Date   

Re: Brody (Lemberg Prov.) Vital Records from 1862-1900's #galicia

Willie46@...
 

Joyce:

I am the coordinator for the JRI-Poland AGAD project that covers
vital records for 86 administrative towns in the eastern part of the
former Austrian province of Galicia and are housed in Warsaw at
the AGAD Archives. The AGAD Archives does not have any
records for Brody.

You probably already know this, but Miriam Weiner's inventory in
her Ukraine book shows the following records in the Lviv Archives:

Births: 1815-1871, 1935
Death: 1815-1861, 1935
Marriage: 1815-1871, 1935

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archives Coordinator

Does anyone know which archive would have vital records >from the town of
Brody, Poland (now Ukraine) for the years of 1862 forward to the 1900's.
This was part of Lemberg Prov. I am told that the L'viv Archives contain
records only up to 1861.

Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA


Morton ALLEN #poland

Marilyn <jade2@...>
 

would someone please give me the address of Morton Allen's site. I
accidentally deleted it.
Thank you,

Marilyn McKay


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Brody (Lemberg Prov.) Vital Records from 1862-1900's #poland

Willie46@...
 

Joyce:

I am the coordinator for the JRI-Poland AGAD project that covers
vital records for 86 administrative towns in the eastern part of the
former Austrian province of Galicia and are housed in Warsaw at
the AGAD Archives. The AGAD Archives does not have any
records for Brody.

You probably already know this, but Miriam Weiner's inventory in
her Ukraine book shows the following records in the Lviv Archives:

Births: 1815-1871, 1935
Death: 1815-1861, 1935
Marriage: 1815-1871, 1935

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archives Coordinator

Does anyone know which archive would have vital records >from the town of
Brody, Poland (now Ukraine) for the years of 1862 forward to the 1900's.
This was part of Lemberg Prov. I am told that the L'viv Archives contain
records only up to 1861.

Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA


JRI Poland #Poland Morton ALLEN #poland

Marilyn <jade2@...>
 

would someone please give me the address of Morton Allen's site. I
accidentally deleted it.
Thank you,

Marilyn McKay


Lubien Kujawski (Wloclawek prov?) - vital records. #poland

b.wassertzug@att.net <b.wassertzug@...>
 

Does anyone know which archive would have vital records >from the town of
Lubien Kujawski (approx 70 miles W of Warsaw, 40 miles N of Lodz). As far
as I know it is not available in the LDS files. Could they be included
under a larger town's records? It is located in the same district or
province as Wloclawek.

I will appreciate any help on this subject, and would like to hear if
anyone else is interested in this town and surrounding area.

Bernard Wassertzug
Potomac, Maryland


JRI Poland #Poland Lubien Kujawski (Wloclawek prov?) - vital records. #poland

b.wassertzug@att.net <b.wassertzug@...>
 

Does anyone know which archive would have vital records >from the town of
Lubien Kujawski (approx 70 miles W of Warsaw, 40 miles N of Lodz). As far
as I know it is not available in the LDS files. Could they be included
under a larger town's records? It is located in the same district or
province as Wloclawek.

I will appreciate any help on this subject, and would like to hear if
anyone else is interested in this town and surrounding area.

Bernard Wassertzug
Potomac, Maryland


Answer from Minsk archives #belarus

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Belarus SIG:
At the London conference in July, I transmitted a
check for $80 to the Minsk Archives asking that a
search be started for all TALALAY (Mogilev, Gorki,
etc.), with some specific names mentioned, but asking
for whatever they could find as there was only one
family. Anyone in the area with this name is sure to be
related.
Several weeks ago, I sent an email asking for a status
report.
Today I received an email >from the Archive director
Mrs. A.K. Golubovich, which reads in part:

We inform you, that the research work on your inquiry is done. The
Archives summary will be send to you after you pay its cost (400 dollars of the > USA in addition of sum of advance payment). The Archives summary consists of
more than 200 separate records on genealogy of the persons, which you are
interested in, by name Talalay (23 pages).
The letter concluded with bank transfer information,
which I shall take care of as quickly as possible. A
further report will be posted when I receive the
summary.
Best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
<dardasht@barak-online.net>


Belarus SIG #Belarus Answer from Minsk archives #belarus

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Belarus SIG:
At the London conference in July, I transmitted a
check for $80 to the Minsk Archives asking that a
search be started for all TALALAY (Mogilev, Gorki,
etc.), with some specific names mentioned, but asking
for whatever they could find as there was only one
family. Anyone in the area with this name is sure to be
related.
Several weeks ago, I sent an email asking for a status
report.
Today I received an email >from the Archive director
Mrs. A.K. Golubovich, which reads in part:

We inform you, that the research work on your inquiry is done. The
Archives summary will be send to you after you pay its cost (400 dollars of the > USA in addition of sum of advance payment). The Archives summary consists of
more than 200 separate records on genealogy of the persons, which you are
interested in, by name Talalay (23 pages).
The letter concluded with bank transfer information,
which I shall take care of as quickly as possible. A
further report will be posted when I receive the
summary.
Best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
<dardasht@barak-online.net>


Gloezer, Feinberg and Dubinsky found in Grodno and Kartuz Bereza #belarus

Arthur Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

After three years of family research, I finally found my
grandmother Libbi Rabinowitch Glazer arriving NYC in
June 1905 >from Grodno travelling with the following family:

Wolf Dubinski age 19 >from Grodno going to father Chaim
Dubinski 211 West 97th Street, NYC
Reise Feinberg age 27 going to husband Mendel Feinberg
87 or 89 Madison Street, NYC, travelling with children
Alter 5, Rivke 3 and Moishe l0 months.

The Feinbergs are related to my grandmother but I am at
a loss as to who is Dubinsky, my grandmother
may have been living with them when her husband
David Goloschoff or Gloezer emigrated in l904. Glazer/
Golasshoff and Feinberg are originally >from Kartuz Bereza
and finding my grandmother living in Grodno was a complete
surprise. Anyone knowing anything about the Dubinsky
name >from Grodno or anywhere else ,please contact me.

Thank you.
Diane Glazer Jacobs
New York


Belarus SIG #Belarus Gloezer, Feinberg and Dubinsky found in Grodno and Kartuz Bereza #belarus

Arthur Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

After three years of family research, I finally found my
grandmother Libbi Rabinowitch Glazer arriving NYC in
June 1905 >from Grodno travelling with the following family:

Wolf Dubinski age 19 >from Grodno going to father Chaim
Dubinski 211 West 97th Street, NYC
Reise Feinberg age 27 going to husband Mendel Feinberg
87 or 89 Madison Street, NYC, travelling with children
Alter 5, Rivke 3 and Moishe l0 months.

The Feinbergs are related to my grandmother but I am at
a loss as to who is Dubinsky, my grandmother
may have been living with them when her husband
David Goloschoff or Gloezer emigrated in l904. Glazer/
Golasshoff and Feinberg are originally >from Kartuz Bereza
and finding my grandmother living in Grodno was a complete
surprise. Anyone knowing anything about the Dubinsky
name >from Grodno or anywhere else ,please contact me.

Thank you.
Diane Glazer Jacobs
New York


Can't get Tomaszow Mazowiecki information #general

Bennett Greenstein <bennettg@...>
 

Hi,

I am trying to get some records >from Tomaszow Mazowiecki (near Lodz in
Poland). According to the JRI website, in order to get these particular
records (>from the 1890s), I need to email TomaszowMas@aol.com. I sent email
several months ago and didn't hear back. I just tried again and the address
is not working.

Does anyone know if there is a new address or if there is some way to
contact JRI to find out what I can do (I couldn't find anything on the
website).

Thank you very much.

Bennett Greenstein
Newton, Massachusetts
bennettg@mediaone.net


Thanks for 1910 census lookup #general

Joe Newman <pcmanager@...>
 

I want to thank all the wonderful subscribers to this newsgroup for the
generous help provided for my request for a NYS 1910 census lookup. I
received several excellent responses full of great information
(unfortunately did find Joseph Chasen in Gloversville but maybe have a lead
for a NYC census record!).

Joe Newman


Re: English Equivalent of first Names #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Dear Richard:

In his response to your email,
rss1130@hotmail.com writes:

<< Chaim
Ryfka
Laja
Rywka >>


Michael Bernet wrote:

Chaim/Haim/Hyman
Rebecca
Leah
Rebecca


This is absolutely correct as a literal translation, but it is also
important to note that immigrants often did not take the "literal"
translations in English of their Yiddish names, sometimes they took a name
that "sounds like" the Yiddish equivalent, sometimes used the first
letter/sound, sometimes just picked a "nice" popular (then, of course) name.
To further complicate things, sometimes they had "two" names (a "double
name") and commonly used the middle, like Sura Ryfka (Sara Rebecca) being
called Ryfka, but "officially" giving Sura (this happened in my family,
quite confusing until we learned of the double name).

So the moral of the story is keep an open mind about name changes!

Debra Kay
debjkay@msn.com
Simi Valley, CA


Re: Hebrew acronyms on tombstones #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2002 7:31:39 PM Eastern Standard Time,
pcmanager@cox-internet.com asked about acronyms on a tombstone. He refers
readers to a Viewmate and asks:

The abbreviation before the name . . . is I believe Kuf Hay. What is the
significance of these letters.
==No, that letter is Kaf or Khaf, sort of three sides of a square. The Kuf
resembles a "hunched back" leaning on a "walking stick" that extends below
the baseline.

==The initials stand for "Kvod[o] Ha'adon", "the honored Mr." a wording you
will find on many tombstones; a more popular abbreviation in Germanic
communities is Kaf Mem Resh which stands for Kvodo Mar--and means the same
thing. >from the Hebrew spelling of the family name, in which the diphthong
"th" is rendered as Tet Heh, I assume a Germanic origin.

Before his father's name, Chaim, are the letters bet, vev, mem, hay.
==They are actually Bet-Mem-Vav-Heh in that order. This stands for "Ben (son
of) Moreynu (our teacher) (the . . .)" That's a new one on me. You'll
frequently find the acronym completed with a Resh and then it would stand for
"our honored Teacher the Rabbi." In this case it might be simply Kvodo
Moreynu Ha'adon ("the honored teacher Mr."), an extension of the honorific
given to the deceased, which would suggest that the father had a reputation
for his Judaic scholarship but was not actually a rabbi.

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Discontinuity of Family Name in British Marriage Certificates of the mid ... #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2002 7:30:11 PM Eastern Standard Time,
harmir@bezeqint.net writes:

<<
In a recent message, I commented on the development of the patronymic name
to a family name registered in the civil records. Quite often, the family
name known today originated with the given name of an ancestor.

==This stems >from German naming customs. A Jew named Plony, son of a Jew
named Almony, was officially called Jud Plony Almony.

==When Jews in Germany were asked to choose family names (around the second
decade of the 19th century) while some chose a sobriquet that had already
been in use to distinguish the family in the village--a trade, a physical
attribute, location of family origin--many simply retained the name by which
they were already known. My Baruch Wolf, son of the Parnas named Wolf (I
don't yet know what the father of this Wolf was called; perhaps Baruch Wolf
), decided to stick with the name he was already called, familiar both to the
congregants and to those with whom he had business dealings, and became
officially Baruch WOLFF.

**As Esther Ramon points out . . . This custom seems to have continued among
Jews resident in England at least until the mid 1800s
==Only among those who came >from Germanic locations. It did not necessarily
apply to the Sfardim who still predominated, nor to the Eastern European Jews
who started trickling in.

** Among the marriage certificates, there are also many examples of brides who
have adopted the given name of their father as their family name.
==I'm not sure that "adopted the given name" is the right phrase. That is how
these women had been listed in community registers and that was the name that
they were known by until their marriage. I don't think there was ever a
decision "I need a family name, why don't I pick my father's?"

**In view of this phenomenon, when searching for an ancestor, one has to
consider the possibility of a discontinuity of family name.
==Yes, that would be a wise idea. However, the "discontinuity" may not have
been in family names. There are the various mutations of Hebrew, Judaized,
Germanized and Anglicized versions of the same name: the cited Barnett was
likely Baruch in the synagogue, Benedikt in Jewish records kept by the church
(yes, in many locations Jewish bdm records had to be deposited with the local
priest or bishop), Berndt or Bernardt in commercial documents, and Barnett
when they got to England. We can find the same person with various forms of
the name as first name in this country or that, and we may find that a family
was variously known by this name or that. In civil records in Germany after
about 1820, there was probably little change in the family name once it was
registered (OK, WOLFF may have changed to WOLF or SCHWARTZ to SCHWARZ--they
weren't sticklers for spelling then).

I'm not sure what happened in England. It is certainly possible that once a
family name had been registered as such (can anyone give the date for that in
the UK?) that's how it stayed, but the Jewish community within itself used
the old style of naming ([son] [father]) that had been common in Germany. It
is also possible that Abraham SALOMON, now in England, had actually adopted
his surname >from his father, who had been Salomon, son of Abraham and had
officially been designated as Salomon Abraham.

Michael Bernet, New York


Yiddish-->English names #general

Anita Citron <anitac1@...>
 

Unfortunately, giving equivalents is very risky. My Grandmother was Ryfka
and became Rae here. Laja became Lilly.

There are more common 'translations' (which is a highly inaccurate word in
these instances) but there are as many exceptions. Whatever seems
reasonable (generally the first letter of the Yiddish named remained
unchanged in the English--at least back then).

Regards,
Anita Citron

In a message dated 1/23/2002 6:17:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
>rss1130@hotmail.com writes:
><< Chaim
> Ryfka
> Laja
> Rywka >>
>Chaim/Haim/Hyman
>Rebecca
>Leah
>Rebecca
>
>
>Michael Bernet, Ph.D.
>New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Can't get Tomaszow Mazowiecki information #general

Bennett Greenstein <bennettg@...>
 

Hi,

I am trying to get some records >from Tomaszow Mazowiecki (near Lodz in
Poland). According to the JRI website, in order to get these particular
records (>from the 1890s), I need to email TomaszowMas@aol.com. I sent email
several months ago and didn't hear back. I just tried again and the address
is not working.

Does anyone know if there is a new address or if there is some way to
contact JRI to find out what I can do (I couldn't find anything on the
website).

Thank you very much.

Bennett Greenstein
Newton, Massachusetts
bennettg@mediaone.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks for 1910 census lookup #general

Joe Newman <pcmanager@...>
 

I want to thank all the wonderful subscribers to this newsgroup for the
generous help provided for my request for a NYS 1910 census lookup. I
received several excellent responses full of great information
(unfortunately did find Joseph Chasen in Gloversville but maybe have a lead
for a NYC census record!).

Joe Newman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: English Equivalent of first Names #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Dear Richard:

In his response to your email,
rss1130@hotmail.com writes:

<< Chaim
Ryfka
Laja
Rywka >>


Michael Bernet wrote:

Chaim/Haim/Hyman
Rebecca
Leah
Rebecca


This is absolutely correct as a literal translation, but it is also
important to note that immigrants often did not take the "literal"
translations in English of their Yiddish names, sometimes they took a name
that "sounds like" the Yiddish equivalent, sometimes used the first
letter/sound, sometimes just picked a "nice" popular (then, of course) name.
To further complicate things, sometimes they had "two" names (a "double
name") and commonly used the middle, like Sura Ryfka (Sara Rebecca) being
called Ryfka, but "officially" giving Sura (this happened in my family,
quite confusing until we learned of the double name).

So the moral of the story is keep an open mind about name changes!

Debra Kay
debjkay@msn.com
Simi Valley, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hebrew acronyms on tombstones #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2002 7:31:39 PM Eastern Standard Time,
pcmanager@cox-internet.com asked about acronyms on a tombstone. He refers
readers to a Viewmate and asks:

The abbreviation before the name . . . is I believe Kuf Hay. What is the
significance of these letters.
==No, that letter is Kaf or Khaf, sort of three sides of a square. The Kuf
resembles a "hunched back" leaning on a "walking stick" that extends below
the baseline.

==The initials stand for "Kvod[o] Ha'adon", "the honored Mr." a wording you
will find on many tombstones; a more popular abbreviation in Germanic
communities is Kaf Mem Resh which stands for Kvodo Mar--and means the same
thing. >from the Hebrew spelling of the family name, in which the diphthong
"th" is rendered as Tet Heh, I assume a Germanic origin.

Before his father's name, Chaim, are the letters bet, vev, mem, hay.
==They are actually Bet-Mem-Vav-Heh in that order. This stands for "Ben (son
of) Moreynu (our teacher) (the . . .)" That's a new one on me. You'll
frequently find the acronym completed with a Resh and then it would stand for
"our honored Teacher the Rabbi." In this case it might be simply Kvodo
Moreynu Ha'adon ("the honored teacher Mr."), an extension of the honorific
given to the deceased, which would suggest that the father had a reputation
for his Judaic scholarship but was not actually a rabbi.

Michael Bernet, New York