Date   

Rivka JEGER, Akko/Acre, Israel #subcarpathia

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Rivka JEGER, who was living in Akko/Acre,
Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
our (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Malka WEISBERGER, Kiryat Motzkin, Israel #subcarpathia

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Malka WEISBERGER, who was living in Kiryat
Motzkin, Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Lea MILLER, Yaffo Street, City Unknown, Israel #subcarpathia

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Lea MILLER, who was living on Yaffo Street,
in an unspecified city in Israel, in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (Peretz MULLER of Sighet), so we may be related.
Thank you
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Rivka JEGER, Akko/Acre, Israel #subcarpathia

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Rivka JEGER, who was living in Akko/Acre,
Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
our (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Malka WEISBERGER, Kiryat Motzkin, Israel #subcarpathia

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Malka WEISBERGER, who was living in Kiryat
Motzkin, Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Lea MILLER, Yaffo Street, City Unknown, Israel #subcarpathia

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Lea MILLER, who was living on Yaffo Street,
in an unspecified city in Israel, in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (Peretz MULLER of Sighet), so we may be related.
Thank you
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Re: The massacre at the Puits de Guéry in the Cher #france

dmh@...
 

On Nov 14, 2018, at 8:37 AM, Diana Henry <dmh@natzweiler-struthof.com> wrote:

Hello,
It occurs to me that other family members of those Jews massacred in August 1944 by the French militia at the wells of Guery in the Department of the Cher might be on this list, as I am
If so, or for any reason related to this massacre, I would be interest to correspond
The atrocity is recounted in Tzvetan Todorov’s book: Une Tragedie Francaise: ete 1944 scenes de la guerre civile en France, published in English as A French Tragedy: Scenes of Civil War, Summer 1944
"As Allied troops landed in Normandy in 1944, members of the local French resistance in the small town of Saint-Amand-Montrond embarked on an ill-fated attempt to liberate their town....Resistance forces took and subsequently executed hostages; their opponents, the milice- collaborationist French police - and German soldiers rounded up 70 Jewish adults and children in retaliation and put them to a horrible death..." - >from the dust jacket of the US edition, A French Tragedy, published by University Press of New England.
I contacted the author because he did not include in his book a list of the people who were murdered there,(!) including five of my relatives. It seems many or all, like them, had been expelled or fled >from Alsace when the Germans retook it and incorporated it into the Reich in 1940. A depiction of the Alsatian towns of Hochfelden and Ingwiller and my two relatives who survived the massacre, Roger and his mother Cora Weil, is at:
http://www.dianamarahenry.com/natzweiler-struthof/VanishingJewsofAlsace.htm
Todorov sent me a list he found somewhere and I have others. Thank you,
Diana Mara Henry
http://www.natzweiler-struthof.org/
http://www.callmeandre.com
802-334-7054 (home office)
413-374-2896 (cell travel only)


French SIG #France Re: The massacre at the Puits de Guéry in the Cher #france

dmh@...
 

On Nov 14, 2018, at 8:37 AM, Diana Henry <dmh@natzweiler-struthof.com> wrote:

Hello,
It occurs to me that other family members of those Jews massacred in August 1944 by the French militia at the wells of Guery in the Department of the Cher might be on this list, as I am
If so, or for any reason related to this massacre, I would be interest to correspond
The atrocity is recounted in Tzvetan Todorov’s book: Une Tragedie Francaise: ete 1944 scenes de la guerre civile en France, published in English as A French Tragedy: Scenes of Civil War, Summer 1944
"As Allied troops landed in Normandy in 1944, members of the local French resistance in the small town of Saint-Amand-Montrond embarked on an ill-fated attempt to liberate their town....Resistance forces took and subsequently executed hostages; their opponents, the milice- collaborationist French police - and German soldiers rounded up 70 Jewish adults and children in retaliation and put them to a horrible death..." - >from the dust jacket of the US edition, A French Tragedy, published by University Press of New England.
I contacted the author because he did not include in his book a list of the people who were murdered there,(!) including five of my relatives. It seems many or all, like them, had been expelled or fled >from Alsace when the Germans retook it and incorporated it into the Reich in 1940. A depiction of the Alsatian towns of Hochfelden and Ingwiller and my two relatives who survived the massacre, Roger and his mother Cora Weil, is at:
http://www.dianamarahenry.com/natzweiler-struthof/VanishingJewsofAlsace.htm
Todorov sent me a list he found somewhere and I have others. Thank you,
Diana Mara Henry
http://www.natzweiler-struthof.org/
http://www.callmeandre.com
802-334-7054 (home office)
413-374-2896 (cell travel only)


Lea MILLER, Yaffo Street, City Unknown, Israel #romania

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Lea MILLER, who was living on Yaffo Street,
in an unspecified city in Israel, in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (Peretz MULLER of Sighet), so we may be related.
Thank you
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Romania SIG #Romania Lea MILLER, Yaffo Street, City Unknown, Israel #romania

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Lea MILLER, who was living on Yaffo Street,
in an unspecified city in Israel, in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (Peretz MULLER of Sighet), so we may be related.
Thank you
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Malka WEISBERGER, Kiryat Motzkin, Israel #romania

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Malka WEISBERGER, who was living in Kiryat
Motzkin, Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Romania SIG #Romania Malka WEISBERGER, Kiryat Motzkin, Israel #romania

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Malka WEISBERGER, who was living in Kiryat
Motzkin, Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
ours (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Rivka JEGER, Akko/Acre, Israel #romania

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Rivka JEGER, who was living in Akko/Acre,
Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
our (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Romania SIG #Romania Rivka JEGER, Akko/Acre, Israel #romania

Shlomo Katz
 

I am seeking the family of Rivka JEGER, who was living in Akko/Acre,
Israel in 1957.
She submitted Yad Vashem POT testimony relating to mutual relatives of
our (MULLER family of Khust), so we may be related.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland USA


Steve Morse "One-Step" tool for New York City tax photos #general

Dick Plotz
 

NYC has recently digitized and put online their 1940 tax photos of
every piece of real estate in the city, but it may not be easy to
search using their website to find the photo of a particular house.
Steve Morse has created a tool that acts as a portal to their photo
collection, making searching their site easier.

Here are some of the advantages that Steve's tool offers:

1. New York City's site has numerous restrictions on the format of an
address, such as:
-- numbered streets must be cardinal numbers and not ordinal numbers
(i.e, "4 Avenue" instead of "4th Avenue")
-- numbered street name must not be spelled out (i.e, "15 Street"
instead of "Fifteen Street" or "Fifteenth Street")
-- no apostrophes in the street name
-- no dashes in the address
-- no abbreviations (i.e., "East 96 Street" instead of "E 96 St")
Steve's tool does away with all these restrictions, allowing searches
by street names as they are usually encountered.

2. On New York City's site, you have to enter your search term using a
very strict syntax, such as "borough=Brooklyn AND block=3598 AND
lot=3". Using Steve's tool you enter the search information by
filling out a form.

3. The result of a search on the New York City site is a set of
thumbnails. The search result >from Steve's tool is a table.

The URL of Steve Morse's tool is
https://stevemorse.org/vital/nyctaxphotos.html

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Steve Morse "One-Step" tool for New York City tax photos #general

Dick Plotz
 

NYC has recently digitized and put online their 1940 tax photos of
every piece of real estate in the city, but it may not be easy to
search using their website to find the photo of a particular house.
Steve Morse has created a tool that acts as a portal to their photo
collection, making searching their site easier.

Here are some of the advantages that Steve's tool offers:

1. New York City's site has numerous restrictions on the format of an
address, such as:
-- numbered streets must be cardinal numbers and not ordinal numbers
(i.e, "4 Avenue" instead of "4th Avenue")
-- numbered street name must not be spelled out (i.e, "15 Street"
instead of "Fifteen Street" or "Fifteenth Street")
-- no apostrophes in the street name
-- no dashes in the address
-- no abbreviations (i.e., "East 96 Street" instead of "E 96 St")
Steve's tool does away with all these restrictions, allowing searches
by street names as they are usually encountered.

2. On New York City's site, you have to enter your search term using a
very strict syntax, such as "borough=Brooklyn AND block=3598 AND
lot=3". Using Steve's tool you enter the search information by
filling out a form.

3. The result of a search on the New York City site is a set of
thumbnails. The search result >from Steve's tool is a table.

The URL of Steve Morse's tool is
https://stevemorse.org/vital/nyctaxphotos.html

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


Re: DNA match to me but not my parents #dna

David Ellis
 

Lynn Pollak Golumbic wrote:

---
During the last year my parents (who are 3rd cousins) and I did the
autosomal family finder test on FTDNA. One surprise was that a very good
friend and neighbor with whom I thought I had no family relationship came up
as a 5th or remote cousin on my test, with 116 Shared Cm and a longest
block of 9.
He did not show up on either of my parents' tests. Can someone explain why?
I am not adopted, I show up as a daughter of each of my parents.
---

This is a consequence of Ashkenazi Jewish endogamy, the fact that we married
almost exclusively within our own population. We are all descended >from a
"founder" group of approximately 350 people who lived some 700 years ago.
For quite a few generations, Ashkenazi Jews married their first, second and
third cousins before the population's rapid growth in the 18th and 19th
centuries. As a consequence, we share lots of little bits and pieces of DNA
from way back. These common bits skew the autosomal analysis algorithms
because they look just like the shared DNA segments that signify
genealogically accessible relationships within the most recent four to five
generations. As a result, the majority of relationship estimates make the
common ancestors appear to be much closer than they actually are. We may be
projected as fourth cousins, but in reality we may be eighth to twentieth
cousins many times over because of the repeated endogamous marriages.

People listed in the results as fifth to distant cousins are almost always
very distant, out of reach of conventional genealogical research. There is
a "tell", however. The general rule of thumb that I've found most useful
(although not foolproof) is to investigate a match further if it contains
one segment of at least 20 cM and another segment of at least 10 cM.
Matches that don't meet this criterion are unlikely to yield an accessible
relationship. A long segment of only 9 cM is almost certainly a sign of no
common ancestor within reach. For matches that do pass this test, you may
or may not be able to connect your family trees, depending on how far back
your paper trail goes. I have one match with a 56 cM segment and a 20 cM
segment that I'm convinced is a third cousin of my dad, but we cannot
confirm such a relationship because I've been able to trace siblings of only
nine of my sixteen fourth generation ancestors, while my match doesn't trace
as far back.

Keep searching, and focus on matches that look promising. I have over
19,000 DNA matches on FTDNA, and I've been able to find some distant
cousins among them. I hope you'll enjoy similar successes.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA
djemkitso@verizon.net


DNA Research #DNA RE: DNA match to me but not my parents #dna

David Ellis
 

Lynn Pollak Golumbic wrote:

---
During the last year my parents (who are 3rd cousins) and I did the
autosomal family finder test on FTDNA. One surprise was that a very good
friend and neighbor with whom I thought I had no family relationship came up
as a 5th or remote cousin on my test, with 116 Shared Cm and a longest
block of 9.
He did not show up on either of my parents' tests. Can someone explain why?
I am not adopted, I show up as a daughter of each of my parents.
---

This is a consequence of Ashkenazi Jewish endogamy, the fact that we married
almost exclusively within our own population. We are all descended >from a
"founder" group of approximately 350 people who lived some 700 years ago.
For quite a few generations, Ashkenazi Jews married their first, second and
third cousins before the population's rapid growth in the 18th and 19th
centuries. As a consequence, we share lots of little bits and pieces of DNA
from way back. These common bits skew the autosomal analysis algorithms
because they look just like the shared DNA segments that signify
genealogically accessible relationships within the most recent four to five
generations. As a result, the majority of relationship estimates make the
common ancestors appear to be much closer than they actually are. We may be
projected as fourth cousins, but in reality we may be eighth to twentieth
cousins many times over because of the repeated endogamous marriages.

People listed in the results as fifth to distant cousins are almost always
very distant, out of reach of conventional genealogical research. There is
a "tell", however. The general rule of thumb that I've found most useful
(although not foolproof) is to investigate a match further if it contains
one segment of at least 20 cM and another segment of at least 10 cM.
Matches that don't meet this criterion are unlikely to yield an accessible
relationship. A long segment of only 9 cM is almost certainly a sign of no
common ancestor within reach. For matches that do pass this test, you may
or may not be able to connect your family trees, depending on how far back
your paper trail goes. I have one match with a 56 cM segment and a 20 cM
segment that I'm convinced is a third cousin of my dad, but we cannot
confirm such a relationship because I've been able to trace siblings of only
nine of my sixteen fourth generation ancestors, while my match doesn't trace
as far back.

Keep searching, and focus on matches that look promising. I have over
19,000 DNA matches on FTDNA, and I've been able to find some distant
cousins among them. I hope you'll enjoy similar successes.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA
djemkitso@verizon.net


Re: DNA match to me but not my parents #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

Lynn,
During the last year my parents (who are 3rd cousins) and I did the
autosomal family finder test on FTDNA. One surprise was that a very
good friend and neighbor with whom I thought I had no family
relationship came up as a 5th or remote cousin on my test, with 116
Shared Cm and a longest block of 9.
He did not show up on either of my parents' tests. Can someone explain
why? I am not adopted, I show up as a daughter of each of my parents.>
My experience as a descendant of eastern European Jews is that if
your longest block of shared dna is 9 cMs, you are unlikely to be able
to prove a relationship between this neighbor because the records do
not go back far enough. If your ancestors were in western Europe or
the U.S. a long time ago, it is possible.
This dna tracing is a combination of science and statistics.
Either could be incorrect, and both are being refined as we speak and
as the testing services' databases become larger.
This is just a guess, but I think the explanation for the match
with you but with neither of your parents is this. Whatever dna you
share with this neighbor came about half >from your father and half
from your mother. The amount shared with neither of your parents was
enough statistically to get them over whatever threshhold of
relationship FT DNA has. Put together in you, it was enough.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA


DNA Research #DNA Re: DNA match to me but not my parents #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

Lynn,
During the last year my parents (who are 3rd cousins) and I did the
autosomal family finder test on FTDNA. One surprise was that a very
good friend and neighbor with whom I thought I had no family
relationship came up as a 5th or remote cousin on my test, with 116
Shared Cm and a longest block of 9.
He did not show up on either of my parents' tests. Can someone explain
why? I am not adopted, I show up as a daughter of each of my parents.>
My experience as a descendant of eastern European Jews is that if
your longest block of shared dna is 9 cMs, you are unlikely to be able
to prove a relationship between this neighbor because the records do
not go back far enough. If your ancestors were in western Europe or
the U.S. a long time ago, it is possible.
This dna tracing is a combination of science and statistics.
Either could be incorrect, and both are being refined as we speak and
as the testing services' databases become larger.
This is just a guess, but I think the explanation for the match
with you but with neither of your parents is this. Whatever dna you
share with this neighbor came about half >from your father and half
from your mother. The amount shared with neither of your parents was
enough statistically to get them over whatever threshhold of
relationship FT DNA has. Put together in you, it was enough.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA

39041 - 39060 of 663900