Date   

Re: Summary of Trip to Poland -- Report 2 #poland

Bialystoker
 

Very interesting commentary >from Tilford. Also, some very interesting
real-life experiences with these two issues.

My intent was to highlight the impact of these two issues to our pursuit
of Genealogy. Of course, these issues have a much heavier impact to Jews
living in Poland and those who lost loved ones and property as a result
of the Soviet occupation in 1939-41, the Nazi occupation and Holocaust,
and the post War Soviet administration.

Recognizing that my observations result >from only a short visit to
Poland and some Internet reading about these issues, I agree that the
property restititution issue is very emotional and more critical to
Jewish-Polish relations. It is true that segments of the Jewish
Community disagree on the disposition of the recovered Jewish communal
property. Even worse, this disagreement is played out in the press.

If anyone is interested in more background on this issue (in English),
please see the following websites:

http://www.jewishcem.waw.pl/english/start.htm
http://www.znak.com.pl/forum/index-en.php?t=przeglad&id=1560
http://tolerancja.pl/index-en.php?b=indeks&q=restitution&l=en

For those interested in Jewish issues in Poland, at the bottom of the
last two webpages are Index of Names and Index of Subjects for you to
explore.

In my mind, the communal restitution and the private restitution are
completely different issues. However, these get mixed together and could
lead to Xenophobia and anti-Semitism in Poland. I am not sure how we can
help, but I think Genealogists must tread lightly at this time when they
research in Poland making sure that research requests do not appear be
addressing property issues.

For those interested in property restitution issues, this is not the
forum for discussion of individual claims. Individual restitution now
must be played out in the Polish political and court system.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tilford Bartman" <bartmant@earthlink.net>
To: "Mark Halpern" <bialystoker@comcast.net>
Cc: "BIALYGen: Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group"
<bialystok@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2005 7:46 AM
Subject: Re: [bialystok] Summary of Trip to Poland -- Report 2


Hi,

Great stuff! I'm envious of your 18 days in Poland. My trips have all
been relatively short ones. I'll make a few comments about your
observations.

About two years ago I wrote the IPN (Institute of National
Remembrance)
trying to find if documentation was available of the trial where my
relative Palter Lopata charged the Polish Police Assistant to the
Germans in Zabludow Zigmond Koslowski with war crimes. They wrote me
back telling me that the records of the trial were destroyed in 1989!
Palter and two other survivors >from Zabludow testified, and I think
the
records of this trial would have information about what happened in
Zabludow during the war which is otherwise unknown and not available
elsewhere. They were nice enough to point me to some other resources
on
Zabludow most of which I was familiar.

I think the issue of people who were recruited by the communist
security
agencies is a huge one for Polish people, and I don't doubt that this
incident with the reporter would create a stir. My understanding is
that
since the fall of the communist government in Poland very little has
been done to identify those who worked for the security agencies or
those who might actually be guilty of various crimes during this
period.
Many ex-communists have been successful in the "new" Poland including
"reformed" ex-communist politicians. Of course this is really an issue
for Poles, but as a observing descendant of Polish Jews I have mixed
feelings about it. One possible benefit of the Poles facing the truth
about the communist period in Poland could be that they (Poles within
Poland and elsewhere) might see that the vast majority of those that
"collaborated" were not "Jews", just more or less ordinary Poles very
much like themselves. And that many millions of Poles simply did what
they needed to do to benefit >from the system and make a life, as
people
generally do elsewhere. There where very few true heroes in this
regard.
Historically I think the view in Poland has been widespread that 1)
communism was nearly 100 percent imposed on Poland >from without- this
I
think is to quite a large extent correct but still somewhat
exaggerated
by many Poles. 2) that it was largely Jews who were responsible for or
who were "used" to impose communism on Poland- this has a small grain
of
truth but is very distorted and exaggerated in a convenient way. I
notice that many "activist" Poles living outside of Poland as
Americans,
Canadians, Brits, etc., would like to see the government in Poland do
much more to expose, root out, and prosecute ex-communists and their
helpers. Inside Poland there has not been nearly as much taste for
this. Hopefuly the effects of the Bronislaw Wildstein incident on
access to Jewish vital records will be short lived but who knows.

The personal property restitution issue is very emotional and really I
think an impossible one in Poland. It's considerably more complex than
it was in the other European countries that have already dealt with
this. There are all kinds of people in Poland who could claim
property
restitution, as you mention even Germans. Can you imagine how many
Poles
might feel about that! What about the more than 1 million Poles from
Eastern Poland who were arrested and deported East by the Russians
between Sept. 1939 and June 1941. Many of them lost property. Who are
they going to go to for restitution and what is their chance of every
seeing it. These are all issues that are ripe for exploitation by
various Polish political parties. We had two very nice Polish high
school students >from the Bialystok area come over to participate in
the
Zabludow Synagogue model project about a year ago. They had a good
time,
and were pretty enthusiastic. Their one concern was that the project
would increase interest among Jews here in their roots in Poland, and
that inevitably would lead them to have interest in property
restitution! Anyway, I think it's important to be aware that Jews
aren't the only ones in Poland that suffered, and what might be the
effects of our words and actions on others.

>from what I understand the community property issue has caused a
great
deal of bitterness and divisions within the Jewish community in Poland
and among those very concerned with it. >from what I understand one of
the assertions is that some of those involved in making decisions like
in selling religious property are people who Jewishness until rather
recently was quite subterranean, and that they are in no position in
terms of their knowledge or their emotional connection to be making
such
decisions. About five years ago I was able to obtain an original
document that was a power of attorney >from 1946 giving the jewish
community in Bialystok the right to sell the religious property in
Zabludow of the Rabbis house and the Bilsk Street prayer house for
130,000 Zloty's. It was signed by Shimon Datner and Menel Turek, and
has
the seal of the post war Bialystok Jewish community. I gave a copy of
it
to the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw. It appears that on the
property that was once the Zabludow wooden synagogue, the Mikvah, and
the Jewish school house, have been built the towns fire station, and
several homes. There is one large vacant lot behind the fire station.
I
learned that when the fire station was being built they hit a large
concrete foundation, and that was removed. It was what was left of the
Mikvah. Architects >from the Conservators Office in Warsaw would like
to
find where were the exact foundations of the synagogue and do some
archeological exploration there, but I don't know if that will be
possible.

The home and Blacksmith shop that was owned by my great grandfather
and
then my great uncle was still there after the war. Now it appears to
have several homes that were built on it, though I don't now just what
the property line was. At first I had the wrong home and I thought
that
the original home was still there. I talked to the owner who told me
that her stepfather bought the home in 1937 >from a Jew named Ico
Baron,
and that my families home and shop was on the other side of the street
right over the little bridge. She showed me the deed, and the
residency
list for her home. She was really very nice. I image in part because
she new she could show that this was not my families home, and that
her
home had been legally bought before the war. She told me that when
they
were building the homes where my families Smith shop was they found
some
old horse shoes and that she still had a few. She gave me one which of
course I still have. I personally have no interest whatsover in
property restitution- just that the truth be known. That the property
belonged to Jews (my family), that they were murdered by the Germans,
and that the property was taken over by others.

I think there is a national election coming up in Poland before very
long? I here the current Polish President Kwasniewski doesn't stand a
chance ( I think he's a center left reformed communist) , and that a
significantly more conservative government is very likely to be
elected.
I wonder what effect that will have on issues of concern to us?

Tilford


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Summary of Trip to Poland -- Report 2 #poland

Bialystoker
 

Very interesting commentary >from Tilford. Also, some very interesting
real-life experiences with these two issues.

My intent was to highlight the impact of these two issues to our pursuit
of Genealogy. Of course, these issues have a much heavier impact to Jews
living in Poland and those who lost loved ones and property as a result
of the Soviet occupation in 1939-41, the Nazi occupation and Holocaust,
and the post War Soviet administration.

Recognizing that my observations result >from only a short visit to
Poland and some Internet reading about these issues, I agree that the
property restititution issue is very emotional and more critical to
Jewish-Polish relations. It is true that segments of the Jewish
Community disagree on the disposition of the recovered Jewish communal
property. Even worse, this disagreement is played out in the press.

If anyone is interested in more background on this issue (in English),
please see the following websites:

http://www.jewishcem.waw.pl/english/start.htm
http://www.znak.com.pl/forum/index-en.php?t=przeglad&id=1560
http://tolerancja.pl/index-en.php?b=indeks&q=restitution&l=en

For those interested in Jewish issues in Poland, at the bottom of the
last two webpages are Index of Names and Index of Subjects for you to
explore.

In my mind, the communal restitution and the private restitution are
completely different issues. However, these get mixed together and could
lead to Xenophobia and anti-Semitism in Poland. I am not sure how we can
help, but I think Genealogists must tread lightly at this time when they
research in Poland making sure that research requests do not appear be
addressing property issues.

For those interested in property restitution issues, this is not the
forum for discussion of individual claims. Individual restitution now
must be played out in the Polish political and court system.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tilford Bartman" <bartmant@earthlink.net>
To: "Mark Halpern" <bialystoker@comcast.net>
Cc: "BIALYGen: Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group"
<bialystok@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2005 7:46 AM
Subject: Re: [bialystok] Summary of Trip to Poland -- Report 2


Hi,

Great stuff! I'm envious of your 18 days in Poland. My trips have all
been relatively short ones. I'll make a few comments about your
observations.

About two years ago I wrote the IPN (Institute of National
Remembrance)
trying to find if documentation was available of the trial where my
relative Palter Lopata charged the Polish Police Assistant to the
Germans in Zabludow Zigmond Koslowski with war crimes. They wrote me
back telling me that the records of the trial were destroyed in 1989!
Palter and two other survivors >from Zabludow testified, and I think
the
records of this trial would have information about what happened in
Zabludow during the war which is otherwise unknown and not available
elsewhere. They were nice enough to point me to some other resources
on
Zabludow most of which I was familiar.

I think the issue of people who were recruited by the communist
security
agencies is a huge one for Polish people, and I don't doubt that this
incident with the reporter would create a stir. My understanding is
that
since the fall of the communist government in Poland very little has
been done to identify those who worked for the security agencies or
those who might actually be guilty of various crimes during this
period.
Many ex-communists have been successful in the "new" Poland including
"reformed" ex-communist politicians. Of course this is really an issue
for Poles, but as a observing descendant of Polish Jews I have mixed
feelings about it. One possible benefit of the Poles facing the truth
about the communist period in Poland could be that they (Poles within
Poland and elsewhere) might see that the vast majority of those that
"collaborated" were not "Jews", just more or less ordinary Poles very
much like themselves. And that many millions of Poles simply did what
they needed to do to benefit >from the system and make a life, as
people
generally do elsewhere. There where very few true heroes in this
regard.
Historically I think the view in Poland has been widespread that 1)
communism was nearly 100 percent imposed on Poland >from without- this
I
think is to quite a large extent correct but still somewhat
exaggerated
by many Poles. 2) that it was largely Jews who were responsible for or
who were "used" to impose communism on Poland- this has a small grain
of
truth but is very distorted and exaggerated in a convenient way. I
notice that many "activist" Poles living outside of Poland as
Americans,
Canadians, Brits, etc., would like to see the government in Poland do
much more to expose, root out, and prosecute ex-communists and their
helpers. Inside Poland there has not been nearly as much taste for
this. Hopefuly the effects of the Bronislaw Wildstein incident on
access to Jewish vital records will be short lived but who knows.

The personal property restitution issue is very emotional and really I
think an impossible one in Poland. It's considerably more complex than
it was in the other European countries that have already dealt with
this. There are all kinds of people in Poland who could claim
property
restitution, as you mention even Germans. Can you imagine how many
Poles
might feel about that! What about the more than 1 million Poles from
Eastern Poland who were arrested and deported East by the Russians
between Sept. 1939 and June 1941. Many of them lost property. Who are
they going to go to for restitution and what is their chance of every
seeing it. These are all issues that are ripe for exploitation by
various Polish political parties. We had two very nice Polish high
school students >from the Bialystok area come over to participate in
the
Zabludow Synagogue model project about a year ago. They had a good
time,
and were pretty enthusiastic. Their one concern was that the project
would increase interest among Jews here in their roots in Poland, and
that inevitably would lead them to have interest in property
restitution! Anyway, I think it's important to be aware that Jews
aren't the only ones in Poland that suffered, and what might be the
effects of our words and actions on others.

>from what I understand the community property issue has caused a
great
deal of bitterness and divisions within the Jewish community in Poland
and among those very concerned with it. >from what I understand one of
the assertions is that some of those involved in making decisions like
in selling religious property are people who Jewishness until rather
recently was quite subterranean, and that they are in no position in
terms of their knowledge or their emotional connection to be making
such
decisions. About five years ago I was able to obtain an original
document that was a power of attorney >from 1946 giving the jewish
community in Bialystok the right to sell the religious property in
Zabludow of the Rabbis house and the Bilsk Street prayer house for
130,000 Zloty's. It was signed by Shimon Datner and Menel Turek, and
has
the seal of the post war Bialystok Jewish community. I gave a copy of
it
to the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw. It appears that on the
property that was once the Zabludow wooden synagogue, the Mikvah, and
the Jewish school house, have been built the towns fire station, and
several homes. There is one large vacant lot behind the fire station.
I
learned that when the fire station was being built they hit a large
concrete foundation, and that was removed. It was what was left of the
Mikvah. Architects >from the Conservators Office in Warsaw would like
to
find where were the exact foundations of the synagogue and do some
archeological exploration there, but I don't know if that will be
possible.

The home and Blacksmith shop that was owned by my great grandfather
and
then my great uncle was still there after the war. Now it appears to
have several homes that were built on it, though I don't now just what
the property line was. At first I had the wrong home and I thought
that
the original home was still there. I talked to the owner who told me
that her stepfather bought the home in 1937 >from a Jew named Ico
Baron,
and that my families home and shop was on the other side of the street
right over the little bridge. She showed me the deed, and the
residency
list for her home. She was really very nice. I image in part because
she new she could show that this was not my families home, and that
her
home had been legally bought before the war. She told me that when
they
were building the homes where my families Smith shop was they found
some
old horse shoes and that she still had a few. She gave me one which of
course I still have. I personally have no interest whatsover in
property restitution- just that the truth be known. That the property
belonged to Jews (my family), that they were murdered by the Germans,
and that the property was taken over by others.

I think there is a national election coming up in Poland before very
long? I here the current Polish President Kwasniewski doesn't stand a
chance ( I think he's a center left reformed communist) , and that a
significantly more conservative government is very likely to be
elected.
I wonder what effect that will have on issues of concern to us?

Tilford


Schleime KIRSHENBAUM #poland #lodz

Tzilla Kratter <kratter@...>
 

I'm trying to find information about Schleime KIRSHENBAUM (Szlejme
KIRSZENBAUM) who lived and died in Lodz around WWI.

I have gathered quite a lot of information about my grandmother, uncles,
aunts and cousins because none of them survived, and they were all in
Ghetto Lodz. Their names appear in the Lodz Names.

However, I know very little about my grandfather, Schleime KIRSHENBAUM,
except for the few facts that my mother used to mention. One of the facts
is that he had gone to the US to work, but when he asked my grandmother to
join him with their kids she ansewered that she wasn't going "me'ayver
layam", that is "across the seas", so he returned. On the Ellis Island
records I have located a Schleime KIRSCHBAUM (may be it's a spelling
mistake?)>from Lodz who came in 1904 to stay with a friend Jacob GROSSMAN of
468 Main St., Paterson, NJ. I even tried - to no avail - to trace
descendants of Jacob GROSSMAN as he was listed as a friend of another Lodz
man on the passenger list. May be Mr. GROSSMAN helped Jews >from Lodz for
some reason or other.

On the Internet, I read that the Lodz cemetry have lists of people buried
there (I'm sure he was buried in Lodz) and even the addresses where they had
lived.

I called up the Gmina Wyznaniowa Zydowska at Ul. Pomorska 18 in Lodz and
spoke to someone (in Polish. I can speak and read Polish quite well but
write rather poorly) giving them the details below. They asked me to call
back the next day when I was informed they did not have the information.
Since last year, I had quite a few unsuccessful experiences with Markuszow
in Poland where they gave me the run around for over a month (written and
over the phone) until I gave up, I'm wondering if I am going the wrong way
about it.

I'm guessing the following information (based on my grandmother's birth date
and having been told that he had been much older etc.):

Szlejme KIRSZENBAUM was born in Markuszow (?). He lived there for certain
before moving to Lodz as his eldest children born between 1898-1904 were
born in Markuszow.

Born: 1860? - 1870?

Address: His wife and children lived at 50 aleja 1-ego maja. I'm assuming
he had lived there too.

Died: around WWI – 1910-1918? I do not think that his death had anything
to do with the war. I think he died of an illness.

I'd really appreciate any suggestions about finding information about my
grandfather.

Tzilla Kratter, Jerusalem


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Schleime KIRSHENBAUM #poland #lodz

Tzilla Kratter <kratter@...>
 

I'm trying to find information about Schleime KIRSHENBAUM (Szlejme
KIRSZENBAUM) who lived and died in Lodz around WWI.

I have gathered quite a lot of information about my grandmother, uncles,
aunts and cousins because none of them survived, and they were all in
Ghetto Lodz. Their names appear in the Lodz Names.

However, I know very little about my grandfather, Schleime KIRSHENBAUM,
except for the few facts that my mother used to mention. One of the facts
is that he had gone to the US to work, but when he asked my grandmother to
join him with their kids she ansewered that she wasn't going "me'ayver
layam", that is "across the seas", so he returned. On the Ellis Island
records I have located a Schleime KIRSCHBAUM (may be it's a spelling
mistake?)>from Lodz who came in 1904 to stay with a friend Jacob GROSSMAN of
468 Main St., Paterson, NJ. I even tried - to no avail - to trace
descendants of Jacob GROSSMAN as he was listed as a friend of another Lodz
man on the passenger list. May be Mr. GROSSMAN helped Jews >from Lodz for
some reason or other.

On the Internet, I read that the Lodz cemetry have lists of people buried
there (I'm sure he was buried in Lodz) and even the addresses where they had
lived.

I called up the Gmina Wyznaniowa Zydowska at Ul. Pomorska 18 in Lodz and
spoke to someone (in Polish. I can speak and read Polish quite well but
write rather poorly) giving them the details below. They asked me to call
back the next day when I was informed they did not have the information.
Since last year, I had quite a few unsuccessful experiences with Markuszow
in Poland where they gave me the run around for over a month (written and
over the phone) until I gave up, I'm wondering if I am going the wrong way
about it.

I'm guessing the following information (based on my grandmother's birth date
and having been told that he had been much older etc.):

Szlejme KIRSZENBAUM was born in Markuszow (?). He lived there for certain
before moving to Lodz as his eldest children born between 1898-1904 were
born in Markuszow.

Born: 1860? - 1870?

Address: His wife and children lived at 50 aleja 1-ego maja. I'm assuming
he had lived there too.

Died: around WWI – 1910-1918? I do not think that his death had anything
to do with the war. I think he died of an illness.

I'd really appreciate any suggestions about finding information about my
grandfather.

Tzilla Kratter, Jerusalem


Reverend as Rabbi [Was: Sexton? Rabbi? Rev.?] #rabbinic

David Ferleger
 

Earlier today, Ethel Jean (Kowan) Saltz <nietgal@airmail.net> wrote:

How can I verify his being a rabbi? I have his business card and
it simply says Rev. as does the death notice.
I don't know when your grandfather lived but I do know that early in
American Judaism there were rabbis who identified and were titled as
"Rev." for "Reverend," including some well known ones who even had
that title, not "Rabbi," on their tombstones.

And Cleveland was a central place for much of the reform/change in
the early/mid 1800s in American Judaism

The book last year "American Judaism" by Sarna has a lot about this
in, I think, the 3d or 4th chapter.

On a Michigan synagogue's use of the term "Reverend" for "Rabbi,"
quoting a newspaper, see http://mi003.urj.net/history.htm : An item
in the Jackson Weekly Citizen for 20 April, 1880, page five, said
"The members of the Beth Israel Society have engaged the services of
a new rabbi - Rev. Dr. Resenoheth of St. Louis, Missouri." Nowhere
else in our archives is this man's name mentioned.

I'm no historian but these are some leads for you.

David Ferleger
Bala Cynwyd, PA


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Reverend as Rabbi [Was: Sexton? Rabbi? Rev.?] #rabbinic

David Ferleger
 

Earlier today, Ethel Jean (Kowan) Saltz <nietgal@airmail.net> wrote:

How can I verify his being a rabbi? I have his business card and
it simply says Rev. as does the death notice.
I don't know when your grandfather lived but I do know that early in
American Judaism there were rabbis who identified and were titled as
"Rev." for "Reverend," including some well known ones who even had
that title, not "Rabbi," on their tombstones.

And Cleveland was a central place for much of the reform/change in
the early/mid 1800s in American Judaism

The book last year "American Judaism" by Sarna has a lot about this
in, I think, the 3d or 4th chapter.

On a Michigan synagogue's use of the term "Reverend" for "Rabbi,"
quoting a newspaper, see http://mi003.urj.net/history.htm : An item
in the Jackson Weekly Citizen for 20 April, 1880, page five, said
"The members of the Beth Israel Society have engaged the services of
a new rabbi - Rev. Dr. Resenoheth of St. Louis, Missouri." Nowhere
else in our archives is this man's name mentioned.

I'm no historian but these are some leads for you.

David Ferleger
Bala Cynwyd, PA


Polish Translation request #poland

Shelly Crane
 


Translation needed, please #poland

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

I have posted a portion of a Vital Records document on the ViewMate site:
VM6187
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

or go directly to the page:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6187

I would appreciate a translation of the handwriting in columns 4 through 6
of my Grandmother's birth certificate [1880].
With the help of Shea and Hoffman's book - Following the Paper Trail, I was
able to translate most of the certificate , but the handwritten paragraph
above my Grandmother's name was impossible for me to translate.

Please respond to me directly.
curiousyl@bellsouth.net

Thank you.
Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita, JGSPBCI, FL
USA
Researching: ABELMAN, AWNER, DOROGOI, EHRENPREIS, FRIEDHOFFER, FRUCHT,
FURSHMAN, FURSTMAN, MELC, NUSINOV, LENT, SCHEINKEROVICH, WECHSLER.
Lithuania, Ukraine, Galicia,Israel, France, England, Argentina


Polish Translation Help Needed - Viewmate 6182 and 6183 #poland

genfam@...
 

I have recently obtained birth records for my great-great-grandmother
Chaie Sura Szperling, as well as my great-great-great grandfather
Szlama Szperling. Would be extremely grateful if someone could
translate these for me.

ViewMate 6182 and 6183.

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6182

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6183

Please reply privately. Thank you in advance for your help!

Ed Posnak
Orlando, FL
genfam@cfl.rr.com


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation request #poland

Shelly Crane
 


JRI Poland #Poland Translation needed, please #poland

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

I have posted a portion of a Vital Records document on the ViewMate site:
VM6187
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

or go directly to the page:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6187

I would appreciate a translation of the handwriting in columns 4 through 6
of my Grandmother's birth certificate [1880].
With the help of Shea and Hoffman's book - Following the Paper Trail, I was
able to translate most of the certificate , but the handwritten paragraph
above my Grandmother's name was impossible for me to translate.

Please respond to me directly.
curiousyl@bellsouth.net

Thank you.
Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita, JGSPBCI, FL
USA
Researching: ABELMAN, AWNER, DOROGOI, EHRENPREIS, FRIEDHOFFER, FRUCHT,
FURSHMAN, FURSTMAN, MELC, NUSINOV, LENT, SCHEINKEROVICH, WECHSLER.
Lithuania, Ukraine, Galicia,Israel, France, England, Argentina


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation Help Needed - Viewmate 6182 and 6183 #poland

genfam@...
 

I have recently obtained birth records for my great-great-grandmother
Chaie Sura Szperling, as well as my great-great-great grandfather
Szlama Szperling. Would be extremely grateful if someone could
translate these for me.

ViewMate 6182 and 6183.

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6182

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6183

Please reply privately. Thank you in advance for your help!

Ed Posnak
Orlando, FL
genfam@cfl.rr.com


Galaz or Gataz? Better View - VM 6172 #poland

Jackye Sullins <jsullins@...>
 

I have found another view of the surname GALAZ/GATAZ and hope some kind
person will have another look for me.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6172

Please reply privately.

Jackye Sullins
jsullins@san.rr.com


JRI Poland #Poland Galaz or Gataz? Better View - VM 6172 #poland

Jackye Sullins <jsullins@...>
 

I have found another view of the surname GALAZ/GATAZ and hope some kind
person will have another look for me.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6172

Please reply privately.

Jackye Sullins
jsullins@san.rr.com


Polish translation needed VM6177 #poland

SM <educatorsm@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could
translate the birth certificate of my great uncle,
Fiszel Milrod, born in Ostrowiec in 1880. Thank you!
The direct link is

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6177

Or go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Please reply privately. Thank you!

Sonia Milrod
Cincinnati, OH
educatorsm@yahoo.com


Polish translation needed VM6178 #poland

SM <educatorsm@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could
translate the birth certificate of my great aunt,
Dobra Milrod, born in Ostrowiec in 1876.
The direct link is
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6178

Or go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Please reply privately. Thank you!

Sonia Milrod
Cincinnati, OH
educatorsm@yahoo.com


JRI Poland #Poland Polish translation needed VM6177 #poland

SM <educatorsm@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could
translate the birth certificate of my great uncle,
Fiszel Milrod, born in Ostrowiec in 1880. Thank you!
The direct link is

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6177

Or go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Please reply privately. Thank you!

Sonia Milrod
Cincinnati, OH
educatorsm@yahoo.com


JRI Poland #Poland Polish translation needed VM6178 #poland

SM <educatorsm@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could
translate the birth certificate of my great aunt,
Dobra Milrod, born in Ostrowiec in 1876.
The direct link is
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6178

Or go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Please reply privately. Thank you!

Sonia Milrod
Cincinnati, OH
educatorsm@yahoo.com


Re: Polish translation needed VM6175 #poland

SM <educatorsm@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could
translate the birth certificate of my grandfather,
Yehiel Aharon Zahvel Milrod, born in Ostrowiec in
1878. The direct link is
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6175.
Or go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Please reply privately. Thank you!

Sonia Milrod
Cincinnati, OH
educatorsm@yahoo.com


Polish translation needed VM6176 #poland

SM <educatorsm@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could
translate the birth certificate of my great uncle,
Mendel Milrod, born in Ostrowiec in 1883. The direct
link is
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6176

Or go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Please reply privately. Thank you!

Sonia Milrod
Cincinnati, OH
educatorsm@yahoo.com