto Library patrons,
further research led to uncovering additional documentation
from the Vilna Ghetto Library in the Lithuanian State Central
Archives - lists of readers in the Library, lists of workers
in the Library and even a list of readers who did not return
books to the Library.

I will also share reports >from two Vilna Ghetto librarians,
which provide a detailed look at which authors and titles
were read by different kinds of Ghetto Library patrons.

See you in Warsaw!

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "Documenting the Vilna Ghetto Library," Monday, August 6 at the Warsaw Conference #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

I invite those of you who will be at the conference in Warsaw -
and who have a connection with Vilna, or an interest in the
cultural and reading patterns of Jews during the Shoah - to
attend my presentation, "Documenting the Vilna Ghetto Library,"
Monday, August 6, >from 2:45-3:45 p.m. in the Lublin-HM-1 Room
at the Conference Hotel.

Vilna - known as the Jerusalem of Lithuania - had a strong
cultural tradition that endured and flourished even after
the Vilna Ghetto was established in 1941. Perhaps the most
important cultural institution in the Ghetto was the Vilna
Ghetto Library.

The Vilna Ghetto was the only ghetto to have a fully
functioning library. In many ways this Library was unique,
but the reading patterns of its patrons can be seen to reflect
those of Jews in other ghettos throughout Eastern Europe.

After I discovered that my three young cousins in the Vilna
Ghetto had been on the list of Ghetto Library patrons,
further research led to uncovering additional documentation
from the Vilna Ghetto Library in the Lithuanian State Central
Archives - lists of readers in the Library, lists of workers
in the Library and even a list of readers who did not return
books to the Library.

I will also share reports >from two Vilna Ghetto librarians,
which provide a detailed look at which authors and titles
were read by different kinds of Ghetto Library patrons.

See you in Warsaw!

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA

47741 - 47760 of 668675