Date   

This week's Yizkor book entry on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake
 

Some of the most crushing and heart-rending experiences of the
Holocaust came after the war when those who had survived the Nazi
exterminations returned to their home towns in search of people or
places they had known. Two chapters in the Yizkor book of Kovel (once
Polish, now part of Ukraine) describe these journeys and the tragic
discoveries of people who had been born and raised there. Moshe
Goodman, author of "On the Rubble," was one of them. He wrote: "In the
old town, where the ghetto was located, there was not one house
standing. Only the Great Synagogue remained untouched- a witness to
the great destruction." His grief was only allayed by a miraculous
discovery which I won't spoil for you by repeating here.

Schlomo Perlmutter was another returnee. In "Writings on the Wall," he
too found only a small handful of survivors (six) and was
grief-stricken by the devastation: "There was no trace left of the
beautiful station. Kovel was a mountain of ruins... There were abandoned
houses, burned bricks, broken pieces of furniture. The grass growing
on the side of the road dimmed its color." Like Moshe Goodman, he was
awed by what he found in the abandoned Great Synagogue. "Hundreds and
thousands of writings were etched on its white walls. Scores of Hebrew
and foreign letters were drawn on them. Letters written in pencil,
ordinary and unsharpened, in colored pencils, with pen and ink and
some even scratched with finger nails" -- all "blood cries for help in
their sentence to death" >from the Jews held captive there before being
killed.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2331379526884189

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book entry on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake
 

Some of the most crushing and heart-rending experiences of the
Holocaust came after the war when those who had survived the Nazi
exterminations returned to their home towns in search of people or
places they had known. Two chapters in the Yizkor book of Kovel (once
Polish, now part of Ukraine) describe these journeys and the tragic
discoveries of people who had been born and raised there. Moshe
Goodman, author of "On the Rubble," was one of them. He wrote: "In the
old town, where the ghetto was located, there was not one house
standing. Only the Great Synagogue remained untouched- a witness to
the great destruction." His grief was only allayed by a miraculous
discovery which I won't spoil for you by repeating here.

Schlomo Perlmutter was another returnee. In "Writings on the Wall," he
too found only a small handful of survivors (six) and was
grief-stricken by the devastation: "There was no trace left of the
beautiful station. Kovel was a mountain of ruins... There were abandoned
houses, burned bricks, broken pieces of furniture. The grass growing
on the side of the road dimmed its color." Like Moshe Goodman, he was
awed by what he found in the abandoned Great Synagogue. "Hundreds and
thousands of writings were etched on its white walls. Scores of Hebrew
and foreign letters were drawn on them. Letters written in pencil,
ordinary and unsharpened, in colored pencils, with pen and ink and
some even scratched with finger nails" -- all "blood cries for help in
their sentence to death" >from the Jews held captive there before being
killed.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2331379526884189

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Thank You - Translation Assistance for Viewmate #73750 #general

Joyce Eastman
 

I want to thank every who assisted me in translating the old German script
document concerning the death of Jakob Michael HONIG. Our HONIG-WILDER
family can now add another sibling of my paternal grandfather to our family
tree. Jakob Michael HONIG was previously unknown to any members of our
family and is quite a find! I also must personally thank Renee Steinig who
assisted me in finding this document on Ancestry.com. Without her diligence
I never would have been able to find this information. In the process of
researching my WANK and KATZ families >from Brooklyn, NY, and the information
I received >from researchers on these digests, it eventually led to the
discovery of two sisters of my grandfather as well.

The JewishGen digests as well as Viewmate are an invaluable tool, and I am
thankful for all the wonderful people who read these digests on a daily
basis. They have provided so much information in response to my requests
over the years, and I am eternally grateful for all the help. I am an
annual donor to JewishGen and support them in the great work that they do to
assist all of us in our family research.

Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA

Researching: WILDER/HONIG/HELFER/ZINKOWER: Brody, Poland/Ukraine and
Vienna, Austria; RUFEISEN: Biala/Sucha/Zywiec/Szare, Poland, Israel, Germany
and Brazil; SCHEIER/ROBINSOHN: Biala/Sucha, Poland and Stanislawow,
Poland/Ukraine (Ivano-Frankvisk); FRANKL/FODOR/PORGES/GROSSMANN/KOHN/WEISZ:
Vaj Ujhely, Hungary/Trencin, Slovakia; KATZ/WANK: Brooklyn, NY/Brody, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thank You - Translation Assistance for Viewmate #73750 #general

Joyce Eastman
 

I want to thank every who assisted me in translating the old German script
document concerning the death of Jakob Michael HONIG. Our HONIG-WILDER
family can now add another sibling of my paternal grandfather to our family
tree. Jakob Michael HONIG was previously unknown to any members of our
family and is quite a find! I also must personally thank Renee Steinig who
assisted me in finding this document on Ancestry.com. Without her diligence
I never would have been able to find this information. In the process of
researching my WANK and KATZ families >from Brooklyn, NY, and the information
I received >from researchers on these digests, it eventually led to the
discovery of two sisters of my grandfather as well.

The JewishGen digests as well as Viewmate are an invaluable tool, and I am
thankful for all the wonderful people who read these digests on a daily
basis. They have provided so much information in response to my requests
over the years, and I am eternally grateful for all the help. I am an
annual donor to JewishGen and support them in the great work that they do to
assist all of us in our family research.

Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA

Researching: WILDER/HONIG/HELFER/ZINKOWER: Brody, Poland/Ukraine and
Vienna, Austria; RUFEISEN: Biala/Sucha/Zywiec/Szare, Poland, Israel, Germany
and Brazil; SCHEIER/ROBINSOHN: Biala/Sucha, Poland and Stanislawow,
Poland/Ukraine (Ivano-Frankvisk); FRANKL/FODOR/PORGES/GROSSMANN/KOHN/WEISZ:
Vaj Ujhely, Hungary/Trencin, Slovakia; KATZ/WANK: Brooklyn, NY/Brody, Poland


New York State Legislature passes bill allowing all adult adoptees (or their descendants, if the adoptee is deceased) to get their original birth certificates #general

Asparagirl
 

Are you a New York adoptee? Or the descendent of one? Or are you
someone who helps either of these groups with their family trees,
either as a hobbyist or as a professional genealogist? If so, there
was big news today!

Today the New York State Legislature passed the Weprin/Montgomery
bill, A5494 / S3419, allowing all New York adoptees who are over the
age of eighteen, or their descendants if the adoptee is deceased, to
request a copy of their original, unaltered, and unredacted birth
certificate. These records will become available by request starting
in January 2020. New York is the tenth state to vote to allow this
kind of full access.

This bill has been years in the making. It passed the State Senate by
a vote of 56-6, then after languishing in the Codes Committee for
weeks, it today passed the Assembly by a vote of 126-2, just before
the legislature is set to adjourn for the session. Governor Cuomo has
said that he will sign the bill.

This means that hundreds of thousands of original birth records, from
the Orphan Train days to the Baby Scoop Era and beyond, will
potentially become available to adoptees and researchers.

For more information on the bill, and for eventual instructions on how
to get your request sent in for your records or for your ancestors'
records, keep your eyes on the website for the New York Adoptee Rights
Coalition (NYARC):

http://nyadopteerights.org

For other states' rules about records access, which are often more
draconian, check out "The United States of OBC" (Original Birth
Certificate), put together by the Adoptee Rights Law blog, which
breaks down all the laws and requirements, state by state:

https://adopteerightslaw.com/united-states-obc/

Reclaim The Records is proud to be a Strategic Partner of the New York
Adoptee Rights Coalition (NYARC), a group of organizations
representing diverse interests including adoptees, foster parents, and
attorneys -- and genealogists! -- all teaming up to help get this bill
passed. Members of NYARC have been on the scene in Albany for months
lobbying to make this happen, and were even livestreaming the Assembly
debate >from up in the gallery today -- although the cellphone video
was shaking a bit because they were crying.

Today is a very happy day for us all. :-)

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Founder and President, Reclaim The Records
https://www.reclaimtherecords.org/
Mill Valley, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New York State Legislature passes bill allowing all adult adoptees (or their descendants, if the adoptee is deceased) to get their original birth certificates #general

Asparagirl
 

Are you a New York adoptee? Or the descendent of one? Or are you
someone who helps either of these groups with their family trees,
either as a hobbyist or as a professional genealogist? If so, there
was big news today!

Today the New York State Legislature passed the Weprin/Montgomery
bill, A5494 / S3419, allowing all New York adoptees who are over the
age of eighteen, or their descendants if the adoptee is deceased, to
request a copy of their original, unaltered, and unredacted birth
certificate. These records will become available by request starting
in January 2020. New York is the tenth state to vote to allow this
kind of full access.

This bill has been years in the making. It passed the State Senate by
a vote of 56-6, then after languishing in the Codes Committee for
weeks, it today passed the Assembly by a vote of 126-2, just before
the legislature is set to adjourn for the session. Governor Cuomo has
said that he will sign the bill.

This means that hundreds of thousands of original birth records, from
the Orphan Train days to the Baby Scoop Era and beyond, will
potentially become available to adoptees and researchers.

For more information on the bill, and for eventual instructions on how
to get your request sent in for your records or for your ancestors'
records, keep your eyes on the website for the New York Adoptee Rights
Coalition (NYARC):

http://nyadopteerights.org

For other states' rules about records access, which are often more
draconian, check out "The United States of OBC" (Original Birth
Certificate), put together by the Adoptee Rights Law blog, which
breaks down all the laws and requirements, state by state:

https://adopteerightslaw.com/united-states-obc/

Reclaim The Records is proud to be a Strategic Partner of the New York
Adoptee Rights Coalition (NYARC), a group of organizations
representing diverse interests including adoptees, foster parents, and
attorneys -- and genealogists! -- all teaming up to help get this bill
passed. Members of NYARC have been on the scene in Albany for months
lobbying to make this happen, and were even livestreaming the Assembly
debate >from up in the gallery today -- although the cellphone video
was shaking a bit because they were crying.

Today is a very happy day for us all. :-)

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Founder and President, Reclaim The Records
https://www.reclaimtherecords.org/
Mill Valley, California


JewishGen Staffing Update - New Senior Level Position #galicia

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

I'm pleased to announce another staffing shift as we continue to
develop JewishGen's internal structure to make the best use of our
resources.

As of last week, Warren Blatt has assumed the new position of Senior
Genealogist for JewishGen.

In this newly created senior level position, Warren will ensure that the
JewishGen website remains reflective of genealogical standards and
that the archival transcriptions are as accurate as possible. He will
accomplish this by providing strategic direction and support to the
Senior Research Team, while also serving as the primary liaison with
technical staff for database projects.

As Senior Genealogist, Warren will also play a larger role in representing
JewishGen at various speaking engagements, and responding to media
requests for comments on Jewish genealogical issues.

Warren's technical background and genealogical expertise make him
particularly suited for this position. A software engineer before joining
the JewishGen staff in 2003, he has worked in various roles, most
recently in the position of Managing Director. Previously, as
JewishGen's Editor-in-Chief, he authored the JewishGen FAQ
("Frequently Asked Questions About Jewish Genealogy"), and dozens
of JewishGen InfoFiles. He is the author of Resources for Jewish
Genealogy in the Boston Area (Boston: JGSGB, 1996), and co-author of
Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy (Avotaynu, 1999), and other works.

Widely recognized for his contributions to Jewish genealogy, in 2004
he was awarded the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (IAJGS) Lifetime Achievement Award in Jerusalem.

Please join me in congratulating Warren on his new position.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen Staffing Update - New Senior Level Position #galicia

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

I'm pleased to announce another staffing shift as we continue to
develop JewishGen's internal structure to make the best use of our
resources.

As of last week, Warren Blatt has assumed the new position of Senior
Genealogist for JewishGen.

In this newly created senior level position, Warren will ensure that the
JewishGen website remains reflective of genealogical standards and
that the archival transcriptions are as accurate as possible. He will
accomplish this by providing strategic direction and support to the
Senior Research Team, while also serving as the primary liaison with
technical staff for database projects.

As Senior Genealogist, Warren will also play a larger role in representing
JewishGen at various speaking engagements, and responding to media
requests for comments on Jewish genealogical issues.

Warren's technical background and genealogical expertise make him
particularly suited for this position. A software engineer before joining
the JewishGen staff in 2003, he has worked in various roles, most
recently in the position of Managing Director. Previously, as
JewishGen's Editor-in-Chief, he authored the JewishGen FAQ
("Frequently Asked Questions About Jewish Genealogy"), and dozens
of JewishGen InfoFiles. He is the author of Resources for Jewish
Genealogy in the Boston Area (Boston: JGSGB, 1996), and co-author of
Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy (Avotaynu, 1999), and other works.

Widely recognized for his contributions to Jewish genealogy, in 2004
he was awarded the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (IAJGS) Lifetime Achievement Award in Jerusalem.

Please join me in congratulating Warren on his new position.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 8 Recap #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

Today, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows spent their third and
final day cleaning up the Krzepice, Poland Jewish Cemetery. They again
arrived early at the cemetery, where they were joined by a group of
special needs adults who came to assist in the clean-up process.

The day began with an emotional and impassioned speech >from Steven
D. Reece about the importance of our work. During the day, as the final
trees were chopped, and various branches and weeds were carried
away, JewishGen Fellows also spent time scraping moss and dirt off of
tombstones, in an effort to read their transcriptions. While this could
take time (some stones could take approximately an hour to clean), the
JewishGen Fellows reported that it was very rewarding to be able to
read about the people buried in this cemetery, and how if not for
JewishGen.org and The Matzevah Foundation, Inc., then these people
would not have been remembered in this way.

In the early afternoon, the JewishGen Fellows took a short lunch and
then visited the ruins of a local synagogue, which had been destroyed
by fire prior to the Shoah (the town's other Synagogue was destroyed
by the Nazis).

Before leaving, the JewishGen Fellows were given a presentation by
Aleksander Schwarz >from the Rabbinical Commission on Cemeteries in
Poland. He delivered an overview of the Halachik requirements for
preserving and restoring cemeteries. He then led the Fellows on a
walk-through of the cemetery to the sites that were potentially those
of mass graves. Alek explained the process he would undertake to
determine if this was the case, and some of the tools that are
rabbinically approved, and under what circumstances he could use them.

Following a really fun dinner, the JewishGen Fellows and Dan Oren,
Avraham Groll, and Steven D. Reece held a final reflection exercise, and
also discussed potential improvements to future programs.

Tomorrow, the Fellows will be visiting Lodz, where they will have lunch
with Maria Synger, a Lodz Jewish community educator. >from there they
will travel to Warsaw's airport for flights home.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and live
videos, please go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 8 Recap #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

Today, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows spent their third and
final day cleaning up the Krzepice, Poland Jewish Cemetery. They again
arrived early at the cemetery, where they were joined by a group of
special needs adults who came to assist in the clean-up process.

The day began with an emotional and impassioned speech >from Steven
D. Reece about the importance of our work. During the day, as the final
trees were chopped, and various branches and weeds were carried
away, JewishGen Fellows also spent time scraping moss and dirt off of
tombstones, in an effort to read their transcriptions. While this could
take time (some stones could take approximately an hour to clean), the
JewishGen Fellows reported that it was very rewarding to be able to
read about the people buried in this cemetery, and how if not for
JewishGen.org and The Matzevah Foundation, Inc., then these people
would not have been remembered in this way.

In the early afternoon, the JewishGen Fellows took a short lunch and
then visited the ruins of a local synagogue, which had been destroyed
by fire prior to the Shoah (the town's other Synagogue was destroyed
by the Nazis).

Before leaving, the JewishGen Fellows were given a presentation by
Aleksander Schwarz >from the Rabbinical Commission on Cemeteries in
Poland. He delivered an overview of the Halachik requirements for
preserving and restoring cemeteries. He then led the Fellows on a
walk-through of the cemetery to the sites that were potentially those
of mass graves. Alek explained the process he would undertake to
determine if this was the case, and some of the tools that are
rabbinically approved, and under what circumstances he could use them.

Following a really fun dinner, the JewishGen Fellows and Dan Oren,
Avraham Groll, and Steven D. Reece held a final reflection exercise, and
also discussed potential improvements to future programs.

Tomorrow, the Fellows will be visiting Lodz, where they will have lunch
with Maria Synger, a Lodz Jewish community educator. >from there they
will travel to Warsaw's airport for flights home.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and live
videos, please go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 8 Recap #poland #lodz

Nancy Siegel
 

Today, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows spent their third and
final day cleaning up the Krzepice, Poland Jewish Cemetery. They again
arrived early at the cemetery, where they were joined by a group of
special needs adults who came to assist in the clean-up process.

The day began with an emotional and impassioned speech >from Steven D.
Reece about the importance of our work. During the day, as the final
trees were chopped, and various branches and weeds were carried away,
JewishGen Fellows also spent time scraping moss and dirt off of
tombstones, in an effort to read their transcriptions. While this
could take time (some stones could take approximately an hour to
clean), the JewishGen Fellows reported that it was very rewarding to
be able to read about the people buried in this cemetery, and how if
not for JewishGen.org and The Matzevah Foundation, Inc., then these
people would not have been remembered in this way.

In the early afternoon, the JewishGen Fellows took a short lunch and
then visited the ruins of a local synagogue, which had been destroyed
by fire prior to the Shoah (the town's other Synagogue was destroyed
by the Nazis).

Before leaving, the JewishGen Fellows were given a presentation by
Aleksander Schwarz >from the Rabbinical Commission on Cemeteries in
Poland. He delivered an overview of the Halachik requirements for
preserving and restoring cemeteries. He then led the Fellows on a
walk-through of the cemetery to the sites that were potentially those
of mass graves. Alek explained the process he would undertake to
determine if this was the case, and some of the tools that are
rabbinically approved, and under what circumstances he could use them.

Following a really fun dinner, the JewishGen Fellows and Dan Oren,
Avraham Groll, and Steven D. Reece held a final reflection exercise,
and also discussed potential improvements to future programs.

Tomorrow, the Fellows will be visiting Lodz, where they will have
lunch with Maria Synger, a Lodz Jewish community educator. >from there
they will travel to Warsaw's airport for flights home.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and
live videos, please go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 8 Recap #lodz #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

Today, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows spent their third and
final day cleaning up the Krzepice, Poland Jewish Cemetery. They again
arrived early at the cemetery, where they were joined by a group of
special needs adults who came to assist in the clean-up process.

The day began with an emotional and impassioned speech >from Steven D.
Reece about the importance of our work. During the day, as the final
trees were chopped, and various branches and weeds were carried away,
JewishGen Fellows also spent time scraping moss and dirt off of
tombstones, in an effort to read their transcriptions. While this
could take time (some stones could take approximately an hour to
clean), the JewishGen Fellows reported that it was very rewarding to
be able to read about the people buried in this cemetery, and how if
not for JewishGen.org and The Matzevah Foundation, Inc., then these
people would not have been remembered in this way.

In the early afternoon, the JewishGen Fellows took a short lunch and
then visited the ruins of a local synagogue, which had been destroyed
by fire prior to the Shoah (the town's other Synagogue was destroyed
by the Nazis).

Before leaving, the JewishGen Fellows were given a presentation by
Aleksander Schwarz >from the Rabbinical Commission on Cemeteries in
Poland. He delivered an overview of the Halachik requirements for
preserving and restoring cemeteries. He then led the Fellows on a
walk-through of the cemetery to the sites that were potentially those
of mass graves. Alek explained the process he would undertake to
determine if this was the case, and some of the tools that are
rabbinically approved, and under what circumstances he could use them.

Following a really fun dinner, the JewishGen Fellows and Dan Oren,
Avraham Groll, and Steven D. Reece held a final reflection exercise,
and also discussed potential improvements to future programs.

Tomorrow, the Fellows will be visiting Lodz, where they will have
lunch with Maria Synger, a Lodz Jewish community educator. >from there
they will travel to Warsaw's airport for flights home.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and
live videos, please go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


TRANSLATION REQUEST - VIEWMATE #73750 #poland

Joyce Eastman
 

I have recently posted a copy of a death notice dated 1915 for Jakob Michael
HONIG of Kassel, Germany on JewishGen's ViewMate #73750, requesting a full
translation for this document written in old German script.

I believe that Jakob Michael HONIG is the son of Abraham Joseph HONIG and
Scheindel WILDER >from Brody, Poland, that would make him a brother of my
paternal grandfather, Salomon Wolf WILDER and his other siblings.

Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide to completely
transcribe this document.


Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA

RESEARCHING: WILDER/HONIG/HELFER/ZINKOWER: Brody, Poland/Ukraine and
Vienna, Austria; RUFEISEN: Biala/Sucha/Zywiec/Szare, Poland, Israel, Germany
and Brazil; SCHEIER/ROBINSOHN: Biala/Sucha, Poland and Stanislawow,
Poland/Ukraine (Ivano-Frankvisk); FRANKL/FODOR/PORGES/GROSSMANN/KOHN/WEISZ:
Vaj Ujhely, Hungary/Trencin, Slovakia; WANK/KATZ: Brody, Poland/Brooklyn, NY


MODERATOR'S NOTE: The direct link to the image on Viewmate is
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73750


JRI Poland #Poland TRANSLATION REQUEST - VIEWMATE #73750 #poland

Joyce Eastman
 

I have recently posted a copy of a death notice dated 1915 for Jakob Michael
HONIG of Kassel, Germany on JewishGen's ViewMate #73750, requesting a full
translation for this document written in old German script.

I believe that Jakob Michael HONIG is the son of Abraham Joseph HONIG and
Scheindel WILDER >from Brody, Poland, that would make him a brother of my
paternal grandfather, Salomon Wolf WILDER and his other siblings.

Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide to completely
transcribe this document.


Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA

RESEARCHING: WILDER/HONIG/HELFER/ZINKOWER: Brody, Poland/Ukraine and
Vienna, Austria; RUFEISEN: Biala/Sucha/Zywiec/Szare, Poland, Israel, Germany
and Brazil; SCHEIER/ROBINSOHN: Biala/Sucha, Poland and Stanislawow,
Poland/Ukraine (Ivano-Frankvisk); FRANKL/FODOR/PORGES/GROSSMANN/KOHN/WEISZ:
Vaj Ujhely, Hungary/Trencin, Slovakia; WANK/KATZ: Brody, Poland/Brooklyn, NY


MODERATOR'S NOTE: The direct link to the image on Viewmate is
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73750


Re: Luger from Craciunesti #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

And what is also important: town names changed quite often and people used
several versions (and spellings) of the names.

When you search JewishGen database for Katz+Luger, what come up are three
births >from the Tiszakaracsonyfalva (KAracsonfalva) area where the parents
are Luger and Katz (not the ones you mentioned but it is probable they are
related and brothers married sisters as happened in many places).

And you probably saw the indexed marriage record (Subcarpathia Jewish
records) >from 1897 where they married in Taraczkoz, Teresva district. In
that marriage record Benczi Fogel is said to be born in KAracsonyfalu,
living in Huszt, the bride born in Hosszumezo, living in Taraczkoz. The
father of the bride was a schohet.

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
genealogist/historian/private tour guide

Hungarian Roots
web: www.hungarianroots.com
e-mail: info@hungarianroots.com
cell: +36-30-546-6950

-----Original Message-----
From: H-SIG [mailto:h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 5:47 PM
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Luger >from Craciunesti

it isn't easy identifying those place names, even using my "usual sources",
bogardi.com and transindex.

craciunesti has several possibilities, so i'm assuming that it's
tiszakaracsonyfalva in maramaros megye (47°58'n 23°59'e), romania, because
that's the one that the jewishgen gazetteer lists as having a jewish
community. (and which is listed in the database as "karacson" rather than
"karacsony".) and i'm guessing that teresif is the yiddish name for
present-day teresva, ukraine, known as tarackoz when it was in hungary.
it's usually helpful to know the "old" names, in addition to the present-day
place names, because that's what you'll find in old documents and in family
lore.

what were the laws prohibiting jews >from living in hungary at that time?
(presumably around 1895, based on their dates of birth.)

....... tom klein, toronto


jyfogel@gmail.com wrote:

Hi i'm doing research in my gggrandfather/mother Jacob Hers Luger &
Rivka Kacz >from Craciunesti and later moved to Teresif as a shochet.
My ggrandfather Chaim Stark(1870-1944) married their daughter
Dina(1877-1944) and since he was not legally allowed to live in Hungary
he adapted a new identity of Bentzi Fogel born to Moishe Fogel & basi
Kacz also of Craciunesti which I believe was family of his wife. If
anyone has more details I would appreciate it.
Thanks Jacob Fogel, Montreal


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Luger from Craciunesti #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

And what is also important: town names changed quite often and people used
several versions (and spellings) of the names.

When you search JewishGen database for Katz+Luger, what come up are three
births >from the Tiszakaracsonyfalva (KAracsonfalva) area where the parents
are Luger and Katz (not the ones you mentioned but it is probable they are
related and brothers married sisters as happened in many places).

And you probably saw the indexed marriage record (Subcarpathia Jewish
records) >from 1897 where they married in Taraczkoz, Teresva district. In
that marriage record Benczi Fogel is said to be born in KAracsonyfalu,
living in Huszt, the bride born in Hosszumezo, living in Taraczkoz. The
father of the bride was a schohet.

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
genealogist/historian/private tour guide

Hungarian Roots
web: www.hungarianroots.com
e-mail: info@hungarianroots.com
cell: +36-30-546-6950

-----Original Message-----
From: H-SIG [mailto:h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 5:47 PM
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Luger >from Craciunesti

it isn't easy identifying those place names, even using my "usual sources",
bogardi.com and transindex.

craciunesti has several possibilities, so i'm assuming that it's
tiszakaracsonyfalva in maramaros megye (47°58'n 23°59'e), romania, because
that's the one that the jewishgen gazetteer lists as having a jewish
community. (and which is listed in the database as "karacson" rather than
"karacsony".) and i'm guessing that teresif is the yiddish name for
present-day teresva, ukraine, known as tarackoz when it was in hungary.
it's usually helpful to know the "old" names, in addition to the present-day
place names, because that's what you'll find in old documents and in family
lore.

what were the laws prohibiting jews >from living in hungary at that time?
(presumably around 1895, based on their dates of birth.)

....... tom klein, toronto


jyfogel@gmail.com wrote:

Hi i'm doing research in my gggrandfather/mother Jacob Hers Luger &
Rivka Kacz >from Craciunesti and later moved to Teresif as a shochet.
My ggrandfather Chaim Stark(1870-1944) married their daughter
Dina(1877-1944) and since he was not legally allowed to live in Hungary
he adapted a new identity of Bentzi Fogel born to Moishe Fogel & basi
Kacz also of Craciunesti which I believe was family of his wife. If
anyone has more details I would appreciate it.
Thanks Jacob Fogel, Montreal


Re: Looking for probate documentation for a person who died in New York City in 1985 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

To add some more details based on my experiences working with the
probate files.

Yes each borough is somewhat different in the resources and what is
available online and how you go about the research. Probate (if one
exists) in the borough where the person had their legal residence ...
not necessarily where they died. They could have gone to a hospital
and died in Manhattan but lived in the Bronx for example and the
probate if one was done would be in the Bronx. So if you can find it,
it helps to first get the death certificate or at least locate the
person in the death index or find a paid obit >from the newspaper.
Dates help because the indexes are very general and in many cases are
nothing more than a name, a date and the file number. A lot of them
do not have addresses so if you are searching a common name you could
have a real challenge if you do not know a date. It is also important
to understand that not everyone had a probate and even if they had
assets to prompt a filing they might not have had a will. This is
important because the courts keep separate files and indexes for a
probate with a will versus what is called an administration when
there is no will. However, the information is about the same in the
files but you have to know to check both (separate) indexes in some
cases. Ancestry has the early wills for the Bronx (up to the 1920s if
I recall correctly) and Family Search has Manhattan to around the turn
of the century. The Brooklyn files are also on Family Search (the
early ones) and the Brooklyn index is on Family Search for both wills
and administrations in theory to 1972 but I have found some gaps or
missing index cards in their file. Problem also is that Family Search
never made it searchable so you have to browse the index card which
requires some experience working with their files. Family Search also
has images of the Manhattan indexes but again it is not searchable so
you have to browse it. They have been adding to their Queens County
file to bring that index online. Some of the courts will work with you
remotely but sometimes the search fees are pretty high. As Phyllis
pointed out it can be easier to go there in person or hire someone to
go there for you. (I do retrievals for people.) Each court is
different. Brooklyn they are all on site in the basement and most
days they will pull the file while you wait unless they are short
staffed. Manhattan i working to scan files to their computers on site
but the old one are stored off site. You have to place an order to get
the file and they retrieve it in a few weeks. Good news if the file is
small they scan it and email it to you free of charge but if it is a
big file they call you to come back. The Bronx the newer files are
available while the older ones are stored and they only pull >from
storage once a week meaning it requires two trips to the Bronx. Queens
the file are on site either in paper or microfiche depending on the age.
Each court is a little different on it rules about copies. Brooklyn
encourages you to take photos on your phone if you have a smartphone
and Manhattan permits it if you ask. The Bronx generally says no to
pictures on your phone (Queens I do not remember since I have done less
work there). Do not take a camera though as the court houses do not
permit even a pocket camera. I know that sounds odd but that is how it
works ... the smart phone with a camera is not a problem but an
independent camera they will make you check at the door.
The good news is the files can be a treasure of information. You should
find next of kin, possibly just close or sometimes extended family
members, addresses where the person lived, their age, marital status and
some explanation of what they owned and its distribution. It could be
more involved depending on the size and complexity of the estate. There
could be a detailed listing of assets, tax papers, the details on what
they did to locate family members, and more. If the will or estate was
contested there can be hundreds of pages in the process with testimony,
etc. Note, in theory, death certificates are being removed >from the
file if they were there. Manhattan is definitely locking them if they
can the file. However if you are working with a paper file you might
till find the death certificate if it was there and no one stands over
you approving which pages you copy or photograph. The copy machine
generally are 25 cent a page so bring lots of change if you plan to make
copies. I am not going to go into the specific steps because they are
very entailed on Family Search other than to say go to search all files
and then you can limit it to USA, New York, and probate. The
explanation for browsing is cumbersome to put it all in this response.

Also note that while my response is specific to New York City since that
is what the original question was about and Phyllis' response a lot of
what I am saying works every where in the USA. If you are looking for
any USA probate start on FamilySearch and Ancestry and then search the
Internet for the probate court or records for the jurisdiction you need.
The court will have a page and generally explains the steps for
retrieving documents. I have done a lot of remote work all around the
USA. Smaller towns you can call the clerk and they work with you on the
phone sometimes. Sometime they send you what is called a docket which
lists the contents of the file and you pick and chose. Some courts for
example I have done Washington State it is all online and you chose
documents or say whole file and then they send you the price and you
pay online and the documents arrive in the mail in a few days. Most of
the courts you can talk to on the phone and explain you are looking for
details on heirs and family and they will work with you to help chose
the right documents.
Questions feel free to contact me. I have presented on probate at both
the International conference as well as some of the regional societies.
Allan Jordan

-----Original Message-----
From: Phyllis Kramer

The first thing to specify is what borough/county of New York City....
There are some really early indexes and files (pre 1910) on
FamilySearch. But for those residents of Queens and Brooklyn,
Familysearch has the probate indexes through the 1950s; these indexes
have names, addresses, date of death and the probate number and you
can browse the database by surname. Alas there is nothing like that
for New York City/Manhattan; but you can browse FamilySearch's partial
index through the early 1920s.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Looking for probate documentation for a person who died in New York City in 1985 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

To add some more details based on my experiences working with the
probate files.

Yes each borough is somewhat different in the resources and what is
available online and how you go about the research. Probate (if one
exists) in the borough where the person had their legal residence ...
not necessarily where they died. They could have gone to a hospital
and died in Manhattan but lived in the Bronx for example and the
probate if one was done would be in the Bronx. So if you can find it,
it helps to first get the death certificate or at least locate the
person in the death index or find a paid obit >from the newspaper.
Dates help because the indexes are very general and in many cases are
nothing more than a name, a date and the file number. A lot of them
do not have addresses so if you are searching a common name you could
have a real challenge if you do not know a date. It is also important
to understand that not everyone had a probate and even if they had
assets to prompt a filing they might not have had a will. This is
important because the courts keep separate files and indexes for a
probate with a will versus what is called an administration when
there is no will. However, the information is about the same in the
files but you have to know to check both (separate) indexes in some
cases. Ancestry has the early wills for the Bronx (up to the 1920s if
I recall correctly) and Family Search has Manhattan to around the turn
of the century. The Brooklyn files are also on Family Search (the
early ones) and the Brooklyn index is on Family Search for both wills
and administrations in theory to 1972 but I have found some gaps or
missing index cards in their file. Problem also is that Family Search
never made it searchable so you have to browse the index card which
requires some experience working with their files. Family Search also
has images of the Manhattan indexes but again it is not searchable so
you have to browse it. They have been adding to their Queens County
file to bring that index online. Some of the courts will work with you
remotely but sometimes the search fees are pretty high. As Phyllis
pointed out it can be easier to go there in person or hire someone to
go there for you. (I do retrievals for people.) Each court is
different. Brooklyn they are all on site in the basement and most
days they will pull the file while you wait unless they are short
staffed. Manhattan i working to scan files to their computers on site
but the old one are stored off site. You have to place an order to get
the file and they retrieve it in a few weeks. Good news if the file is
small they scan it and email it to you free of charge but if it is a
big file they call you to come back. The Bronx the newer files are
available while the older ones are stored and they only pull >from
storage once a week meaning it requires two trips to the Bronx. Queens
the file are on site either in paper or microfiche depending on the age.
Each court is a little different on it rules about copies. Brooklyn
encourages you to take photos on your phone if you have a smartphone
and Manhattan permits it if you ask. The Bronx generally says no to
pictures on your phone (Queens I do not remember since I have done less
work there). Do not take a camera though as the court houses do not
permit even a pocket camera. I know that sounds odd but that is how it
works ... the smart phone with a camera is not a problem but an
independent camera they will make you check at the door.
The good news is the files can be a treasure of information. You should
find next of kin, possibly just close or sometimes extended family
members, addresses where the person lived, their age, marital status and
some explanation of what they owned and its distribution. It could be
more involved depending on the size and complexity of the estate. There
could be a detailed listing of assets, tax papers, the details on what
they did to locate family members, and more. If the will or estate was
contested there can be hundreds of pages in the process with testimony,
etc. Note, in theory, death certificates are being removed >from the
file if they were there. Manhattan is definitely locking them if they
can the file. However if you are working with a paper file you might
till find the death certificate if it was there and no one stands over
you approving which pages you copy or photograph. The copy machine
generally are 25 cent a page so bring lots of change if you plan to make
copies. I am not going to go into the specific steps because they are
very entailed on Family Search other than to say go to search all files
and then you can limit it to USA, New York, and probate. The
explanation for browsing is cumbersome to put it all in this response.

Also note that while my response is specific to New York City since that
is what the original question was about and Phyllis' response a lot of
what I am saying works every where in the USA. If you are looking for
any USA probate start on FamilySearch and Ancestry and then search the
Internet for the probate court or records for the jurisdiction you need.
The court will have a page and generally explains the steps for
retrieving documents. I have done a lot of remote work all around the
USA. Smaller towns you can call the clerk and they work with you on the
phone sometimes. Sometime they send you what is called a docket which
lists the contents of the file and you pick and chose. Some courts for
example I have done Washington State it is all online and you chose
documents or say whole file and then they send you the price and you
pay online and the documents arrive in the mail in a few days. Most of
the courts you can talk to on the phone and explain you are looking for
details on heirs and family and they will work with you to help chose
the right documents.
Questions feel free to contact me. I have presented on probate at both
the International conference as well as some of the regional societies.
Allan Jordan

-----Original Message-----
From: Phyllis Kramer

The first thing to specify is what borough/county of New York City....
There are some really early indexes and files (pre 1910) on
FamilySearch. But for those residents of Queens and Brooklyn,
Familysearch has the probate indexes through the 1950s; these indexes
have names, addresses, date of death and the probate number and you
can browse the database by surname. Alas there is nothing like that
for New York City/Manhattan; but you can browse FamilySearch's partial
index through the early 1920s.


JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 8 Recap #general

Nancy Siegel
 

Today, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows spent their third and
final day cleaning up the Krzepice, Poland Jewish Cemetery. They again
arrived early at the cemetery, where they were joined by a group of
special needs adults who came to assist in the clean-up process.

The day began with an emotional and impassioned speech >from Steven D.
Reece about the importance of our work. During the day, as the final
trees were chopped, and various branches and weeds were carried away,
JewishGen Fellows also spent time scraping moss and dirt off of
tombstones, in an effort to read their transcriptions. While this
could take time (some stones could take approximately an hour to
clean), the JewishGen Fellows reported that it was very rewarding to
be able to read about the people buried in this cemetery, and how if
not for JewishGen.org and The Matzevah Foundation, Inc., then these
people would not have been remembered in this way.

In the early afternoon, the JewishGen Fellows took a short lunch and
then visited the ruins of a local synagogue, which had been destroyed
by fire prior to the Shoah (the town's other Synagogue was destroyed
by the Nazis).

Before leaving, the JewishGen Fellows were given a presentation by
Aleksander Schwarz >from the Rabbinical Commission on Cemeteries in
Poland. He delivered an overview of the Halachik requirements for
preserving and restoring cemeteries. He then led the Fellows on a
walk-through of the cemetery to the sites that were potentially those
of mass graves. Alek explained the process he would undertake to
determine if this was the case, and some of the tools that are
rabbinically approved, and under what circumstances he could use them.

Following a really fun dinner, the JewishGen Fellows and Dan Oren,
Avraham Groll, and Steven D. Reece held a final reflection exercise,
and also discussed potential improvements to future programs.

Tomorrow, the Fellows will be visiting Lodz, where they will have
lunch with Maria Synger, a Lodz Jewish community educator. >from there
they will travel to Warsaw's airport for flights home.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and
live videos, please go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 8 Recap #general

Nancy Siegel
 

Today, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows spent their third and
final day cleaning up the Krzepice, Poland Jewish Cemetery. They again
arrived early at the cemetery, where they were joined by a group of
special needs adults who came to assist in the clean-up process.

The day began with an emotional and impassioned speech >from Steven D.
Reece about the importance of our work. During the day, as the final
trees were chopped, and various branches and weeds were carried away,
JewishGen Fellows also spent time scraping moss and dirt off of
tombstones, in an effort to read their transcriptions. While this
could take time (some stones could take approximately an hour to
clean), the JewishGen Fellows reported that it was very rewarding to
be able to read about the people buried in this cemetery, and how if
not for JewishGen.org and The Matzevah Foundation, Inc., then these
people would not have been remembered in this way.

In the early afternoon, the JewishGen Fellows took a short lunch and
then visited the ruins of a local synagogue, which had been destroyed
by fire prior to the Shoah (the town's other Synagogue was destroyed
by the Nazis).

Before leaving, the JewishGen Fellows were given a presentation by
Aleksander Schwarz >from the Rabbinical Commission on Cemeteries in
Poland. He delivered an overview of the Halachik requirements for
preserving and restoring cemeteries. He then led the Fellows on a
walk-through of the cemetery to the sites that were potentially those
of mass graves. Alek explained the process he would undertake to
determine if this was the case, and some of the tools that are
rabbinically approved, and under what circumstances he could use them.

Following a really fun dinner, the JewishGen Fellows and Dan Oren,
Avraham Groll, and Steven D. Reece held a final reflection exercise,
and also discussed potential improvements to future programs.

Tomorrow, the Fellows will be visiting Lodz, where they will have
lunch with Maria Synger, a Lodz Jewish community educator. >from there
they will travel to Warsaw's airport for flights home.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and
live videos, please go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org

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