Date   

H. Elliott Lipschultz <adoniram@...>
 

Here are view websites about TEA.
www.everything2.com/index.pl?node=tea.

www.easterntea.com/tea/tang.htm

www.tea.co.uk/tGloriousT/tcustoms.htm

http://ausis.gf.vu.It/eka/food/drinks.html
see receipe for Lietuviokas midus

Was Tea accidently invented >from the need to give boiled water some taste?
Did the custom of drinking tea with a cube of sugar under one's
tongue develop when there was a shortage of honey? After several
generations was there a debate between tea with honey and tea with sugar?

If in the late 19th and early 20th century, British Shipping Agents were present in Lithuania (to sell tickets on ships >from Lithuania to England, South Africa etc), did these Shipping Agents bring with them British Tea drinking customs? Is there a similarity between this and drinking tea with milk during the British Mandate in Palestine/Israel?

Is the custom of placing sugar or honey in tea or a cube of sugar
under one's tongue when drinking tea a reflection of the human need for
something sweet?
To what extent are tea drinking customs the result of individual
taste applied to long held customs?

Cordially, H. Elliott Lipschultz
adoniram@taxhistoryfoundation.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Tea #lithuania

H. Elliott Lipschultz <adoniram@...>
 

Here are view websites about TEA.
www.everything2.com/index.pl?node=tea.

www.easterntea.com/tea/tang.htm

www.tea.co.uk/tGloriousT/tcustoms.htm

http://ausis.gf.vu.It/eka/food/drinks.html
see receipe for Lietuviokas midus

Was Tea accidently invented >from the need to give boiled water some taste?
Did the custom of drinking tea with a cube of sugar under one's
tongue develop when there was a shortage of honey? After several
generations was there a debate between tea with honey and tea with sugar?

If in the late 19th and early 20th century, British Shipping Agents were present in Lithuania (to sell tickets on ships >from Lithuania to England, South Africa etc), did these Shipping Agents bring with them British Tea drinking customs? Is there a similarity between this and drinking tea with milk during the British Mandate in Palestine/Israel?

Is the custom of placing sugar or honey in tea or a cube of sugar
under one's tongue when drinking tea a reflection of the human need for
something sweet?
To what extent are tea drinking customs the result of individual
taste applied to long held customs?

Cordially, H. Elliott Lipschultz
adoniram@taxhistoryfoundation.org


Chai (Tea) #lithuania

Bruce Sanders <wire_paladin@...>
 

My Bubba, also named "Chane" >from Odessa, drank tea >from a glass with a sugar cube between her front teeth. [Remember the joke about the two Jewish men ordering tea in a restaurant? One orders "a glass tea." The other orders "a glass tea, in a clean glass." The waiter returns with the tea and asks: "Who ordered the clean glass?"]

My theory is that not only did the sugar make the tea taste better, but by having the cube visible for all to see was a sign that you could afford sugar, and were therefore a person of substance. This custom caused her front upper teeth to decay. They were capped with gold, which also reinforced the appearance of wealth.

Bruce Sanders


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Chai (Tea) #lithuania

Bruce Sanders <wire_paladin@...>
 

My Bubba, also named "Chane" >from Odessa, drank tea >from a glass with a sugar cube between her front teeth. [Remember the joke about the two Jewish men ordering tea in a restaurant? One orders "a glass tea." The other orders "a glass tea, in a clean glass." The waiter returns with the tea and asks: "Who ordered the clean glass?"]

My theory is that not only did the sugar make the tea taste better, but by having the cube visible for all to see was a sign that you could afford sugar, and were therefore a person of substance. This custom caused her front upper teeth to decay. They were capped with gold, which also reinforced the appearance of wealth.

Bruce Sanders


Tea in a glass #lithuania

Bronstein Family <sygaa@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks,

Following in my zada’s footsteps (Mayer Shulman, b. 1883
Panevezys) I drank tea >from a glass until we could no longer get what we called ‘lump sugar’ that was made by Domino and came in a yellow box. He taught me how to break the cube into 8 pieces and the trick was to see how
little sugar one could use. It turned out that the tea tasted much sweeter with far less sugar. Sugar, of course, was extremely expensive in ‘der heim.’

There was also a special way to hold the glass, a recycled Yahrzeit glass also used as a cookie cutter. The thumb on the rim and two
finger on the bottom edge. That way you did not get burned.

An aside with regards to tea – the famous Panevezys Yeshiva was endowed by the daughter of the founder of Wissotzky tea. Here in Israel we still drink their tea. The great Zionist thinker, Ahad Ha-am was an accountant for the firm. Their American brand was called Swee Touch Nee.

Shalom Bronstein, Jerusalem

Researching - SHULMAN/SHILLMAN – Panevezys; BLOCH – Krekanava (Lithuania);
the DIMMERMAN, BECK & GELMAN families >from Ostrog & vicinity (Volhyn);
BRONSTEIN, BROWNSTEIN, RUNSTEIN, ROCHMANN - Kishinev (Moldava); GOLDSTEIN -
Iasi (Romania) – those who came to America all settled in Philadelphia;
GOLDZWEIG & LETZTER - Cholojow/Uzlovoye (Eastern Galicia/Ukraine)


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Tea in a glass #lithuania

Bronstein Family <sygaa@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks,

Following in my zada’s footsteps (Mayer Shulman, b. 1883
Panevezys) I drank tea >from a glass until we could no longer get what we called ‘lump sugar’ that was made by Domino and came in a yellow box. He taught me how to break the cube into 8 pieces and the trick was to see how
little sugar one could use. It turned out that the tea tasted much sweeter with far less sugar. Sugar, of course, was extremely expensive in ‘der heim.’

There was also a special way to hold the glass, a recycled Yahrzeit glass also used as a cookie cutter. The thumb on the rim and two
finger on the bottom edge. That way you did not get burned.

An aside with regards to tea – the famous Panevezys Yeshiva was endowed by the daughter of the founder of Wissotzky tea. Here in Israel we still drink their tea. The great Zionist thinker, Ahad Ha-am was an accountant for the firm. Their American brand was called Swee Touch Nee.

Shalom Bronstein, Jerusalem

Researching - SHULMAN/SHILLMAN – Panevezys; BLOCH – Krekanava (Lithuania);
the DIMMERMAN, BECK & GELMAN families >from Ostrog & vicinity (Volhyn);
BRONSTEIN, BROWNSTEIN, RUNSTEIN, ROCHMANN - Kishinev (Moldava); GOLDSTEIN -
Iasi (Romania) – those who came to America all settled in Philadelphia;
GOLDZWEIG & LETZTER - Cholojow/Uzlovoye (Eastern Galicia/Ukraine)


Fw: The Goldsmids and Admiral Lord Nelson #unitedkingdom

Jill Whitehead
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Jill Whitehead
To: jcr-uk@lyris.jewishgen.org
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2003 7:07 PM
Subject: The Goldsmids and Admiral Lord Nelson


Does anyone know anything about the Goldsmid family and their connections
with Admiral Lord Nelson? "A History of Lord Nelson's Merton Place" talks
about how Horatio Nelson left Merton Place to Emma, Lady Hamilton when he
died at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805. She used her estate as collatoral
for loans between 1806 and 1808 (she was somewhat profligate in her
spending). In 1808 it became necessary to sell Merton Place and her "City
friends" came to the rescue including Abraham Goldsmid, when they took over
the estate on trust to sell and redeem six annuities Emma had taken out. In
1809, Abraham, who was her neighbour, and his brother Asher Goldsmid
purchased the entire estate for nearly £13,000 (a princely sum in those
days, worth millions today). However, in 1810, fearing ruin Abraham shot
himself in the grounds of his country house, Morden Lodge, and Merton Place
was once more put up for sale. Part of the property stayed within the
Goldsmid family for 40 years mainly because no-one would buy it. Asher was
still the owner of the mansion when he died in 1822. The Wimbledon tithe
map showed that Abraham's son Aaron still owned much of the estate in 1848.
Eventually the land was sold on in smaller job lots and became in the 1860s
firstly terraced housing for the workers and then then later a council
housing estate.Evidently the Goldsmids were a wealthy family with their
roots in finance before their connections with Nelson and Lady Hamilton
virtually bankrupted them. I wondered if there was other information about
them?

Jill Whitehead


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Fw: The Goldsmids and Admiral Lord Nelson #unitedkingdom

Jill Whitehead
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Jill Whitehead
To: jcr-uk@lyris.jewishgen.org
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2003 7:07 PM
Subject: The Goldsmids and Admiral Lord Nelson


Does anyone know anything about the Goldsmid family and their connections
with Admiral Lord Nelson? "A History of Lord Nelson's Merton Place" talks
about how Horatio Nelson left Merton Place to Emma, Lady Hamilton when he
died at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805. She used her estate as collatoral
for loans between 1806 and 1808 (she was somewhat profligate in her
spending). In 1808 it became necessary to sell Merton Place and her "City
friends" came to the rescue including Abraham Goldsmid, when they took over
the estate on trust to sell and redeem six annuities Emma had taken out. In
1809, Abraham, who was her neighbour, and his brother Asher Goldsmid
purchased the entire estate for nearly £13,000 (a princely sum in those
days, worth millions today). However, in 1810, fearing ruin Abraham shot
himself in the grounds of his country house, Morden Lodge, and Merton Place
was once more put up for sale. Part of the property stayed within the
Goldsmid family for 40 years mainly because no-one would buy it. Asher was
still the owner of the mansion when he died in 1822. The Wimbledon tithe
map showed that Abraham's son Aaron still owned much of the estate in 1848.
Eventually the land was sold on in smaller job lots and became in the 1860s
firstly terraced housing for the workers and then then later a council
housing estate.Evidently the Goldsmids were a wealthy family with their
roots in finance before their connections with Nelson and Lady Hamilton
virtually bankrupted them. I wondered if there was other information about
them?

Jill Whitehead


Wysokie Mazowieckie Tombstones - Translation #poland

Marvin Brooks <lakebenj@...>
 

Of the approximate 100 stones in the Wysokie Mazowieckie Cemetery in Lomza
district of Poland

http://www.zchor.org/wysokie/wysokie.htm

only two are standing. They are shown in Viewmates:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2880

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2881

Ada Holtzman has supplied a complete translation of the first (dating to
1910) and a partial translation of the second on the Wysokie Mazowieckie
website.

http://www.zchor.org/wysokie/tombstones.htm

Assistance would be appreciated in completing translation of second
tombstone (2881).

Marvin Brooks
Philadelphia, PA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Wysokie Mazowieckie Tombstones - Translation #poland

Marvin Brooks <lakebenj@...>
 

Of the approximate 100 stones in the Wysokie Mazowieckie Cemetery in Lomza
district of Poland

http://www.zchor.org/wysokie/wysokie.htm

only two are standing. They are shown in Viewmates:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2880

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2881

Ada Holtzman has supplied a complete translation of the first (dating to
1910) and a partial translation of the second on the Wysokie Mazowieckie
website.

http://www.zchor.org/wysokie/tombstones.htm

Assistance would be appreciated in completing translation of second
tombstone (2881).

Marvin Brooks
Philadelphia, PA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: WOLKOW and SVEZNIK #poland

Henry P. Kaplan <Henry@...>
 

I do not know whether this will ring any bells, but my great grandfather,
Hirsh Zvi Lipsky, was a rabbi who chose not the pulpit, but the deanship of a large yeshiva in Bialystok. Do you know what the name of your ancestor's yeshiva was? He and his wife (ne Yellen) left Bialystok for Palestine in about 1899-1900 where he died 16 years later.

Henry Kaplan


One of my maternal greatgrandfathers: Dovid Hersh WOLKOW was a Rabbi
and taught in a rabbinical school in Bialystok for many years. He
raised a family in Bransk, Grodno. The time frame is about 1860-1890.
My other maternal great grandfather: Kalman Moishe SVEZNIK (sp) was a
Hassidic Rabbi during the same time frame. He also lived in Bransk.
They both married KRASHIN or KRESHIN sisters.

I am looking for any additional information concerning them.
Thanks.
Cal Weil
San Diego, CA
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please continue any exchange of family information privately.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: WOLKOW and SVEZNIK #poland

Henry P. Kaplan <Henry@...>
 

I do not know whether this will ring any bells, but my great grandfather,
Hirsh Zvi Lipsky, was a rabbi who chose not the pulpit, but the deanship of a large yeshiva in Bialystok. Do you know what the name of your ancestor's yeshiva was? He and his wife (ne Yellen) left Bialystok for Palestine in about 1899-1900 where he died 16 years later.

Henry Kaplan


One of my maternal greatgrandfathers: Dovid Hersh WOLKOW was a Rabbi
and taught in a rabbinical school in Bialystok for many years. He
raised a family in Bransk, Grodno. The time frame is about 1860-1890.
My other maternal great grandfather: Kalman Moishe SVEZNIK (sp) was a
Hassidic Rabbi during the same time frame. He also lived in Bransk.
They both married KRASHIN or KRESHIN sisters.

I am looking for any additional information concerning them.
Thanks.
Cal Weil
San Diego, CA
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please continue any exchange of family information privately.


Re: Jewish Farming Colony of Galileyskaya #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Mark Halpern wrote:


Last year while I was visiting the Bialystok area, I took a side
trip on my way to Sokolka and saw the village of Palestyna, which
is very near the Belarus border. What was this town? In his book,
Jewish Bialystok and Surroundings in Eastern Poland, Tomasz
Wisniewski explains that Palestyna, Kolonia Izaaka, and Kolonia
Chanaan were three Jewish agricultural colonies established about
1850. Apparently, Palestyna is the only one that still exists.
Today, it appears to be a very poor farming community with only
dirt roads leading to the village.

If I recall correctly, I was told that these three colonies were
setup to train Zionists to farm -- sort of a training ground for
Kibbutzniks.

Does anyone have any more information about these Jewish
Agricultural colonies?

I haven't been there but I've heard about it. In Zabludow (not very far
from Palestyna) in the 1930s there was a "kibbutz" (not really a place
but a group of people organized) called Yevneal (sp?) It was a group
of mostly young people who were training to go to Palestine. I have a
picture of them. When I was in Chicago I showed the picture to Abe Baker
(an old zabludover and survivor of Auschwitz). He told me he was quite
sure one of the young women in the photo was the daughter of one of my
Aunts, and he thinks this daughter went to Argentina before the war. I'd
very much like to be able to identify all the people in the photo but
haven't been able to do it yet.

Anyway, perhaps these young people >from Zabludow spent time at these
"colonies". If I find out anything more about it I'll let you know.

Tilford Bartman


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Jewish Farming Colony of Galileyskaya #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Mark Halpern wrote:


Last year while I was visiting the Bialystok area, I took a side
trip on my way to Sokolka and saw the village of Palestyna, which
is very near the Belarus border. What was this town? In his book,
Jewish Bialystok and Surroundings in Eastern Poland, Tomasz
Wisniewski explains that Palestyna, Kolonia Izaaka, and Kolonia
Chanaan were three Jewish agricultural colonies established about
1850. Apparently, Palestyna is the only one that still exists.
Today, it appears to be a very poor farming community with only
dirt roads leading to the village.

If I recall correctly, I was told that these three colonies were
setup to train Zionists to farm -- sort of a training ground for
Kibbutzniks.

Does anyone have any more information about these Jewish
Agricultural colonies?

I haven't been there but I've heard about it. In Zabludow (not very far
from Palestyna) in the 1930s there was a "kibbutz" (not really a place
but a group of people organized) called Yevneal (sp?) It was a group
of mostly young people who were training to go to Palestine. I have a
picture of them. When I was in Chicago I showed the picture to Abe Baker
(an old zabludover and survivor of Auschwitz). He told me he was quite
sure one of the young women in the photo was the daughter of one of my
Aunts, and he thinks this daughter went to Argentina before the war. I'd
very much like to be able to identify all the people in the photo but
haven't been able to do it yet.

Anyway, perhaps these young people >from Zabludow spent time at these
"colonies". If I find out anything more about it I'll let you know.

Tilford Bartman


Jewish Cemeteries in Bialystok Region #poland

Bialystoker
 

Earlier this month, I posted a message about Cemetery projects in
our area and described these Cemeteries as decaying day by day.
As a result, Marjorie Holden suggested that priorities be
re-examined to address these Cemeteries and the discussion has
continued.

There are two sources of information about these Cemeteries that
are readily accessible. One is the IAJGS Cemetery Project. Access
the Poland section at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/poland.html. The other
is Tomasz Wisniewski's book JEWISH BIALYSTOK AND
SURROUNDINGS IN EASTERN POLAND.

In his book, Tomasz provides the following information on the
number of Matzevot.

Bialystok 1 of 5 still exists with 5-7,000 stones
Bielsk Podlaski "remains"
Bocki 2 sites: one has 1 stone, other "remains"
Bransk 200 stones
Choroszcz 1 of 2 still exists with 259 stones
Dabrowa 1 of 2 still exists with 70 stones
Drohiczyn many stones
Grodek few "relics"
Jalowka 1 of 2 still exists with several stones
Janow Sokolski 200
Jasionowka 2 sites: one has 400 stones, other few
Kleszczele "ruins"/several stones
Knyszyn 700
Korycin several
Krynki more than 3,000
Michalowo 50
Mielnik 50
Milejczyce several
Narew 70
Narewka 230
Orla 2 sites: one has none, other 40 stones
Siemiatycze none
Sokolka 1,000
Suchowola "rubble"
Suraz 10
Tykocin 450
Wasilkow 3 sites: 2 have none, other has 13stones
Zabludow 2 sites: one has none, other "fragments"

If anyone knows of any preservation activities in these
Cemeteries, please share them with the group.

In the last two years I have been to Eastern Poland twice and
have taken some photographs of the cemeteries in Bialystok,
Grodek, Krynki, Michalowo, Sokolka, and Tykocin.

I will place these photos on the Internet and provide links to
the group later today or tomorrow.

Mark Halpern


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Jewish Cemeteries in Bialystok Region #poland

Bialystoker
 

Earlier this month, I posted a message about Cemetery projects in
our area and described these Cemeteries as decaying day by day.
As a result, Marjorie Holden suggested that priorities be
re-examined to address these Cemeteries and the discussion has
continued.

There are two sources of information about these Cemeteries that
are readily accessible. One is the IAJGS Cemetery Project. Access
the Poland section at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/poland.html. The other
is Tomasz Wisniewski's book JEWISH BIALYSTOK AND
SURROUNDINGS IN EASTERN POLAND.

In his book, Tomasz provides the following information on the
number of Matzevot.

Bialystok 1 of 5 still exists with 5-7,000 stones
Bielsk Podlaski "remains"
Bocki 2 sites: one has 1 stone, other "remains"
Bransk 200 stones
Choroszcz 1 of 2 still exists with 259 stones
Dabrowa 1 of 2 still exists with 70 stones
Drohiczyn many stones
Grodek few "relics"
Jalowka 1 of 2 still exists with several stones
Janow Sokolski 200
Jasionowka 2 sites: one has 400 stones, other few
Kleszczele "ruins"/several stones
Knyszyn 700
Korycin several
Krynki more than 3,000
Michalowo 50
Mielnik 50
Milejczyce several
Narew 70
Narewka 230
Orla 2 sites: one has none, other 40 stones
Siemiatycze none
Sokolka 1,000
Suchowola "rubble"
Suraz 10
Tykocin 450
Wasilkow 3 sites: 2 have none, other has 13stones
Zabludow 2 sites: one has none, other "fragments"

If anyone knows of any preservation activities in these
Cemeteries, please share them with the group.

In the last two years I have been to Eastern Poland twice and
have taken some photographs of the cemeteries in Bialystok,
Grodek, Krynki, Michalowo, Sokolka, and Tykocin.

I will place these photos on the Internet and provide links to
the group later today or tomorrow.

Mark Halpern


Re: Jewish Farming Colony of Galileyskaya #poland

Alexander Sharon
 

"Mark Halpern" wrote

Last year while I was visiting the Bialystok area, I took a side
trip on my way to Sokolka and saw the village of Palestyna, which
is very near the Belarus border. What was this town? In his book,
Jewish Bialystok and Surroundings in Eastern Poland, Tomasz
Wisniewski explains that Palestyna, Kolonia Izaaka, and Kolonia
Chanaan were three Jewish agricultural colonies established about
1850. Apparently, Palestyna is the only one that still exists.
Today, it appears to be a very poor farming community with only
dirt roads leading to the village.

If I recall correctly, I was told that these three colonies were
setup to train Zionists to farm -- sort of a training ground for
Kibbutzniks.

Does anyone have any more information about these Jewish
Agricultural colonies?

Mark Halpern
Hi,

Perhaps this website can be of assistance. Please scroll to the English
translation.

http://punk.do.pl/~crefff/index.php?d=50&s=50.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish Farming Colony of Galileyskaya #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Mark Halpern" wrote

Last year while I was visiting the Bialystok area, I took a side
trip on my way to Sokolka and saw the village of Palestyna, which
is very near the Belarus border. What was this town? In his book,
Jewish Bialystok and Surroundings in Eastern Poland, Tomasz
Wisniewski explains that Palestyna, Kolonia Izaaka, and Kolonia
Chanaan were three Jewish agricultural colonies established about
1850. Apparently, Palestyna is the only one that still exists.
Today, it appears to be a very poor farming community with only
dirt roads leading to the village.

If I recall correctly, I was told that these three colonies were
setup to train Zionists to farm -- sort of a training ground for
Kibbutzniks.

Does anyone have any more information about these Jewish
Agricultural colonies?

Mark Halpern
Hi,

Perhaps this website can be of assistance. Please scroll to the English
translation.

http://punk.do.pl/~crefff/index.php?d=50&s=50.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


JFRA Israel - Ra'anana - Wed., Oct. 8 #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

It is our great pleasure to welcome all JFRA members, friends and visitors
to a very special presentation at the JFRA Ra'anana branch. Programs in
Ra'anana are in English.

Wednesday, October 8
Doors open 7 pm, program begins at 7.30 pm
Beit Fisher, 5 Klausner St, Ra'anana
JFRA members, NIS 5; others, NIS 15

Michael Freund will speak on "Finding Lost Jews."

Michael Freund is director of Amishav, a Jerusalem-based group which
reaches out and assists "lost Jews" seeking to return to the Jewish
people. He will speak about his recent travels to India, Peru, Spain and
Portugal and the growing phenomenon of Jewish descendants seeking to
reclaim their heritage.
Amishav has organized crypto-Jewish conferences in Spain, has arranged for
a rabbi for the Belmonte, Portugal community, has just arranged for a rabbi
for the Chuetas of Mallorca, among other endeavors, such as assisting the
Bnai Menashe of Northern India. A recent article focused on Moroccan Jews
who went to seek their fortunes in the Amazon and their descendants who
seek to return.
Michael was a speaker at this summer's Crypto-Jewish Conference in the US.
He served as deputy communications director for former PM Benjamin
Netanyahu, and is also a syndicated Jerusalem Post columnist and writer.

For more information, contact Ra'anana chair Ingrid Rockberger,
mailto:ingrid@genealogy.org.il, or 09-745-0456.

We look forward to greeting everyone, and wish all our members, friends and
Genners, a Happy New Year, with all good things, and great genealogical
success.

Membership renewals for 2004 will be accepted: Single, NIS 100; couple, NIS
160, and will include October-November-December 2003. Please bring checks
made out to JFRA, and remember to update personal details (phone, email,
etc.). Those renewing should arrive early so accounting can take place
before the program begins. JFRA Israel is a member of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS).

With best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
JFRA Israel president
dardasht@barak-online.net
schelly@genealogy.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JFRA Israel - Ra'anana - Wed., Oct. 8 #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

It is our great pleasure to welcome all JFRA members, friends and visitors
to a very special presentation at the JFRA Ra'anana branch. Programs in
Ra'anana are in English.

Wednesday, October 8
Doors open 7 pm, program begins at 7.30 pm
Beit Fisher, 5 Klausner St, Ra'anana
JFRA members, NIS 5; others, NIS 15

Michael Freund will speak on "Finding Lost Jews."

Michael Freund is director of Amishav, a Jerusalem-based group which
reaches out and assists "lost Jews" seeking to return to the Jewish
people. He will speak about his recent travels to India, Peru, Spain and
Portugal and the growing phenomenon of Jewish descendants seeking to
reclaim their heritage.
Amishav has organized crypto-Jewish conferences in Spain, has arranged for
a rabbi for the Belmonte, Portugal community, has just arranged for a rabbi
for the Chuetas of Mallorca, among other endeavors, such as assisting the
Bnai Menashe of Northern India. A recent article focused on Moroccan Jews
who went to seek their fortunes in the Amazon and their descendants who
seek to return.
Michael was a speaker at this summer's Crypto-Jewish Conference in the US.
He served as deputy communications director for former PM Benjamin
Netanyahu, and is also a syndicated Jerusalem Post columnist and writer.

For more information, contact Ra'anana chair Ingrid Rockberger,
mailto:ingrid@genealogy.org.il, or 09-745-0456.

We look forward to greeting everyone, and wish all our members, friends and
Genners, a Happy New Year, with all good things, and great genealogical
success.

Membership renewals for 2004 will be accepted: Single, NIS 100; couple, NIS
160, and will include October-November-December 2003. Please bring checks
made out to JFRA, and remember to update personal details (phone, email,
etc.). Those renewing should arrive early so accounting can take place
before the program begins. JFRA Israel is a member of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS).

With best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
JFRA Israel president
dardasht@barak-online.net
schelly@genealogy.org.il