Date   

Re: The Lumber Business #belarus

Paula Eisenstein Baker <eisenbak@...>
 

David and all,

For a brief description of the work itself, I suggest looking at Chaim
Weizmann's autobiography, _Trial and Error_, pp. 7-9 (and there is probably more
information later in the volume -- I happened to xerox those pages for another
reason). *How* our fathers got into this line of work, I don't know; I'd be
interested in hearing reminiscences or learning of other sources.

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX

David Goldman wrote:

I was wondering what folks may have to say about the Jewish profession in
the lumber business.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: The Lumber Business #belarus

Paula Eisenstein Baker <eisenbak@...>
 

David and all,

For a brief description of the work itself, I suggest looking at Chaim
Weizmann's autobiography, _Trial and Error_, pp. 7-9 (and there is probably more
information later in the volume -- I happened to xerox those pages for another
reason). *How* our fathers got into this line of work, I don't know; I'd be
interested in hearing reminiscences or learning of other sources.

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX

David Goldman wrote:

I was wondering what folks may have to say about the Jewish profession in
the lumber business.


Re: The Lumber Business #belarus

Glen Strauss <gstrauss@...>
 

David -

I know that my great-gradfather came >from Drogichin and worked in the
lumber business. What I have been told is that in his case what that meant
was that he transported lumber by boat down the river and sold lumber along
with other goods.

Don't know if that is of any help to you or not, but thought I'd try.

Glen Strauss
gstrauss@mail.com


David Goldman wrote:

I was wondering what folks may have to say about the Jewish profession in
the lumber business. It seems that a number of my ancestors were in the
"lumber business" in the Belarus/Russia area. What did this entail, and how
did Jews get into this particular field in certain areas? Did they purchase
forests? Or were they contracted with the government, and what kind of
facilities did it entail, chopping down trees or turning them into planks
or what? Apparently the ones who went into this line of work did rather
well by 19th century Jewish shtetl standards.....


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: The Lumber Business #belarus

Glen Strauss <gstrauss@...>
 

David -

I know that my great-gradfather came >from Drogichin and worked in the
lumber business. What I have been told is that in his case what that meant
was that he transported lumber by boat down the river and sold lumber along
with other goods.

Don't know if that is of any help to you or not, but thought I'd try.

Glen Strauss
gstrauss@mail.com


David Goldman wrote:

I was wondering what folks may have to say about the Jewish profession in
the lumber business. It seems that a number of my ancestors were in the
"lumber business" in the Belarus/Russia area. What did this entail, and how
did Jews get into this particular field in certain areas? Did they purchase
forests? Or were they contracted with the government, and what kind of
facilities did it entail, chopping down trees or turning them into planks
or what? Apparently the ones who went into this line of work did rather
well by 19th century Jewish shtetl standards.....


MUTED VOICES #latvia

K.& L. Bertelsen <klb@...>
 

Further the discussions about databases, etc. I recently received >from my
cousin in Hartford, Ct. a copy of a book which I think was remaindered and
she thought it might be of interest to me. I actually haven't had time to
read it but thought it might be of interest. I am sure it is available in
the USA >from libraries.

MUTED VOICES
Jewish Survivors of Latvia Remember
Colleted and Edited by Gertrude Schneider
Philosphical Library Inc. N.Y. Distributed by Alpha Book Distributors
Published in 1987 - ISBN 0-8022-2536-5

Contents :

Preface - Professor Howard L. Adelson, Department of History, Graduate
School and University Centre, City University of New York
Introduction - Gertrude Schnieder
Weapons in the Riga Ghetto - Israel Kaplan
Deportation to the East - Lilly Pancis
Human Guinea Pigs - Semyon Peyros
A Child of the Ghetto - Vera Ruth Mausner
Jan Lipke : An Unusual Man - Davied Silberman
Perfect Aryan - Hessy Levinsons Taft
from Karava to Sweden - Aizik Dimantstein
Music in the Ghetto - Peter Springfield
The Hangman of Camp Salaspils - Gertrude Schneider
The Destruction of a Family - George David Schwab
Survival in a Libau Bunker - Aaron Vesterman
Bloody Sloka - Max Kaufman
Full Circle - Lewis R. Schloss
The Church Across >from Kaiserwald - David Packin
A Sad Time to be Young - Hannelore Temel
So Many Miracles - Sonja Ludsin
Surviving Burggraben - Jack Ratz
Escape and Disguis - Shoshana Kahn
After the Liberation - Sasha Semenoff
Liberation in Buchenwald - Isaac Leo Kram
The Return to Riga - Jules R.Lippert
Bibliography, etc.

There are some photographs, including :

The Libau synagogue, which was destroyed and Skede beach at Libau where
Jews were murdered 1941/2
Partial view of the Synagogue in Riga
Schuler Kreis group of gymnasium students in 1938
Schwab villa - Libau before WWI
Latvian army unit - Libau 1939 or early 1940 including Bernard Boris (Bubi)
Schwab
Group of Buchenwald survivors, the day after liberation, including Isaac
Leo Kram
Janis Lipke and his wife Johanna - who saved several Jewish people
I.D. issued to Rita Hirschhorn after she returned to Vienna
David Packin, Fr. Kasimir Vilnis (who hid David) and Profesor Gertrude
Schneider

Lorraine Bertelsen


Latvia SIG #Latvia MUTED VOICES #latvia

K.& L. Bertelsen <klb@...>
 

Further the discussions about databases, etc. I recently received >from my
cousin in Hartford, Ct. a copy of a book which I think was remaindered and
she thought it might be of interest to me. I actually haven't had time to
read it but thought it might be of interest. I am sure it is available in
the USA >from libraries.

MUTED VOICES
Jewish Survivors of Latvia Remember
Colleted and Edited by Gertrude Schneider
Philosphical Library Inc. N.Y. Distributed by Alpha Book Distributors
Published in 1987 - ISBN 0-8022-2536-5

Contents :

Preface - Professor Howard L. Adelson, Department of History, Graduate
School and University Centre, City University of New York
Introduction - Gertrude Schnieder
Weapons in the Riga Ghetto - Israel Kaplan
Deportation to the East - Lilly Pancis
Human Guinea Pigs - Semyon Peyros
A Child of the Ghetto - Vera Ruth Mausner
Jan Lipke : An Unusual Man - Davied Silberman
Perfect Aryan - Hessy Levinsons Taft
from Karava to Sweden - Aizik Dimantstein
Music in the Ghetto - Peter Springfield
The Hangman of Camp Salaspils - Gertrude Schneider
The Destruction of a Family - George David Schwab
Survival in a Libau Bunker - Aaron Vesterman
Bloody Sloka - Max Kaufman
Full Circle - Lewis R. Schloss
The Church Across >from Kaiserwald - David Packin
A Sad Time to be Young - Hannelore Temel
So Many Miracles - Sonja Ludsin
Surviving Burggraben - Jack Ratz
Escape and Disguis - Shoshana Kahn
After the Liberation - Sasha Semenoff
Liberation in Buchenwald - Isaac Leo Kram
The Return to Riga - Jules R.Lippert
Bibliography, etc.

There are some photographs, including :

The Libau synagogue, which was destroyed and Skede beach at Libau where
Jews were murdered 1941/2
Partial view of the Synagogue in Riga
Schuler Kreis group of gymnasium students in 1938
Schwab villa - Libau before WWI
Latvian army unit - Libau 1939 or early 1940 including Bernard Boris (Bubi)
Schwab
Group of Buchenwald survivors, the day after liberation, including Isaac
Leo Kram
Janis Lipke and his wife Johanna - who saved several Jewish people
I.D. issued to Rita Hirschhorn after she returned to Vienna
David Packin, Fr. Kasimir Vilnis (who hid David) and Profesor Gertrude
Schneider

Lorraine Bertelsen


Re: Gubernias and Uyezds #belarus

Zapote1@...
 

To all who have questions regarding Gubernias, and Uyezds, I found this
article, that helped me a lot in my own research. I hope it can be usefull to
yours !

Bonnie Shapiro
Zapote1@aol.com
Researching:
SHAPIRO >from Ilya, Vilna Gubernia, Belarus
KLINCOVSTEIN, SHATSZKES, CYBULSKI >from Lomza, Poland
ALPEROVICH >from Dolginov, Belarus

PROVINCES AND REGIONS:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Definitions:
- Gubernia = province of the Russian Empire.
There were 60 gubernias in 1914, including 15 in the Pale
of Settlement and 10 in the Kingdom of Poland.
Each gubernia was divided into several uyezds (districts).
- Pale of Settlement (Russian: Cherta osedlosti) =
The 15 gubernias on the western edge of the Russian Empire,
to which Jewish residence was restricted, 1794 to 1917.

Bessarabia -- Region bordered by Black Sea, Dniester, Danube
and Prut rivers. In Ottoman Empire until 1812.
Russian gubernia after 1873, in Pale.
In Russian Empire 1812-1856, 1878-1918;
Part of Romania 1856-1878, 1918-1940;
In USSR (Moldavian SSR) 1940-1991.
Today, mostly in Moldova (northernmost part in Ukraine).
Bohemia (Ger. Bohmen) -- Province of Austrian Empire until WWI.
Province of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992.
Today, in westernmost Czech Republic. Chief city: Prague.
Bukovina -- Region in foothills of eastern Carpathian mountains.
Ruled by Ottoman Turks until 1769, when occupied by
Russia. Taken by Austria in 1775, it formed part of
Galicia until 1849, when it became a separate province of
the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until the end of WWI.
Province of Romania 1917-1944. After WWII, northern
area became part of USSR, southern area in Romania.
Today, northeastern Romania and southwestern Ukraine.
Chief city: Chernivtsi (Ger. Czernowitz, Rom. Cernauti).
Chernigov -- Russian gubernia, 1796-1917, in Pale of Settlement.
Today, northern Ukraine.
Congress Poland = Kingdom of Poland.
Courland (Kurland) -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, outside of
the Pale. In Latvia 1918-1940, in USSR until 1989.
Today, southern Latvia.
Crimea (Krim) -- Peninsula and oblast in southeast Ukraine,
southern part of Taurida gubernia. Capital: Simferopol.
Czechoslovakia -- Nation formed in 1918 >from parts of Austro-
Hungary (Czech-speaking Bohemia and Moravia >from Austria,
and Slovak-speaking northern counties of Hungary).
Split into Slovakia and Czech Republic in 1991.
Dobruja -- Region on the Black Sea south of the Danube.
Today, SE Romania and NE Bulgaria.
Ekaterinoslav -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, eastern Ukraine.
Estland -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, outside of Pale.
In Estonia 1918-1940, in USSR until 1989.
Today, northern Estonia.
Galicia -- Province of Austro-Hungarian Empire 1772 until 1917;
Belonged to Poland between the two world wars (Polish
provinces of Krakow, Lvov, Tarnopol and Stanislawow).
Last three became part of Ukrainian SSR in 1945.
Today, southeastern Poland and western Ukraine.
Grodno -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
In Poland between the two world wars (parts of Polish
provinces of Wilno, Nowogrodek, Polesie and Bialystok).
Eastern 2/3rds became part of Belorussian SSR in 1939,
Bialystok area remained in Poland.
Today, western Belarus, some northeastern Poland.
Kalisz -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, west-central Poland
Kherson -- Russian gubernia, 1803-1917, in Pale.
Today, south-central Ukraine.
Kielce (Keltz) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, south-central Poland.
Kiev -- Russian gubernia, in Pale.
Today, central Ukraine.
Kingdom of Poland (Krolestwa Polska) = Congress Poland =
"Russian Poland" = part of Poland occupied by the
Russian Empire, 1815-1918. The 10 gubernias (1867-1917):
Suwalki, Lomza, Plock, Warszawa, Siedlce, Lublin,
Radom, Kielce, Piotrkow and Kalisz.
Today, all in east-central Poland (except north Suwalki).
Kovno -- Russian gubernia, 1842-1917, in Pale.
Formed >from Vilna gubernia in 1842.
Part of independent Lithuania, 1920-1940.
Belonged to Lithuanian SSR 1944-1991.
Today, northern Lithuania. Chief city: Kaunas.
Livonia (Livland) -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, outside Pale.
Today, northern Latvia, southern Estonia. Capital: Riga.
Lomza -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, northeastern Poland.
Lublin -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, southeastern Poland.
Maramaros -- Province of Austro-Hungarian Empire until 1917.
Today, in northwest Romania, Slovakia, and Ukraine.
Memel -- Northeasternmost area of East Prussia, on Baltic coast,
which became part of Lithuania in 1918.
Minsk -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, in Pale.
Today, south-central Belarus.
Mogilev -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, eastern Belarus.
Moldavia -- Former principality under Turkish domination,
which included Bessarabia and Bukovina.
Moldavia and Wallachia merged to form Romania in 1859.
Republic of USSR 1924-1991.
Today, in northeastern Romania and Moldova.
Chief city: Kishinev (Chisinau).
Moravia (Ger. Mahren) -- Province of Austrian Empire until WWI.
In central Czechoslovakia 1918-1992.
Today, in eastern Czech Republic. Chief city: Brno.
Piotrkow -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, south-central Poland.
Plock (Plotsk) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, north-central Poland.
Podolia (Podolsk) -- Russian gubernia, 1796-1917, in Pale.
Today, southwestern Ukraine. Capital: Kamenetz-Podolsk.
Polesie -- a large region of southern Belarus, including parts
of Minsk, Grodno, Mogilev, Kiev and Volhynia gubernias.
A province of Poland between the wars.
Poltava -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, eastern Ukraine.
Pomerania (Ger. Pommern) -- Province of Prussia since 1815, on
Baltic Sea. Formerly in Germany; since WWII, mostly in
northwest Poland.
Posen (Pol. Poznan) -- Region now in western Poland.
Ruled by Prussia 1793-1807, and 1815 until WWI.
Grand Duchy of Posen (1815-1850), part of Prussia.
Polish province of Poznan after 1919.
Prussia -- Former kingdom (1701-1871), largest state in German
Empire (1871-1918). After WWI, parts of West Prussia
ceded to Poland. After WWII, remainder of West Prussia
to Poland; East Prussia divided: northern half to USSR
(Kalinigrad oblast, now Russia), southern half to Poland.
Radom -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, south-central Poland.
Russian Poland = Kingdom of Poland
Ruthenia -- Region south of the Carpathian mountains.
Part of Hungary before WWI and 1939-1945;
a province of Czechoslovakia 1918-1938. To USSR in 1945.
Today, in western Ukraine (Zakarpatska Oblast).
Also, Ruthenia is another word for Ukraine.
Siedlce (Shedlitz) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, east-central Poland.
Silesia (Ger. Schlesien, Pol. Slask) -- Region in valley of the
upper Oder bordering on Sudeten mountains. Ruled by
Austrian Empire until 1742, when most of it annexed by
Prussia. After WWII, ceded to Poland. Today, in
southwestern Poland and some in northern Czech Republic
(North Moravia).
Suwalki (Suvalk) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
After WWI northern half in Lithuania, southern in Poland.
Today, northeastern Poland, southwest Lithuania.
Taurida -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, southeastern Ukraine. Capital: Simferopol.
Transylvania -- Region bounded by Carpathians and Transylvanian
Alps. Under Austrian rule since 1765, province of
Austro-Hungarian Empire 1867-1918. Became part of
Romania following WWI. Today, in western Romania.
Chief city: Cluj (Klausenburg).
Vilna -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Polish province of Wilno between the wars.
Today, southeastern Lithuania and northwest Belarus.
Vitebsk -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale of Settlement.
Today, southeastern Latvia, northeastern Belarus;
some northeastern parts now in Russia.
Volhynia -- Russian gubernia, until 1917, in Pale.
Polish province of Wolyn between the wars.
Today, northwestern Ukraine. Chief city: Zhitomer.
Wallachia -- Region between Transylvanian Alps and the Danube.
Former principality under Turkish domination.
Wallachia and Moldavia merged to form Romania in 1859.
Today, in southern Romania. Chief city: Bucharest.
Warszawa (Warsaw) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, central Poland.
White Russia -- another name for Byelorussia = Belarus.


Suggestions, additions and corrections to this document are
encouraged. E-mail to <wblatt@jewishgen.org>.

Copyright (C) 1994, 1997 by Warren Blatt. All Rights Reserved.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Gubernias and Uyezds #belarus

Zapote1@...
 

To all who have questions regarding Gubernias, and Uyezds, I found this
article, that helped me a lot in my own research. I hope it can be usefull to
yours !

Bonnie Shapiro
Zapote1@aol.com
Researching:
SHAPIRO >from Ilya, Vilna Gubernia, Belarus
KLINCOVSTEIN, SHATSZKES, CYBULSKI >from Lomza, Poland
ALPEROVICH >from Dolginov, Belarus

PROVINCES AND REGIONS:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Definitions:
- Gubernia = province of the Russian Empire.
There were 60 gubernias in 1914, including 15 in the Pale
of Settlement and 10 in the Kingdom of Poland.
Each gubernia was divided into several uyezds (districts).
- Pale of Settlement (Russian: Cherta osedlosti) =
The 15 gubernias on the western edge of the Russian Empire,
to which Jewish residence was restricted, 1794 to 1917.

Bessarabia -- Region bordered by Black Sea, Dniester, Danube
and Prut rivers. In Ottoman Empire until 1812.
Russian gubernia after 1873, in Pale.
In Russian Empire 1812-1856, 1878-1918;
Part of Romania 1856-1878, 1918-1940;
In USSR (Moldavian SSR) 1940-1991.
Today, mostly in Moldova (northernmost part in Ukraine).
Bohemia (Ger. Bohmen) -- Province of Austrian Empire until WWI.
Province of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992.
Today, in westernmost Czech Republic. Chief city: Prague.
Bukovina -- Region in foothills of eastern Carpathian mountains.
Ruled by Ottoman Turks until 1769, when occupied by
Russia. Taken by Austria in 1775, it formed part of
Galicia until 1849, when it became a separate province of
the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until the end of WWI.
Province of Romania 1917-1944. After WWII, northern
area became part of USSR, southern area in Romania.
Today, northeastern Romania and southwestern Ukraine.
Chief city: Chernivtsi (Ger. Czernowitz, Rom. Cernauti).
Chernigov -- Russian gubernia, 1796-1917, in Pale of Settlement.
Today, northern Ukraine.
Congress Poland = Kingdom of Poland.
Courland (Kurland) -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, outside of
the Pale. In Latvia 1918-1940, in USSR until 1989.
Today, southern Latvia.
Crimea (Krim) -- Peninsula and oblast in southeast Ukraine,
southern part of Taurida gubernia. Capital: Simferopol.
Czechoslovakia -- Nation formed in 1918 >from parts of Austro-
Hungary (Czech-speaking Bohemia and Moravia >from Austria,
and Slovak-speaking northern counties of Hungary).
Split into Slovakia and Czech Republic in 1991.
Dobruja -- Region on the Black Sea south of the Danube.
Today, SE Romania and NE Bulgaria.
Ekaterinoslav -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, eastern Ukraine.
Estland -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, outside of Pale.
In Estonia 1918-1940, in USSR until 1989.
Today, northern Estonia.
Galicia -- Province of Austro-Hungarian Empire 1772 until 1917;
Belonged to Poland between the two world wars (Polish
provinces of Krakow, Lvov, Tarnopol and Stanislawow).
Last three became part of Ukrainian SSR in 1945.
Today, southeastern Poland and western Ukraine.
Grodno -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
In Poland between the two world wars (parts of Polish
provinces of Wilno, Nowogrodek, Polesie and Bialystok).
Eastern 2/3rds became part of Belorussian SSR in 1939,
Bialystok area remained in Poland.
Today, western Belarus, some northeastern Poland.
Kalisz -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, west-central Poland
Kherson -- Russian gubernia, 1803-1917, in Pale.
Today, south-central Ukraine.
Kielce (Keltz) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, south-central Poland.
Kiev -- Russian gubernia, in Pale.
Today, central Ukraine.
Kingdom of Poland (Krolestwa Polska) = Congress Poland =
"Russian Poland" = part of Poland occupied by the
Russian Empire, 1815-1918. The 10 gubernias (1867-1917):
Suwalki, Lomza, Plock, Warszawa, Siedlce, Lublin,
Radom, Kielce, Piotrkow and Kalisz.
Today, all in east-central Poland (except north Suwalki).
Kovno -- Russian gubernia, 1842-1917, in Pale.
Formed >from Vilna gubernia in 1842.
Part of independent Lithuania, 1920-1940.
Belonged to Lithuanian SSR 1944-1991.
Today, northern Lithuania. Chief city: Kaunas.
Livonia (Livland) -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, outside Pale.
Today, northern Latvia, southern Estonia. Capital: Riga.
Lomza -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, northeastern Poland.
Lublin -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, southeastern Poland.
Maramaros -- Province of Austro-Hungarian Empire until 1917.
Today, in northwest Romania, Slovakia, and Ukraine.
Memel -- Northeasternmost area of East Prussia, on Baltic coast,
which became part of Lithuania in 1918.
Minsk -- Russian gubernia, 1795-1917, in Pale.
Today, south-central Belarus.
Mogilev -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, eastern Belarus.
Moldavia -- Former principality under Turkish domination,
which included Bessarabia and Bukovina.
Moldavia and Wallachia merged to form Romania in 1859.
Republic of USSR 1924-1991.
Today, in northeastern Romania and Moldova.
Chief city: Kishinev (Chisinau).
Moravia (Ger. Mahren) -- Province of Austrian Empire until WWI.
In central Czechoslovakia 1918-1992.
Today, in eastern Czech Republic. Chief city: Brno.
Piotrkow -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, south-central Poland.
Plock (Plotsk) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, north-central Poland.
Podolia (Podolsk) -- Russian gubernia, 1796-1917, in Pale.
Today, southwestern Ukraine. Capital: Kamenetz-Podolsk.
Polesie -- a large region of southern Belarus, including parts
of Minsk, Grodno, Mogilev, Kiev and Volhynia gubernias.
A province of Poland between the wars.
Poltava -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, eastern Ukraine.
Pomerania (Ger. Pommern) -- Province of Prussia since 1815, on
Baltic Sea. Formerly in Germany; since WWII, mostly in
northwest Poland.
Posen (Pol. Poznan) -- Region now in western Poland.
Ruled by Prussia 1793-1807, and 1815 until WWI.
Grand Duchy of Posen (1815-1850), part of Prussia.
Polish province of Poznan after 1919.
Prussia -- Former kingdom (1701-1871), largest state in German
Empire (1871-1918). After WWI, parts of West Prussia
ceded to Poland. After WWII, remainder of West Prussia
to Poland; East Prussia divided: northern half to USSR
(Kalinigrad oblast, now Russia), southern half to Poland.
Radom -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, south-central Poland.
Russian Poland = Kingdom of Poland
Ruthenia -- Region south of the Carpathian mountains.
Part of Hungary before WWI and 1939-1945;
a province of Czechoslovakia 1918-1938. To USSR in 1945.
Today, in western Ukraine (Zakarpatska Oblast).
Also, Ruthenia is another word for Ukraine.
Siedlce (Shedlitz) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
Today, east-central Poland.
Silesia (Ger. Schlesien, Pol. Slask) -- Region in valley of the
upper Oder bordering on Sudeten mountains. Ruled by
Austrian Empire until 1742, when most of it annexed by
Prussia. After WWII, ceded to Poland. Today, in
southwestern Poland and some in northern Czech Republic
(North Moravia).
Suwalki (Suvalk) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1867-1917.
After WWI northern half in Lithuania, southern in Poland.
Today, northeastern Poland, southwest Lithuania.
Taurida -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Today, southeastern Ukraine. Capital: Simferopol.
Transylvania -- Region bounded by Carpathians and Transylvanian
Alps. Under Austrian rule since 1765, province of
Austro-Hungarian Empire 1867-1918. Became part of
Romania following WWI. Today, in western Romania.
Chief city: Cluj (Klausenburg).
Vilna -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale.
Polish province of Wilno between the wars.
Today, southeastern Lithuania and northwest Belarus.
Vitebsk -- Russian gubernia, 1802-1917, in Pale of Settlement.
Today, southeastern Latvia, northeastern Belarus;
some northeastern parts now in Russia.
Volhynia -- Russian gubernia, until 1917, in Pale.
Polish province of Wolyn between the wars.
Today, northwestern Ukraine. Chief city: Zhitomer.
Wallachia -- Region between Transylvanian Alps and the Danube.
Former principality under Turkish domination.
Wallachia and Moldavia merged to form Romania in 1859.
Today, in southern Romania. Chief city: Bucharest.
Warszawa (Warsaw) -- Gubernia of Russian Poland, 1844-1917.
Today, central Poland.
White Russia -- another name for Byelorussia = Belarus.


Suggestions, additions and corrections to this document are
encouraged. E-mail to <wblatt@jewishgen.org>.

Copyright (C) 1994, 1997 by Warren Blatt. All Rights Reserved.


Belchatow #poland

Ronisl@...
 

Dear Neighbors,

Do you have ancestors >from Belchatow or the surrounding areas? Belchatow
(5122/1923) is located only 27 miles south of Lodz and 13 miles west of
Piotrkow Trybunalski. If you have or will be using the Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland database to do research into your family names, we need your
help.

The Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP volunteers have begun transcribing the family names
and dates of birth, marriage and death indices of the Belchatow records held
by the Family History Center in Salt Lake City. The results of our time and
effort engaging in this project will be made available to all researchers via
the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland website on JewishGen.

To date, we've ordered most of the the Polish language films (1809-1867),
placed them on permanent loan to be able to check the records themselves when
the indices are illegible, copied the indices, made xeroxed back-up copies,
enhanced some pages by further enlarging and adjusting the lighting on those
copies for easier readability, and mailed packets to volunteers. When we
first started this, many of you expressed interest in the records of
Belchatow but were unable to volunteer to help index these records. Some of
you offered to contribute cash to help us cover the many costs related to the
project. Now we really need your help and the help of all of you with
interests in that area. With your help we can ensure that all of us,
descendents and researchers of Belchatow alike, can support and benefit from
this project. Your donation will help pay for the rental and photocopying of
a roll of microfilm and will cover some of the mailing charges.

Contributiong is now easier than ever. A contribution to "Jewish Records
Indexing-Poland is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization and therefore is tax-
deductible in the U.S. You can donate at the JRI-Poland website
<<http:www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/visa.htm >> using VISA or you can mail your
contribution to Jewish Records Indexing, Inc. The address is at the website.
Please be sure to indicate that the donation is earmarked for the Belchatow
Shtetl CO-OP Initiative.

We volunteers are eager to get the results to you as soon as possible. We
need your help.
Thank You.
Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
New York


JRI Poland #Poland Belchatow #poland

Ronisl@...
 

Dear Neighbors,

Do you have ancestors >from Belchatow or the surrounding areas? Belchatow
(5122/1923) is located only 27 miles south of Lodz and 13 miles west of
Piotrkow Trybunalski. If you have or will be using the Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland database to do research into your family names, we need your
help.

The Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP volunteers have begun transcribing the family names
and dates of birth, marriage and death indices of the Belchatow records held
by the Family History Center in Salt Lake City. The results of our time and
effort engaging in this project will be made available to all researchers via
the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland website on JewishGen.

To date, we've ordered most of the the Polish language films (1809-1867),
placed them on permanent loan to be able to check the records themselves when
the indices are illegible, copied the indices, made xeroxed back-up copies,
enhanced some pages by further enlarging and adjusting the lighting on those
copies for easier readability, and mailed packets to volunteers. When we
first started this, many of you expressed interest in the records of
Belchatow but were unable to volunteer to help index these records. Some of
you offered to contribute cash to help us cover the many costs related to the
project. Now we really need your help and the help of all of you with
interests in that area. With your help we can ensure that all of us,
descendents and researchers of Belchatow alike, can support and benefit from
this project. Your donation will help pay for the rental and photocopying of
a roll of microfilm and will cover some of the mailing charges.

Contributiong is now easier than ever. A contribution to "Jewish Records
Indexing-Poland is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization and therefore is tax-
deductible in the U.S. You can donate at the JRI-Poland website
<<http:www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/visa.htm >> using VISA or you can mail your
contribution to Jewish Records Indexing, Inc. The address is at the website.
Please be sure to indicate that the donation is earmarked for the Belchatow
Shtetl CO-OP Initiative.

We volunteers are eager to get the results to you as soon as possible. We
need your help.
Thank You.
Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
New York


A first look at the new Canadian arrival lists #general

Harry Dodsworth <af877@...>
 

I recently posted that arrival lists for Canadian seaports >from 1919-1924
were available (letters A to Ha) and that the rest of the alphabet from
that time, and arrival manifests >from 1925 to 1935 are being processed.

Mark Grekin asked me how to access the records. As his surname was in the
available reels, I offered to look for it while familiarizing myself with
the records. Normally I don't have the time to do extensive lookups.
He has given me permission to use his family information as an example.

The index to the reels is available on the National Archives (Canada)
website at www.archives.ca under Immigration Records and then Form 30A
(the form used 1919-1924). Grekin falls on reel T-15046. This is available
on open access in the Archives microfilm room. It was a surprise that 16mm
microfilm was used. I used a regular 35 mm reader (but might have done
better with a 16mm reader)

The records are copies of forms indexed in approximate alphabetical order.
The system is a liitle confusing but much better than the unindexed older
manifests. The records I looked at were generally clear. My difficulty was
with the personal names and place names which are always difficult to
transcribe >from handwriting even when the names, places and writing style
are familiar.

The cards contain much useful information (as often collected by the INS
in the USA) besides basic data on the immigrant, the ship and the voyage.

Place born, destination in Canada, who paid for the ticket, contact in
the former country. Real treasure if your relatives are listed.

I found two Grekins, mother Sima and daughter Tzivia. Unfortunately there
should have been four; the wife and daughter mentioned above, a son, and
her sister-in-law (also a Grekin) travelling alone. But neither the boy nor
the sister-in-law were found.
It is possible I missed them, otherwise the reason for their absence is
another mystery of genealogy.

I suggested they might have used another spelling of the name but Mark
assures me that is unlikely.
The family lore suggests that all four travelled together.

Mark is going to borrow the film through InterLibrary Loan to search for
the two missing people and to transcribe the names better than I can :-)
He will also borrow the Russian Consular passport records microfilm to see
if any of the family are listed there.

But if your family entered Canada during 1919-1924 (and your surname
begins A - Ha), this is a wonderful new source of information to try.
I hope you are lucky :-)

Harry Dodsworth
Ottawa, Ontario - Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A first look at the new Canadian arrival lists #general

Harry Dodsworth <af877@...>
 

I recently posted that arrival lists for Canadian seaports >from 1919-1924
were available (letters A to Ha) and that the rest of the alphabet from
that time, and arrival manifests >from 1925 to 1935 are being processed.

Mark Grekin asked me how to access the records. As his surname was in the
available reels, I offered to look for it while familiarizing myself with
the records. Normally I don't have the time to do extensive lookups.
He has given me permission to use his family information as an example.

The index to the reels is available on the National Archives (Canada)
website at www.archives.ca under Immigration Records and then Form 30A
(the form used 1919-1924). Grekin falls on reel T-15046. This is available
on open access in the Archives microfilm room. It was a surprise that 16mm
microfilm was used. I used a regular 35 mm reader (but might have done
better with a 16mm reader)

The records are copies of forms indexed in approximate alphabetical order.
The system is a liitle confusing but much better than the unindexed older
manifests. The records I looked at were generally clear. My difficulty was
with the personal names and place names which are always difficult to
transcribe >from handwriting even when the names, places and writing style
are familiar.

The cards contain much useful information (as often collected by the INS
in the USA) besides basic data on the immigrant, the ship and the voyage.

Place born, destination in Canada, who paid for the ticket, contact in
the former country. Real treasure if your relatives are listed.

I found two Grekins, mother Sima and daughter Tzivia. Unfortunately there
should have been four; the wife and daughter mentioned above, a son, and
her sister-in-law (also a Grekin) travelling alone. But neither the boy nor
the sister-in-law were found.
It is possible I missed them, otherwise the reason for their absence is
another mystery of genealogy.

I suggested they might have used another spelling of the name but Mark
assures me that is unlikely.
The family lore suggests that all four travelled together.

Mark is going to borrow the film through InterLibrary Loan to search for
the two missing people and to transcribe the names better than I can :-)
He will also borrow the Russian Consular passport records microfilm to see
if any of the family are listed there.

But if your family entered Canada during 1919-1924 (and your surname
begins A - Ha), this is a wonderful new source of information to try.
I hope you are lucky :-)

Harry Dodsworth
Ottawa, Ontario - Canada


Leeds, England--A Success! #general

Steve Slesinger <slesingersteve@...>
 

Thanks to this news group, I tracked down several of my ancestors.
Thought I'd document the route I took (briefly) so it might help others
new to the search.

I was trying to research my great grandfather Barnet Kaiser, married in
Boston, supposedly attended school in Leeds, England before coming to
America. The family was originally >from Russia. A few family names
were known.

I used the Jewish Genealogy web site (www.jewishgen.org) to locate
archives in Massachusetts with vital records. Paid someone to lookup the
marriage and found the names of my four great great parents (I had known
3, 1 was a "find"). The marriage certicate gave me Barnet's age.

I learned about Avotaynu, a company that publishes a Jewish Genealogy
magazine (and books) and I got their back issues on CD-ROM. They are at
www.avotaynu.com. >from a back issue, I kept finding mentions to a Mr.
Murray Freedman, who lived in England, and has researched the Jews of
Leeds. I wrote him (initially via snail mail, then got his email) and
I bought his interesting little book "Leeds Jewry, The First Hundred
Years." It discusses the Leylands Board School (that my great
grandfather attended) as well as the clothing industry he participated
in. Quite an interesting little book.

I paid Mr. Freedman (a nominal fee) to do some research for me. At
first he couldn't find my family at all--no census, no birth records,
etc. But lo and behold, since he has computerized all the data in his
research, he searched first names and VOILA'--he found my family alright
in the 1891 census. The last name had been jumbled when it was written
phonetically by the official.

Thanks to everyone for your interesting postings. This newsgroup is
fantastic.

--Steve Slesinger, Melbourne, FL
researching SLESINGER, SLESSINGER, HIBEL, KAISER, KEISER, KAIZER,
LABUNSKY, SEFFER, DOLOWSKY, WEINSTEIN, KLEIN, EPSTEIN, RUBIN, GOLDBERG,
OSTROWER, SHURMASTER, FREEDMAN, MICHELSON


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leeds, England--A Success! #general

Steve Slesinger <slesingersteve@...>
 

Thanks to this news group, I tracked down several of my ancestors.
Thought I'd document the route I took (briefly) so it might help others
new to the search.

I was trying to research my great grandfather Barnet Kaiser, married in
Boston, supposedly attended school in Leeds, England before coming to
America. The family was originally >from Russia. A few family names
were known.

I used the Jewish Genealogy web site (www.jewishgen.org) to locate
archives in Massachusetts with vital records. Paid someone to lookup the
marriage and found the names of my four great great parents (I had known
3, 1 was a "find"). The marriage certicate gave me Barnet's age.

I learned about Avotaynu, a company that publishes a Jewish Genealogy
magazine (and books) and I got their back issues on CD-ROM. They are at
www.avotaynu.com. >from a back issue, I kept finding mentions to a Mr.
Murray Freedman, who lived in England, and has researched the Jews of
Leeds. I wrote him (initially via snail mail, then got his email) and
I bought his interesting little book "Leeds Jewry, The First Hundred
Years." It discusses the Leylands Board School (that my great
grandfather attended) as well as the clothing industry he participated
in. Quite an interesting little book.

I paid Mr. Freedman (a nominal fee) to do some research for me. At
first he couldn't find my family at all--no census, no birth records,
etc. But lo and behold, since he has computerized all the data in his
research, he searched first names and VOILA'--he found my family alright
in the 1891 census. The last name had been jumbled when it was written
phonetically by the official.

Thanks to everyone for your interesting postings. This newsgroup is
fantastic.

--Steve Slesinger, Melbourne, FL
researching SLESINGER, SLESSINGER, HIBEL, KAISER, KEISER, KAIZER,
LABUNSKY, SEFFER, DOLOWSKY, WEINSTEIN, KLEIN, EPSTEIN, RUBIN, GOLDBERG,
OSTROWER, SHURMASTER, FREEDMAN, MICHELSON


Yiskor Book #general

Wildpom@...
 

Is there a Yiskor Book for Brest-Litovsk? If so, how can I obtain a copy?

Michele V. Pomerantz
Secaucus, NJ

MODERATOR NOTE: You will (also) find an answer at JewishGen's Database of
Yizkor Books at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiskor Book #general

Wildpom@...
 

Is there a Yiskor Book for Brest-Litovsk? If so, how can I obtain a copy?

Michele V. Pomerantz
Secaucus, NJ

MODERATOR NOTE: You will (also) find an answer at JewishGen's Database of
Yizkor Books at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/


Re: Yizkor Book Listing #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

At 03:13 PM 12/2/98 -0500, Leonard S. Duboff <LSDUBF@aol.com> wrote:

I am also the coordinator of the Gorgzd Yizkor book translation project and
after reading today's letter raises the question of whether a listing of all
known Yizkor books exists and secondly a companion list of all those already
translated. I think this would be a worthwhile project incorporated into the
Yizkor book translation project to avoid duplication of effort and better use
of the funds available..
We maintain a Database that is designed to serve both of these purposes.
It lists all known Yizkor Books, and it lists any translations that have
been brought to our attention -- both published and unpublished. There are
undoubtedly additional translations that we don't yet know about, and we
would urge people to tell us about these so we can add them to the
Database. You can search the Database or submit new information at:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/database.html>.

There are a number of published lists of Yizkor Book -- see
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/links.html>. Most of these focus on
Eastern European memorial books written after the Holocaust. Our Database
uses a broader definition, and includes books or resources written during
any time period, describing Jewish communities in Germany and other parts
of Europe, in addition to Eastern Europe.

Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Re: USHMM #general

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

At 02:08 AM 12/2/98 -0500, SBernst579@aol.com wrote:

<< ushmm.org
museum archive: archives@ushmm.org >>


The two above addresses are not accessable. Awindow stating Unknown Host
appears when trying to open either.
The first address originally read: Museum Library: library@ushmm.org
Both addresses appear to be valid e-mail addresses. A complete contact
list for the U.S. Holocuast Memorial Museum is available at
<http://www.ushmm.org/contact.htm>.

However, before contacting people at the museum, try searching the Library
catalog at <http://library.ushmm.org/> and the Archives at
<http://www.ushmm.org/misc-bin/add_goback/queryinfo_archives.html>.
Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Re: Yizkor Book Listing #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

At 03:13 PM 12/2/98 -0500, Leonard S. Duboff <LSDUBF@aol.com> wrote:

I am also the coordinator of the Gorgzd Yizkor book translation project and
after reading today's letter raises the question of whether a listing of all
known Yizkor books exists and secondly a companion list of all those already
translated. I think this would be a worthwhile project incorporated into the
Yizkor book translation project to avoid duplication of effort and better use
of the funds available..
We maintain a Database that is designed to serve both of these purposes.
It lists all known Yizkor Books, and it lists any translations that have
been brought to our attention -- both published and unpublished. There are
undoubtedly additional translations that we don't yet know about, and we
would urge people to tell us about these so we can add them to the
Database. You can search the Database or submit new information at:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/database.html>.

There are a number of published lists of Yizkor Book -- see
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/links.html>. Most of these focus on
Eastern European memorial books written after the Holocaust. Our Database
uses a broader definition, and includes books or resources written during
any time period, describing Jewish communities in Germany and other parts
of Europe, in addition to Eastern Europe.

Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Re: USHMM #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

At 02:08 AM 12/2/98 -0500, SBernst579@aol.com wrote:

<< ushmm.org
museum archive: archives@ushmm.org >>


The two above addresses are not accessable. Awindow stating Unknown Host
appears when trying to open either.
The first address originally read: Museum Library: library@ushmm.org
Both addresses appear to be valid e-mail addresses. A complete contact
list for the U.S. Holocuast Memorial Museum is available at
<http://www.ushmm.org/contact.htm>.

However, before contacting people at the museum, try searching the Library
catalog at <http://library.ushmm.org/> and the Archives at
<http://www.ushmm.org/misc-bin/add_goback/queryinfo_archives.html>.
Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>