Date   

Victory for genetics over Tay-Sachs - genealogy can be a lifesaver #general

Jerome Seligsohn <jselig1315@...>
 

In today's Science section of the New York Times
[catch it on the Drudge Report] a great victory for
genetics over Tay-Sachs was announced. Because of my
narrow point of view I see it as a victory for
genealogy. A tracking system of carriers which was the
heart of the campaign I prefer to think as a
genealogical victory.
Again the issues of privacy and publicity came up in
the article. Some disease organization leaders sees
the publicity as bad for the image of Jews citing the
occurrence of the disease in other ethnic groups. A
long time ago I retreated >from my advocacy of privacy
over this issue.
Other Ashkenazic genetic illnesses are discussed in
this article.We must realize the importance of
practicing genealogy as an act for the public good.

Jerry Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses related to genealogical aspects of this
subject will be considered for posting, while responses focused on
genetic diseases or genetic testing should be sent privately.


Pisha Paysha Revisited #general

Carole Glick Feinberg <feincgs@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Wow! Did I hit the jackpot with my "pisha paysha" query.
So many of you wonderful people sent me responses and
corrected my faulty memory. "Pisha paysha" is, indeed, a
card game, not the name of the string game that many of
you referred to as "Cat's Cradle."

Thanks to a few Genners, I now recall the name of the
string game my grandmother taught us--"ettel bettel".
Sorry for the confusion. Many of you said Cat's Cradle,
or, "ettel bettel", was known universally, not only in
Galicia. Among the regions cited were Belgium, Hungary,
Ukraine (Odessa), Belarus (Minsk), Africa, USA, and
Israel.

One of my favorite responses was >from an Israeli friend
who said "ettel bettel" is known as Savta Soreget
(knitting grandmother), and he taught the game to his
child last week. Most of the responders said they learned
the game >from their grandparents.

Some of you said the instructions were in print. One or
two of you sent me to a web site for "ettel bettel":

http://personal.riverusers.com/~busybee/main.htm

A few of you used the word, "fun", which can, I think, be
used, also, to describe what we are all about-- connecting
to our past.

One Genner made me laugh by saying she didn't know what
"paysha" meant. Another, told me his grandparents were
introduced to each other by someone who turned out to be a
distant relative of mine.

I learned that using a piece of string or playing cards
helps link the generations and us, one to another.

Carole Glick Feinberg
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
feincgs@...

Searching: LERNER, BERNSTEIN, LANTNER, HAMERMAN,
GARTENBERG, SCHNEIDSCHER, KREUTZENAUER, KOCH,
WEBER/Drohobycz;
HILLEBRAND, SCHECK/Boryslaw;
SOMERFLEK, MALKISCHER, KATZ/Romanowe Siolo, Kujdance,
Zbaraz, Tarnopol;
GLEKEL/Volochisk, Belozerka, Kupil


finding Russian army documents #general

lili susser <susserl@...>
 

Hi All
I have my grandparents marriage document stating that at the time of
marriage in the year 1883 in Plock, my g-father was an "army officer".
The document is in Russian therefore I assume it must have been the
Russian army. What are my chances of finding a document of his service,
where do I turn and did anyone have the experience of obtaining such
document. In other words what can I expect to pay for it?
Any help will be much appreciated.
Thank you for any replies

Lili Susser
Susserl@...


Tay-Sachs #general

David Sencer <djud2@...>
 

There is an excellent article on Tay-Sachs in today's New York Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/18/science/18DISE.html


David J. Sencer,
Atlanta, GA
"mailto:djud@..."

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses related to genealogical aspects of this
subject will be considered for posting, while responses focused on
genetic diseases or genetic testing should be sent privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Victory for genetics over Tay-Sachs - genealogy can be a lifesaver #general

Jerome Seligsohn <jselig1315@...>
 

In today's Science section of the New York Times
[catch it on the Drudge Report] a great victory for
genetics over Tay-Sachs was announced. Because of my
narrow point of view I see it as a victory for
genealogy. A tracking system of carriers which was the
heart of the campaign I prefer to think as a
genealogical victory.
Again the issues of privacy and publicity came up in
the article. Some disease organization leaders sees
the publicity as bad for the image of Jews citing the
occurrence of the disease in other ethnic groups. A
long time ago I retreated >from my advocacy of privacy
over this issue.
Other Ashkenazic genetic illnesses are discussed in
this article.We must realize the importance of
practicing genealogy as an act for the public good.

Jerry Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses related to genealogical aspects of this
subject will be considered for posting, while responses focused on
genetic diseases or genetic testing should be sent privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pisha Paysha Revisited #general

Carole Glick Feinberg <feincgs@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Wow! Did I hit the jackpot with my "pisha paysha" query.
So many of you wonderful people sent me responses and
corrected my faulty memory. "Pisha paysha" is, indeed, a
card game, not the name of the string game that many of
you referred to as "Cat's Cradle."

Thanks to a few Genners, I now recall the name of the
string game my grandmother taught us--"ettel bettel".
Sorry for the confusion. Many of you said Cat's Cradle,
or, "ettel bettel", was known universally, not only in
Galicia. Among the regions cited were Belgium, Hungary,
Ukraine (Odessa), Belarus (Minsk), Africa, USA, and
Israel.

One of my favorite responses was >from an Israeli friend
who said "ettel bettel" is known as Savta Soreget
(knitting grandmother), and he taught the game to his
child last week. Most of the responders said they learned
the game >from their grandparents.

Some of you said the instructions were in print. One or
two of you sent me to a web site for "ettel bettel":

http://personal.riverusers.com/~busybee/main.htm

A few of you used the word, "fun", which can, I think, be
used, also, to describe what we are all about-- connecting
to our past.

One Genner made me laugh by saying she didn't know what
"paysha" meant. Another, told me his grandparents were
introduced to each other by someone who turned out to be a
distant relative of mine.

I learned that using a piece of string or playing cards
helps link the generations and us, one to another.

Carole Glick Feinberg
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
feincgs@...

Searching: LERNER, BERNSTEIN, LANTNER, HAMERMAN,
GARTENBERG, SCHNEIDSCHER, KREUTZENAUER, KOCH,
WEBER/Drohobycz;
HILLEBRAND, SCHECK/Boryslaw;
SOMERFLEK, MALKISCHER, KATZ/Romanowe Siolo, Kujdance,
Zbaraz, Tarnopol;
GLEKEL/Volochisk, Belozerka, Kupil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen finding Russian army documents #general

lili susser <susserl@...>
 

Hi All
I have my grandparents marriage document stating that at the time of
marriage in the year 1883 in Plock, my g-father was an "army officer".
The document is in Russian therefore I assume it must have been the
Russian army. What are my chances of finding a document of his service,
where do I turn and did anyone have the experience of obtaining such
document. In other words what can I expect to pay for it?
Any help will be much appreciated.
Thank you for any replies

Lili Susser
Susserl@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tay-Sachs #general

David Sencer <djud2@...>
 

There is an excellent article on Tay-Sachs in today's New York Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/18/science/18DISE.html


David J. Sencer,
Atlanta, GA
"mailto:djud@..."

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses related to genealogical aspects of this
subject will be considered for posting, while responses focused on
genetic diseases or genetic testing should be sent privately.


Pisha Paysha #general

Howard Greer <h.greer@...>
 

Hi,
For me, Pisha Paysha is a card game taught to me by my Russian born
grandfather when I was a child. The beauty of the game is that the
winner is determined by chance, no skill involved. Thus, a child can
win against an adult. It is easy for a child to learn once they know
the cards. It is played like "war" except that there are no wars. The
idea is to get rid of your cards by making runs on your opponent's pile.

Cat's cradle is a string figure game played with one or more people. It
has been known for centuries. It is popular among Native Americans and
other cultures. Search the internet for "string figures". Have fun.
H S Greer


Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #galicia

Arlene <aparnes@...>
 

I remember my grandmother playing Pisha Pasha -- a card game...Cat's Cradle
wa a game with string and is still very much around today for the kids to
play....
Arlene
Arlene Parnes, Orlando
aparnes@...

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sally Bruckheimer"
It is Cat's Cradle, Yiddish style. I never knew it as
a 'Jewish' game, but it is a common enough game in the
US and, I think, most of the world.

I've seen it played in Africa on National Geographic.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY


Re: PISHA PAISHA and other Spellings #general

Robert & Ena Jacobs <enabob@...>
 

Hello Genners:
With regard to the card game Pisha/Pishi Paisha/Paysha and other spellings.
It may be of interest to know that this game is mentioned in the book:
'A Double Thread' - 'Growing Up English & Jewish in London' -
by John Gross - ISBN 1-56663-424-5 Ivan R Dee Publisher - Chicago
Published in Britain by Chatto & Windus. (Page 8 - Chapter 1)

This was a popular card game played by many immigrants to the East End
of London - very popular during World War 2 -now a vanished culture.
I highly recommend this book, a fascinating memoir of growing up by a
child of a family >from Eastern Europe - his father was a Jewish doctor.

Ena JACOBS nee SCHWALBE/SELBY
Born in London - now in California
EnaBob@...


Re: Pisha Paysha #general

Lalita Claff <lalita@...>
 

We too played pisha paysha as kids (Manchester, England -
Lithuanian/Russian roots). I also knew it as Peace and Patience - aka
solitaire - the solo card game. Had a feeling though that Pisha Paysha
was somehow different but never worked it out.

The string game we knew as Cats Cradle

Leora Claff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pisha Paysha #general

Howard Greer <h.greer@...>
 

Hi,
For me, Pisha Paysha is a card game taught to me by my Russian born
grandfather when I was a child. The beauty of the game is that the
winner is determined by chance, no skill involved. Thus, a child can
win against an adult. It is easy for a child to learn once they know
the cards. It is played like "war" except that there are no wars. The
idea is to get rid of your cards by making runs on your opponent's pile.

Cat's cradle is a string figure game played with one or more people. It
has been known for centuries. It is popular among Native Americans and
other cultures. Search the internet for "string figures". Have fun.
H S Greer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pisha Paysha Hand Game Remembered #general

Arlene <aparnes@...>
 

I remember my grandmother playing Pisha Pasha -- a card game...Cat's Cradle
wa a game with string and is still very much around today for the kids to
play....
Arlene
Arlene Parnes, Orlando
aparnes@...

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sally Bruckheimer"
It is Cat's Cradle, Yiddish style. I never knew it as
a 'Jewish' game, but it is a common enough game in the
US and, I think, most of the world.

I've seen it played in Africa on National Geographic.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: PISHA PAISHA and other Spellings #general

Robert & Ena Jacobs <enabob@...>
 

Hello Genners:
With regard to the card game Pisha/Pishi Paisha/Paysha and other spellings.
It may be of interest to know that this game is mentioned in the book:
'A Double Thread' - 'Growing Up English & Jewish in London' -
by John Gross - ISBN 1-56663-424-5 Ivan R Dee Publisher - Chicago
Published in Britain by Chatto & Windus. (Page 8 - Chapter 1)

This was a popular card game played by many immigrants to the East End
of London - very popular during World War 2 -now a vanished culture.
I highly recommend this book, a fascinating memoir of growing up by a
child of a family >from Eastern Europe - his father was a Jewish doctor.

Ena JACOBS nee SCHWALBE/SELBY
Born in London - now in California
EnaBob@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pisha Paysha #general

Lalita Claff <lalita@...>
 

We too played pisha paysha as kids (Manchester, England -
Lithuanian/Russian roots). I also knew it as Peace and Patience - aka
solitaire - the solo card game. Had a feeling though that Pisha Paysha
was somehow different but never worked it out.

The string game we knew as Cats Cradle

Leora Claff


Descendants of Jankel GREENZWEIG #general

Main179@...
 

2/18/03

I am looking for descendants of a Jankel GREENZWEIG. The Ellis Island
Arrivals have him listed a being 16 years of age and arriving from
Dubno, Russia on December 04,1911. He is listed as a tailor going to
visit his brother Nathan in NYC (who is listed as living on Montgomery
St.) Any information concerning this individual or his family would be
appreciated as I believe he may be a relative. Thank you . Please
answer privately at
hm 1401 @ yahoo.com.
C. Flack


Re: Pisha Paysha #general

Debbie Pomerance <dpomeran@...>
 

My father knew of this game, and his family came >from the
Ukraine. Unfortunately however, he was not sure exactly what the rules
were - only the basics - cards!. I have been trying for some time to
determine what it was. Probably as others have mentioned - different
games in different locales.

Debbie


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Descendants of Jankel GREENZWEIG #general

Main179@...
 

2/18/03

I am looking for descendants of a Jankel GREENZWEIG. The Ellis Island
Arrivals have him listed a being 16 years of age and arriving from
Dubno, Russia on December 04,1911. He is listed as a tailor going to
visit his brother Nathan in NYC (who is listed as living on Montgomery
St.) Any information concerning this individual or his family would be
appreciated as I believe he may be a relative. Thank you . Please
answer privately at
hm 1401 @ yahoo.com.
C. Flack


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pisha Paysha #general

Debbie Pomerance <dpomeran@...>
 

My father knew of this game, and his family came >from the
Ukraine. Unfortunately however, he was not sure exactly what the rules
were - only the basics - cards!. I have been trying for some time to
determine what it was. Probably as others have mentioned - different
games in different locales.

Debbie