Date   
Jewish Marriage Ceremonial Book with Marriage Records: 1899-1919 #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

The subject heading of my posting is the title of an LDS film I discovered today.
Some genealogists may know about it, but I thought I'd bring it to everyone's
attention because it seems to be such "hodge-podge."

The film number is 1012750 and it contains marriage records for the following
communities (community/county/state):

Bloomington,McLean, Illinois, 1905-1907
Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee, 1902-1904
Chicago,Cook, Illinois1905-1907
Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, 1908
Grand Junction, Van Buren, Michigan, 1899
Kalamazoo, Kalamzoo, Michigan, 1899
New York, 1908-1909, 1919
Taylorville, Christian, Illinois, 1905-1907

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA

Confusion over LAUFER/BANK - Sieniawa. #general

Nigel Wilson <wilsonettes@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Again a question regarding names:-

I was always told that my great-grandmother's maiden name was LAUFER and that she
came >from Sieniawa, Austria/Poland.

However, upon obtaining birth certificates of 2 of her children born in London in
1885/1889 (she went to London in 1882 with her husband and 1 child) it shows that
her maiden name was not Laufer but BANK.

How can this be? does Laufer have any meaning leaning towards the word Bank?
Who should I be researching - Laufer or Bank?

I have absolutely no idea as to my great-grandmother's parents names as her
gravestone does not indicate such either in Hebrew or English - which I find
rather strange, neither do I know the names of her siblings, although I do have
but one picture card, written on the back is, Katil sister of Betsy,(which is the
name she had put on the birth certificates), so I must presume that my
great-grandmother must have had at least one sister.

I would appreciate your input.

Many thanks.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)

Researching:-

Bank/Laufer - Sieniawa - Austria.
Nadler - Botosani/Dorohoi/ Mihaileni - Romania.
Weintraub - Galatz - Romania.
Catz/Katz - Piatra Neamt/Roman - Romania.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Marriage Ceremonial Book with Marriage Records: 1899-1919 #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

The subject heading of my posting is the title of an LDS film I discovered today.
Some genealogists may know about it, but I thought I'd bring it to everyone's
attention because it seems to be such "hodge-podge."

The film number is 1012750 and it contains marriage records for the following
communities (community/county/state):

Bloomington,McLean, Illinois, 1905-1907
Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee, 1902-1904
Chicago,Cook, Illinois1905-1907
Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, 1908
Grand Junction, Van Buren, Michigan, 1899
Kalamazoo, Kalamzoo, Michigan, 1899
New York, 1908-1909, 1919
Taylorville, Christian, Illinois, 1905-1907

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Confusion over LAUFER/BANK - Sieniawa. #general

Nigel Wilson <wilsonettes@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Again a question regarding names:-

I was always told that my great-grandmother's maiden name was LAUFER and that she
came >from Sieniawa, Austria/Poland.

However, upon obtaining birth certificates of 2 of her children born in London in
1885/1889 (she went to London in 1882 with her husband and 1 child) it shows that
her maiden name was not Laufer but BANK.

How can this be? does Laufer have any meaning leaning towards the word Bank?
Who should I be researching - Laufer or Bank?

I have absolutely no idea as to my great-grandmother's parents names as her
gravestone does not indicate such either in Hebrew or English - which I find
rather strange, neither do I know the names of her siblings, although I do have
but one picture card, written on the back is, Katil sister of Betsy,(which is the
name she had put on the birth certificates), so I must presume that my
great-grandmother must have had at least one sister.

I would appreciate your input.

Many thanks.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)

Researching:-

Bank/Laufer - Sieniawa - Austria.
Nadler - Botosani/Dorohoi/ Mihaileni - Romania.
Weintraub - Galatz - Romania.
Catz/Katz - Piatra Neamt/Roman - Romania.

Are Variations in New World Yiddish Genealogically Useful? #general

Mel Comisarow <melcom@...>
 

Are variations in New World Yiddish genealogically useful?

There have been several postings discussing geographic variations in European
Yiddish. This is genealogically useful because exact word usage or pronunciation
can indicate the geographic origin of individuals. North American Yiddish differs
from European Yiddish by the inclusion of some English words but it also has
different word meanings. Perhaps the best known example of the latter is the word
shtetl, which means town in European Yiddish but tiny village, what would be dorf
or dorfala in Old World Yiddish, in New World Yiddish.

New World Yiddish also has slang terms that were unknown in Europe. For example,
the Yiddish speakers of the Canadian Prairie Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan
and Alberta used the slang term Gimelah for their Ukrainian neighbors. This was
because (Western Canadian) Ukrainians were >from the Austro-Hungarian province of
Galicia and the letter g in the Hebrew alphabet is gimel. I first became aware of
possible geographic variations in New World Yiddish when I asked a fluent Yiddish
speaker, originally >from Toronto, the president of our local Peretz Society no
less, about Gimelah and he had never heard the term. While New World Yiddish slang
for Ukrainians had an origin that was geographic and alphabetic, the origin of New
World Yiddish slang for Italians was gastronomic. Lokshen, literaly noodles in
Yiddish, was Yiddish slang for Italians in both Alberta and New York City. So I
assume it was universal in North America. Gimelah for Ukrainians and Lokshen for
Italians were unknown in Old World Yiddish. Quoting directly my father, "When the
family was in Russia, we never (even) heard of Italians.". So here are the
questions. Is anyone not >from the Canadian Prairies familiar with Gimelah =
Ukrainians? Are there any other geographic variations in North American Yiddish?
What about Australian Yiddish or South African Yiddish?

Mel Comisarow, Vancouver, BC

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Are Variations in New World Yiddish Genealogically Useful? #general

Mel Comisarow <melcom@...>
 

Are variations in New World Yiddish genealogically useful?

There have been several postings discussing geographic variations in European
Yiddish. This is genealogically useful because exact word usage or pronunciation
can indicate the geographic origin of individuals. North American Yiddish differs
from European Yiddish by the inclusion of some English words but it also has
different word meanings. Perhaps the best known example of the latter is the word
shtetl, which means town in European Yiddish but tiny village, what would be dorf
or dorfala in Old World Yiddish, in New World Yiddish.

New World Yiddish also has slang terms that were unknown in Europe. For example,
the Yiddish speakers of the Canadian Prairie Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan
and Alberta used the slang term Gimelah for their Ukrainian neighbors. This was
because (Western Canadian) Ukrainians were >from the Austro-Hungarian province of
Galicia and the letter g in the Hebrew alphabet is gimel. I first became aware of
possible geographic variations in New World Yiddish when I asked a fluent Yiddish
speaker, originally >from Toronto, the president of our local Peretz Society no
less, about Gimelah and he had never heard the term. While New World Yiddish slang
for Ukrainians had an origin that was geographic and alphabetic, the origin of New
World Yiddish slang for Italians was gastronomic. Lokshen, literaly noodles in
Yiddish, was Yiddish slang for Italians in both Alberta and New York City. So I
assume it was universal in North America. Gimelah for Ukrainians and Lokshen for
Italians were unknown in Old World Yiddish. Quoting directly my father, "When the
family was in Russia, we never (even) heard of Italians.". So here are the
questions. Is anyone not >from the Canadian Prairies familiar with Gimelah =
Ukrainians? Are there any other geographic variations in North American Yiddish?
What about Australian Yiddish or South African Yiddish?

Mel Comisarow, Vancouver, BC

Spitalfields Great Synagogue, Brick Lane #unitedkingdom

Petegolob@...
 

I am researching details of origins of my grandfather Philip Freedman who
died in 1934. He was a regular attendee of the Brick Lane Synagogue, which I
believe was known as the Machzike Hadath. Are membership records of this
synagogue still in existence, where are they held?


Peter Golob
petegolob@...

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Spitalfields Great Synagogue, Brick Lane #unitedkingdom

Petegolob@...
 

I am researching details of origins of my grandfather Philip Freedman who
died in 1934. He was a regular attendee of the Brick Lane Synagogue, which I
believe was known as the Machzike Hadath. Are membership records of this
synagogue still in existence, where are they held?


Peter Golob
petegolob@...

Next Meeting of the JGSGB #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

Genealogical Treasure Troves of Israel:
How to Use Them Here and There

Dr. Martha Lev-Zion

Sunday, March 13, 2005
1:30-4:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Israel offers an amazing array of genealogical resources. In addition to major
repositories such as the Central Archives of the Jewish People, every kibbutz,
every association of Shoah survivors, every Jewish youth movement, every Jewish
organization, active or dormant, has an archive with priceless material. The
Israel Genealogical Society has posted on its website a thorough survey of
available archives in Israel. This talk will tell you which resources are likely
to be most useful to you (for example, the new Yad Vashem database), which ones
make their data available online, how to discover hidden ways to access online
databases, and how to use other internet facilities to plan in advance for a
research trip to Israel.

Dr. Martha Lev-Zion is an historian of modern European intellectual history. She
is the founder and president of the Israel Genealogical Society of the Negev,
serves on the board of directors of the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies, and was a key organizer of the IAJGS Conference on Jewish
Genealogy in Jerusalem last summer. She is a former president of the Latvia SIG
and a member of the steering committee of the Courland Research Group. She will be
happy to answer questions on Latvian and Courland research.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is near Newton-Wellesley
Hospital and the Woodland stop on the Riverside Green Line, as well as a short
ride >from Route 128 at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.

Upcoming programs:

Tuesday, April 12, 2005, 6:30-9:00 PM
Research Workshop at the National Archives in
Waltham, 380 Trapelo Road

Thursday, May 19, 2005, 7:00-9:30 PM at Temple Reyim

"Genealogical Adventures in Poland" by Yale Reisner
(visiting >from Poland)


Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Next Meeting of the JGSGB #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston

presents

Genealogical Treasure Troves of Israel:
How to Use Them Here and There

Dr. Martha Lev-Zion

Sunday, March 13, 2005
1:30-4:30 PM
Temple Reyim, Newton

Israel offers an amazing array of genealogical resources. In addition to major
repositories such as the Central Archives of the Jewish People, every kibbutz,
every association of Shoah survivors, every Jewish youth movement, every Jewish
organization, active or dormant, has an archive with priceless material. The
Israel Genealogical Society has posted on its website a thorough survey of
available archives in Israel. This talk will tell you which resources are likely
to be most useful to you (for example, the new Yad Vashem database), which ones
make their data available online, how to discover hidden ways to access online
databases, and how to use other internet facilities to plan in advance for a
research trip to Israel.

Dr. Martha Lev-Zion is an historian of modern European intellectual history. She
is the founder and president of the Israel Genealogical Society of the Negev,
serves on the board of directors of the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies, and was a key organizer of the IAJGS Conference on Jewish
Genealogy in Jerusalem last summer. She is a former president of the Latvia SIG
and a member of the steering committee of the Courland Research Group. She will be
happy to answer questions on Latvian and Courland research.

Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington Street (Route 16), Newton, is near Newton-Wellesley
Hospital and the Woodland stop on the Riverside Green Line, as well as a short
ride >from Route 128 at Exit 21.

Admission is free for members, $5 for non-members.
Refreshments will be served.

Upcoming programs:

Tuesday, April 12, 2005, 6:30-9:00 PM
Research Workshop at the National Archives in
Waltham, 380 Trapelo Road

Thursday, May 19, 2005, 7:00-9:30 PM at Temple Reyim

"Genealogical Adventures in Poland" by Yale Reisner
(visiting >from Poland)


Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@...

Brandson, Katz, Sher #latvia

Chaim freedman
 

I realise that Sher was a fairly common name in Latvia and Lithuania
but I wonder if someone may have encountered a family in Latvia whom
I may be descended from. My grandmother had a greataunt Beila (Bessie)
BRANDSON who was born in 1850, probably in Libau (Liepaja), and died
in 1920 in Glasgow, Scotland.

Her parents, listed on her death record were Isaac KATZ and Dinah SHER.
I know nothing about them, when or even where they lived, possibly Libau
or nearby Priekule where my grandmother Khaya-Reeva (Annie) FREEDMAN,
nee KVINT was born in 1885.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
chaimjan@...

Latvia SIG #Latvia Brandson, Katz, Sher #latvia

Chaim freedman
 

I realise that Sher was a fairly common name in Latvia and Lithuania
but I wonder if someone may have encountered a family in Latvia whom
I may be descended from. My grandmother had a greataunt Beila (Bessie)
BRANDSON who was born in 1850, probably in Libau (Liepaja), and died
in 1920 in Glasgow, Scotland.

Her parents, listed on her death record were Isaac KATZ and Dinah SHER.
I know nothing about them, when or even where they lived, possibly Libau
or nearby Priekule where my grandmother Khaya-Reeva (Annie) FREEDMAN,
nee KVINT was born in 1885.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
chaimjan@...

Nathan JOFFE #latvia

Robin Joffe <jofferobin@...>
 

I had sent a request to find Nathan JOFFE info >from the archives
(through the Latvian Embassy) but no luck. Now I am using a Law
Firm who is trying to find details. They still have no reply
after a year. If anyone knows of the JOFFE family (not sure >from
what part of the country. Born Dec. 12, 1891 and left for US in
1908. Apparantly family had an Ice Cream shop in Riga but can't
confirm that. They lived in Brooklyn in NY. I am trying to find
any info on Nathan.

Thanks

Robin Joffe <jofferobin@...>

Latvia SIG #Latvia Nathan JOFFE #latvia

Robin Joffe <jofferobin@...>
 

I had sent a request to find Nathan JOFFE info >from the archives
(through the Latvian Embassy) but no luck. Now I am using a Law
Firm who is trying to find details. They still have no reply
after a year. If anyone knows of the JOFFE family (not sure >from
what part of the country. Born Dec. 12, 1891 and left for US in
1908. Apparantly family had an Ice Cream shop in Riga but can't
confirm that. They lived in Brooklyn in NY. I am trying to find
any info on Nathan.

Thanks

Robin Joffe <jofferobin@...>

old German handwriting #germany

Zeev Raphael <zeevra@...>
 

Our MODERATOR wrote: "I believe that "Gothic" is not the word that best describes
old German handwriting but lack the time to look up the correct spelling of the
other word." [But I should have written: For more on old German handwriting
use the links at the GerSIG website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/script.htm MOD1]

I think the name may be S?tterlin Schrift. See this site:

http://www.peter-doerling.de/Lese/Sutterlin.htm

Best regards, Zeev Raphael, Haifa zeevra@...

German SIG #Germany old German handwriting #germany

Zeev Raphael <zeevra@...>
 

Our MODERATOR wrote: "I believe that "Gothic" is not the word that best describes
old German handwriting but lack the time to look up the correct spelling of the
other word." [But I should have written: For more on old German handwriting
use the links at the GerSIG website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/script.htm MOD1]

I think the name may be S?tterlin Schrift. See this site:

http://www.peter-doerling.de/Lese/Sutterlin.htm

Best regards, Zeev Raphael, Haifa zeevra@...

Re: Emigration to UK in 1938 #austria-czech

Richard Gaskell <rgaskell@...>
 

You will find a wealth of related information about this at
Richard Gaskell's web site:

http://www.geocities.com/czechandslovakthings/WW2_aguide.htm

bonne chance,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada
Thanks for the plug Karel! :-)

I was actually already "on the case", so back to the original posting by
Peter Bakos:

The specifics are that a Franz Hans Podwinetz is shown on his police
residential record as having gone to England in May 1938. There is no
further mention of him.
Unfortunately I could find no reference to a Franz Hans PODWINETZ in any
material I have or at the National Archive / Public Record Office (BCRC/CRTF
files; Tribunals for Aliens/Internment; Post-war naturalisations). In fact
the only mention of the name PODWINETZ at all came >from the section on
Aliens left at liberty in the UK after review:

PRO reference: HO 396/68 (869+870)
PODWINETZ Johanna
Born: 6th May 1899. Vienna.
Nationality: German formerly Austrian
Police Regn.Cert.No.: 727746
Home Office reference: P.9688
Address: Arden Close, Gilberts Green, Tamworth-in-Arden.
Normal occupation: ----
Present occupation: ----
Exempt >from internment. 13th November 1939.

Regards
Richard Gaskell
London, UK.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Emigration to UK in 1938 #austria-czech

Richard Gaskell <rgaskell@...>
 

You will find a wealth of related information about this at
Richard Gaskell's web site:

http://www.geocities.com/czechandslovakthings/WW2_aguide.htm

bonne chance,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada
Thanks for the plug Karel! :-)

I was actually already "on the case", so back to the original posting by
Peter Bakos:

The specifics are that a Franz Hans Podwinetz is shown on his police
residential record as having gone to England in May 1938. There is no
further mention of him.
Unfortunately I could find no reference to a Franz Hans PODWINETZ in any
material I have or at the National Archive / Public Record Office (BCRC/CRTF
files; Tribunals for Aliens/Internment; Post-war naturalisations). In fact
the only mention of the name PODWINETZ at all came >from the section on
Aliens left at liberty in the UK after review:

PRO reference: HO 396/68 (869+870)
PODWINETZ Johanna
Born: 6th May 1899. Vienna.
Nationality: German formerly Austrian
Police Regn.Cert.No.: 727746
Home Office reference: P.9688
Address: Arden Close, Gilberts Green, Tamworth-in-Arden.
Normal occupation: ----
Present occupation: ----
Exempt >from internment. 13th November 1939.

Regards
Richard Gaskell
London, UK.

The Pinkeltrager of Gut Miskowitz - Tabor Kreis #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Last night I wrote about the possible meaning of
Beunkel/Binkeltrager as a lower form of Hausierer or
pedlar: "Hence in Binkel or Buenkelgehen; Binkel is a
'hold-all' or carrier, so a Buenkelgeher must be the
same a Hausierer. Perhaps he collected rags etc as
opposed to selling items; the seller might have been
higher up the employment ladder!

The word has a pejorative meaning; I have come across
it recently in the phrase Binkel-Jude re immigration
of unwanted Soviet Jews into Austria".

I now have a possible confirmation of this view:

I had noticed that Gut Miskowitz, Tabor Kreis
[Mylskovice] with 32 Jewish families listed in the
1793 census had no fewer than 9 Pinkeltrager.
I have never seen such a cluster before!

Looking at Jiri Fiedler's book on the the Jewish
Sights of Bohemia and Moravia I read:

"The Jewish population increased at the turn of the
18th and 19th century after the arrival of Jewish
families >from Galicia."

So I conclude, perhaps incorrectly, that the
Pinkeltrager of Miskowitz were the bottom of the heap
ie the poor Galician Jews who had arrived and settled
in "town". The home-grown Bohemian pedlars were graced
with the superior word "Hausierer"!

Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose!

Now to give the poor Galician? Pinkeltrager and
Bettel-manner [beggars] of Miskowitz their hour of
glory, I am delighted to record their names here for
posterity:

Jacob GOTTLIEB; Dawid [sic] SCHWARZ; Michael
BARON; Benedikt KRAUS; Michal [sic] FRANKEL;
Israel DUBSKY; Benedikt KRASCHOPP; Jakob
FREUND; Jakob SPITALER

Bettelmann [beggar]:Joseph SCHONBAUM

and in the neighbouring village of Raudna [Roudna]
also on Gut Miskowitz: Wolf, Kopplman [sic] & Leopold
GROSSLICHT. Leopold was a Bettelmann.

Any descendants out there?

Celia Male [UK]

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech The Pinkeltrager of Gut Miskowitz - Tabor Kreis #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Last night I wrote about the possible meaning of
Beunkel/Binkeltrager as a lower form of Hausierer or
pedlar: "Hence in Binkel or Buenkelgehen; Binkel is a
'hold-all' or carrier, so a Buenkelgeher must be the
same a Hausierer. Perhaps he collected rags etc as
opposed to selling items; the seller might have been
higher up the employment ladder!

The word has a pejorative meaning; I have come across
it recently in the phrase Binkel-Jude re immigration
of unwanted Soviet Jews into Austria".

I now have a possible confirmation of this view:

I had noticed that Gut Miskowitz, Tabor Kreis
[Mylskovice] with 32 Jewish families listed in the
1793 census had no fewer than 9 Pinkeltrager.
I have never seen such a cluster before!

Looking at Jiri Fiedler's book on the the Jewish
Sights of Bohemia and Moravia I read:

"The Jewish population increased at the turn of the
18th and 19th century after the arrival of Jewish
families >from Galicia."

So I conclude, perhaps incorrectly, that the
Pinkeltrager of Miskowitz were the bottom of the heap
ie the poor Galician Jews who had arrived and settled
in "town". The home-grown Bohemian pedlars were graced
with the superior word "Hausierer"!

Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose!

Now to give the poor Galician? Pinkeltrager and
Bettel-manner [beggars] of Miskowitz their hour of
glory, I am delighted to record their names here for
posterity:

Jacob GOTTLIEB; Dawid [sic] SCHWARZ; Michael
BARON; Benedikt KRAUS; Michal [sic] FRANKEL;
Israel DUBSKY; Benedikt KRASCHOPP; Jakob
FREUND; Jakob SPITALER

Bettelmann [beggar]:Joseph SCHONBAUM

and in the neighbouring village of Raudna [Roudna]
also on Gut Miskowitz: Wolf, Kopplman [sic] & Leopold
GROSSLICHT. Leopold was a Bettelmann.

Any descendants out there?

Celia Male [UK]