Date   
Re: Holitz/Holice #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

--- peter bakos <pgbakos@...> wrote:
-snip->
The nearest bigger towns which are on the Gundacker list are Hradec Kralove
and Pardubice. But there are also other places. Anybody with ideas where
to search for this birth?
Peter, when I began searching for documentation on the Auerbachs >from Becov nad
Teplou, the archives in Prague informed me that prewar documentation for that
town had been lost.

What a great surprise to find on my visit to Becov that the Town Hall had a
Register of Births and Deaths and were willing to let me search through it on
site without an appointment.

I was able to retrieve information on all Auerbachs residing in that town all
the way back to the early 1800s. Birth, death, father, mother, siblings, house
number they lived in, metier of the father, cause of death, attendants at
birth.

I would have learned a lot more but became frustrated with trying to decipher
handwritten German script.

The point is that even though there may not be records available in some
central archive, mistakes do happen and there may be some records available in
the town/village in which you're interested and a physical visit may unearth
them.

cheers,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada

AUERBACH - Vienna, Becov
HELFGOTT - Vienna, Becov
STEINER - Oschelin

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Holitz/Holice #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

--- peter bakos <pgbakos@...> wrote:
-snip->
The nearest bigger towns which are on the Gundacker list are Hradec Kralove
and Pardubice. But there are also other places. Anybody with ideas where
to search for this birth?
Peter, when I began searching for documentation on the Auerbachs >from Becov nad
Teplou, the archives in Prague informed me that prewar documentation for that
town had been lost.

What a great surprise to find on my visit to Becov that the Town Hall had a
Register of Births and Deaths and were willing to let me search through it on
site without an appointment.

I was able to retrieve information on all Auerbachs residing in that town all
the way back to the early 1800s. Birth, death, father, mother, siblings, house
number they lived in, metier of the father, cause of death, attendants at
birth.

I would have learned a lot more but became frustrated with trying to decipher
handwritten German script.

The point is that even though there may not be records available in some
central archive, mistakes do happen and there may be some records available in
the town/village in which you're interested and a physical visit may unearth
them.

cheers,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada

AUERBACH - Vienna, Becov
HELFGOTT - Vienna, Becov
STEINER - Oschelin

Re: Western and Eastern Galicia divisions - understanding the division and terms #galicia

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

I don't presume to be an expert in the terminology or history of "Eastern
and Western" Galicia, but I have noticed in various books/articles that the
terms do not always refer to the same geographic locations. Therefore, I
have made an attempt to reconcile these unprecise terms, if merely to
clarify their coloquial usage. I wrote an unpublished article about this a
while ago and since the topic has now come up, I wish to post my thoughts
here. Perhaps it will shed some light on the topic. If I am mistaken please
correct me.

Eastern or Western Galicia?



Avrohom A. Krauss





I would like to comment on what to me has been a confusing matter, that is,
which parts of Galicia are "Eastern" and which are "Western"? There seems to
be contradictory definitions used to describe these territories.



In "The Galizianer" (vol. 9, no.3, p.. 8) Shelley Pollero lists the 1877
Austrian Galicia Administration Districts and defines the division of
western and eastern Galicia in the usual manner, "Western" as part of
today's Poland and "Eastern" as part of the Ukraine. This definition is also
found in "Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia" by Suzan Wynne (p. 3).
While true for most places, this definition does not accurately reflect the
division of east and west in the Austrian period. There are towns formerly
considered in the "eastern" part but are now "western." Such is the case
with one of my ancestral towns, Przemysl. According to the above definition,
one should find Przemysl, located in today's Poland, in Western Galicia and
in fact, Przemysl appears classified as such in Wynne's book (p.101) and in
Pollero's article.



Piotr Wrobel, however, in "Jews of Galicia 1869-1918, Part I" (The
Galicianer, vol. 8, nos. 2&3, p.21) lists Przemysl in Table 4- Number of
Jews in the District of Eastern Galicia in 1910. Yad Vashem's "Pinkas
HaKehillot," series (based on inter-war borders for Eastern Europe), also
lists Przemysl in the volume of Poland- Eastern Galicia. If one studies
George Sackheim's "Town Name Index to Pinkas HaKehillot found in Wynne
(ibid. p. 82) one will find other places that today are "west" but are
classified as "east" in Pinkas HaKehillot.



The questions are as follows: What is the precise definition, or
definitions of "Eastern" and "Western" Galicia? Is the definition a
constant, or did it change according to political boundaries? Was the
notion of "Eastern" and "Western" Galicia applicable when one country
accommodated the entire region known as Galicia (such as Austria or the
re-created, independent Poland) or was it a later invention used to describe
the split between two countries of a once unified Galicia?



from Piotr Wrobel's article (ibid.) and the introduction to "Pinkas
HaKehillot, Eastern Galicia," we see that the definition will depend upon
the time period in question. Let us briefly review the political borders of
Galicia. Wrobel (ibid. p.15) divides Galician history (until the end of the
Austrian empire in 1918) into three periods, the last era, 1867-1918,
Austrian autonomy, being the first era germane to our discussion. After the
dissolving of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which we will refer to as period#
1 we may add two periods: # 2 The Inter-war period, when all of Galicia
became part of newly Independent Poland during (1922-39) (except for a brief
period 1918-1922 when eastern Galicia was part of Ukraine) and # 3 the
post-WW II era 1944- present. (>from 1939-1941 Eastern Galicia was part of
Soviet dominion and >from 1941-1944 it was controlled by Germany). After the
war, most of eastern Galicia went to the Ukraine while the western part
stayed in Poland). When Galicia was unified, either by Austrian rule (#1),
or during the inter-war Polish period (#2), "east" and "west" could not
refer to political divisions, since Galicia was not politically divided;
"east" and "west" simply described ethnicity. The "east," in general, was
where ethnic Ukrainians comprised the majority of the gentile population,
ethnic Poles were the majority in the "west." Prior to WW II, the San River
was used to divide west >from east. As Wrobel (ibid. p. 19) writes:



"Galicia, in ethnic terms, consisted of two halves: predominantly Polish
Western Galicia-west of the River San- and Ukrainian Eastern Galicia-east of
San."



If so, Przemysl belongs in the east. Pinkas Hakehillot- Eastern Galicia,
therefore, includes the regions of Przemysl, Dobromil and Chyrow of Lwow
province.



After WW II (# 3), "east" and "west" became political entities with the
division of Galicia between Poland and Soviet Ukraine- and a new border was
established, namely the Bug River instead of the San. (This remained the
border even after Ukraine achieved independence.) Przemysl and the others
mentioned above then found their way to the west.



In light of this, we see that not only did Poland's border shift westward
after WW II, taking part of Germany, but the eastern border of Poland also
shifted to the east, absorbing certain areas >from the Ukraine.



Political lines do not always coincide with ethnic divisions, nor are they
necessarily totally accurate. In our case, interestingly, and perhaps a bit
ironically, today's political borders may more accurately reflect ethnicity
than the former line of demarcation. Przemysl, for example, had a Polish
majority and more resembled a "western" town >from the start. It seems to
have found its rightful place by staying in Poland.





In summation:



1. "Eastern" and "Western" Galicia mean the following:



a. Prior to WW II they describe the demographic Ukrainian or Polish
majority of the respective territories. The San River is the border.



b. Post WW II, in addition to ethnicity, they refer to the political
entities of Poland and the Ukraine and uses the Bug River as the border.



2. The regions of Przemysl, Dobromil and Chyrow shift >from "east" to "west
after WW II.



Note: Researchers should always bear in mind border changes in regard to
"Eastern" and "Western" Galicia (as well as any other region, for that
manner) and not presume all information or documents to be where one might
expect them to be!



Avrohom A. Krauss

Telz-Stone ISRAEL

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Western and Eastern Galicia divisions - understanding the division and terms #galicia

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

I don't presume to be an expert in the terminology or history of "Eastern
and Western" Galicia, but I have noticed in various books/articles that the
terms do not always refer to the same geographic locations. Therefore, I
have made an attempt to reconcile these unprecise terms, if merely to
clarify their coloquial usage. I wrote an unpublished article about this a
while ago and since the topic has now come up, I wish to post my thoughts
here. Perhaps it will shed some light on the topic. If I am mistaken please
correct me.

Eastern or Western Galicia?



Avrohom A. Krauss





I would like to comment on what to me has been a confusing matter, that is,
which parts of Galicia are "Eastern" and which are "Western"? There seems to
be contradictory definitions used to describe these territories.



In "The Galizianer" (vol. 9, no.3, p.. 8) Shelley Pollero lists the 1877
Austrian Galicia Administration Districts and defines the division of
western and eastern Galicia in the usual manner, "Western" as part of
today's Poland and "Eastern" as part of the Ukraine. This definition is also
found in "Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia" by Suzan Wynne (p. 3).
While true for most places, this definition does not accurately reflect the
division of east and west in the Austrian period. There are towns formerly
considered in the "eastern" part but are now "western." Such is the case
with one of my ancestral towns, Przemysl. According to the above definition,
one should find Przemysl, located in today's Poland, in Western Galicia and
in fact, Przemysl appears classified as such in Wynne's book (p.101) and in
Pollero's article.



Piotr Wrobel, however, in "Jews of Galicia 1869-1918, Part I" (The
Galicianer, vol. 8, nos. 2&3, p.21) lists Przemysl in Table 4- Number of
Jews in the District of Eastern Galicia in 1910. Yad Vashem's "Pinkas
HaKehillot," series (based on inter-war borders for Eastern Europe), also
lists Przemysl in the volume of Poland- Eastern Galicia. If one studies
George Sackheim's "Town Name Index to Pinkas HaKehillot found in Wynne
(ibid. p. 82) one will find other places that today are "west" but are
classified as "east" in Pinkas HaKehillot.



The questions are as follows: What is the precise definition, or
definitions of "Eastern" and "Western" Galicia? Is the definition a
constant, or did it change according to political boundaries? Was the
notion of "Eastern" and "Western" Galicia applicable when one country
accommodated the entire region known as Galicia (such as Austria or the
re-created, independent Poland) or was it a later invention used to describe
the split between two countries of a once unified Galicia?



from Piotr Wrobel's article (ibid.) and the introduction to "Pinkas
HaKehillot, Eastern Galicia," we see that the definition will depend upon
the time period in question. Let us briefly review the political borders of
Galicia. Wrobel (ibid. p.15) divides Galician history (until the end of the
Austrian empire in 1918) into three periods, the last era, 1867-1918,
Austrian autonomy, being the first era germane to our discussion. After the
dissolving of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which we will refer to as period#
1 we may add two periods: # 2 The Inter-war period, when all of Galicia
became part of newly Independent Poland during (1922-39) (except for a brief
period 1918-1922 when eastern Galicia was part of Ukraine) and # 3 the
post-WW II era 1944- present. (>from 1939-1941 Eastern Galicia was part of
Soviet dominion and >from 1941-1944 it was controlled by Germany). After the
war, most of eastern Galicia went to the Ukraine while the western part
stayed in Poland). When Galicia was unified, either by Austrian rule (#1),
or during the inter-war Polish period (#2), "east" and "west" could not
refer to political divisions, since Galicia was not politically divided;
"east" and "west" simply described ethnicity. The "east," in general, was
where ethnic Ukrainians comprised the majority of the gentile population,
ethnic Poles were the majority in the "west." Prior to WW II, the San River
was used to divide west >from east. As Wrobel (ibid. p. 19) writes:



"Galicia, in ethnic terms, consisted of two halves: predominantly Polish
Western Galicia-west of the River San- and Ukrainian Eastern Galicia-east of
San."



If so, Przemysl belongs in the east. Pinkas Hakehillot- Eastern Galicia,
therefore, includes the regions of Przemysl, Dobromil and Chyrow of Lwow
province.



After WW II (# 3), "east" and "west" became political entities with the
division of Galicia between Poland and Soviet Ukraine- and a new border was
established, namely the Bug River instead of the San. (This remained the
border even after Ukraine achieved independence.) Przemysl and the others
mentioned above then found their way to the west.



In light of this, we see that not only did Poland's border shift westward
after WW II, taking part of Germany, but the eastern border of Poland also
shifted to the east, absorbing certain areas >from the Ukraine.



Political lines do not always coincide with ethnic divisions, nor are they
necessarily totally accurate. In our case, interestingly, and perhaps a bit
ironically, today's political borders may more accurately reflect ethnicity
than the former line of demarcation. Przemysl, for example, had a Polish
majority and more resembled a "western" town >from the start. It seems to
have found its rightful place by staying in Poland.





In summation:



1. "Eastern" and "Western" Galicia mean the following:



a. Prior to WW II they describe the demographic Ukrainian or Polish
majority of the respective territories. The San River is the border.



b. Post WW II, in addition to ethnicity, they refer to the political
entities of Poland and the Ukraine and uses the Bug River as the border.



2. The regions of Przemysl, Dobromil and Chyrow shift >from "east" to "west
after WW II.



Note: Researchers should always bear in mind border changes in regard to
"Eastern" and "Western" Galicia (as well as any other region, for that
manner) and not presume all information or documents to be where one might
expect them to be!



Avrohom A. Krauss

Telz-Stone ISRAEL

East and West Galicia #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

I was given the gift of two old maps that were produced in color by the
Austrian government in a year that I have not been able to identify, with
the two halves of Galicia in two different colors. The maps were used as
the frontspieces in my book. The western part was clearly labeled as
westlichen Kreisen (No. 35) Koenigreichs Galizien und Lodmerien. The map
depicted the districts, which included Rzeszower Kreis, Dukla Kreis and
Sanoker Kreis. There was a middle section with no color, which included
Przemysler Kreis and Samborer Kreis and Zolkiewer Kreis and then the rest
was in a colored section on the other map, number 37 and clearly marked as
"ostliche Kreise."

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia East and West Galicia #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

I was given the gift of two old maps that were produced in color by the
Austrian government in a year that I have not been able to identify, with
the two halves of Galicia in two different colors. The maps were used as
the frontspieces in my book. The western part was clearly labeled as
westlichen Kreisen (No. 35) Koenigreichs Galizien und Lodmerien. The map
depicted the districts, which included Rzeszower Kreis, Dukla Kreis and
Sanoker Kreis. There was a middle section with no color, which included
Przemysler Kreis and Samborer Kreis and Zolkiewer Kreis and then the rest
was in a colored section on the other map, number 37 and clearly marked as
"ostliche Kreise."

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD

Viewmate Translation-Polish to English #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

Would like to ask if someone could please translate the following ViewMate
submissions found at,
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

First marriage of my Great Grandfather Herman Eisig and Tobe Pfeffer
VM5555 page 2
VM5556 page1

Second marriage of my Great Grandfather Hersch Eisyk and Berte Roitain.
VM5557 page 1
VM5558 page2

Marriage of Nesaul Schneegurt and Chana
VM 5559

Please respond to me directly at ESLVIV@...

Thank you
Errol Schneegurt LI NY USA

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Viewmate Translation-Polish to English #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

Would like to ask if someone could please translate the following ViewMate
submissions found at,
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

First marriage of my Great Grandfather Herman Eisig and Tobe Pfeffer
VM5555 page 2
VM5556 page1

Second marriage of my Great Grandfather Hersch Eisyk and Berte Roitain.
VM5557 page 1
VM5558 page2

Marriage of Nesaul Schneegurt and Chana
VM 5559

Please respond to me directly at ESLVIV@...

Thank you
Errol Schneegurt LI NY USA

The record of my ggfather's death? #poland

Doug Mason
 

The following refers to records on the JRI-Poland database for Tarnopol.
All adults involved do not appear to have had a civil marriage ceremony.

I am searching for the record of my ggfather's death.

When a 2-year old boy died in January 1899, my ggfather is cited as the
"alleged father". If he was the father, the boy was the outcome of an
adulterous relationship.

When my ggfather's second wife died just a few days later, she is
described as being his widow.

Does this explain why my ggfather's death is not recorded? Or where else
should I look? How was adultery handled?

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This is an important question, and a sensitive subject.
When replying with examples >from your own family histories, please refrain

from using surnames, to protect the privacy of those being discussed.

JRI Poland #Poland The record of my ggfather's death? #poland

Doug Mason
 

The following refers to records on the JRI-Poland database for Tarnopol.
All adults involved do not appear to have had a civil marriage ceremony.

I am searching for the record of my ggfather's death.

When a 2-year old boy died in January 1899, my ggfather is cited as the
"alleged father". If he was the father, the boy was the outcome of an
adulterous relationship.

When my ggfather's second wife died just a few days later, she is
described as being his widow.

Does this explain why my ggfather's death is not recorded? Or where else
should I look? How was adultery handled?

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This is an important question, and a sensitive subject.
When replying with examples >from your own family histories, please refrain

from using surnames, to protect the privacy of those being discussed.

Simplified donor form #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

This message is a repeat of an earlier offer. Researchers wishing to
contribute to the Vital Records Indexing Project can request a simplified
donor form by sending a request to me at Joelrat1@... . Just type
"Simplified Donor Form" as the subject and I will forward the form. Sometime
in the future, we aspire to allow the form to be downloadable >from the
LitvakSIG web site.


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group
Interim Coordinator, Vilna Vital Records

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Simplified donor form #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

This message is a repeat of an earlier offer. Researchers wishing to
contribute to the Vital Records Indexing Project can request a simplified
donor form by sending a request to me at Joelrat1@... . Just type
"Simplified Donor Form" as the subject and I will forward the form. Sometime
in the future, we aspire to allow the form to be downloadable >from the
LitvakSIG web site.


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group
Interim Coordinator, Vilna Vital Records

Researching Siwek Family roots in Bialystock #poland

AlexSiwek@...
 

Hello fellow Bialystock researchers,

My name is Alexandra Siwek. My grandparents Abe and Bertha Siwek both came
from Bialystock and immigrated to New York City (separately) and did not
meet until they were in New York. They came over in the 1880s. I am
trying to find out more about my family. My father was Manuel Siwek. He
had sisters Wanda, Mariam and Golden and a brother Saul. I believe that my
grandmother Bertha immigrated under the name of a cousin who became ill and
could not travel at the last minute, and so I have not been able to find
much about her family. I believe her parents were >from Switzerland and
came through Russia to Poland. Their names were Leopold and Rima. I think
their name was something like Gessler. Anyone who knows anything that may
lead me to a clue, I would be grateful. I already had two genaeologists
who live in Bialystock try. I may be related to a Morduch Siwek who had a
ladies shoe store in Bialystock, but I cannot trace those roots. I think
my great grandfather Siwek was the glove designer and glove maker to the Tsar.

Alexandra Siwek

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Researching Siwek Family roots in Bialystock #poland

AlexSiwek@...
 

Hello fellow Bialystock researchers,

My name is Alexandra Siwek. My grandparents Abe and Bertha Siwek both came
from Bialystock and immigrated to New York City (separately) and did not
meet until they were in New York. They came over in the 1880s. I am
trying to find out more about my family. My father was Manuel Siwek. He
had sisters Wanda, Mariam and Golden and a brother Saul. I believe that my
grandmother Bertha immigrated under the name of a cousin who became ill and
could not travel at the last minute, and so I have not been able to find
much about her family. I believe her parents were >from Switzerland and
came through Russia to Poland. Their names were Leopold and Rima. I think
their name was something like Gessler. Anyone who knows anything that may
lead me to a clue, I would be grateful. I already had two genaeologists
who live in Bialystock try. I may be related to a Morduch Siwek who had a
ladies shoe store in Bialystock, but I cannot trace those roots. I think
my great grandfather Siwek was the glove designer and glove maker to the Tsar.

Alexandra Siwek

Re: Holocaust Testimonies from Jewish Historical Institute #poland

Bialystoker
 

Tilford:

Thank you for your comments about the value of these testimonies and the
links to the translations on your fabulous Zabludow Memorial website.

I think BIALYGenners would like to know (as I would), how you obtained
copies of these testimonies >from the Jewish Historical Institute and how
you arranged for their translation. Could you please post a message with
answers to these questions.

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----

Great job on the website!!

On the list of testimonies >from file 301 at the Jewish Historical
Institute in Warsaw is Szyja Bortnowska. He is related to me and as
far
as I can tell was the last openly Jewish person in Bialystok. He died
about three or four years ago. He was known as Szymon Bartnovski. I
have
a page dedicated to his memory on my website
at,http://www.zabludow.com/ShimonBartnovski.html

Also on the list is Rachel Pleban. Her family owned one of the leather
factories in Zabludow. It was owned by two brothers. One lived in
Zabludow and ran the factory, and the other lived in Bialystok and
marketed the goods. Rachel is still alive and living in Israel. She is
among the last Zabludovers. It says Rachel was in Majdanek, but I'm
also
quite certain she was in Auschwitz. I have occasional contact with her
Nephew Shlomo Pleban who is an Israeli living in California. When I
was
last in Israel I wanted to meet with Shlomo's father who I think left
Bialystok just before the war, but I just didn't have time. I know
Rachel has actually been back to Poland and visited Zabludow several
times where she visits a Polish family.

Also on the list is Israel Bramson. He is one of the young men who my
cousin Palter Lopata invited to join him at the farm of the Danieluk
family in Solniki where they were hiding out >from the Nazis. I have
Israel's testimony translated to English on my website. I am friends
with his two daughters in Israel, and helped them get the Danieluk
family recognized by Yad Vashem as holocaust rescuers. Here is a link
to
his remarkable testimony,
http://www.zabludow.com/bramsontestimony.html

For some reason my relative Palter Lopata is not on the list but he
should be. I have his testimony on my website, and the story about the
massacre in Solniki in 1945 after the war. Here is a link,
http://www.zabludow.com/Paltierstestimony.html
I also produced a movie on DVD that tells his story. It has video from
the ceremony at Yad Vashem, and of the tour of Jerusalem that we took
the surviving Danieluk family members on. It was one of the greatest
experiences of my life. If anyone is really interested in my DVD I can
send a copy.

Mendal Mielnicki is now Michel Mielnicki. He is still alive at least
as
of a year or two ago and lives in Vancouver BC. As far as I can tell
he
is one of only two Jews still alive who were in Zabludow on June 26th
1941 the day the Germans came in. I have his testimony of that day in
English. I've spoken to him on the phone.

David Zabludowski I also know about and have his testimony >from the
Zabludow Yizkor book on my website. I think he died quite a long time
ago in Argentina.

I could go on for hours about these testimonies. They are so much more
than just names on a list. These testimonies can be very frustrating
however once you get them translated. Anyway great Job!!

Tilford Bartman

www.zabludow.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Holocaust Testimonies from Jewish Historical Institute #poland

Bialystoker
 

Tilford:

Thank you for your comments about the value of these testimonies and the
links to the translations on your fabulous Zabludow Memorial website.

I think BIALYGenners would like to know (as I would), how you obtained
copies of these testimonies >from the Jewish Historical Institute and how
you arranged for their translation. Could you please post a message with
answers to these questions.

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----

Great job on the website!!

On the list of testimonies >from file 301 at the Jewish Historical
Institute in Warsaw is Szyja Bortnowska. He is related to me and as
far
as I can tell was the last openly Jewish person in Bialystok. He died
about three or four years ago. He was known as Szymon Bartnovski. I
have
a page dedicated to his memory on my website
at,http://www.zabludow.com/ShimonBartnovski.html

Also on the list is Rachel Pleban. Her family owned one of the leather
factories in Zabludow. It was owned by two brothers. One lived in
Zabludow and ran the factory, and the other lived in Bialystok and
marketed the goods. Rachel is still alive and living in Israel. She is
among the last Zabludovers. It says Rachel was in Majdanek, but I'm
also
quite certain she was in Auschwitz. I have occasional contact with her
Nephew Shlomo Pleban who is an Israeli living in California. When I
was
last in Israel I wanted to meet with Shlomo's father who I think left
Bialystok just before the war, but I just didn't have time. I know
Rachel has actually been back to Poland and visited Zabludow several
times where she visits a Polish family.

Also on the list is Israel Bramson. He is one of the young men who my
cousin Palter Lopata invited to join him at the farm of the Danieluk
family in Solniki where they were hiding out >from the Nazis. I have
Israel's testimony translated to English on my website. I am friends
with his two daughters in Israel, and helped them get the Danieluk
family recognized by Yad Vashem as holocaust rescuers. Here is a link
to
his remarkable testimony,
http://www.zabludow.com/bramsontestimony.html

For some reason my relative Palter Lopata is not on the list but he
should be. I have his testimony on my website, and the story about the
massacre in Solniki in 1945 after the war. Here is a link,
http://www.zabludow.com/Paltierstestimony.html
I also produced a movie on DVD that tells his story. It has video from
the ceremony at Yad Vashem, and of the tour of Jerusalem that we took
the surviving Danieluk family members on. It was one of the greatest
experiences of my life. If anyone is really interested in my DVD I can
send a copy.

Mendal Mielnicki is now Michel Mielnicki. He is still alive at least
as
of a year or two ago and lives in Vancouver BC. As far as I can tell
he
is one of only two Jews still alive who were in Zabludow on June 26th
1941 the day the Germans came in. I have his testimony of that day in
English. I've spoken to him on the phone.

David Zabludowski I also know about and have his testimony >from the
Zabludow Yizkor book on my website. I think he died quite a long time
ago in Argentina.

I could go on for hours about these testimonies. They are so much more
than just names on a list. These testimonies can be very frustrating
however once you get them translated. Anyway great Job!!

Tilford Bartman

www.zabludow.com


Holocaust Testimonies from Jewish Historical Institute #poland

Greenberger <greenberger@...>
 

I just received your digest for Wednesday 23 February 2005, and am very
impressed with all the work that is being done for the Bialygen Website.
Yasher Koach to you and all those involved in this wonderful project.

On a personal note I was most excited to find my fathers name (Abraham
Ostroburski )amongst those on the list of Holocaust survivors testimonies.
As he passed away over 30 years ago I would love to obtain a copy of his
testimony. Could you please advise me how I can obtain a copy.

Regards
Aviva Greenberger
Melbourne, Australia

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Holocaust Testimonies from Jewish Historical Institute #poland

Greenberger <greenberger@...>
 

I just received your digest for Wednesday 23 February 2005, and am very
impressed with all the work that is being done for the Bialygen Website.
Yasher Koach to you and all those involved in this wonderful project.

On a personal note I was most excited to find my fathers name (Abraham
Ostroburski )amongst those on the list of Holocaust survivors testimonies.
As he passed away over 30 years ago I would love to obtain a copy of his
testimony. Could you please advise me how I can obtain a copy.

Regards
Aviva Greenberger
Melbourne, Australia

Vital Record Transcriptions #hungary

Carol J. Robinson <caroljr@...>
 

Vital record transcriptions are progressing nicely, even in the absence
of a coordinator (though it would be great to have someone volunteer to
serve as the coordinator - contact me to volunteer).

One of our transcribers has encountered some very unusual entries in
Hungarian and some column headings that are beyond my German language
skills. I also think it would be helpful to compile a guide for
transcribers listing common headings and terms at least in German and
Hungarian. If you are willing to help us with the unusual entries and/or
with translating words for the vital record transcription guide, please
contact me at caroljr@....

Carol Robinson
H-SIG Research Coordinator
caroljr@...
Alameda, CA

Hungary SIG #Hungary Vital Record Transcriptions #hungary

Carol J. Robinson <caroljr@...>
 

Vital record transcriptions are progressing nicely, even in the absence
of a coordinator (though it would be great to have someone volunteer to
serve as the coordinator - contact me to volunteer).

One of our transcribers has encountered some very unusual entries in
Hungarian and some column headings that are beyond my German language
skills. I also think it would be helpful to compile a guide for
transcribers listing common headings and terms at least in German and
Hungarian. If you are willing to help us with the unusual entries and/or
with translating words for the vital record transcription guide, please
contact me at caroljr@....

Carol Robinson
H-SIG Research Coordinator
caroljr@...
Alameda, CA