Date   

FRAENKEL, KRIVINE, WEIL, NOVOCHELSKI #france

Hazel Dakers
 

I am seeking living descendants of the following whose families were living
in Paris late C19th and into C20th:

Isaac FRAENKEL and his wife Elvire nee NOVOCHELSKI m.1896 Paris

Maurice Alter Meier KRIVINE and his wife Sophie nee FRAENKEL and sons
Pierre Leon Georges KRIVINE b. 1899 Paris and Andre Louis Robert KRIVINE b.
1901 Paris

Marcus FRAENKEL and his wife Berthe nee WEIL m 1894 Paris

(This Fraenkel family originated >from Kamenetz Podolsk).

Many thanks.

Hazel Dakers, London UK
www.hazeldakers.co.uk


(Lithuania-US-NY) YIVO Institute and Lithuanian Government Agree About Digitizing Collection #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The YIVO Institute for Jewish research- the world's foremost collection of
Yiddish books and cultural artifacts, prewar collection was split up at the
end of WW2-during the War some of the collection was shipped to Frankfurt
Germany for an anti-Semitic institute for the study of the "Jewish
question". That part of the collection recovered by the US Army was sent to
YIVO's home in New York City. However, much of the collection remained in
Vilnius-formerly called Vilna- the Jerusalem of Europe. The Lithuanian
government did not want to part with the collection which it considers part
of its national heritage. However, the Lithuanian government has agreed to
having is hundreds of thousands of document pages and books digitally copied
and integrated into a web portal so that the cache will be available to all
worldwide.

YIVO has announced a $5.25 million project to reunite the treasures,
digitally.

YIVO in New York with an archive of 24 million items will also be digitized.
The project will take up to seven years. The Lithuanian Central State
archives will pay about $250,000 for the digitization of the materials still
in Lithuania. YIVO in New York City will pay an additional two employees for
the project.

To read more about the project and the history of the collection during WW2
go to http://yivo.org/about/index.php?tid=154&aid=1330

Or read the NY Times article >from October 2 entitled: Split Up by
Holocaust, Top Collection of Yiddish Works Will Reunite Digitally at:
http://tinyurl.com/oec3esr

Original url:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/03/nyregion/split-up-by-holocaust-top-collect
ion-of-yiddish-works-will-reunite-digitally.html?mabReward=RI%3A8&action=cli
ck&pgtype=Homepage&region=CColumn&module=Recommendation&src=rechp&WT.nav=Rec
Engine

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


French SIG #France FRAENKEL, KRIVINE, WEIL, NOVOCHELSKI #france

Hazel Dakers
 

I am seeking living descendants of the following whose families were living
in Paris late C19th and into C20th:

Isaac FRAENKEL and his wife Elvire nee NOVOCHELSKI m.1896 Paris

Maurice Alter Meier KRIVINE and his wife Sophie nee FRAENKEL and sons
Pierre Leon Georges KRIVINE b. 1899 Paris and Andre Louis Robert KRIVINE b.
1901 Paris

Marcus FRAENKEL and his wife Berthe nee WEIL m 1894 Paris

(This Fraenkel family originated >from Kamenetz Podolsk).

Many thanks.

Hazel Dakers, London UK
www.hazeldakers.co.uk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Lithuania-US-NY) YIVO Institute and Lithuanian Government Agree About Digitizing Collection #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The YIVO Institute for Jewish research- the world's foremost collection of
Yiddish books and cultural artifacts, prewar collection was split up at the
end of WW2-during the War some of the collection was shipped to Frankfurt
Germany for an anti-Semitic institute for the study of the "Jewish
question". That part of the collection recovered by the US Army was sent to
YIVO's home in New York City. However, much of the collection remained in
Vilnius-formerly called Vilna- the Jerusalem of Europe. The Lithuanian
government did not want to part with the collection which it considers part
of its national heritage. However, the Lithuanian government has agreed to
having is hundreds of thousands of document pages and books digitally copied
and integrated into a web portal so that the cache will be available to all
worldwide.

YIVO has announced a $5.25 million project to reunite the treasures,
digitally.

YIVO in New York with an archive of 24 million items will also be digitized.
The project will take up to seven years. The Lithuanian Central State
archives will pay about $250,000 for the digitization of the materials still
in Lithuania. YIVO in New York City will pay an additional two employees for
the project.

To read more about the project and the history of the collection during WW2
go to http://yivo.org/about/index.php?tid=154&aid=1330

Or read the NY Times article >from October 2 entitled: Split Up by
Holocaust, Top Collection of Yiddish Works Will Reunite Digitally at:
http://tinyurl.com/oec3esr

Original url:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/03/nyregion/split-up-by-holocaust-top-collect
ion-of-yiddish-works-will-reunite-digitally.html?mabReward=RI%3A8&action=cli
ck&pgtype=Homepage&region=CColumn&module=Recommendation&src=rechp&WT.nav=Rec
Engine

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Szalaszend, Hungary birth,marriage Records #general

PATRICIA SHAW Owner
 

My GGF, William Friedmann, was born 20 Nov 1859 in Szalaszend, Hungary.
Where would look for his birth record? I have been to Szalaszend and
there are no records being kept there.
Would appreciate any suggestions.
Thank you

You may answer me either on the list or to email -
pshaw36@centurylink.net

Patricia Shaw, Oregon
Searching: William Friedmann, Szalaszend, Miskolc; Sarah Friedmann (Cziner),
Buzinka (now Slovakia) Alexander Pollacsek, Debrecen, Hungary,
Ida Pollacsek (Friedmann), Miskolc


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Szalaszend, Hungary birth,marriage Records #general

PATRICIA SHAW Owner
 

My GGF, William Friedmann, was born 20 Nov 1859 in Szalaszend, Hungary.
Where would look for his birth record? I have been to Szalaszend and
there are no records being kept there.
Would appreciate any suggestions.
Thank you

You may answer me either on the list or to email -
pshaw36@centurylink.net

Patricia Shaw, Oregon
Searching: William Friedmann, Szalaszend, Miskolc; Sarah Friedmann (Cziner),
Buzinka (now Slovakia) Alexander Pollacsek, Debrecen, Hungary,
Ida Pollacsek (Friedmann), Miskolc


Given name Sidney #bessarabia

Deborah Barr
 

Dear Group,

I've been told there were many Sidneys in my family in Rascov, Moldova going back for generations,
including my great-grandfather, but I don't know what the name would have been in Europe. The
only Sidney to come over to the US was listed as Shepsel on the passenger list, and I presume that
was a knickname.

There is nothing for Romania in the Given Names Database. For Ukraine I get Simcha as a possibility
and also Yehoshue (Ishie/Shaie/Shaye/Yehoyshue/Yeshie/Yeshiye).

If you know the original name of anyone >from this area who was called Sidney in English I am
curious to learn it. I would appreciate any thoughts about this.

Regards,

Deborah Barr
LUMER, GUREFSKY, GRONMAN (Rascov)


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Given name Sidney #bessarabia

Deborah Barr
 

Dear Group,

I've been told there were many Sidneys in my family in Rascov, Moldova going back for generations,
including my great-grandfather, but I don't know what the name would have been in Europe. The
only Sidney to come over to the US was listed as Shepsel on the passenger list, and I presume that
was a knickname.

There is nothing for Romania in the Given Names Database. For Ukraine I get Simcha as a possibility
and also Yehoshue (Ishie/Shaie/Shaye/Yehoyshue/Yeshie/Yeshiye).

If you know the original name of anyone >from this area who was called Sidney in English I am
curious to learn it. I would appreciate any thoughts about this.

Regards,

Deborah Barr
LUMER, GUREFSKY, GRONMAN (Rascov)


JGS Toronto Meeting October 22, 2014 #general

Valerie Fox
 

JGS of Toronto presents:

Date: October 22, 2014

Time: 8:00 p.m.
Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

Place: Temple Sinai
210 Wilson Avenue
Toronto, Ontario

Refreshments will be served

Non- Members : $5.00

Presenter: Fiona Gold Kroll, author of "A Stone for Benjamin: My
Genealogical Search for my Great Uncle"

Fiona Gold Kroll was born in England and has resided in Toronto since 1966.
This professional researcher turned genealogy sleuth talks about her
emotional journey writing this book, a book about her research into the
life of her great-uncle, Benjamin Albaum, who disappeared >from Paris during
WWII and perished in Auschwitz.

For further information go to: www.jgstoronto.ca
info@jgstoronto.ca
telephone 647-247-6414

Valerie Miller Fox
Mentoring Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Toronto Meeting October 22, 2014 #general

Valerie Fox
 

JGS of Toronto presents:

Date: October 22, 2014

Time: 8:00 p.m.
Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

Place: Temple Sinai
210 Wilson Avenue
Toronto, Ontario

Refreshments will be served

Non- Members : $5.00

Presenter: Fiona Gold Kroll, author of "A Stone for Benjamin: My
Genealogical Search for my Great Uncle"

Fiona Gold Kroll was born in England and has resided in Toronto since 1966.
This professional researcher turned genealogy sleuth talks about her
emotional journey writing this book, a book about her research into the
life of her great-uncle, Benjamin Albaum, who disappeared >from Paris during
WWII and perished in Auschwitz.

For further information go to: www.jgstoronto.ca
info@jgstoronto.ca
telephone 647-247-6414

Valerie Miller Fox
Mentoring Coordinator


JGSGW October 2014 Meeting Announcement #general

Robin Meltzer
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington will host its October
2014 meeting on Sunday, October 19, 2014 at 1:00 pm at The Lillian & Albert
Small Jewish Museum, 701 Third Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20001. Link to
map on the JGSGW website: http://www.jgsgw.org/directions.html#LASJM.
Directions may be found on the Jewish Historical Society of Greater
Washington’s website: http://www.jhsgw.org/about/contact.php#directions.

Program: Genealogy Resources in the Library of Congress

Discover world class genealogy resources in your own backyard! This program
features two presentations >from representatives of the Library of Congress,
one >from the Map Division and one >from the Genealogy & Local History
section. Each speaker will highlight many resources of interest to
genealogists and how the Library's unique collections can further family
history research.

Presentation One: Genealogic and Historical Research Using Sanborn Maps
Speaker: Dr. Habte Teclemariam, Library of Congress

Sanborn Maps provide a unique close-up view of the American communities our
ancestors knew. Published >from 1867 to 2007 to assess fire and flood
insurance risks, the maps show not only property numbers and building
outlines, but wells, pipelines, dumps and railroads. These details can
provide valuable historical information and confirm data provided in vital
records and newspaper accounts. The Map Division of the Library of Congress
has a complete collection of Sanborn Maps, covering approximately 12,000
towns and cities throughout the United States.

Dr. Habte Teclemariam is Senior Reference Librarian of the Geography and Map
Division of The Library of Congress. He is a graduate of the University of
Asmara, Hope College and has pursued advanced studies at the University of
Michigan. Dr. Teclemariam specializes in European and Middle Eastern
geography. He is fluent in a number of languages, including Hebrew.

Presentation Two: Finding Jewish Ancestors and their Stories
Susan Garfinkel and Anne Toohey, Library of Congress

Many ancestors, immigrants, women, minorities, and others, do not have
compiled biographies. While their presence is duly noted in public records
such as the census, the richness of their lives can seem lost to history.
Yet, when the dry facts of records are placed in context with a broad
variety of social and cultural artifacts, a fuller story soon emerges.
Available sources of evidence run the gamut >from newspapers, travelogues,
letters, diaries, printed texts and ephemera; to photographs, moving images,
sound recordings, and maps; to three-dimensional objects. Anne Toohey of
the Local History and Genealogy Section and Susan Garfinkel of the Digital
Reference Section will discuss resources and strategies for reconstructing
the life stories of our ancestors using materials available on site at the
Library of Congress and digitized on its website, with special attention to
the historical context that enriches Jewish genealogical research.

Susan Garfinkel is a research specialist at the Library of Congress; her
subject areas include architecture, early American cultural history and
digital humanities. With a PhD in American Civilization (Penn) as well as MA
degrees in folklore (Penn) and in American material culture (Winterthur),
she taught at several universities in the Washington, DC area before coming
to LC in 2002. Her published work spans topics >from breast cancer in the
early 19th century, to Quakers and plainness, to elevators in film and
fiction, to vernacular architecture and performance theory. She has recently
begun to research her own family's history.

Anne Toohey has served as a reference librarian in the Local History and
Genealogy Section at the Library of Congress since 1991. Toohey specializes
in genealogy and local history for Virginia, Canada and France and is the
Canadian Recommending Officer for books at the Library of Congress. In
addition, she specializes in the genealogy of groups such as Loyalists,
Huguenots and Quakers, and is interested in migration history.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy: As of January 1, 2014, a non-member may
attend the monthly JGSGW meeting as a Guest for a $5.00 fee payable at the
sign-in table. The $5.00 Guest fee may be applied toward payment of annual
JGSGW membership dues if dues are paid at the same meeting at which the
guest fee was paid. JGSGW members requiring personal assistance at a
meeting due to a health condition or disability may bring someone to assist
them free of charge.

Robin Meltzer
VP Communications, JGSGW
www.jgsgw.org
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgw


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW October 2014 Meeting Announcement #general

Robin Meltzer
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington will host its October
2014 meeting on Sunday, October 19, 2014 at 1:00 pm at The Lillian & Albert
Small Jewish Museum, 701 Third Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20001. Link to
map on the JGSGW website: http://www.jgsgw.org/directions.html#LASJM.
Directions may be found on the Jewish Historical Society of Greater
Washington’s website: http://www.jhsgw.org/about/contact.php#directions.

Program: Genealogy Resources in the Library of Congress

Discover world class genealogy resources in your own backyard! This program
features two presentations >from representatives of the Library of Congress,
one >from the Map Division and one >from the Genealogy & Local History
section. Each speaker will highlight many resources of interest to
genealogists and how the Library's unique collections can further family
history research.

Presentation One: Genealogic and Historical Research Using Sanborn Maps
Speaker: Dr. Habte Teclemariam, Library of Congress

Sanborn Maps provide a unique close-up view of the American communities our
ancestors knew. Published >from 1867 to 2007 to assess fire and flood
insurance risks, the maps show not only property numbers and building
outlines, but wells, pipelines, dumps and railroads. These details can
provide valuable historical information and confirm data provided in vital
records and newspaper accounts. The Map Division of the Library of Congress
has a complete collection of Sanborn Maps, covering approximately 12,000
towns and cities throughout the United States.

Dr. Habte Teclemariam is Senior Reference Librarian of the Geography and Map
Division of The Library of Congress. He is a graduate of the University of
Asmara, Hope College and has pursued advanced studies at the University of
Michigan. Dr. Teclemariam specializes in European and Middle Eastern
geography. He is fluent in a number of languages, including Hebrew.

Presentation Two: Finding Jewish Ancestors and their Stories
Susan Garfinkel and Anne Toohey, Library of Congress

Many ancestors, immigrants, women, minorities, and others, do not have
compiled biographies. While their presence is duly noted in public records
such as the census, the richness of their lives can seem lost to history.
Yet, when the dry facts of records are placed in context with a broad
variety of social and cultural artifacts, a fuller story soon emerges.
Available sources of evidence run the gamut >from newspapers, travelogues,
letters, diaries, printed texts and ephemera; to photographs, moving images,
sound recordings, and maps; to three-dimensional objects. Anne Toohey of
the Local History and Genealogy Section and Susan Garfinkel of the Digital
Reference Section will discuss resources and strategies for reconstructing
the life stories of our ancestors using materials available on site at the
Library of Congress and digitized on its website, with special attention to
the historical context that enriches Jewish genealogical research.

Susan Garfinkel is a research specialist at the Library of Congress; her
subject areas include architecture, early American cultural history and
digital humanities. With a PhD in American Civilization (Penn) as well as MA
degrees in folklore (Penn) and in American material culture (Winterthur),
she taught at several universities in the Washington, DC area before coming
to LC in 2002. Her published work spans topics >from breast cancer in the
early 19th century, to Quakers and plainness, to elevators in film and
fiction, to vernacular architecture and performance theory. She has recently
begun to research her own family's history.

Anne Toohey has served as a reference librarian in the Local History and
Genealogy Section at the Library of Congress since 1991. Toohey specializes
in genealogy and local history for Virginia, Canada and France and is the
Canadian Recommending Officer for books at the Library of Congress. In
addition, she specializes in the genealogy of groups such as Loyalists,
Huguenots and Quakers, and is interested in migration history.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy: As of January 1, 2014, a non-member may
attend the monthly JGSGW meeting as a Guest for a $5.00 fee payable at the
sign-in table. The $5.00 Guest fee may be applied toward payment of annual
JGSGW membership dues if dues are paid at the same meeting at which the
guest fee was paid. JGSGW members requiring personal assistance at a
meeting due to a health condition or disability may bring someone to assist
them free of charge.

Robin Meltzer
VP Communications, JGSGW
www.jgsgw.org
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgw


Are your ancestors from Wurzburg? #germany

Judith Elam
 

I have just returned >from a life-changing trip to Germany. One that I
thought I would never make but am so grateful I did!

Although based mainly in Berlin, I also spent two days in Wurzburg,
visiting the wonderful Shalom Europa museum and Johanna Stahl
Zentrum at Valentin-Beckerstrasse 11, and the Jewish cemetery, where my
paternal grandparents, Werner and Grete NATHAN, are buried. The museum sits
on the site of the former home for survivors - mainly of Theresienstadt.

My grandparents, who were >from Berlin and survived Theresienstadt, were at
Deggendorf displacement camp for the next two years, and then placed in this home,
where they died in the 50's.

Very few of these survivors were actually >from Wurzburg originally. All
that remains of the home today is a small section of a surrounding wall.
While the history of the Jews of Wurzburg is well documented in the museum,
I was disappointed to see that there is nothing whatsoever to indicate that
the home had even existed on this spot, much less documents, photos or
anything on its residents, such as my grandparents. Indeed I was told by
the delightful director, Dr. Rotraud Ries, that I was the first descendant
of former residents to visit the museum! So the museum has nothing to
document this post-war era, other than some documents and photos that I have
now provided pertaining to my grandparents. I have discussed this sad
situation with Dr. Ries, and she agrees that it would be important to have
an exhibition on this post-war period, but she needs material! And they do
have space for it.

Is there anyone out there whose parents or grandparents also lived at this
home for survivors at Valentin-Beckerstrasse 11, Wurzburg, after 1945? If
so, would you be willing to donate documents, photos and personal items to
the museum for this exhibition? They would also welcome items >from the
pre-war period to expand their existing exhibitions.

Judith Elam, Kihei, Hawaii elamj@hawaii.rr.com


German SIG #Germany Are your ancestors from Wurzburg? #germany

Judith Elam
 

I have just returned >from a life-changing trip to Germany. One that I
thought I would never make but am so grateful I did!

Although based mainly in Berlin, I also spent two days in Wurzburg,
visiting the wonderful Shalom Europa museum and Johanna Stahl
Zentrum at Valentin-Beckerstrasse 11, and the Jewish cemetery, where my
paternal grandparents, Werner and Grete NATHAN, are buried. The museum sits
on the site of the former home for survivors - mainly of Theresienstadt.

My grandparents, who were >from Berlin and survived Theresienstadt, were at
Deggendorf displacement camp for the next two years, and then placed in this home,
where they died in the 50's.

Very few of these survivors were actually >from Wurzburg originally. All
that remains of the home today is a small section of a surrounding wall.
While the history of the Jews of Wurzburg is well documented in the museum,
I was disappointed to see that there is nothing whatsoever to indicate that
the home had even existed on this spot, much less documents, photos or
anything on its residents, such as my grandparents. Indeed I was told by
the delightful director, Dr. Rotraud Ries, that I was the first descendant
of former residents to visit the museum! So the museum has nothing to
document this post-war era, other than some documents and photos that I have
now provided pertaining to my grandparents. I have discussed this sad
situation with Dr. Ries, and she agrees that it would be important to have
an exhibition on this post-war period, but she needs material! And they do
have space for it.

Is there anyone out there whose parents or grandparents also lived at this
home for survivors at Valentin-Beckerstrasse 11, Wurzburg, after 1945? If
so, would you be willing to donate documents, photos and personal items to
the museum for this exhibition? They would also welcome items >from the
pre-war period to expand their existing exhibitions.

Judith Elam, Kihei, Hawaii elamj@hawaii.rr.com


Geographical question #germany

John Anderson
 

I have someone I am researching who claimed on censuses 1915, 1920 and 1925
that he was born in 1885 in Russia. Yet on the 1930 census, he claims he was
born in Czechoslovakia. Why would he change that? Was any part of 1930
Czechoslovakia part of Russia?

John Anderson, Orlando, Florida counselor12721@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Geographical question #germany

John Anderson
 

I have someone I am researching who claimed on censuses 1915, 1920 and 1925
that he was born in 1885 in Russia. Yet on the 1930 census, he claims he was
born in Czechoslovakia. Why would he change that? Was any part of 1930
Czechoslovakia part of Russia?

John Anderson, Orlando, Florida counselor12721@gmail.com


Facebook site for Iasi... #romania

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All,

A well-meant couple of message went out to the SIG recently regarding a
new Facebook site for discussion of Iasi families.

Unfortunately, this resulted in messages coming to the List, some pro
and others very anti such a site, including a couple of very ugly
flaming ones. JewishGen policies, Rules and Guidelines do not permit
the posting of such messages. It is matter of using the Web with good
manners to all.

Therefore this thread is closed! There will be no more discussion of
this subject permitted on our site. If there are those of you who wish
to continue it please do so privately.

Thank you,
Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator Rom-SIG


Romania SIG #Romania Facebook site for Iasi... #romania

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All,

A well-meant couple of message went out to the SIG recently regarding a
new Facebook site for discussion of Iasi families.

Unfortunately, this resulted in messages coming to the List, some pro
and others very anti such a site, including a couple of very ugly
flaming ones. JewishGen policies, Rules and Guidelines do not permit
the posting of such messages. It is matter of using the Web with good
manners to all.

Therefore this thread is closed! There will be no more discussion of
this subject permitted on our site. If there are those of you who wish
to continue it please do so privately.

Thank you,
Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator Rom-SIG


Dressmaking #austria-czech

leah9knud@...
 

Re Helen Epstine's posting about the Strnad exhibition at Milwaukee Jewish Museum
and the dressmaker Hedvig Strnad of Prague, I recently came upon the
name STRNAD name in my research relating to my late step-Father's WEISS-ZIPPER etc.
family of Vienna. However, I have not yet followed this up.

My step-Father's Mother was Malvine WEISS ZIPPER, B. Vienna 1888 D. Melbourne 1970
daughter of : Samuel b. Benjamin WEISS, B. Kralovitz, Ledec, Bohemia 1836 d. Vienna 1896
and his second wife, Katharina b. Marcus STIASSNY B.1850 Radenin, Bohemia d. Vienna 1917

Malvine was the second youngest child of Samuel (of about 10 children -
only two children of Katharina).

Amongst a considerable number of photographs and documents >from my late
step-Father's possessions, I found what look like three apprenticeship books in the
name of Malvine WEISS.

Malvine was a dressmaker who worked for high-class Viennese women >from
her home in Wien 15, before the family fled to Shanghai.
My step-Father fled in October 1938 after his Mother's dressmaking
assistant managed to dissuade the police when they knocked
on the door of their flat, that no Jews were living there. Some of his
ZIPPER cousins were arrested and ended up in Dachau and
then Buchenwald, before managing to get out and flee to Philippines.
Dad's parents, paternal grandfather, two paternal aunts, and some of his
maternal uncles and their families managed to get to Shanghai in 1939.
Two of his WEISS uncles died in Shanghai.
But most of his maternal WEISS, WOLLNER, LOFF, KOWENKRON, and related
families perished.

I wonder if anyone else has similar apprenticeship records >from Vienna,
which, one day soon, I will eventually have to find a safe home for,
probably in either the Jewish Museum or the Holocaust Centre in Melbourne.

Lorraine Bertelsen
Boho, Downunder












Subject: strnad exhibit at Milwaukee jewish museum
From:helen.epstein@gmail.com
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014

I wanted to let you know about a current exhibit at the Jewish Museum
in Milwaukee where I'll be giving a talk next week on Czech Jewish
dressmakers. The families mentioned in the exhibit which centers
around dressmaker Hedvig Strnad of Prague include: Penticka, Kohn,
Ancerl or Antsherl, Neumann, Bauml and Neuschul.

I do not have the documents myself but if you are interested in
getting hold of them you can email the Education Director of the
Museum, Ellie
at:<educator@jewishmuseummilwaukee.org>


And if you have friends in Milwaukee, the program begins at 11:30 am

Shanah tovah to all,


www.helenepstein.com
www.plunkettlakepress.com


Re: Early Immigration #austria-czech

vshovlin@...
 

The Castle Garden site (www.castlegarden.org) is down. I called the Battery Conservancy and was
told that their tech person was on vacation but the site should be back up by tomorrow or
Wednesday.


Virginia

Virginia Shovlin
vshovlin@sbcglobal.net

________________________________
From: Austria-Czech SIG digest <austriaczech@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: austriaczech digest recipients <austriaczech@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Sunday, October 5, 2014 2:04 AM
Subject: austriaczech digest: October 04, 2014


AUSTRIACZECH Digest for Saturday, October 04, 2014.

1. Re: Early immigration
2. Re: Mario Toselli again
3. Opening the Door to the History of Jewish Presence in Bohemia
4. strnad exhibit at Milwaukee jewish museum
5. Cadastral Map for Bukaczowce: Gesher Galicia Map Room
6. Re: Early immigration

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Early immigration
From: vshovlin@sbcglobal.net
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:26:38 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Most early records show up on Ancestry but you can also check www.castlegarden.org a free site that lists immigrants entering the U.S. before 1892. During the 1860s it was the official entry point for immigrants in New York.

Virginia

Virginia Shovlin
vshovlin@sbcglobal.net


Subject: Early immigration
From: adrienne9919@yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:56:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Does anyone know if there are immigration records into the U.S. >from as early as the 1860's? Thank you.

Adrienne Lasky

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mario Toselli again
From: madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 20:55:58 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks to Thomas Fischer Weiss,

For going to the trouble to try and translate the Italian pages. I
think we get the picture. One of the people who responded seem to
think that because he charged for his services, that would make him
ineligilble for recognition as a Righteous Gentile. I don't know the
rules, per se.

from what I could glean >from the imperfect translation, I would like
to think that he did it more than just for the money. Surely he had
to pay others to assist him, buy fuel, etc.

He was daring, risking his life and was imprisoned more than once; he
organized the process; he "streamlined" the process with better boats,
and people were saved. (Perhaps he had a few failures, like Thomas,
but even so, Thomas is still here to tell of it.)

If anyone has more to add, it would be fun to hear about it.

Thanks again,

Madeleine Isenberg,
Beverly Hills, CA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Opening the Door to the History of Jewish Presence in Bohemia
From: randols@bslaw.net
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 11:36:51 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

Society for the History of Czechoslovak Jews is pleased to invite you to:

A FAMILY AFFAIR:
OPENING THE DOOR TO THE HISTORY OF JEWISH PRESENCE IN BOHEMIA
BY MARTIN SMOK
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 7PM
THE BOHEMIAN NATIONAL HALL, 321 EAST 73RD STREET,
NEW YORK, NY 10021

Admissions free

Presentation and lecture by Martin Smok is based on the archives of
Amira Kohn-Trattner, president emeritus of SHCSJ, tracing the history of
one Jewish family >from late 19th century Bohemia until the present day.
Featuring unique pictorial material >from this private source, it will
document the changes in cultural, national and religious identity of
Czech Jews after the establishment of the Czechoslovak Republic, as well
as the impact of the Holocaust and exile.

http://new-york.czechcentres.cz/program/event-details/a-family-affair/

Martin Smok is a Czech researcher, writer and filmmaker. He is also the
Senior International Program Consultant for the USC Shoah Foundation,
the Institute for Visual History and Education.
www.shcsj.org info@shcsj.org

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: strnad exhibit at Milwaukee jewish museum
From: helen.epstein@gmail.com
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:36:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

I wanted to let you know about a current exhibit at the Jewish Museum
in Milwaukee where I'll be giving a talk next week on Czech Jewish
dressmakers. The families mentioned in the exhibit which centers
around dressmaker Hedvig Strnad of Prague include: Penticka, Kohn,
Ancerl or Antsherl, Neumann, Bauml and Neuschul.

I do not have the documents myself but if you are interested in
getting hold of them you can email the Education Director of the
Museum, Ellie
at: <educator@jewishmuseummilwaukee.org>


And if you have friends in Milwaukee, the program begins at 11:30 am

Shanah tovah to all,


www.helenepstein.com
www.plunkettlakepress.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cadastral Map for Bukaczowce: Gesher Galicia Map Room
From: pweisberger@gmail.com
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 12:53:48 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

Gesher Galicia's Cadastral Map room has just added a map for
Bukaczowce ( Bukachivtsi, Bukachevtsy, Bukashevitz,) formerly Galicia,
today in Ukraine.

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/bukachivtsi-bukaczowce-1853/

This is a partial feldskizzen (field sketch) map, showing urban
concentration wrapping around the marshy reservoir and its outlet
creeks. Businesses and residences are numbered; farmlands are numbered
and named. If your family lived in this town and owned land in the mid
19th century you may well find their name on this map. On the far left
you'll find a list of homeowners (Jewish and Polish) referencing those
who lived close the market square and/or may be prominent community
members. The capital letter next to their name will also be found on
their house near the square.

The map shows the central market square and the Jewish community
square where the synagogue is denoted by a triangle sign, usually
found marking Jewish cemeteries. There are also several churches or
chapels, governmental buildings (denoted with flag icons,) Christian
and Jewish cemeteries, and what appears to be planned acquisition of
land for the future Lemberg-Czernowitz line of the Galicia Railway.

If you compare this map to the earlier one (1848) on our site:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/bukachivtsi-bukaczowce-1848/

You can see the growth of the town over five years: a wonderful
example of how maps can illuminate the life of a shtetl and should be
considered an integral part of historical and genealogical research.

If you identify family >from these maps or have postcard views of the
town or market square you are willing to share, please let me know.

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching the map (which was copied by Brian
Lenius) and for writing and researching the descriptive text.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Early immigration
From: hpgrab@augustakom.net
Date: Sat, 04 Oct 2014 11:10:03 +0200
X-Message-Number: 6

The search does not work. When I click on "Search", then the following
error message is displayed: "Error: connecting to database: localhost"
Can anyone help me?

Best
Hanus Grab


9/25/2014 17:26, wrote Virginia Anne Shovlin vshovlin@sbcglobal.net:
Most early records show up on Ancestry but you can also check www.castlegarden.org a free site that lists immigrants entering the U.S. before 1892. During the 1860s it was the official entry point for immigrants in New York.

Virginia Shovlin
vshovlin@sbcglobal.net



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