Date   

Re: jri-pl digest: November 08, 2003 #poland

debw@...
 

re-jewish lawyers in Warsaw-2 years ago I attended the
International association of Jewish lawyers and jurists
conference in Warsaw. They handed out a list of all the pre war
lawyers. I cant lay my hands on it-itis possible I left it in my
office or I may have turfed it. I suggest you contact them in
Israel and I am sure they will have a copy of it . I will keep
hunting...
Debbie Wiener
Melbourne

Subject: Alexander GOLDBERG, Warsaw attorney
From: "George Mason" <gmason3815@hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 13:24:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I am looking for any information about my great uncle, Alexander
"Sasha"
GOLDBERG. He was an attorney/solicitor specializing in civil law
in Warsaw
in the 1920s and 1930s. He lived and had his office at #3
Poznanska Street.

He was married to Sonia/Sophie NATHANSON. I am told they died
during the
siege of Warsaw in September 1939. Can anyone tell me how I might
go about
finding a picture of him or a pre-war picture of #3 Poznanska
Street? Does
anyone have anything like a Who's Who of pre-war Warsaw
solicitors book with any details on him? Is there an archive
that keeps copies of applications for licenses to practice law?


Also, my father, Percy MOZESON, lived at #29 Ogordowa Street. Are=
there any pre-war pictures available of this building?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
George Mason (Mozeson)
USA

Looking for: GOLDBERG in Warsaw, MOZESON in Warsaw, Latvia, and=
Lithuania,
and NATHANSON in Latvia and Lithuania

-----------------------------------------------------------------=


JRI Poland #Poland RE: jri-pl digest: November 08, 2003 #poland

debw@...
 

re-jewish lawyers in Warsaw-2 years ago I attended the
International association of Jewish lawyers and jurists
conference in Warsaw. They handed out a list of all the pre war
lawyers. I cant lay my hands on it-itis possible I left it in my
office or I may have turfed it. I suggest you contact them in
Israel and I am sure they will have a copy of it . I will keep
hunting...
Debbie Wiener
Melbourne

Subject: Alexander GOLDBERG, Warsaw attorney
From: "George Mason" <gmason3815@hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 13:24:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I am looking for any information about my great uncle, Alexander
"Sasha"
GOLDBERG. He was an attorney/solicitor specializing in civil law
in Warsaw
in the 1920s and 1930s. He lived and had his office at #3
Poznanska Street.

He was married to Sonia/Sophie NATHANSON. I am told they died
during the
siege of Warsaw in September 1939. Can anyone tell me how I might
go about
finding a picture of him or a pre-war picture of #3 Poznanska
Street? Does
anyone have anything like a Who's Who of pre-war Warsaw
solicitors book with any details on him? Is there an archive
that keeps copies of applications for licenses to practice law?


Also, my father, Percy MOZESON, lived at #29 Ogordowa Street. Are=
there any pre-war pictures available of this building?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
George Mason (Mozeson)
USA

Looking for: GOLDBERG in Warsaw, MOZESON in Warsaw, Latvia, and=
Lithuania,
and NATHANSON in Latvia and Lithuania

-----------------------------------------------------------------=


Re: Given name Boruch #poland

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

There is no correlation between Boruch and William, but that does not mean
one way or the other whether you have the same person. When they came to
America, there was a common need to take on a more "American" name.
Although they often chose a similar sounding name (in our family, Baruch
became Benjamin and Moshe became Morris or Maurice) there was no requirement or real tradition. I would keep looking backwards >from the death certificate and see if you can pinpoint his arrival in America.

That will give you a name by which he was probably known in the old country. Good luck in your search.

Chuck Weinstein in Commack, NY
cweinstein@jewishgen.org

Eden Joachim wrote:

Subject: Given Name Boruch
From: Eden Joachim <esjoachim@optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 16:31:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I have a death certificate for a William JOACHIM, died Brooklyn, New York in 1910. Based on his age at death, 60 years, and his parents' names, I am
able to pinpoint him as a Boruch JACHIMOWITZ found in the Rzeszow, Poland
(Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire) births index on-line at JRI-Poland.

Can anyone tell me if William was a name adopted by men born Boruch in that
part of the world, in the time frame involved?

As always, I checked Professor Esterson's given names database and did not
locate the confirmation for which I am looking.

Many thanks to all,
Eden Joachim
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@optonline.net


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Given name Boruch #poland

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

There is no correlation between Boruch and William, but that does not mean
one way or the other whether you have the same person. When they came to
America, there was a common need to take on a more "American" name.
Although they often chose a similar sounding name (in our family, Baruch
became Benjamin and Moshe became Morris or Maurice) there was no requirement or real tradition. I would keep looking backwards >from the death certificate and see if you can pinpoint his arrival in America.

That will give you a name by which he was probably known in the old country. Good luck in your search.

Chuck Weinstein in Commack, NY
cweinstein@jewishgen.org

Eden Joachim wrote:

Subject: Given Name Boruch
From: Eden Joachim <esjoachim@optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 16:31:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I have a death certificate for a William JOACHIM, died Brooklyn, New York in 1910. Based on his age at death, 60 years, and his parents' names, I am
able to pinpoint him as a Boruch JACHIMOWITZ found in the Rzeszow, Poland
(Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire) births index on-line at JRI-Poland.

Can anyone tell me if William was a name adopted by men born Boruch in that
part of the world, in the time frame involved?

As always, I checked Professor Esterson's given names database and did not
locate the confirmation for which I am looking.

Many thanks to all,
Eden Joachim
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@optonline.net


Re: Given Name Boruch #galicia

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Eden Joachim posted as follows:

"I have a death certificate for a William JOACHIM, died Brooklyn, New York
in 1910. Based on his age at death, 60 years, and his parents' names, I am
able to pinpoint him as a Boruch JACHIMOWITZ found in the Rzeszow, Poland
(Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire) births index on-line at JRI-Poland.

Can anyone tell me if William was a name adopted by men born Boruch in that
part of the world, in the time frame involved?"

The Hebrew name Boruch is one of those unique names for which emigrants
from most European countries chose to select English vernacular names
beginning only with the letter "B". So, it is unlikely (but possible) that upon immigrating to the US he chose the English name William based on his Hebrew name Boruch. Instead, Eden might consider that he also had another Hebrew and/or Yiddish name for which William was a natural choice in the US, or that this is an example of an exception to the above "rule" and that he chose the name in a non-statistical way.

Thus, it might be worthwhile for Eden to search the Given Names Data Bases
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames > in a "reverse"
sense. That is, start with her entry of the English name William in the
US, and search in the Eastern European country GNDBs where he might have
originated, for various Hebrew and Yiddish names which he might have had
there in addition to his known name Boruch.

This is admittedly a bit of a task, but it might lead to sparking someone's memory about a possible other name, or provide some other Hebrew/Yiddish names to watch for in archival documents.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Given Name Boruch #poland

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Eden Joachim posted as follows:

"I have a death certificate for a William JOACHIM, died Brooklyn, New York
in 1910. Based on his age at death, 60 years, and his parents' names, I am
able to pinpoint him as a Boruch JACHIMOWITZ found in the Rzeszow, Poland
(Galicia, Austro-Hungarian Empire) births index on-line at JRI-Poland.

Can anyone tell me if William was a name adopted by men born Boruch in that
part of the world, in the time frame involved?"

The Hebrew name Boruch is one of those unique names for which emigrants
from most European countries chose to select English vernacular names
beginning only with the letter "B". So, it is unlikely (but possible) that upon immigrating to the US he chose the English name William based on his Hebrew name Boruch. Instead, Eden might consider that he also had another Hebrew and/or Yiddish name for which William was a natural choice in the US, or that this is an example of an exception to the above "rule" and that he chose the name in a non-statistical way.

Thus, it might be worthwhile for Eden to search the Given Names Data Bases
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames > in a "reverse"
sense. That is, start with her entry of the English name William in the
US, and search in the Eastern European country GNDBs where he might have
originated, for various Hebrew and Yiddish names which he might have had
there in addition to his known name Boruch.

This is admittedly a bit of a task, but it might lead to sparking someone's memory about a possible other name, or provide some other Hebrew/Yiddish names to watch for in archival documents.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Architecture of Pre-War Warsaw #poland

Peter Lebensold <lebensold@...>
 

Just a note that the Polish-language website we were recently told of -
The Architecture of Pre-War Warsaw - seems to have a new address:

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/

It offers a wealth of information. At the bottom of the welcome screen
..."fotoplan" leads to a 1935 aerial photo of Warsaw, "plan miasta" leads
to a variety of maps of downtown Warsaw (1831, 1897 and 1935), "rozmaitosci" leads to tramway maps (among other things), "zrodla" seems to be a bibliography (with many street-specific books listed), and "indeks" leads toan index of pre-war and current photographs of various buildings (inc. banks, factories, etc.) and streets ("ulice").

Peter Lebensold


JRI Poland #Poland Architecture of Pre-War Warsaw #poland

Peter Lebensold <lebensold@...>
 

Just a note that the Polish-language website we were recently told of -
The Architecture of Pre-War Warsaw - seems to have a new address:

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/

It offers a wealth of information. At the bottom of the welcome screen
..."fotoplan" leads to a 1935 aerial photo of Warsaw, "plan miasta" leads
to a variety of maps of downtown Warsaw (1831, 1897 and 1935), "rozmaitosci" leads to tramway maps (among other things), "zrodla" seems to be a bibliography (with many street-specific books listed), and "indeks" leads toan index of pre-war and current photographs of various buildings (inc. banks, factories, etc.) and streets ("ulice").

Peter Lebensold


Lezajsk, Poland #poland

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I have just been advised of the existence of Marriage registers for Lezajsk,Poland for the period 1899-1901. As the Rzeszow PSA Coordinator, I am seeking an individual to step forward to act as the Town Leader for this indexing project.

Please contact me directly to discuss the responsibilities of the volunteer
position as well as the specifics of the project.

Your involvement is greatly appreciated by me and your fellow researchers
and the addition of the indices to the JRI-Poland database will serve as a
memorial in perpetuity.

Eden Joachim
Rzeszow PSA Archive Coordinator
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@optonline.net


JRI Poland #Poland Lezajsk, Poland #poland

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I have just been advised of the existence of Marriage registers for Lezajsk,Poland for the period 1899-1901. As the Rzeszow PSA Coordinator, I am seeking an individual to step forward to act as the Town Leader for this indexing project.

Please contact me directly to discuss the responsibilities of the volunteer
position as well as the specifics of the project.

Your involvement is greatly appreciated by me and your fellow researchers
and the addition of the indices to the JRI-Poland database will serve as a
memorial in perpetuity.

Eden Joachim
Rzeszow PSA Archive Coordinator
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@optonline.net


Translation:Hebrew to English #poland #ciechanow

Stan Zeidenberg
 

We have an important 9 page extraction requiring translation >from Hebrew to
English. Once translated this material will be placed on our Ciechanow Shetl
Page. Anyone qualified and interested in assisting should contact me directly.

Regarding our Yizkor Book Translation (already online), there was some
discussion some time ago about making the work available in a hard copy bound
edition. In order to do this we would first need to develop a names and places
index as well as a glossary. If anyone would like to assist in this area,
please contact me.

Stan Zeidenberg
Ciechanow Research Group


#Ciechanow #Poland Translation:Hebrew to English #poland #ciechanow

Stan Zeidenberg
 

We have an important 9 page extraction requiring translation >from Hebrew to
English. Once translated this material will be placed on our Ciechanow Shetl
Page. Anyone qualified and interested in assisting should contact me directly.

Regarding our Yizkor Book Translation (already online), there was some
discussion some time ago about making the work available in a hard copy bound
edition. In order to do this we would first need to develop a names and places
index as well as a glossary. If anyone would like to assist in this area,
please contact me.

Stan Zeidenberg
Ciechanow Research Group


Research in Pittsburgh #general

Rae M. Barent <RaeBarent@...>
 

I must take exception to a recent post.. I currently live in
Pittsburgh and have visited the Pennsylvania room of the Carnegie
Library many times. While it is a valuable resource for obituaries
and Pittsburgh census information, is is virtually useless for
cemetery records for two reasons: virtually none of the cities Jewish
cemeteries have been catalogued in print and the books that do exist
are very old. Bear in mind, too, that the Pennsylvania Room is
staffed and was compiled by the Western PA Genealogical Society which
focusses on non-Jewish genealogy. I'm sure that if my grandparents
had belonged to Rodef Shalom in the mid 1800's I might be able to
find references in the books in the Pennsylvania Room, but mine were
part of the mass immigration >from Eastern Europe and neither the
Russian cemetery, Beth Abraham, nor the Romanian one, New Light ever
found their way into a book.

On the other hand, the Rauh Jewish Archives of the John Heinz History
Center has become for Pittsburghers and former Pittsburghers, the
resource center of choice. It is the repository for , among others, the
records of Bnai Israel Congregation, the Irene Kaufmann Settlement,
the YM&WHA, Dor Hodosh Congregation . As for Rodef Shalom records, they
are found in their own excellent archives and include a comprehensive
set of Jewish Criterions.
As for the Rauh Archive cemetery project, it will be when completed, a
complete listing of every grave in every Jewish cemetery in Western PA
done not >from error-prone records but >from actual observation. Nine of
these have been included in JOWBR; more will be in the future.
I would argue that while the "bulk of the world's published information"
may have been in books and libraries ten or twenty years ago, this is no
longer true.

Rae Melnick Barent
Pittsburgh, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research in Pittsburgh #general

Rae M. Barent <RaeBarent@...>
 

I must take exception to a recent post.. I currently live in
Pittsburgh and have visited the Pennsylvania room of the Carnegie
Library many times. While it is a valuable resource for obituaries
and Pittsburgh census information, is is virtually useless for
cemetery records for two reasons: virtually none of the cities Jewish
cemeteries have been catalogued in print and the books that do exist
are very old. Bear in mind, too, that the Pennsylvania Room is
staffed and was compiled by the Western PA Genealogical Society which
focusses on non-Jewish genealogy. I'm sure that if my grandparents
had belonged to Rodef Shalom in the mid 1800's I might be able to
find references in the books in the Pennsylvania Room, but mine were
part of the mass immigration >from Eastern Europe and neither the
Russian cemetery, Beth Abraham, nor the Romanian one, New Light ever
found their way into a book.

On the other hand, the Rauh Jewish Archives of the John Heinz History
Center has become for Pittsburghers and former Pittsburghers, the
resource center of choice. It is the repository for , among others, the
records of Bnai Israel Congregation, the Irene Kaufmann Settlement,
the YM&WHA, Dor Hodosh Congregation . As for Rodef Shalom records, they
are found in their own excellent archives and include a comprehensive
set of Jewish Criterions.
As for the Rauh Archive cemetery project, it will be when completed, a
complete listing of every grave in every Jewish cemetery in Western PA
done not >from error-prone records but >from actual observation. Nine of
these have been included in JOWBR; more will be in the future.
I would argue that while the "bulk of the world's published information"
may have been in books and libraries ten or twenty years ago, this is no
longer true.

Rae Melnick Barent
Pittsburgh, PA


Seeking a cousin from New York #general

Curiousyl@...
 

This is a long shot - I know - but miracles do happen in JewishGen.

In looking through old photos, I found a letter written in October,1941
or '42, >from Harriet STERN, XXX Creston Ave., Bronx, N.Y.

Harriet may have been about 16-18 at the time, and had visited my family
in Baltimore.
"Hints" included in the letter were: she was attending school - "day and
night", and "she went fishing with Semour".

She was my Grandmother Clara EHRENPREIS's niece.
We had exchanged rings, an aquamarine and a moonstone!

Is there anyone reading this Digest who may know of Harriet STERN or her
family? Her married name? Any bit of information?

Please reply privately to:
curiousyl@aol.com

Thank you.
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita JGSPBCI

MODERATOR NOTE: The house number was replaced by XXX.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking a cousin from New York #general

Curiousyl@...
 

This is a long shot - I know - but miracles do happen in JewishGen.

In looking through old photos, I found a letter written in October,1941
or '42, >from Harriet STERN, XXX Creston Ave., Bronx, N.Y.

Harriet may have been about 16-18 at the time, and had visited my family
in Baltimore.
"Hints" included in the letter were: she was attending school - "day and
night", and "she went fishing with Semour".

She was my Grandmother Clara EHRENPREIS's niece.
We had exchanged rings, an aquamarine and a moonstone!

Is there anyone reading this Digest who may know of Harriet STERN or her
family? Her married name? Any bit of information?

Please reply privately to:
curiousyl@aol.com

Thank you.
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita JGSPBCI

MODERATOR NOTE: The house number was replaced by XXX.


HOEXTER - GE > ZA #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

I am addressing this to both GerSIG and South Africa SIG.

Leo GINSBERG(1845-1895) married Louise HOEXTER(1850-1906). I am fairly
sure that they lived in Germany. Louise had a brother Gustav HOEXTER who
was a medical doctor in Rouxville, in the Orange Free State of South
Africa. During the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), Dr Gustav HOEXTER looked
after boer women, interned by the British. This is all that I know about
the Hoexter family.

Can anyone please give me more information about this family?

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>


German SIG #Germany HOEXTER - GE > ZA #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

I am addressing this to both GerSIG and South Africa SIG.

Leo GINSBERG(1845-1895) married Louise HOEXTER(1850-1906). I am fairly
sure that they lived in Germany. Louise had a brother Gustav HOEXTER who
was a medical doctor in Rouxville, in the Orange Free State of South
Africa. During the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), Dr Gustav HOEXTER looked
after boer women, interned by the British. This is all that I know about
the Hoexter family.

Can anyone please give me more information about this family?

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>


What is Schwacha? #germany

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Gersiggers,
I have just been advised of the existence of marriage registers for the
town of Lezajsk, Poland, formerly part of Galicia, Austro-Hungary.

The archives tell me these records are written in the German language, and
refer to it as Schwacha.

Can any of you knowledgeable people tell me what this means, and explain
the implications of translating records in this "tongue"?

I thank you in advance for your responses, and request private replies,
unless the moderator feels theses replies are pertinent for posting to
the GerSig Discussion Group.

Eden Joachim Pomona, New York esjoachim@optonline.net

MOD NOTE: I've not heard of this term before and assume that other members
haven't either. If you get what seems to be an authoritative definition
of the term "Schwacha" and explaination for it's usage in that context
please let the Forum know. MOD1


German SIG #Germany What is Schwacha? #germany

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Gersiggers,
I have just been advised of the existence of marriage registers for the
town of Lezajsk, Poland, formerly part of Galicia, Austro-Hungary.

The archives tell me these records are written in the German language, and
refer to it as Schwacha.

Can any of you knowledgeable people tell me what this means, and explain
the implications of translating records in this "tongue"?

I thank you in advance for your responses, and request private replies,
unless the moderator feels theses replies are pertinent for posting to
the GerSig Discussion Group.

Eden Joachim Pomona, New York esjoachim@optonline.net

MOD NOTE: I've not heard of this term before and assume that other members
haven't either. If you get what seems to be an authoritative definition
of the term "Schwacha" and explaination for it's usage in that context
please let the Forum know. MOD1