Date   

Foreign Registrants in Italy during WWII #general

Lande
 

During the 1930s and early 1940s thousands of Jews >from other countries
fled to Italy both because conditions were better there and the hope to
be able to escape further, e.g. Palestine. Anna Pizzuti has put together
an interesting yet underutilized database identifying these foreigners, who
were required to register. The full name of this website, Ebrei stranieri
internati in Italia durante il periodo bellico, can be accessed at
www.annapizzuti.it . To search for individual names go to La ricerca and
then La pagina della ricerca.

The information is provided in alphabetical order by family name and
includes nationality, family and given name and date and place of birth and
place of registration. All information is in Italian, which requires some
language flexibility. For example. while it is easy to see that Berlino
means Berlin, it requires some effort to realize that tedesco/tedesca means
German and that Monaco is not the city in southern France, but rather the
Italian name for Munich.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Foreign Registrants in Italy during WWII #general

Lande
 

During the 1930s and early 1940s thousands of Jews >from other countries
fled to Italy both because conditions were better there and the hope to
be able to escape further, e.g. Palestine. Anna Pizzuti has put together
an interesting yet underutilized database identifying these foreigners, who
were required to register. The full name of this website, Ebrei stranieri
internati in Italia durante il periodo bellico, can be accessed at
www.annapizzuti.it . To search for individual names go to La ricerca and
then La pagina della ricerca.

The information is provided in alphabetical order by family name and
includes nationality, family and given name and date and place of birth and
place of registration. All information is in Italian, which requires some
language flexibility. For example. while it is easy to see that Berlino
means Berlin, it requires some effort to realize that tedesco/tedesca means
German and that Monaco is not the city in southern France, but rather the
Italian name for Munich.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


Re: Changing of Last Names On Way to England from Russia #general

Molly Staub
 

Hi David,

Where did you find the list in Liverpool? Several of my ancestors embarked
there.

By now you've probably read about the variety of names our ancestors used on
various documents. It can be very confusing if you're looking for one name,
and somebody else's name appears. You have to coordinate dates, siblings,
etc. I located my own maternal grandfather listed under five different
spellings.

Now, about getting to Liverpool: In 2013, as a journalist I was sent to
Antwerp, Belgium to cover the opening of the Red Star Line Museum. We were
told -- and shown photos -- of the agents representing the ship lines who
came to the various towns >from where people wanted to leave. They bought
their ship tickets >from this agent. As I understand it, the cost included
their *train* fare to the point of embarkation. That's how most of them got
from their homes to Liverpool, Hamburg, or wherever. My father and his
family sailed >from Le Havre, France, so I guess the agent in their Romanian
town represented the French line that left >from France.

The person buying the tickets gave his name as he used it; it might have
been Yiddish, a nickname, Russian, or whatever. The agent wrote *what he
heard*, which may have sounded different for cousins, for instance. The list
with these names was written on the manifest. When the passengers arrived in
Ellis Island, Philadelphia, Boston, or Galveston, their names were simply
checked off the manifest. American names were taken by the people themselves
(genealogists know they were not assigned at Ellis Island), and usually
appear on the forms they filled for Naturalization papers.

Happy hunting, Molly

Molly Arost Staub
Boca Raton, FL

-----Original Message-----

From: "David Goldman" <lugman@...>
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2018 15:32:15 -0400

I just realized that the solution to the mystery could lie in the very fact
that these relatives also used *English* first names on their records of
arrival into Liverpool. They used the names Bessie, William and Morris,
which are not Russian or Yiddish names but are the equivalent of Pessya,
Velko/Velvel and Moshko/Moyshe, and they certainly did not have these
English names in Nova Ushitza or have any Russian documents issued with such
names. So this would suggest that something happened after leaving Nova
Ushitza and boarding the ship which enabled them to easily have
identification with new first *and* last names, creating no legal
difficulties.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Changing of Last Names On Way to England from Russia #general

Molly Staub
 

Hi David,

Where did you find the list in Liverpool? Several of my ancestors embarked
there.

By now you've probably read about the variety of names our ancestors used on
various documents. It can be very confusing if you're looking for one name,
and somebody else's name appears. You have to coordinate dates, siblings,
etc. I located my own maternal grandfather listed under five different
spellings.

Now, about getting to Liverpool: In 2013, as a journalist I was sent to
Antwerp, Belgium to cover the opening of the Red Star Line Museum. We were
told -- and shown photos -- of the agents representing the ship lines who
came to the various towns >from where people wanted to leave. They bought
their ship tickets >from this agent. As I understand it, the cost included
their *train* fare to the point of embarkation. That's how most of them got
from their homes to Liverpool, Hamburg, or wherever. My father and his
family sailed >from Le Havre, France, so I guess the agent in their Romanian
town represented the French line that left >from France.

The person buying the tickets gave his name as he used it; it might have
been Yiddish, a nickname, Russian, or whatever. The agent wrote *what he
heard*, which may have sounded different for cousins, for instance. The list
with these names was written on the manifest. When the passengers arrived in
Ellis Island, Philadelphia, Boston, or Galveston, their names were simply
checked off the manifest. American names were taken by the people themselves
(genealogists know they were not assigned at Ellis Island), and usually
appear on the forms they filled for Naturalization papers.

Happy hunting, Molly

Molly Arost Staub
Boca Raton, FL

-----Original Message-----

From: "David Goldman" <lugman@...>
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2018 15:32:15 -0400

I just realized that the solution to the mystery could lie in the very fact
that these relatives also used *English* first names on their records of
arrival into Liverpool. They used the names Bessie, William and Morris,
which are not Russian or Yiddish names but are the equivalent of Pessya,
Velko/Velvel and Moshko/Moyshe, and they certainly did not have these
English names in Nova Ushitza or have any Russian documents issued with such
names. So this would suggest that something happened after leaving Nova
Ushitza and boarding the ship which enabled them to easily have
identification with new first *and* last names, creating no legal
difficulties.


Re: Doing Genealogy #general

Vladimir Oksman
 

I am doing this just because this is how I contribute to the memory of my
family prev. generations. We always say "what will be left after we died
- these are our children". But to make this statement complete - do our
children must know who were their ancestors. I think so.

Vladimir Oksman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Doing Genealogy #general

Vladimir Oksman
 

I am doing this just because this is how I contribute to the memory of my
family prev. generations. We always say "what will be left after we died
- these are our children". But to make this statement complete - do our
children must know who were their ancestors. I think so.

Vladimir Oksman


photo of gravestone at Mt. Carmel cemetery, Glendale, Queens NY #general

Milton Koch
 

I am hoping someone will be able to obtain a picture of the gravestone
of Sophy/Sophie Resnikoff, buried in this cemetery, in 1957. I will
supply the exact location of the plot to anyone who is able to
photograph this stone for me. Please contact me for details.
Thank you,
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD
DICKOVSKY/RESNIKOFF


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen photo of gravestone at Mt. Carmel cemetery, Glendale, Queens NY #general

Milton Koch
 

I am hoping someone will be able to obtain a picture of the gravestone
of Sophy/Sophie Resnikoff, buried in this cemetery, in 1957. I will
supply the exact location of the plot to anyone who is able to
photograph this stone for me. Please contact me for details.
Thank you,
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD
DICKOVSKY/RESNIKOFF


birth certificate of the KAMIENIECKI family in Kobryn #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

I would like to retrieve the birth certificates of my great maternal
grandparents born in Kobrin (Poland) both.

Zelman or zalman kamieniecki born in 1872 who was a businessman in
brest litowsk
Chaya khaya sora avner wife kamieniecki born in 1874

They were merchant and lived on komsomolskaya street, number 3 in
brest litowsk (lithuania) until 1942.

evelyne lemberski
saint Maurice
france
evelynelemberski@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen birth certificate of the KAMIENIECKI family in Kobryn #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

I would like to retrieve the birth certificates of my great maternal
grandparents born in Kobrin (Poland) both.

Zelman or zalman kamieniecki born in 1872 who was a businessman in
brest litowsk
Chaya khaya sora avner wife kamieniecki born in 1874

They were merchant and lived on komsomolskaya street, number 3 in
brest litowsk (lithuania) until 1942.

evelyne lemberski
saint Maurice
france
evelynelemberski@...


Nemorozh camp #yizkorbooks

Lemberski Evelyne
 

It seems that there is a person whose family is lemberska >from the
city of zvenigorodka is survived at the nemorozh camp in ukraine
during the second world war. Would a person have information about
this person please?

evelyne lemberski
saint Maurice
France
evelynelemberski@...


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Nemorozh camp #yizkorbooks

Lemberski Evelyne
 

It seems that there is a person whose family is lemberska >from the
city of zvenigorodka is survived at the nemorozh camp in ukraine
during the second world war. Would a person have information about
this person please?

evelyne lemberski
saint Maurice
France
evelynelemberski@...


Re: Changing of Last Names On Way to England from Russia #general

Judith Singer
 

Hi - The best source for information about the emigration process is
JewishGen. Go to "Search Website", the last item on the menu below
"About Us" on the JewishGen homepage, and enter "emigration from
Russia". There is a wealth of information in articles, memoirs, etc.
.
Some helpful details I've found that may help David Goldman track down
his family members:

1. Hamburg was the port >from which most of our ancestors left mainland
Europe, and luckily, most passenger lists >from Hamburg for the period
of mass immigration and later have been digitized and are available on
Ancestry.com. If they left >from a Dutch or Belgian port, the records
are not as easy to find, and frustratingly, the UK did not keep
records of immigrants arriving >from Europe.

2. It is not likely that the family members arrived at Southampton.
The voyages >from Germany to England generally arrived in London or
Grimsby or other ports on the North Sea side of England. Transmigrants
then took a train across England to Liverpool or other ports on the
North Atlantic to begin the voyage to America. Voyages >from Dutch or
Belgian ports to England probably arrived in Southampton.

3. The fact that the great-grandfather had fulfilled his military
service made it much easier for him to obtain an exit permit from
Tsarist Russia, so that's why the service would have been noted on the
permit. It was young men who were not yet subject to conscription and
their families who found it most difficult to obtain exit permits. The
family was not allowed to leave either because the fine of 300 rubles
for evading conscription was levied against all remaining family
members, and they could not obtain exit permits until the fine was
paid in full. 300 rubles was at the time a huge amount.

4. It was not unusual for children to risk illegal departures. It was
usually not that dangerous as long as sufficient bribes were paid to
the border guards. Rose Cohen wrote in her autobiography "Out of the
Shadow" about being smuggled out at age 12 in a wagon covered with
hay, while another wagonload of emigrants in the same group were
betrayed to the guards by a crying baby.

5. Within a few years after mass emigration >from Europe had begun,
there was a system of shipping company agents throughout Eastern
Europe that furnished assistance with obtaining exit permits - or
other means of crossing the Russian border - for those who purchased
tickets. The price of the ticket included the cost of the bribes that
were necessary to be paid to government officials to obtain permits or
to the border guards. I read in "Moving Here: Migration Histories" in
the UK National Archives that the shipping agents sometimes added
unrelated people to exit permits and that's where some name changes
occurred.

6. The fact that English first names were used for the voyage to
America suggests that the family spent some time in England before
taking the final stage of the journey to the U.S. Many thousands did
so, sometimes because they had intended England as their destination
and later changed their minds and some because they could initially
afford only the trip to England and then earned enough money while
there to continue the voyage.

Good luck - Judith Singer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Changing of Last Names On Way to England from Russia #general

Judith Singer
 

Hi - The best source for information about the emigration process is
JewishGen. Go to "Search Website", the last item on the menu below
"About Us" on the JewishGen homepage, and enter "emigration from
Russia". There is a wealth of information in articles, memoirs, etc.
.
Some helpful details I've found that may help David Goldman track down
his family members:

1. Hamburg was the port >from which most of our ancestors left mainland
Europe, and luckily, most passenger lists >from Hamburg for the period
of mass immigration and later have been digitized and are available on
Ancestry.com. If they left >from a Dutch or Belgian port, the records
are not as easy to find, and frustratingly, the UK did not keep
records of immigrants arriving >from Europe.

2. It is not likely that the family members arrived at Southampton.
The voyages >from Germany to England generally arrived in London or
Grimsby or other ports on the North Sea side of England. Transmigrants
then took a train across England to Liverpool or other ports on the
North Atlantic to begin the voyage to America. Voyages >from Dutch or
Belgian ports to England probably arrived in Southampton.

3. The fact that the great-grandfather had fulfilled his military
service made it much easier for him to obtain an exit permit from
Tsarist Russia, so that's why the service would have been noted on the
permit. It was young men who were not yet subject to conscription and
their families who found it most difficult to obtain exit permits. The
family was not allowed to leave either because the fine of 300 rubles
for evading conscription was levied against all remaining family
members, and they could not obtain exit permits until the fine was
paid in full. 300 rubles was at the time a huge amount.

4. It was not unusual for children to risk illegal departures. It was
usually not that dangerous as long as sufficient bribes were paid to
the border guards. Rose Cohen wrote in her autobiography "Out of the
Shadow" about being smuggled out at age 12 in a wagon covered with
hay, while another wagonload of emigrants in the same group were
betrayed to the guards by a crying baby.

5. Within a few years after mass emigration >from Europe had begun,
there was a system of shipping company agents throughout Eastern
Europe that furnished assistance with obtaining exit permits - or
other means of crossing the Russian border - for those who purchased
tickets. The price of the ticket included the cost of the bribes that
were necessary to be paid to government officials to obtain permits or
to the border guards. I read in "Moving Here: Migration Histories" in
the UK National Archives that the shipping agents sometimes added
unrelated people to exit permits and that's where some name changes
occurred.

6. The fact that English first names were used for the voyage to
America suggests that the family spent some time in England before
taking the final stage of the journey to the U.S. Many thousands did
so, sometimes because they had intended England as their destination
and later changed their minds and some because they could initially
afford only the trip to England and then earned enough money while
there to continue the voyage.

Good luck - Judith Singer


ViewMate translation request - Louis Lips tombstone #belarus

J Willner
 

I have posted a photo of Louis Lips' tombstone and I would appreciate a
translation of the Hebrew into English. It is on ViewMate at the following
address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM69340


Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.



J. Willner=


Belarus SIG #Belarus ViewMate translation request - Louis Lips tombstone #belarus

J Willner
 

I have posted a photo of Louis Lips' tombstone and I would appreciate a
translation of the Hebrew into English. It is on ViewMate at the following
address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM69340


Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.



J. Willner=


Searching:BADANOV from Grodno, What to do next? #belarus

Sylvia Caras
 

I've posted a birth record on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69331
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application or here

The name BADANOV and it's variants is not common.

Joseph Bond (Yehuda Badanovitz) is my grandfather. We know nothing
about him before his immigration in 1892 except registering his
daughters' births in Bialystok in 1891 and that the language he listed
on his documents is Polish. I was not ever aware of any relatives
connected to his line.

His father's name and Hebrew name is >from Joseph's tombstone.

2-Shlioma-Shaya
3-Yehuda (Yudel) Badanovitz (1868-)

I have found these people.below. I think they are relatives, that
Itsko might be a brother of Shiloma-Shaya, my great great uncle, and
that Ginda's husband might be my father's (first) cousin. And Ginda
might be a sister of Girsh not a daughter. But this began with
Ginda's birth record, pictured on ViewMate.

1-Mikhel BADANOV (-)
2-Itsko BADANOV (1825-) +Gita (BADANOVSKY) (1822-)
3-Risia BADANOV (EPSHTEIN) (-) +Girsh Ariia EPSHTEIN (-)
4-Ginda EPSHTEIN (BADANOVITZ ) (1842-)

I'm getting very confused - all the first names are beginning to
overlap and the place names aren't yet giving me clues. Please
suggest some next steps to find out how the families are connected?

Sylvia Bond Caras
Santa Cruz, California, United States
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


success story #bessarabia

Dale Melanie <dale.melanie@...>
 

I registered as a researcher for Kamenka, Moldova, the town my mother
was from. The combination of a common last name and small town led to
contact >from a Berenstein who came to my mother's apartment in NYC.
After he looked at our photo album, he concluded that we were not
related to him.

Right away he called the other Berensteins >from the town whom he knew
had moved to New Jersey about ten years before.
When those Berensteins visited the apartment and looked at the album,
they were amazed to see photos of themselves. They were my
grandmother's brother's grandchildren.

MODERATOR NOTE
Please remember to include your name and the town where you live after each post.
Also, we recommend that you include the names of the families you are researching
in ALL CAPS, along with the town or city where they might have lived.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching:BADANOV from Grodno, What to do next? #belarus

Sylvia Caras
 

I've posted a birth record on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69331
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application or here

The name BADANOV and it's variants is not common.

Joseph Bond (Yehuda Badanovitz) is my grandfather. We know nothing
about him before his immigration in 1892 except registering his
daughters' births in Bialystok in 1891 and that the language he listed
on his documents is Polish. I was not ever aware of any relatives
connected to his line.

His father's name and Hebrew name is >from Joseph's tombstone.

2-Shlioma-Shaya
3-Yehuda (Yudel) Badanovitz (1868-)

I have found these people.below. I think they are relatives, that
Itsko might be a brother of Shiloma-Shaya, my great great uncle, and
that Ginda's husband might be my father's (first) cousin. And Ginda
might be a sister of Girsh not a daughter. But this began with
Ginda's birth record, pictured on ViewMate.

1-Mikhel BADANOV (-)
2-Itsko BADANOV (1825-) +Gita (BADANOVSKY) (1822-)
3-Risia BADANOV (EPSHTEIN) (-) +Girsh Ariia EPSHTEIN (-)
4-Ginda EPSHTEIN (BADANOVITZ ) (1842-)

I'm getting very confused - all the first names are beginning to
overlap and the place names aren't yet giving me clues. Please
suggest some next steps to find out how the families are connected?

Sylvia Bond Caras
Santa Cruz, California, United States
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia success story #bessarabia

Dale Melanie <dale.melanie@...>
 

I registered as a researcher for Kamenka, Moldova, the town my mother
was from. The combination of a common last name and small town led to
contact >from a Berenstein who came to my mother's apartment in NYC.
After he looked at our photo album, he concluded that we were not
related to him.

Right away he called the other Berensteins >from the town whom he knew
had moved to New Jersey about ten years before.
When those Berensteins visited the apartment and looked at the album,
they were amazed to see photos of themselves. They were my
grandmother's brother's grandchildren.

MODERATOR NOTE
Please remember to include your name and the town where you live after each post.
Also, we recommend that you include the names of the families you are researching
in ALL CAPS, along with the town or city where they might have lived.