Date   

New data available from the Vilnius household registers project #general

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is very pleased to announce that batch 3 of the Vilnius
household register project, 5000 lines, is now available to qualified
donors. To help you decide if this batch is relevant to you,
we provide a full surname-frequency list of over 2000 surnames on the
VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-registers
(short URL: https://tinyurl.com/yab5ojnv).

During the period between WWI and WWII, Vilnius and adjoining
areas (that today are within eastern Lithuania and western Belarus)
were under Polish control. In Vilnius, the Poland imposed its system
of household registration for population registration and mobility
control >from 1919 to 1940. More than 13,000 household registers
have survived. They contain a treasure trove of information about
people who lived in or visited Vilnius. Typical records may include
the first and last name, maiden name, names of the parents including
the mother's maiden name, marital status, nationality and religion,
place and date of birth (or age), place of previous residence, date of
arrival to the lodgings, date of leaving the lodgings and next destination.
We estimate that the collection, in all, contains several million entries,
perhaps a third of them for Jews.

Of particular note, because of the shifting national boundaries, the
Vilnius household registers (VHR) will be of interest to a wider
audience than one might imagine. There was no border between
Vilnius and the rest of interwar Poland. People flowed freely between
Vilnius and such other cities as Warsaw, Bialystok, Lodz, Lida, Disna,
Oshmiany, Minsk, and others. If your ancestors were anywhere in that
area between the wars, they could have stopped in Vilnius and made
an appearance in a household register.

Because this is a long-term project, we are releasing data 5,000 lines
at a time. The first batch was released during the IAJGS conference
in Warsaw in August. That batch is available free of charge, thanks
to a Rabbi Malcolm Stern grant awarded to the project. Batch 2 was
released a month ago. The data of each batch will be added to the
All-Lithuania database about 18 months after release, where it will
be searchable free of charge.

All necessary information about these data releases, including how to
become a qualified donor, can be found on our VHR home page
linked above. Any questions should be directed to me at
vhrproject@...

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New data available from the Vilnius household registers project #general

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is very pleased to announce that batch 3 of the Vilnius
household register project, 5000 lines, is now available to qualified
donors. To help you decide if this batch is relevant to you,
we provide a full surname-frequency list of over 2000 surnames on the
VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-registers
(short URL: https://tinyurl.com/yab5ojnv).

During the period between WWI and WWII, Vilnius and adjoining
areas (that today are within eastern Lithuania and western Belarus)
were under Polish control. In Vilnius, the Poland imposed its system
of household registration for population registration and mobility
control >from 1919 to 1940. More than 13,000 household registers
have survived. They contain a treasure trove of information about
people who lived in or visited Vilnius. Typical records may include
the first and last name, maiden name, names of the parents including
the mother's maiden name, marital status, nationality and religion,
place and date of birth (or age), place of previous residence, date of
arrival to the lodgings, date of leaving the lodgings and next destination.
We estimate that the collection, in all, contains several million entries,
perhaps a third of them for Jews.

Of particular note, because of the shifting national boundaries, the
Vilnius household registers (VHR) will be of interest to a wider
audience than one might imagine. There was no border between
Vilnius and the rest of interwar Poland. People flowed freely between
Vilnius and such other cities as Warsaw, Bialystok, Lodz, Lida, Disna,
Oshmiany, Minsk, and others. If your ancestors were anywhere in that
area between the wars, they could have stopped in Vilnius and made
an appearance in a household register.

Because this is a long-term project, we are releasing data 5,000 lines
at a time. The first batch was released during the IAJGS conference
in Warsaw in August. That batch is available free of charge, thanks
to a Rabbi Malcolm Stern grant awarded to the project. Batch 2 was
released a month ago. The data of each batch will be added to the
All-Lithuania database about 18 months after release, where it will
be searchable free of charge.

All necessary information about these data releases, including how to
become a qualified donor, can be found on our VHR home page
linked above. Any questions should be directed to me at
vhrproject@...

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator


Israel cemetery search #general

Trudy Barch
 

Hi friends,

Happy Chanukah to all.

1) Where would a family member that died after 1950 in Jerusalem, Israel
probably be buried?
I tried JewishGen database and had no luck. Where else should I look?

The name is Eleizer (or some similar spelling) WATSTEIN

2) Also twins that died at birth prior to 1905 in Jerusalem Palastine,
would there be a birth and death record for them?
If so, where would I find that information? Don't know if they were male
or female or one of each.

Thank you, Trudy Barch (FL)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Israel cemetery search #general

Trudy Barch
 

Hi friends,

Happy Chanukah to all.

1) Where would a family member that died after 1950 in Jerusalem, Israel
probably be buried?
I tried JewishGen database and had no luck. Where else should I look?

The name is Eleizer (or some similar spelling) WATSTEIN

2) Also twins that died at birth prior to 1905 in Jerusalem Palastine,
would there be a birth and death record for them?
If so, where would I find that information? Don't know if they were male
or female or one of each.

Thank you, Trudy Barch (FL)


Barbara Simon (1820 - 1888) #general

David_Linda Thompson <david.lindat@...>
 

I am trying to document the family (parents & siblings) of Barbara
Simon (Birth: 1820 in Waldhilbersheim, Landkreis Bad Kreuznach,
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany - Death: 13 Feb 1888 (aged 67 - 68) in
Kosciusko, Attala County, Mississippi, USA - Burial: Beth Israel
Cemetery, Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi, USA per Find A Grave
Memorial ID 11022597

In the 1880 census, Kosciusko, Attala County, MS, she was age 60, born
abt 1820 in Germany, white, female, single and recorded with the R. G.
McCoy family in a hotel operated by Mary McKinney.

R. G. was age 30, his wife Bettie, age 25, their daughter Nannie, age
4. Also with them was Henry Clark (age 30, born abt 1850 in MS, black,
male, single, servant) and Mariah Veasley, (age 50, born abt 1830 in
MS, black, female, widowed, servant).

I am neither Jewish nor a family member, but I am slowly documenting
the names and relationships of individuals and families who lived in
Attala County in 1830 ~ 1930. See
https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/155780143/person/412053397528/facts
[or https://tinyurl.com/yck6b5jz --Mod.]

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you, Dave Thompson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Barbara Simon (1820 - 1888) #general

David_Linda Thompson <david.lindat@...>
 

I am trying to document the family (parents & siblings) of Barbara
Simon (Birth: 1820 in Waldhilbersheim, Landkreis Bad Kreuznach,
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany - Death: 13 Feb 1888 (aged 67 - 68) in
Kosciusko, Attala County, Mississippi, USA - Burial: Beth Israel
Cemetery, Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi, USA per Find A Grave
Memorial ID 11022597

In the 1880 census, Kosciusko, Attala County, MS, she was age 60, born
abt 1820 in Germany, white, female, single and recorded with the R. G.
McCoy family in a hotel operated by Mary McKinney.

R. G. was age 30, his wife Bettie, age 25, their daughter Nannie, age
4. Also with them was Henry Clark (age 30, born abt 1850 in MS, black,
male, single, servant) and Mariah Veasley, (age 50, born abt 1830 in
MS, black, female, widowed, servant).

I am neither Jewish nor a family member, but I am slowly documenting
the names and relationships of individuals and families who lived in
Attala County in 1830 ~ 1930. See
https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/155780143/person/412053397528/facts
[or https://tinyurl.com/yck6b5jz --Mod.]

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you, Dave Thompson


ITMAN #lithuania

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

On JewishGen, I have found the death of a relative
Itman, Jankelis s/o Abramas Ickas and Sore Etel died in Stakliskes died
11th November 1930, aged 68 years.

On Yad Vashem I have found the death of
Chaim Yakov, born about 1882, husband of Henia, nee FINK. He was murdered
in 1942.

According to my records, 'my' Chaim Yankel ITMAN was married to Gena
Funkaite/Funk.

My records are taken >from JewishGen.

Any suggestion would be much appreciated about when Chaim Yakov actually
died.

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel


Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds
ITMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/USA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania ITMAN #lithuania

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

On JewishGen, I have found the death of a relative
Itman, Jankelis s/o Abramas Ickas and Sore Etel died in Stakliskes died
11th November 1930, aged 68 years.

On Yad Vashem I have found the death of
Chaim Yakov, born about 1882, husband of Henia, nee FINK. He was murdered
in 1942.

According to my records, 'my' Chaim Yankel ITMAN was married to Gena
Funkaite/Funk.

My records are taken >from JewishGen.

Any suggestion would be much appreciated about when Chaim Yakov actually
died.

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel


Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds
ITMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/USA


Gdal David LERNER and Rywska Gitla SILBERSTEIN #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

I research :

the date and place of birth, the date of naturalization and the date
of death of Gdal David LERNER who had a kosher poultry butchery before
and after the second world war. His business was called "Schomrey
Hadass" and was located at 27 rue des rosiers in Paris.

the date and place of birth, the date of naturalization and the date
of death of his wife Rywska Gitla SILBERSTEIN.

Thanking you for your help,

Evelyne LEMBERSKI
Saint Maurice
France
evelynelemberski@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gdal David LERNER and Rywska Gitla SILBERSTEIN #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

I research :

the date and place of birth, the date of naturalization and the date
of death of Gdal David LERNER who had a kosher poultry butchery before
and after the second world war. His business was called "Schomrey
Hadass" and was located at 27 rue des rosiers in Paris.

the date and place of birth, the date of naturalization and the date
of death of his wife Rywska Gitla SILBERSTEIN.

Thanking you for your help,

Evelyne LEMBERSKI
Saint Maurice
France
evelynelemberski@...


Re: Barbara Simon (1820 - 1888) #general

P. S. Wyant
 

Shalom, David.

I can't assist you very much, I'm afraid.

"Juedische Grabstaetten im Kreis Bad Kreuznach" (Kreisverwaltung Bad
Kreuznach, 1995) does not list an extant Juedische Friedhof (Jewish
cemetery) at D-55452 Waldhilbersheim. The closest Jewish cemetery is
at D-55452 Guldental, about 1 km. SE of Waldhilbersheim (in fact,
Waldhilbersheim is now considered to be part of Guldental). There are
no existing gravestones for SIMONs in the small Jewish cemetery at
Guldental, but then only 20 gravestones remain there. Gravestones for
relatives of Barbara might no longer exist there or they might be
found in a neighbouring Jewish cemetery.

The BMD records (Personenstandesregistern) for this entire area have
been fully microfilmed by the Latter-Day Saints. My best suggestion
for unearthing Barbara's parents and siblings is to have a read of
those microfilms.

Regards,

Peter Wyant
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: david.lindat@...
Sent: Monday, December 03, 2018 20:39

I am trying to document the family (parents & siblings) of Barbara
Simon (Birth: 1820 in Waldhilbersheim, Landkreis Bad Kreuznach,
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany - Death: 13 Feb 1888 (aged 67 - 68) in
Kosciusko, Attala County, Mississippi, USA - Burial: Beth Israel
Cemetery, Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi, USA per Find A Grave
Memorial ID 11022597
...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Barbara Simon (1820 - 1888) #general

P. S. Wyant
 

Shalom, David.

I can't assist you very much, I'm afraid.

"Juedische Grabstaetten im Kreis Bad Kreuznach" (Kreisverwaltung Bad
Kreuznach, 1995) does not list an extant Juedische Friedhof (Jewish
cemetery) at D-55452 Waldhilbersheim. The closest Jewish cemetery is
at D-55452 Guldental, about 1 km. SE of Waldhilbersheim (in fact,
Waldhilbersheim is now considered to be part of Guldental). There are
no existing gravestones for SIMONs in the small Jewish cemetery at
Guldental, but then only 20 gravestones remain there. Gravestones for
relatives of Barbara might no longer exist there or they might be
found in a neighbouring Jewish cemetery.

The BMD records (Personenstandesregistern) for this entire area have
been fully microfilmed by the Latter-Day Saints. My best suggestion
for unearthing Barbara's parents and siblings is to have a read of
those microfilms.

Regards,

Peter Wyant
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: david.lindat@...
Sent: Monday, December 03, 2018 20:39

I am trying to document the family (parents & siblings) of Barbara
Simon (Birth: 1820 in Waldhilbersheim, Landkreis Bad Kreuznach,
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany - Death: 13 Feb 1888 (aged 67 - 68) in
Kosciusko, Attala County, Mississippi, USA - Burial: Beth Israel
Cemetery, Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi, USA per Find A Grave
Memorial ID 11022597
...


Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

The naming pattern for eastern European Ashkenazi Jews was:
1. A child is named for a deceased ancestor or a deceased highly
respected person, but never for a living person. Subject to that rule:
2. The first son is named for its father's father; the second son
for its mother's father.
3. The first daughter is named for its mother's mother; the second
daughter for its father's mother.
4. If someone cannot have a namesake in the normal order of rules
2 or 3 because they are still alive at the appropriate time, the next
baby of the appropriate sex to be born after the death of that person
will be named for that person.
5. When the child's father dies during the pregnancy, the child is
named after the child's father if the child is a boy.
After that, I do not think there was a rule.
One must remember that this is only a custom. Individuals could,
and sometimes did, disregard custom.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

The naming pattern for eastern European Ashkenazi Jews was:
1. A child is named for a deceased ancestor or a deceased highly
respected person, but never for a living person. Subject to that rule:
2. The first son is named for its father's father; the second son
for its mother's father.
3. The first daughter is named for its mother's mother; the second
daughter for its father's mother.
4. If someone cannot have a namesake in the normal order of rules
2 or 3 because they are still alive at the appropriate time, the next
baby of the appropriate sex to be born after the death of that person
will be named for that person.
5. When the child's father dies during the pregnancy, the child is
named after the child's father if the child is a boy.
After that, I do not think there was a rule.
One must remember that this is only a custom. Individuals could,
and sometimes did, disregard custom.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


Abbreviation on Ellis Island Detention Form #general

Gail Marcus <ghmarcus@...>
 

I am trying to interpret an abbreviation on an Ellis Island detention
form. Before the name of the person to whom the immigrant is being
released, I see what looks like the abbreviation "Fd" in a couple of
cases.

The JewishGen page on the detention records does not list this
abbreviation. It lists "RR" for people being sent to their relatives
by rail. Is "Fd" an indication of people being sent to relatives some
other way? If so, how?

Would appreciate any explanation of this.

Gail Marcus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Abbreviation on Ellis Island Detention Form #general

Gail Marcus <ghmarcus@...>
 

I am trying to interpret an abbreviation on an Ellis Island detention
form. Before the name of the person to whom the immigrant is being
released, I see what looks like the abbreviation "Fd" in a couple of
cases.

The JewishGen page on the detention records does not list this
abbreviation. It lists "RR" for people being sent to their relatives
by rail. Is "Fd" an indication of people being sent to relatives some
other way? If so, how?

Would appreciate any explanation of this.

Gail Marcus


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Seeking information about Shifra/Sofia LUCHANSKAYA and descendants, Tarashcha #ukraine

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

I am seeking information about the extended LUCHANSKY family of Tarashcha and Koshevata, Tarashcha uyezd, Kiev gubernia in the Russian imperial era. I am particularly interested in descendants of Moshko Elev LUCHANSKY born about 1867. Background information follows.

My maternal grandmother, original name Yenta Moisevna MURAKHOVSKAYA (1897-1985), was the daughter of Krenie LUCHANSKAYA (1856-1919), granddaughter of Itzhak Manev LUCHANSKY (born about 1831). I recently came across a number of photos of my grandmother together with one Shifra (or Sofia) LUCHANSKAYA, whom I have determined was born about 1894, daughter of Moshko Elev LUCHANSKY (born about 1867), granddaughter of Ela Manev LUCHANSKY (born about 1830). Itzhak Manev and Ela Manev were brothers. Thus Shifra LUCHANSKAYA and my grandmother were second cousins.

The most recent photograph I have of Shifra LUCHANSKAYA dates >from about 1930 and shows her posed with a daughter Rivulia and a husband Beni, according to an inscription on the back. The husband's surname may have been SHEPETOVSKY.

Iâ??m trying to determine if Shifra LUCHANSKAYA and family survived the Second World War and, if so, what became of them. Any information or hints would be appreciated.


Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon
jswalder@...


Seeking information about Shifra/Sofia LUCHANSKAYA and descendants, Tarashcha #ukraine

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

I am seeking information about the extended LUCHANSKY family of Tarashcha and Koshevata, Tarashcha uyezd, Kiev gubernia in the Russian imperial era. I am particularly interested in descendants of Moshko Elev LUCHANSKY born about 1867. Background information follows.

My maternal grandmother, original name Yenta Moisevna MURAKHOVSKAYA (1897-1985), was the daughter of Krenie LUCHANSKAYA (1856-1919), granddaughter of Itzhak Manev LUCHANSKY (born about 1831). I recently came across a number of photos of my grandmother together with one Shifra (or Sofia) LUCHANSKAYA, whom I have determined was born about 1894, daughter of Moshko Elev LUCHANSKY (born about 1867), granddaughter of Ela Manev LUCHANSKY (born about 1830). Itzhak Manev and Ela Manev were brothers. Thus Shifra LUCHANSKAYA and my grandmother were second cousins.

The most recent photograph I have of Shifra LUCHANSKAYA dates >from about 1930 and shows her posed with a daughter Rivulia and a husband Beni, according to an inscription on the back. The husband's surname may have been SHEPETOVSKY.

Iâ??m trying to determine if Shifra LUCHANSKAYA and family survived the Second World War and, if so, what became of them. Any information or hints would be appreciated.


Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon
jswalder@...


Yizkor Book Project, November 2018 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

This time our Yizkor Book monthly report coincides with the beginning
of Channuka and I would like to take this opportunity to wish you dear
readers and your families, a bright, enjoyable and enlightening
holiday.

As it happens, many of the Yizkor books have vivid descriptions of how
Channuka and the other Jewish festivals were celebrated in the
communities that these books cover, bringing us an insight of the life
we know precious little about. We are fortunate that, at least, these
descriptions of the period before the Holocaust do exist in these
books and our aim is to make the stories and information they contain
as widely accessible as possible. As most of the books were written in
Yiddish and Hebrew, for the many unable to read these languages, the
challenge of our project is to provide the books in English and other
languages to allow the information they contain to be read freely and
globally over the Internet.

A classic example of the colorful descriptions about the Jewish
festivals is something that is included in the Meichow, Poland Yizkor
book which I am happy to say, the translation of which, was completed
during November. We are greatly indebted to Bill Cherny who diligently
coordinated and generously financially supported its translation,
making it available to all of you with roots in Miechow and nearby
communities. We are now able to read about the life style, the people
and yes, the festivals, of this Jewish community that is no more.

It is clear that to carry out the complete translation of the books,
which are many hundreds of pages in length, does require considerable
funds to undertake. This does mean that a joint effort is called for
in order to achieve the goal of completely translating a Yizkor book.
So, as always, if you are able to make a donation of any size to one
of the many Translation Funds we have running, you will be doing your
part to make this happen. Details of all the these books may be found
in the JewishGen-erosity link at the end of this report.

In many cases, our projects don’t end with the completion of the book
and the translations go on to our Yizkor Books in Print Project where
that dedicated team deftly converts them into something substantial -
a hard-covered book. As such, I am pleased to let you know that yet
another project has gone on to this second stage and this time it is
the book on the community of Roman, Romania. Details of this and the
over 70 other books may be found through the link at the end of this
report.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out
during November:

We have added in one new book:

- Kaunas, Lithuania (The Extermination of the Jews of Kovno)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaunas2/Kaunas2.html

We have added in 6 new entries:

- Jurbarkas, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_052.html

- Kapciamiestis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_079.html

- Panevezys, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_310.html

- Sakiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_386.html

- Salantai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_406.html

- Seta, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_455.html

And we have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubiecko, Poland (Dubiecko)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubiecko/Dubiecko.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Lviv, Ukraine (Lwow Volume: Part I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lviv/lviv.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka,
New Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish
community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki in flames; a memorial book to the
community of Olkenik in the Vilna district)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai/Valkininkai.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

Channuka Sameach/Happy Channuka,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project, November 2018 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

This time our Yizkor Book monthly report coincides with the beginning
of Channuka and I would like to take this opportunity to wish you dear
readers and your families, a bright, enjoyable and enlightening
holiday.

As it happens, many of the Yizkor books have vivid descriptions of how
Channuka and the other Jewish festivals were celebrated in the
communities that these books cover, bringing us an insight of the life
we know precious little about. We are fortunate that, at least, these
descriptions of the period before the Holocaust do exist in these
books and our aim is to make the stories and information they contain
as widely accessible as possible. As most of the books were written in
Yiddish and Hebrew, for the many unable to read these languages, the
challenge of our project is to provide the books in English and other
languages to allow the information they contain to be read freely and
globally over the Internet.

A classic example of the colorful descriptions about the Jewish
festivals is something that is included in the Meichow, Poland Yizkor
book which I am happy to say, the translation of which, was completed
during November. We are greatly indebted to Bill Cherny who diligently
coordinated and generously financially supported its translation,
making it available to all of you with roots in Miechow and nearby
communities. We are now able to read about the life style, the people
and yes, the festivals, of this Jewish community that is no more.

It is clear that to carry out the complete translation of the books,
which are many hundreds of pages in length, does require considerable
funds to undertake. This does mean that a joint effort is called for
in order to achieve the goal of completely translating a Yizkor book.
So, as always, if you are able to make a donation of any size to one
of the many Translation Funds we have running, you will be doing your
part to make this happen. Details of all the these books may be found
in the JewishGen-erosity link at the end of this report.

In many cases, our projects don’t end with the completion of the book
and the translations go on to our Yizkor Books in Print Project where
that dedicated team deftly converts them into something substantial -
a hard-covered book. As such, I am pleased to let you know that yet
another project has gone on to this second stage and this time it is
the book on the community of Roman, Romania. Details of this and the
over 70 other books may be found through the link at the end of this
report.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out
during November:

We have added in one new book:

- Kaunas, Lithuania (The Extermination of the Jews of Kovno)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaunas2/Kaunas2.html

We have added in 6 new entries:

- Jurbarkas, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_052.html

- Kapciamiestis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_079.html

- Panevezys, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_310.html

- Sakiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_386.html

- Salantai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_406.html

- Seta, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_455.html

And we have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubiecko, Poland (Dubiecko)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubiecko/Dubiecko.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Lviv, Ukraine (Lwow Volume: Part I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lviv/lviv.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka,
New Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish
community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki in flames; a memorial book to the
community of Olkenik in the Vilna district)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai/Valkininkai.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

Channuka Sameach/Happy Channuka,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

48181 - 48200 of 673641