Date   

A GerSIG success story and many thanks! #germany

Lin Herz
 

Dear GerSIG Friends,

This story is a GerSIG success story. In May of 2013 I wrote to GerSIG
asking for help in finding more information about my HERZ, SCHOENWALTER,
and AFFHAUSER families >from Markt Berolzheim. I had written the the
town numerous times and got no response. Little did I dream that I
would get a letter >from a GerSIG member, Beverly Blum, about a month
later, telling me that she also had HERZ family members >from Markt
Berolzheim. Bev thought we must be related but did not know how. She
did not have a family tree.

A few months later Bev visited Orlando and I met her. She asked me to
bring photos of some of the male members of my family on the HERZ side
as she had seen some of my male relatives on my Ancestry.com tree, and
though they resembled hers. We still did not know how we were related. A
few months later someone wrote GerSIG (sorry I was not able to find the
letter in the archives) specifically to contact me, telling me that on
Alemannia Judaica they had seen some documents having to do with HERZ
family >from Markt Berolzheim. I thought I had seen all the documents
having to do with my family on Alemannia Judaica but I looked again.

There was a document I had not seen before, >from Der Israelit newspaper,
written by my great grandmother's brother Lazarus HERZ. It was a
card of thanks specific people and to a Jewish burial society in Berlin
for helping after his brother Emanuel HERZ died in the hospital while
traveling through Berlin. I sent this article and the translation done
for me by GerSIG members to all my HERZ cousins including Bev. She
mailed it to her cousin Herbert HERZ who lived in France. Herbert told
her this Emanuel HERZ was her great grandfather. So Bev and I found out
we are third cousins!

Bev and I stayed in close touch and became close. She introduced me to
several of her HERZ cousins via email, and I introduced her to mine. One
of her cousins, Muriel HERZ SPIERER in Switzerland and I have become
close as well.

Sadly Bev died last week. I'm of course very sad about that, but
so grateful for GerSIG for bring us together.

Sincerely, Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida


German SIG #Germany A GerSIG success story and many thanks! #germany

Lin Herz
 

Dear GerSIG Friends,

This story is a GerSIG success story. In May of 2013 I wrote to GerSIG
asking for help in finding more information about my HERZ, SCHOENWALTER,
and AFFHAUSER families >from Markt Berolzheim. I had written the the
town numerous times and got no response. Little did I dream that I
would get a letter >from a GerSIG member, Beverly Blum, about a month
later, telling me that she also had HERZ family members >from Markt
Berolzheim. Bev thought we must be related but did not know how. She
did not have a family tree.

A few months later Bev visited Orlando and I met her. She asked me to
bring photos of some of the male members of my family on the HERZ side
as she had seen some of my male relatives on my Ancestry.com tree, and
though they resembled hers. We still did not know how we were related. A
few months later someone wrote GerSIG (sorry I was not able to find the
letter in the archives) specifically to contact me, telling me that on
Alemannia Judaica they had seen some documents having to do with HERZ
family >from Markt Berolzheim. I thought I had seen all the documents
having to do with my family on Alemannia Judaica but I looked again.

There was a document I had not seen before, >from Der Israelit newspaper,
written by my great grandmother's brother Lazarus HERZ. It was a
card of thanks specific people and to a Jewish burial society in Berlin
for helping after his brother Emanuel HERZ died in the hospital while
traveling through Berlin. I sent this article and the translation done
for me by GerSIG members to all my HERZ cousins including Bev. She
mailed it to her cousin Herbert HERZ who lived in France. Herbert told
her this Emanuel HERZ was her great grandfather. So Bev and I found out
we are third cousins!

Bev and I stayed in close touch and became close. She introduced me to
several of her HERZ cousins via email, and I introduced her to mine. One
of her cousins, Muriel HERZ SPIERER in Switzerland and I have become
close as well.

Sadly Bev died last week. I'm of course very sad about that, but
so grateful for GerSIG for bring us together.

Sincerely, Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida


Looking For Relatives of K. KLAUSNER in New York #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

We just discovered a scrap address book of my late David APOTHEKER (1908-1995).
He was born in Bardejov,Slovakia to Lazar APOTHEKER and Bina KLAUSNER. Bina
Klausner was born in Bardejov as well.

In the scrap address book which is probably >from the beginning of the 1950s we
saw L. KLAUSNER 5120 Ft. Hamilton Park W(?) N.Y.

KLAUSNER is a big clan and we never heard >from my father in law about any
KLAUSNER relatives in the USA.

Does it ring a bell?

Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking For Relatives of K. KLAUSNER in New York #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

We just discovered a scrap address book of my late David APOTHEKER (1908-1995).
He was born in Bardejov,Slovakia to Lazar APOTHEKER and Bina KLAUSNER. Bina
Klausner was born in Bardejov as well.

In the scrap address book which is probably >from the beginning of the 1950s we
saw L. KLAUSNER 5120 Ft. Hamilton Park W(?) N.Y.

KLAUSNER is a big clan and we never heard >from my father in law about any
KLAUSNER relatives in the USA.

Does it ring a bell?

Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Genealogical Conference #bessarabia

Isabel Seldin <iwseldin@...>
 

I would like to know if you have plans to hold any future conferences in the
New York City area? I would love to attend if you could arrange this, as would
many others. Please consider this request...

Isabel Seldin
Westchester County, New York


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Genealogical Conference #bessarabia

Isabel Seldin <iwseldin@...>
 

I would like to know if you have plans to hold any future conferences in the
New York City area? I would love to attend if you could arrange this, as would
many others. Please consider this request...

Isabel Seldin
Westchester County, New York


Genealogical Conference in Cleveland... in a little more than 2 weeks #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

I am very pleased to see a lot of responses >from people interested in Bessarabia
research coming to the conference.

Use this site for the whole conference program: https://www.iajgs2019.org/
and also lectures provided by Bessarabia SIG members at
https://www.jewishgen.org/bessarabia/PTM_Article.asp?id=205

I am glad that already 8 people requested a personal consultation and I
would be glad to talk with more people if needed. Please email me directly.
I also invite you to our Bessarabia SIG Meeting, and for the Bessarabia SIG
Luncheon with a topic of "Eliyahu Meitus poet of Love, Desperation and
Joy" by Sheli Fain.

All the best.

Shabbat Shalom
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Genealogical Conference in Cleveland... in a little more than 2 weeks #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

I am very pleased to see a lot of responses >from people interested in Bessarabia
research coming to the conference.

Use this site for the whole conference program: https://www.iajgs2019.org/
and also lectures provided by Bessarabia SIG members at
https://www.jewishgen.org/bessarabia/PTM_Article.asp?id=205

I am glad that already 8 people requested a personal consultation and I
would be glad to talk with more people if needed. Please email me directly.
I also invite you to our Bessarabia SIG Meeting, and for the Bessarabia SIG
Luncheon with a topic of "Eliyahu Meitus poet of Love, Desperation and
Joy" by Sheli Fain.

All the best.

Shabbat Shalom
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


1916-1921 Lodz Registration Card Project is now complete. 230,000 entries added to JRI-Poland #general

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear fellow researchers:

More than three years ago we embarked on a project to extract and
create a database of the Jewish entries in the huge collection of Lodz
Registration Cards >from 1916 to 1921.
https://jri-poland.org/psa/lodz-registration-card-scans.htm

Like any large initiative, it was difficult to initially grasp the
depth of this project and the time it might take to complete. But we
soon learned that there are more than 262 thousand cards to be
reviewed and, of course, knew that a large percentage would be for
Jewish families. It was clear that to carry out this project would
require many years of engaging with and retaining volunteers.

We soon were able to assemble what turned out to be a dedicated team
of our fellow genealogists who took this project to heart. They
realized that the information in these cards would open vital research
opportunities with the potential for dramatic breakthroughs.

Our volunteers reviewed each card to identify the Jewish families and
then extract the key genealogical information - surnames, given names,
parentsâ?? names, towns of birth, birth date, occupation, marital
status, date of arrival in Lodz, and in some cases, dates of death.

While we had a core group who drove the project forward, along the way
we were joined by dozens of other volunteers doing their share. It
was truly an international group representing the U.S. Israel, Canada,
Spain, France, Belgium, Russia and Argentina. We also had a
Kenya-based company, Digital Divide, volunteer the time of one of
their expert employees.

Some volunteers were with us >from beginning to end, others offered
their help in between business hours, care giving or simply involved
in their families' day-to-day lives. Each day I could visualize their
activity on this project, the hours at their computers, diligently
reading through and documenting the names of our Jewish brethren.
Their devotion was a heartwarming example of the power of a united
force carrying out a unique mission. In this case ensuring that all
Jewish names in this collection became new stars in the heavens, their
memory forever ingrained on the web for future generations of their
families to find and treasure.

In fact, I have heard >from countless researchers who have found family
members, often learning about cousins and even entire branches they
never knew existed.

I would also like to extend a special and heartfelt thanks to
JRI-Poland super volunteer Howard Fink who has played such a vital
role in processing the data and preparing it to be uploaded to the
JRI-Poland database.

The Lodz Registration Card Project is now complete and the data is
online. Along the way, we reviewed 262,000 cards and identified more
than 230,000 Jewish individuals. They are now forever part of the
database of Jewish Records of Poland, available for all to find.

As the leader of the Lodz Registration Card 1916-1921 Extraction
Project, I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to bring this
mission to fruition and once again express my heartfelt thanks to the
volunteers who made this long journey a success. Yasher Koach to each
and every one of the volunteers.

Shabbat Shalom,
Margalit Ashira Ir
Lodz Registration Card Project Leader
JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1916-1921 Lodz Registration Card Project is now complete. 230,000 entries added to JRI-Poland #general

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear fellow researchers:

More than three years ago we embarked on a project to extract and
create a database of the Jewish entries in the huge collection of Lodz
Registration Cards >from 1916 to 1921.
https://jri-poland.org/psa/lodz-registration-card-scans.htm

Like any large initiative, it was difficult to initially grasp the
depth of this project and the time it might take to complete. But we
soon learned that there are more than 262 thousand cards to be
reviewed and, of course, knew that a large percentage would be for
Jewish families. It was clear that to carry out this project would
require many years of engaging with and retaining volunteers.

We soon were able to assemble what turned out to be a dedicated team
of our fellow genealogists who took this project to heart. They
realized that the information in these cards would open vital research
opportunities with the potential for dramatic breakthroughs.

Our volunteers reviewed each card to identify the Jewish families and
then extract the key genealogical information - surnames, given names,
parentsâ?? names, towns of birth, birth date, occupation, marital
status, date of arrival in Lodz, and in some cases, dates of death.

While we had a core group who drove the project forward, along the way
we were joined by dozens of other volunteers doing their share. It
was truly an international group representing the U.S. Israel, Canada,
Spain, France, Belgium, Russia and Argentina. We also had a
Kenya-based company, Digital Divide, volunteer the time of one of
their expert employees.

Some volunteers were with us >from beginning to end, others offered
their help in between business hours, care giving or simply involved
in their families' day-to-day lives. Each day I could visualize their
activity on this project, the hours at their computers, diligently
reading through and documenting the names of our Jewish brethren.
Their devotion was a heartwarming example of the power of a united
force carrying out a unique mission. In this case ensuring that all
Jewish names in this collection became new stars in the heavens, their
memory forever ingrained on the web for future generations of their
families to find and treasure.

In fact, I have heard >from countless researchers who have found family
members, often learning about cousins and even entire branches they
never knew existed.

I would also like to extend a special and heartfelt thanks to
JRI-Poland super volunteer Howard Fink who has played such a vital
role in processing the data and preparing it to be uploaded to the
JRI-Poland database.

The Lodz Registration Card Project is now complete and the data is
online. Along the way, we reviewed 262,000 cards and identified more
than 230,000 Jewish individuals. They are now forever part of the
database of Jewish Records of Poland, available for all to find.

As the leader of the Lodz Registration Card 1916-1921 Extraction
Project, I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to bring this
mission to fruition and once again express my heartfelt thanks to the
volunteers who made this long journey a success. Yasher Koach to each
and every one of the volunteers.

Shabbat Shalom,
Margalit Ashira Ir
Lodz Registration Card Project Leader
JRI-Poland


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake
 

Jews both prospered and suffered grievously during their long history
in Lithuania. "My Shtetele Shkud" (Skuodas) tells of both. The chapter
is >from a book titled "Lita," a history of the 700 years life of
Lithuanian Jewry. (Lita refers in Yiddish to the area where Lithuanian
Jews lived). The Jewish Lithuanian population before World War II
numbered around 160,000, a number that swelled to more than 200,000 as
Jews fled Poland believing they would be safer there during its
short-lived occupation by the Red Army. Under the Nazi occupation in
1941, 180,000 had perished in pogroms and organized mass killings.

"The laughter of Jewish children will never again echo in the
marketplace," writes the author, Leon Bernstein. That laughter, he
says, "the laughter of Lithuanian peasants must not disturb the rest
of our murdered generation; young Lithuanians in their Sunday
drunkenness must not compete with one another: I murdered three, and
I, five..." He recalls times when Shkud was "a happy, lively shtetl,"
such as in the 1920s when industrialization made the town a prosperous
place, though it came at the cost of some traditional occupations.

"Only the heirs of its memory remain, a handful of Jews in America, in
Israel, in South Africa."

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2371909322831209?__tn__=K-R

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake
 

Jews both prospered and suffered grievously during their long history
in Lithuania. "My Shtetele Shkud" (Skuodas) tells of both. The chapter
is >from a book titled "Lita," a history of the 700 years life of
Lithuanian Jewry. (Lita refers in Yiddish to the area where Lithuanian
Jews lived). The Jewish Lithuanian population before World War II
numbered around 160,000, a number that swelled to more than 200,000 as
Jews fled Poland believing they would be safer there during its
short-lived occupation by the Red Army. Under the Nazi occupation in
1941, 180,000 had perished in pogroms and organized mass killings.

"The laughter of Jewish children will never again echo in the
marketplace," writes the author, Leon Bernstein. That laughter, he
says, "the laughter of Lithuanian peasants must not disturb the rest
of our murdered generation; young Lithuanians in their Sunday
drunkenness must not compete with one another: I murdered three, and
I, five..." He recalls times when Shkud was "a happy, lively shtetl,"
such as in the 1920s when industrialization made the town a prosperous
place, though it came at the cost of some traditional occupations.

"Only the heirs of its memory remain, a handful of Jews in America, in
Israel, in South Africa."

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2371909322831209?__tn__=K-R

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Did immigrants travel with pets? #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

This is a first for me. I'm helping a friend compile a report on her family
history and in it she says that one branch of her family emigrated >from
Hamburg in 1908 to Argentina with the "family dog". They didn't travel first
class and the dog was, many years later buried in Argentina where the family
lived.

I've never heard or read of immigrants traveling with pets. Has anyone else
read or heard of stories like this? I have searched online but not seen
anything conclusive either way.

Best

Jeremy

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-Edgware, Middlesex, England
now Sacramento, California, USA

Searching for:
FRANKEL/FRENKEL/: Gombin, Poland; London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland; London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania; London, England; NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland; London, England
PINKUS, Poland; London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland; London, England; NY, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Did immigrants travel with pets? #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,

This is a first for me. I'm helping a friend compile a report on her family
history and in it she says that one branch of her family emigrated >from
Hamburg in 1908 to Argentina with the "family dog". They didn't travel first
class and the dog was, many years later buried in Argentina where the family
lived.

I've never heard or read of immigrants traveling with pets. Has anyone else
read or heard of stories like this? I have searched online but not seen
anything conclusive either way.

Best

Jeremy

Jeremy G Frankel
ex-Edgware, Middlesex, England
now Sacramento, California, USA

Searching for:
FRANKEL/FRENKEL/: Gombin, Poland; London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland; London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania; London, England; NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland; London, England
PINKUS, Poland; London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland; London, England; NY, USA


Re: Finding a grave in Romania #romania

K Charles Real Estate <charles@...>
 

Greetings,can you please suggest how I can trace the grave of my late
father Shmuel SHMATNIK. All I know he died in Romania around 1956.

Best Regards,
Charles German
Charles@kcharlesrealestate.com.au


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Finding a grave in Romania #romania

K Charles Real Estate <charles@...>
 

Greetings,can you please suggest how I can trace the grave of my late
father Shmuel SHMATNIK. All I know he died in Romania around 1956.

Best Regards,
Charles German
Charles@kcharlesrealestate.com.au


1916-1921 Lodz Registration Card Extraction Project is now complete. 230,000 entries added to JRI-Poland #poland

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear fellow researchers:

More than three years ago we embarked on a project to extract and
create a database of the Jewish entries in the huge collection of Lodz
Registration Cards >from 1916 to 1921.
https://jri-poland.org/psa/lodz-registration-card-scans.htm

Like any large initiative, it was difficult to initially grasp the
depth of this project and the time it might take to complete. But we
soon learned that there are more than 262 thousand cards to be
reviewed and, of course, knew that a large percentage would be for
Jewish families. It was clear that to carry out this project would
require many years of engaging with and retaining volunteers.

We soon were able to assemble what turned out to be a dedicated team
of our fellow genealogists who took this project to heart. They
realized that the information in these cards would open vital research
opportunities with the potential for dramatic breakthroughs.

Our volunteers reviewed each card to identify the Jewish families and
then extract the key genealogical information - surnames, given names,
parents=E2=80=99 names, towns of birth, birth date, occupation, marital
status, date of arrival in Lodz, and in some cases, dates of death.

While we had a core group who drove the project forward, along the way
we were joined by dozens of other volunteers doing their share. It
was truly an international group representing the U.S. Israel, Canada,
Spain, France, Belgium, Russia and Argentina. We also had a
Kenya-based company, Digital Divide, volunteer the time of one of
their expert employees.

Some volunteers were with us >from beginning to end, others offered
their help in between business hours, care giving or simply involved
in their families=E2=80=99 day-to-day lives. Each day I could visualize th=
eir
activity on this project, the hours at their computers, diligently
reading through and documenting the names of our Jewish brethren.
Their devotion was a heartwarming example of the power of a united
force carrying out a unique mission. In this case ensuring that all
Jewish names in this collection became new stars in the heavens, their
memory forever ingrained on the web for future generations of their
families to find and treasure.

In fact, I have heard >from countless researchers who have found family
members, often learning about cousins and even entire branches they
never knew existed.

I would also like to extend a special and heartfelt thanks to
JRI-Poland super volunteer Howard Fink who has played such a vital
role in processing the data and preparing it to be uploaded to the
JRI-Poland database.

The Lodz Registration Card Project is now complete and the data is
online. Along the way, we reviewed 262,000 cards and identified more
than 230,000 Jewish individuals. They are now forever part of the
database of Jewish Records of Poland, available for all to find.

As the leader of the Lodz Registration Card 1916-1921 Extraction
Project, I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to bring this
mission to fruition and once again express my heartfelt thanks to the
volunteers who made this long journey a success. Yasher Koach to each
and every one of the volunteers.

Shabbat Shalom
Margalit Ashira Ir
Lodz Registration Card Project Leader
JRI-POLAND


JRI Poland #Poland 1916-1921 Lodz Registration Card Extraction Project is now complete. 230,000 entries added to JRI-Poland #poland

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear fellow researchers:

More than three years ago we embarked on a project to extract and
create a database of the Jewish entries in the huge collection of Lodz
Registration Cards >from 1916 to 1921.
https://jri-poland.org/psa/lodz-registration-card-scans.htm

Like any large initiative, it was difficult to initially grasp the
depth of this project and the time it might take to complete. But we
soon learned that there are more than 262 thousand cards to be
reviewed and, of course, knew that a large percentage would be for
Jewish families. It was clear that to carry out this project would
require many years of engaging with and retaining volunteers.

We soon were able to assemble what turned out to be a dedicated team
of our fellow genealogists who took this project to heart. They
realized that the information in these cards would open vital research
opportunities with the potential for dramatic breakthroughs.

Our volunteers reviewed each card to identify the Jewish families and
then extract the key genealogical information - surnames, given names,
parents=E2=80=99 names, towns of birth, birth date, occupation, marital
status, date of arrival in Lodz, and in some cases, dates of death.

While we had a core group who drove the project forward, along the way
we were joined by dozens of other volunteers doing their share. It
was truly an international group representing the U.S. Israel, Canada,
Spain, France, Belgium, Russia and Argentina. We also had a
Kenya-based company, Digital Divide, volunteer the time of one of
their expert employees.

Some volunteers were with us >from beginning to end, others offered
their help in between business hours, care giving or simply involved
in their families=E2=80=99 day-to-day lives. Each day I could visualize th=
eir
activity on this project, the hours at their computers, diligently
reading through and documenting the names of our Jewish brethren.
Their devotion was a heartwarming example of the power of a united
force carrying out a unique mission. In this case ensuring that all
Jewish names in this collection became new stars in the heavens, their
memory forever ingrained on the web for future generations of their
families to find and treasure.

In fact, I have heard >from countless researchers who have found family
members, often learning about cousins and even entire branches they
never knew existed.

I would also like to extend a special and heartfelt thanks to
JRI-Poland super volunteer Howard Fink who has played such a vital
role in processing the data and preparing it to be uploaded to the
JRI-Poland database.

The Lodz Registration Card Project is now complete and the data is
online. Along the way, we reviewed 262,000 cards and identified more
than 230,000 Jewish individuals. They are now forever part of the
database of Jewish Records of Poland, available for all to find.

As the leader of the Lodz Registration Card 1916-1921 Extraction
Project, I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to bring this
mission to fruition and once again express my heartfelt thanks to the
volunteers who made this long journey a success. Yasher Koach to each
and every one of the volunteers.

Shabbat Shalom
Margalit Ashira Ir
Lodz Registration Card Project Leader
JRI-POLAND


Searching for Manchester relatives (1895-1912) #unitedkingdom

Brad Mirkin
 

Hello, I am searching for information on my family in Manchester
(including Cheetham and Prestwich) in the 1895-1912 time frame. The
family name was Krainsky (also written as Krainskiy, Kriensky,
Karyinsky, Grayinski, Crainsky). They came to Manchester >from Hamburg
sometime between 1895 and 1900, having originated in Zolotonosha,
Ukraine (a small city and uzeyd in the Poltava gubernia, 85 miles SE
of Kiev and 15 miles N of Cherkasy). Family members were cabinet
makers and possibly cobblers.

The parents were Joseph/Perssie and Hanna (Lisinsky/Leschinsky). Their
children included Moshe/Morris (born circa 1881), Mary/Munna (born
circa 1884), Israel/Irving (born March 8, 1885), Barnet (born circa
1891) and Jennie (born circa 1892).

Israel/Irving worked in the textile business in Manchester and went to
Paris circa 1910 to work in fabrics, possibly as a representative of a
Manchester company. Mary married Solomon ("Sam") Spector of Odessa in
Manchester in 1904 and Jennie married Hyman Prikupetz at the Austrian
Synagogue in Cheetham in 1909. Morris went to Liverpool and ultimately
to the US in 1912. Barnet went to Liverpool, then Glasgow, then the US
in 1923.

I didn't find any of these relatives in the 1901 census (I found
Morris and Barnet in LIverpool in the 1911 census and Jennie and Mary
had emigrated to the US by that time.) or city or telephone
directories.

Ideas welcome. Thanks everyone,

Brad Mirkin


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Searching for Manchester relatives (1895-1912) #unitedkingdom

Brad Mirkin
 

Hello, I am searching for information on my family in Manchester
(including Cheetham and Prestwich) in the 1895-1912 time frame. The
family name was Krainsky (also written as Krainskiy, Kriensky,
Karyinsky, Grayinski, Crainsky). They came to Manchester >from Hamburg
sometime between 1895 and 1900, having originated in Zolotonosha,
Ukraine (a small city and uzeyd in the Poltava gubernia, 85 miles SE
of Kiev and 15 miles N of Cherkasy). Family members were cabinet
makers and possibly cobblers.

The parents were Joseph/Perssie and Hanna (Lisinsky/Leschinsky). Their
children included Moshe/Morris (born circa 1881), Mary/Munna (born
circa 1884), Israel/Irving (born March 8, 1885), Barnet (born circa
1891) and Jennie (born circa 1892).

Israel/Irving worked in the textile business in Manchester and went to
Paris circa 1910 to work in fabrics, possibly as a representative of a
Manchester company. Mary married Solomon ("Sam") Spector of Odessa in
Manchester in 1904 and Jennie married Hyman Prikupetz at the Austrian
Synagogue in Cheetham in 1909. Morris went to Liverpool and ultimately
to the US in 1912. Barnet went to Liverpool, then Glasgow, then the US
in 1923.

I didn't find any of these relatives in the 1901 census (I found
Morris and Barnet in LIverpool in the 1911 census and Jennie and Mary
had emigrated to the US by that time.) or city or telephone
directories.

Ideas welcome. Thanks everyone,

Brad Mirkin

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