Date   

Re: Adolf Zukor from Ricse #hungary

Shmuel Spiro <avnesho@...>
 

Adolf Zukor was born in 1873 at Ricse, in northern Hungary, about 20km north
of Kisvarda near the Tisza River. I'm not related to him, but my father's
cousin's wife is. There is a story in her family of him coming back once to
visit after he had gotten rich, and bringing toys for all the children in
the village.

Ricse was formerly in Zemplen county, and Zukor is written up in the
Zemplen- Satoraljaujhely yizkor book by Meir Sas (published in 1986 in
Toronto).


Subject: Adolf Zukor
From: "moishe@langsam.com" <moishe@langsam.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 19:44:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Dear Group,

I am inspired by the article in the recent issue of
Avotaynu regarding Jan Murray.

In our family we have a story that Adolf Zukor of Hollywood
Movie Mogul fame was either a cousin or uncle to my late
grandmother. My great-aunt used to tell over a story how
Adolf came to the family in Hungary asking for money to
help him start a business before he left to America.

What I do know about my own family is that my late
grandmother ob"m, Chana (Jane) YUROWITZ nee WEINSTOCK (1907
- 1981), was born to Moshe Weinstock (1868-1949) and Raizel
STERN (1873-1929). In 1929 the family was living in Puks,
Hungary. They were >from Zenta, Yugoslavia.

Moshe Weinstock's parents were Yona and Rachel WEINSTOCK,
possibly >from Zenta too. Raizel Weinstock nee Stern's
parents were Tzvi Stern and Rochel STEINER >from Iloc,
Yugoslavia.

Does anybody know how this might fit into Adolf Zucker's
family history?

Thanks!
Moishe Miller
moishe@langsam.com
Brooklyn, NY


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Adolf Zukor from Ricse #hungary

Shmuel Spiro <avnesho@...>
 

Adolf Zukor was born in 1873 at Ricse, in northern Hungary, about 20km north
of Kisvarda near the Tisza River. I'm not related to him, but my father's
cousin's wife is. There is a story in her family of him coming back once to
visit after he had gotten rich, and bringing toys for all the children in
the village.

Ricse was formerly in Zemplen county, and Zukor is written up in the
Zemplen- Satoraljaujhely yizkor book by Meir Sas (published in 1986 in
Toronto).


Subject: Adolf Zukor
From: "moishe@langsam.com" <moishe@langsam.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 19:44:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Dear Group,

I am inspired by the article in the recent issue of
Avotaynu regarding Jan Murray.

In our family we have a story that Adolf Zukor of Hollywood
Movie Mogul fame was either a cousin or uncle to my late
grandmother. My great-aunt used to tell over a story how
Adolf came to the family in Hungary asking for money to
help him start a business before he left to America.

What I do know about my own family is that my late
grandmother ob"m, Chana (Jane) YUROWITZ nee WEINSTOCK (1907
- 1981), was born to Moshe Weinstock (1868-1949) and Raizel
STERN (1873-1929). In 1929 the family was living in Puks,
Hungary. They were >from Zenta, Yugoslavia.

Moshe Weinstock's parents were Yona and Rachel WEINSTOCK,
possibly >from Zenta too. Raizel Weinstock nee Stern's
parents were Tzvi Stern and Rochel STEINER >from Iloc,
Yugoslavia.

Does anybody know how this might fit into Adolf Zucker's
family history?

Thanks!
Moishe Miller
moishe@langsam.com
Brooklyn, NY


Bea COHEN (#2851) of Easton, Penn. #general

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

Would anyone have an email or current address for Bea COHEN (#2851) of
Easton, PA. She is searching GLEZER >from Salakas, Lithuania. She has not
updated her JGFF data since before 1997. I know her phone number (without
address) is online but I'd rather not make my first contact by phone.

Steven Weiss
Chicago, IL
SHVARTZBERG >from Rakishok, Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bea COHEN (#2851) of Easton, Penn. #general

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

Would anyone have an email or current address for Bea COHEN (#2851) of
Easton, PA. She is searching GLEZER >from Salakas, Lithuania. She has not
updated her JGFF data since before 1997. I know her phone number (without
address) is online but I'd rather not make my first contact by phone.

Steven Weiss
Chicago, IL
SHVARTZBERG >from Rakishok, Lithuania


Kantor & Katzenellenbogen families #general

Michael Trapunsky <trapunsky@...>
 

Hi all,

I was wondering if anyone has come across a connection between the Kantor
and Katzenellenbogen families in their research.

My grandmother's 1st cousin mentioned that his grandmother (my great great
grandmother) - Chana Hinde SHER (nee KANTOR) - was somehow related to the
KATZENELLENBOGEN family. But he never mentioned the exact connection. We
also have a Yichus brief outlining the Katzenellenbogen family but
unfortunately it leaves out the last few generations making the connection
to my great great grandmother.

Would love to hear back >from anyone who might have some information to tie
these 2 families together.

Chag Sameach,

Michael Trapunsky
Forest Hills, New York, USA
trapunsky@earthlink.net


Missing Portion on a Manifest #general

Marilen Pitler <mpitler@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I am researching my Pitler side of the family. I am in possession of the
ship's manifest on which they sailed; the Mauretania >from Cherbourg to New
York, leaving May 5, 1922, arriving May 12, 1922. The manifest lists
several of the relatives with whom they traveled (Cheskis), but does not
list their names: Pearl, Abe, Morris, and Lillian Pitler.

These records laid in barrels on the docks for years and rats got into them.
My fear is that this particular section of the manifest is permanently lost.
I have tried many searches, but have not found their names. Any ideas for
further searching?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Marilen Pitler
St. Louis, MO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kantor & Katzenellenbogen families #general

Michael Trapunsky <trapunsky@...>
 

Hi all,

I was wondering if anyone has come across a connection between the Kantor
and Katzenellenbogen families in their research.

My grandmother's 1st cousin mentioned that his grandmother (my great great
grandmother) - Chana Hinde SHER (nee KANTOR) - was somehow related to the
KATZENELLENBOGEN family. But he never mentioned the exact connection. We
also have a Yichus brief outlining the Katzenellenbogen family but
unfortunately it leaves out the last few generations making the connection
to my great great grandmother.

Would love to hear back >from anyone who might have some information to tie
these 2 families together.

Chag Sameach,

Michael Trapunsky
Forest Hills, New York, USA
trapunsky@earthlink.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Missing Portion on a Manifest #general

Marilen Pitler <mpitler@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I am researching my Pitler side of the family. I am in possession of the
ship's manifest on which they sailed; the Mauretania >from Cherbourg to New
York, leaving May 5, 1922, arriving May 12, 1922. The manifest lists
several of the relatives with whom they traveled (Cheskis), but does not
list their names: Pearl, Abe, Morris, and Lillian Pitler.

These records laid in barrels on the docks for years and rats got into them.
My fear is that this particular section of the manifest is permanently lost.
I have tried many searches, but have not found their names. Any ideas for
further searching?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Marilen Pitler
St. Louis, MO


Summary of responses to my request for information about Kamenets, Kobrin, Antopol & Slonim #belarus

Shana Egan <segan@...>
 

I was asked to post a summary of the responses I received regarding
information on Kamenets, Kobrin, Antopol and Slonim.

Please do not ask me any questions about the responses. I have listed all I
was told and I have not checked to see if the information is accurate or if
things have changed since the towns were visited.

Double spaces have been placed between comments by different individuals.
[MODERATOR NOTE: Because we pay for bandwidth double spaces are only between towns]

Kobrin
Visited in 2001
A destroyed Synagogue
No Jewish people living there
Check out the Bereza-Antopol website at
http://www.stevemorse.org/bereza-and-antopol/
Visited in 2003
Not much to see of inspirational interest
Former shul that had last been a Soviet era bottling plant. But
recognizing it as shul architecture was somewhat moving
City Historical Museum which pays lip services to Jewish deaths in
the Holocaust. Jewish Cemetery
Visited in 2000
Is a plaque on the outside of the Historical Museum mentioning some
of the people who died in WWII. There were some Jewish sounding names.
Only remnants of a burial area were a few scattered broken stones
that lined the road along a military landing strip.
Small Holocaust Memorial off the main road

Antopol
Check out the Bereza-Antopol website at
http://www.stevemorse.org/bereza-and-antopol/
Visited in 1988
Monument at a mass grave where 4000 Jews were murdered and buried
A small grave with rough stones and names on them
Only one Jew living in the town
Looks just like the set in Fiddler on the Roof

Kamenets
Visited in 1991 and 2001
Two cemeteries were destroyed by the Russians during the WWII
There are several buildings that belonged to Jewish families
The synagogues and Jewish Schools were transformed into clubs
See the yizkor book on JewishGen
at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html
There was a notable yeshiva there
Kamenets and Wysokie Litewskie shared a volunteer fire department.

Slonim

Use www.google.com to search and you will find much information
Region is rich in parks and nature preserves.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Summary of responses to my request for information about Kamenets, Kobrin, Antopol & Slonim #belarus

Shana Egan <segan@...>
 

I was asked to post a summary of the responses I received regarding
information on Kamenets, Kobrin, Antopol and Slonim.

Please do not ask me any questions about the responses. I have listed all I
was told and I have not checked to see if the information is accurate or if
things have changed since the towns were visited.

Double spaces have been placed between comments by different individuals.
[MODERATOR NOTE: Because we pay for bandwidth double spaces are only between towns]

Kobrin
Visited in 2001
A destroyed Synagogue
No Jewish people living there
Check out the Bereza-Antopol website at
http://www.stevemorse.org/bereza-and-antopol/
Visited in 2003
Not much to see of inspirational interest
Former shul that had last been a Soviet era bottling plant. But
recognizing it as shul architecture was somewhat moving
City Historical Museum which pays lip services to Jewish deaths in
the Holocaust. Jewish Cemetery
Visited in 2000
Is a plaque on the outside of the Historical Museum mentioning some
of the people who died in WWII. There were some Jewish sounding names.
Only remnants of a burial area were a few scattered broken stones
that lined the road along a military landing strip.
Small Holocaust Memorial off the main road

Antopol
Check out the Bereza-Antopol website at
http://www.stevemorse.org/bereza-and-antopol/
Visited in 1988
Monument at a mass grave where 4000 Jews were murdered and buried
A small grave with rough stones and names on them
Only one Jew living in the town
Looks just like the set in Fiddler on the Roof

Kamenets
Visited in 1991 and 2001
Two cemeteries were destroyed by the Russians during the WWII
There are several buildings that belonged to Jewish families
The synagogues and Jewish Schools were transformed into clubs
See the yizkor book on JewishGen
at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html
There was a notable yeshiva there
Kamenets and Wysokie Litewskie shared a volunteer fire department.

Slonim

Use www.google.com to search and you will find much information
Region is rich in parks and nature preserves.


Exciting new resource for Polish research #poland

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States

Last November (2004) I visited the Library of Congress in Washington DC.
I was looking for some specific material that I thought was to be found
at the L.of C.

After searching the catalogues the librarian on duty suggested that I
speak with Ron Bachman, Area Specialist for Poland - European Division.
She placed a phone call and Ron came up to meet me. The material I was
looking for was not to be found at the L.of C. but,if I were interested
he would tell me about something new he was working on. Don escorted me
to the Library of Congress Manuscript Room where he showed me samples
of the material that would soon be available to the public. I can't
begin to describe the emotions that ran through me when I saw the material.
I wanted to run out and tell everyone about it. But... since the material
was still being catalogued and prepared he asked me to "keep it under my
hat".

I received e-mail >from Don Bachman just before Pessach telling me the
project was finished and giving me permission to "spread the word". This
I am doing with great pleasure! To describe this new resource I will
quote >from the Library of Congress press release. The quote is given
with full permission:

<< Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States
is a presentation of the first 13 manuscript volumes of a larger collection
of 111 volumes compiled in Poland in 1926 and delivered to President Calvin
Coolidge at the White House to honor the 150th anniversary of the
Declaration of Independence. Richly illustrated with original works by
prominent Polish graphic artists, the collection includes the greetings and
signatures of national, provincial, and local government officials,
representatives of religious, social, business, academic, and military
institutions, and approximately five-and-a-half million school
children. At President Coolidge's behest, this unique gift was transferred
to the Library of Congress, where it remained largely forgotten for some
seven decades. In 1996 the collection was "rediscovered" serendipitously
during the visit of Polish First Lady Jolanta Kwasniewska and other
dignitaries >from the Embassy of Poland. The collection generated such
intense interest that the Library, in cooperation with the Embassy of
Poland, organized a special program on May 2, 1997 to showcase this symbol
of the enduring friendship between Poland and the United States.

More than an impressive artifact, the collection is an important, largely
unexplored primary source for genealogical, historical, and sociological
research for it includes the signatures of nearly one-sixth of the
population of Poland as it existed in 1926.

This searchable online presentation is a complete facsimile of the six
oversized presentation volumes and the seven volumes of secondary school
signatures. Researchers are now able to search by keyword (English or
Polish without diacritics) and locate information about particular
villages, cities, districts, provinces, institutions, or organizations. >>

What exactly are these books? They represent entries >from hundreds
of elementary and secondary schools throughout Poland, including shtetlach
in former Galicia that were part of Poland in the inter-war years.
Every town, every village, every shtetl that had an elementary school
is represented. Every pupil in every class signed his/her name. I looked,
of course, at the pages for the schools in the shtetlach where my family
came >from and recognized surnames, saw their handwritingand with tears in
my eyes turned the pages to see more.

The digitalized secondary school volumes can be seen at:
<http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html>http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html

Ron Bachman did a heroic amount of work to create the page-level indexing
that is crucial for making these materials work on the Internet.

Only the secondary school volumes are available on line. There are no
plans to digitalize the primary school volumes but they have been
catalogued and indexed and copies for shtetl entries can be ordered.
You can contact Ron Bachman for further details and for help in navigating
the website. His e-mail address is given here with full permission
(please mention my name when contacting him):
"Ronald D Bachman" <rbac@loc.gov>.

Susana Leistner Bloch
Coordinator, JewishGen ShtetLinks Project
Coordinator, JewishGen International Desk Project
Coordinator, Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
Coordinator, Suchostaw Region Research Group


JRI Poland #Poland Exciting new resource for Polish research #poland

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States

Last November (2004) I visited the Library of Congress in Washington DC.
I was looking for some specific material that I thought was to be found
at the L.of C.

After searching the catalogues the librarian on duty suggested that I
speak with Ron Bachman, Area Specialist for Poland - European Division.
She placed a phone call and Ron came up to meet me. The material I was
looking for was not to be found at the L.of C. but,if I were interested
he would tell me about something new he was working on. Don escorted me
to the Library of Congress Manuscript Room where he showed me samples
of the material that would soon be available to the public. I can't
begin to describe the emotions that ran through me when I saw the material.
I wanted to run out and tell everyone about it. But... since the material
was still being catalogued and prepared he asked me to "keep it under my
hat".

I received e-mail >from Don Bachman just before Pessach telling me the
project was finished and giving me permission to "spread the word". This
I am doing with great pleasure! To describe this new resource I will
quote >from the Library of Congress press release. The quote is given
with full permission:

<< Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States
is a presentation of the first 13 manuscript volumes of a larger collection
of 111 volumes compiled in Poland in 1926 and delivered to President Calvin
Coolidge at the White House to honor the 150th anniversary of the
Declaration of Independence. Richly illustrated with original works by
prominent Polish graphic artists, the collection includes the greetings and
signatures of national, provincial, and local government officials,
representatives of religious, social, business, academic, and military
institutions, and approximately five-and-a-half million school
children. At President Coolidge's behest, this unique gift was transferred
to the Library of Congress, where it remained largely forgotten for some
seven decades. In 1996 the collection was "rediscovered" serendipitously
during the visit of Polish First Lady Jolanta Kwasniewska and other
dignitaries >from the Embassy of Poland. The collection generated such
intense interest that the Library, in cooperation with the Embassy of
Poland, organized a special program on May 2, 1997 to showcase this symbol
of the enduring friendship between Poland and the United States.

More than an impressive artifact, the collection is an important, largely
unexplored primary source for genealogical, historical, and sociological
research for it includes the signatures of nearly one-sixth of the
population of Poland as it existed in 1926.

This searchable online presentation is a complete facsimile of the six
oversized presentation volumes and the seven volumes of secondary school
signatures. Researchers are now able to search by keyword (English or
Polish without diacritics) and locate information about particular
villages, cities, districts, provinces, institutions, or organizations. >>

What exactly are these books? They represent entries >from hundreds
of elementary and secondary schools throughout Poland, including shtetlach
in former Galicia that were part of Poland in the inter-war years.
Every town, every village, every shtetl that had an elementary school
is represented. Every pupil in every class signed his/her name. I looked,
of course, at the pages for the schools in the shtetlach where my family
came >from and recognized surnames, saw their handwritingand with tears in
my eyes turned the pages to see more.

The digitalized secondary school volumes can be seen at:
<http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html>http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html

Ron Bachman did a heroic amount of work to create the page-level indexing
that is crucial for making these materials work on the Internet.

Only the secondary school volumes are available on line. There are no
plans to digitalize the primary school volumes but they have been
catalogued and indexed and copies for shtetl entries can be ordered.
You can contact Ron Bachman for further details and for help in navigating
the website. His e-mail address is given here with full permission
(please mention my name when contacting him):
"Ronald D Bachman" <rbac@loc.gov>.

Susana Leistner Bloch
Coordinator, JewishGen ShtetLinks Project
Coordinator, JewishGen International Desk Project
Coordinator, Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
Coordinator, Suchostaw Region Research Group


using JRI-PL database #poland

Gilbert Hendlisz <gilbert.hendlisz@...>
 

I wonder if there is way to search chronologically the JRI-PL databases.
Here is what I mean. One of my ancestors, called Temera, left her
hometown, Piatek after her husband's death, probably remarried, in one
of the nearby towns and died between 1841 and 1844. The problem is that
I do not know the surname of his second husband and can't localise her
death certificate.

If I could search all the names for one town for the period 1840-1845
for instance, the givenname Temera could appear and give me a clue.
Does that possibility exist and if yes, how to do it ?

Thanks for your help.


Gilbert HENDLISZ ( #43912)
Brussels
Belgium

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The way to search a town's indices chronologically
is to become a qualified contributor to the town's indexing project,
which makes one eligible to obtain the Excel file of the town's indices.
It may then be sorted by year, surname, first name, etc.


JRI Poland #Poland using JRI-PL database #poland

Gilbert Hendlisz <gilbert.hendlisz@...>
 

I wonder if there is way to search chronologically the JRI-PL databases.
Here is what I mean. One of my ancestors, called Temera, left her
hometown, Piatek after her husband's death, probably remarried, in one
of the nearby towns and died between 1841 and 1844. The problem is that
I do not know the surname of his second husband and can't localise her
death certificate.

If I could search all the names for one town for the period 1840-1845
for instance, the givenname Temera could appear and give me a clue.
Does that possibility exist and if yes, how to do it ?

Thanks for your help.


Gilbert HENDLISZ ( #43912)
Brussels
Belgium

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The way to search a town's indices chronologically
is to become a qualified contributor to the town's indexing project,
which makes one eligible to obtain the Excel file of the town's indices.
It may then be sorted by year, surname, first name, etc.


TUROBIN, LU - PSA and LDS indexing #poland

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland Project is pleased to announce that
all 1826-31, 1833-71, 1875-89 Jewish records filmed by the Mormons for the
town of Turobin, in all 6293 entries and became part of the JRI-Poland
database in January 2005.

AND the first indexes >from the Polish State Archives(PSA) in Zamosc for
the unfilmed years 1891-02, in all 1366 entries, are indexed by the
JRI-Poland team. Years 1873-75 >from Lublin PSA will be added later.

Turobin is located in the Krasnystaw district, Lublin province at latitude/
longitude 50 50/22 44 and had in 1921 a Jewish population of 965. Nearest
towns with Jewish records for which there may
be family names similar to those in Turobin are Wysokie, Zolkiewka,
Szczebrzeszyn, Frampol.

In the years to come we will receive new indexes as they are transferred
from Turobin City Archives(USC) to Zamosc PSA after 100 years. The years
available at USC are 1903-1904; 1906-1913; 1920-1933; 1935-1937.

The most common surnames in the 1891-02 records - found more than 9 times
- are the following:

AJCHENBLAT, AJNWOJNER/AJNWOLNER, BAUMFELD, BERGMAN, BLUM, BRYK, CYMERMAN,
FEDER, FELDMAN, FLAJSZER, FRUMER, FUKS, GAJER, GALPERN, GIWERC, GLAS,
GLATMAN, GUTMACHER, JAKUBZON, JUFFE, KAFENBAUM, KLAJNER, LIBERBAUM,
LICHTMAN, REDELMAN, ROZBRUCH, ROZENFELD, SZTERENFELD/SZTERNFELD, TAJGMAN,
TREGER, TUROBINER, WAJNRYB, WECHTER, ZYNTAK.

As you all know the filmed years are indexed by volunteers and donated to
JRI-Poland so all can search those indexes for free.

For the unfilmed years, however, JRI-Poland needs to buy the index pages
from PSA and to pay our professional transliteration team in Warsaw and it
is tJRI-Poland policy not to publish such indexes untill the expenses are
covered.

For Turobin the target sum we need to collect is $425 and contributions of
any size are greatly appreciated.

Researchers who contribute a minimum of $75 and sign a Database Sharing
Agreement are qualified contributors and eligible to obtain the complete
PSA file, not only the present one but also those arriving in future years.
To have the full file is far better that searching for surnames in the
database: You find many and often unexpected spellings of the surnames,
you can search for given names, name combinations etc.

Here is how to contribute:

Contributions to "Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" may be
made by check, bank draft, money order, or Visa or MasterCard.
The web site for the credit card contribution form is:
www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm

PLEASE NOTE on the form: Turobin, Zamosc PSA project.

Send your contributions to:
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland, Inc.
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785 USA

Tel: 1-301-341-1261
Fax: 1-810-592-1768 (24 hours)
E-Mail: ssalo@capaccess.org

Credit card contributions may also be telephoned to Sheila Salo.
(Only between the hours of 8:00 am to 8:00 pm EDT/EST, please).

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is an independent
non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions to JRI-Poland
are tax-deductible in the U.S. to the extent permitted by law.

My best regards

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


JRI Poland #Poland TUROBIN, LU - PSA and LDS indexing #poland

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland Project is pleased to announce that
all 1826-31, 1833-71, 1875-89 Jewish records filmed by the Mormons for the
town of Turobin, in all 6293 entries and became part of the JRI-Poland
database in January 2005.

AND the first indexes >from the Polish State Archives(PSA) in Zamosc for
the unfilmed years 1891-02, in all 1366 entries, are indexed by the
JRI-Poland team. Years 1873-75 >from Lublin PSA will be added later.

Turobin is located in the Krasnystaw district, Lublin province at latitude/
longitude 50 50/22 44 and had in 1921 a Jewish population of 965. Nearest
towns with Jewish records for which there may
be family names similar to those in Turobin are Wysokie, Zolkiewka,
Szczebrzeszyn, Frampol.

In the years to come we will receive new indexes as they are transferred
from Turobin City Archives(USC) to Zamosc PSA after 100 years. The years
available at USC are 1903-1904; 1906-1913; 1920-1933; 1935-1937.

The most common surnames in the 1891-02 records - found more than 9 times
- are the following:

AJCHENBLAT, AJNWOJNER/AJNWOLNER, BAUMFELD, BERGMAN, BLUM, BRYK, CYMERMAN,
FEDER, FELDMAN, FLAJSZER, FRUMER, FUKS, GAJER, GALPERN, GIWERC, GLAS,
GLATMAN, GUTMACHER, JAKUBZON, JUFFE, KAFENBAUM, KLAJNER, LIBERBAUM,
LICHTMAN, REDELMAN, ROZBRUCH, ROZENFELD, SZTERENFELD/SZTERNFELD, TAJGMAN,
TREGER, TUROBINER, WAJNRYB, WECHTER, ZYNTAK.

As you all know the filmed years are indexed by volunteers and donated to
JRI-Poland so all can search those indexes for free.

For the unfilmed years, however, JRI-Poland needs to buy the index pages
from PSA and to pay our professional transliteration team in Warsaw and it
is tJRI-Poland policy not to publish such indexes untill the expenses are
covered.

For Turobin the target sum we need to collect is $425 and contributions of
any size are greatly appreciated.

Researchers who contribute a minimum of $75 and sign a Database Sharing
Agreement are qualified contributors and eligible to obtain the complete
PSA file, not only the present one but also those arriving in future years.
To have the full file is far better that searching for surnames in the
database: You find many and often unexpected spellings of the surnames,
you can search for given names, name combinations etc.

Here is how to contribute:

Contributions to "Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" may be
made by check, bank draft, money order, or Visa or MasterCard.
The web site for the credit card contribution form is:
www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm

PLEASE NOTE on the form: Turobin, Zamosc PSA project.

Send your contributions to:
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland, Inc.
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785 USA

Tel: 1-301-341-1261
Fax: 1-810-592-1768 (24 hours)
E-Mail: ssalo@capaccess.org

Credit card contributions may also be telephoned to Sheila Salo.
(Only between the hours of 8:00 am to 8:00 pm EDT/EST, please).

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is an independent
non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions to JRI-Poland
are tax-deductible in the U.S. to the extent permitted by law.

My best regards

Kirsten Gradel
Nyborg, Denmark
Zamosc Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

e-mail: kmgradel@dadlnet.dk


Exciting new resource for Polish research #poland

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States

Last November (2004) I visited the Library of Congress in Washington DC.
I was looking for some specific material that I thought was to be found
at the L.of C.

After searching the catalogues the librarian on duty suggested that I
speak with Ron Bachman, Area Specialist for Poland - European Division.
She placed a phone call and Ron came up to meet me. The material I was
looking for was not to be found at the L.of C. but,if I were interested
he would tell me about something new he was working on. Don escorted me
to the Library of Congress Manuscript Room where he showed me samples
of the material that would soon be available to the public. I can't
begin to describe the emotions that ran through me when I saw the material.
I wanted to run out and tell everyone about it. But... since the material
was still being catalogued and prepared he asked me to "keep it under my
hat".

I received e-mail >from Don Bachman just before Pessach telling me the
project was finished and giving me permission to "spread the word". This
I am doing with great pleasure! To describe this new resource I will
quote >from the Library of Congress press release. The quote is given
with full permission:

<< Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States
is a presentation of the first 13 manuscript volumes of a larger collection
of 111 volumes compiled in Poland in 1926 and delivered to President Calvin
Coolidge at the White House to honor the 150th anniversary of the
Declaration of Independence. Richly illustrated with original works by
prominent Polish graphic artists, the collection includes the greetings and
signatures of national, provincial, and local government officials,
representatives of religious, social, business, academic, and military
institutions, and approximately five-and-a-half million school
children. At President Coolidge's behest, this unique gift was transferred
to the Library of Congress, where it remained largely forgotten for some
seven decades. In 1996 the collection was "rediscovered" serendipitously
during the visit of Polish First Lady Jolanta Kwasniewska and other
dignitaries >from the Embassy of Poland. The collection generated such
intense interest that the Library, in cooperation with the Embassy of
Poland, organized a special program on May 2, 1997 to showcase this symbol
of the enduring friendship between Poland and the United States.

More than an impressive artifact, the collection is an important, largely
unexplored primary source for genealogical, historical, and sociological
research for it includes the signatures of nearly one-sixth of the
population of Poland as it existed in 1926.

This searchable online presentation is a complete facsimile of the six
oversized presentation volumes and the seven volumes of secondary school
signatures. Researchers are now able to search by keyword (English or
Polish without diacritics) and locate information about particular
villages, cities, districts, provinces, institutions, or organizations. >>

What exactly are these books? They represent entries >from hundreds
of elementary and secondary schools throughout Poland, including shtetlach
in former Galicia that were part of Poland in the inter-war years.
Every town, every village, every shtetl that had an elementary school
is represented. Every pupil in every class signed his/her name. I looked,
of course, at the pages for the schools in the shtetlach where my family
came >from and recognized surnames, saw their handwritingand with tears in
my eyes turned the pages to see more.

The digitalized secondary school volumes can be seen at:
<http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html>http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html

Ron Bachman did a heroic amount of work to create the page-level indexing
that is crucial for making these materials work on the Internet.

Only the secondary school volumes are available on line. There are no
plans to digitalize the primary school volumes but they have been
catalogued and indexed and copies for shtetl entries can be ordered.
You can contact Ron Bachman for further details and for help in navigating
the website. His e-mail address is given here with full permission
(please mention my name when contacting him):
"Ronald D Bachman" <rbac@loc.gov>.

Susana Leistner Bloch
Coordinator, JewishGen ShtetLinks Project
Coordinator, JewishGen International Desk Project
Coordinator, Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
Coordinator, Suchostaw Region Research Group


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Exciting new resource for Polish research #poland

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States

Last November (2004) I visited the Library of Congress in Washington DC.
I was looking for some specific material that I thought was to be found
at the L.of C.

After searching the catalogues the librarian on duty suggested that I
speak with Ron Bachman, Area Specialist for Poland - European Division.
She placed a phone call and Ron came up to meet me. The material I was
looking for was not to be found at the L.of C. but,if I were interested
he would tell me about something new he was working on. Don escorted me
to the Library of Congress Manuscript Room where he showed me samples
of the material that would soon be available to the public. I can't
begin to describe the emotions that ran through me when I saw the material.
I wanted to run out and tell everyone about it. But... since the material
was still being catalogued and prepared he asked me to "keep it under my
hat".

I received e-mail >from Don Bachman just before Pessach telling me the
project was finished and giving me permission to "spread the word". This
I am doing with great pleasure! To describe this new resource I will
quote >from the Library of Congress press release. The quote is given
with full permission:

<< Polish Declarations of Admiration and Friendship for the United States
is a presentation of the first 13 manuscript volumes of a larger collection
of 111 volumes compiled in Poland in 1926 and delivered to President Calvin
Coolidge at the White House to honor the 150th anniversary of the
Declaration of Independence. Richly illustrated with original works by
prominent Polish graphic artists, the collection includes the greetings and
signatures of national, provincial, and local government officials,
representatives of religious, social, business, academic, and military
institutions, and approximately five-and-a-half million school
children. At President Coolidge's behest, this unique gift was transferred
to the Library of Congress, where it remained largely forgotten for some
seven decades. In 1996 the collection was "rediscovered" serendipitously
during the visit of Polish First Lady Jolanta Kwasniewska and other
dignitaries >from the Embassy of Poland. The collection generated such
intense interest that the Library, in cooperation with the Embassy of
Poland, organized a special program on May 2, 1997 to showcase this symbol
of the enduring friendship between Poland and the United States.

More than an impressive artifact, the collection is an important, largely
unexplored primary source for genealogical, historical, and sociological
research for it includes the signatures of nearly one-sixth of the
population of Poland as it existed in 1926.

This searchable online presentation is a complete facsimile of the six
oversized presentation volumes and the seven volumes of secondary school
signatures. Researchers are now able to search by keyword (English or
Polish without diacritics) and locate information about particular
villages, cities, districts, provinces, institutions, or organizations. >>

What exactly are these books? They represent entries >from hundreds
of elementary and secondary schools throughout Poland, including shtetlach
in former Galicia that were part of Poland in the inter-war years.
Every town, every village, every shtetl that had an elementary school
is represented. Every pupil in every class signed his/her name. I looked,
of course, at the pages for the schools in the shtetlach where my family
came >from and recognized surnames, saw their handwritingand with tears in
my eyes turned the pages to see more.

The digitalized secondary school volumes can be seen at:
<http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html>http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/egwinv/egwdir.html

Ron Bachman did a heroic amount of work to create the page-level indexing
that is crucial for making these materials work on the Internet.

Only the secondary school volumes are available on line. There are no
plans to digitalize the primary school volumes but they have been
catalogued and indexed and copies for shtetl entries can be ordered.
You can contact Ron Bachman for further details and for help in navigating
the website. His e-mail address is given here with full permission
(please mention my name when contacting him):
"Ronald D Bachman" <rbac@loc.gov>.

Susana Leistner Bloch
Coordinator, JewishGen ShtetLinks Project
Coordinator, JewishGen International Desk Project
Coordinator, Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
Coordinator, Suchostaw Region Research Group


Kutler - Bialystok #poland

Frances Milat <frances_mil@...>
 

I am a resident of Sydney NSW Australia, very keen to try to establish
contact with any member of the Kutler family who would have known my
father, Marks Kutler, who migrated to the UK >from Bialystok in 1898.

He died in 1949, aged 72, and I learned later that he had four brothers
who migrated to the USA. Some previous enquiries I have made have not
been successful, and tho' I realise a great deal of time has passed,
I would very much appreciate any response.

I was told on first subscribing that there was somebody else interested
in the Kutler family, but have not had any emails >from that person.

Thank you!
Frances Milat
Sydney NSW
AUSTRALIA


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Kutler - Bialystok #poland

Frances Milat <frances_mil@...>
 

I am a resident of Sydney NSW Australia, very keen to try to establish
contact with any member of the Kutler family who would have known my
father, Marks Kutler, who migrated to the UK >from Bialystok in 1898.

He died in 1949, aged 72, and I learned later that he had four brothers
who migrated to the USA. Some previous enquiries I have made have not
been successful, and tho' I realise a great deal of time has passed,
I would very much appreciate any response.

I was told on first subscribing that there was somebody else interested
in the Kutler family, but have not had any emails >from that person.

Thank you!
Frances Milat
Sydney NSW
AUSTRALIA