Date   

Re: "fabryka wody sodowej" - "soda water factory?" #galicia

Peter Jassem <pjassem@...>
 

"Woda sodowa" means sparkling water - just clear water with bubbles, not a
fancy flavored soda/pop.

Peter Jassem


Re: "fabryka wody sodowej" - "soda water factory?" #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Robert,

Soda water is known as a seltzer or carbonated water = carbon dioxide +
water.
In Galicia we called this a schpritzer.

Soda water factories were filling one liter glass containers, known as a
"siphon", equipped with the valve on a top.

Another type of a smaller container were glass bottles equipped with glass
cork and the rubber gasket, very similar to the types shown on this website:

http://www.worldlynx.net/sodasandbeers/closures.htm

Generally, water used for the bottling has been >from the mountain creeks or
a mineral type >from the numerous spa sources in the Carpathian mountains..
Artificial orange powders were also sometimes added to the bottled water
making so called "oranzada".

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: "fabryka wody sodowej" - "soda water factory?" #galicia

Peter Jassem <pjassem@...>
 

"Woda sodowa" means sparkling water - just clear water with bubbles, not a
fancy flavored soda/pop.

Peter Jassem


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: "fabryka wody sodowej" - "soda water factory?" #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Robert,

Soda water is known as a seltzer or carbonated water = carbon dioxide +
water.
In Galicia we called this a schpritzer.

Soda water factories were filling one liter glass containers, known as a
"siphon", equipped with the valve on a top.

Another type of a smaller container were glass bottles equipped with glass
cork and the rubber gasket, very similar to the types shown on this website:

http://www.worldlynx.net/sodasandbeers/closures.htm

Generally, water used for the bottling has been >from the mountain creeks or
a mineral type >from the numerous spa sources in the Carpathian mountains..
Artificial orange powders were also sometimes added to the bottled water
making so called "oranzada".

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Re: Naming a newborn after a sibling who died earlier #galicia

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

I would like to thank all you who responded either
privately or via the different lists to my query. I
got more than 20 answers and I believe that it is my
humble duty to summarize them for the sake of all of
us.The Jewishgen archives contain some references to
this issue but the responsa I got are more focused.
Almost all those who responded were acquainted with
this phenomenon/practice and came across it,however
they differ in their iterpretation.

Few made the comment that because of the bad fortune
people would refrain >from renaming a newborn after a
sibling who died earlier.

However, the majority of those who responded made the
comment that traditionally a newborn was named after a
relative who passed away. It was a Mitzvah to do it.
If a baby who carried this name died,they would name
the next one after the same relative,sometimes addind
an additional name or a "kinui".

Whatever the reasoning,the net result is that one
finds in the same household successive children with
the same given name!!! More important,it is not a
mistake of the registering clerk and it should not
confuse us.

I hope it helps.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem

--- Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com> wrote:

I am searching my maternal family KOENIGSBUCH from
Brzesko, Galicia and am making a steady progress.
Recently I came twice across a phenomenon of a
child(male) which died very early,within a year from
birth, and then the next child which was born was
given the same name.
I would like to hear how common such custom was,if
at
all.
Thanks.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Naming a newborn after a sibling who died earlier #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

I would like to thank all you who responded either
privately or via the different lists to my query. I
got more than 20 answers and I believe that it is my
humble duty to summarize them for the sake of all of
us.The Jewishgen archives contain some references to
this issue but the responsa I got are more focused.
Almost all those who responded were acquainted with
this phenomenon/practice and came across it,however
they differ in their iterpretation.

Few made the comment that because of the bad fortune
people would refrain >from renaming a newborn after a
sibling who died earlier.

However, the majority of those who responded made the
comment that traditionally a newborn was named after a
relative who passed away. It was a Mitzvah to do it.
If a baby who carried this name died,they would name
the next one after the same relative,sometimes addind
an additional name or a "kinui".

Whatever the reasoning,the net result is that one
finds in the same household successive children with
the same given name!!! More important,it is not a
mistake of the registering clerk and it should not
confuse us.

I hope it helps.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem

--- Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com> wrote:

I am searching my maternal family KOENIGSBUCH from
Brzesko, Galicia and am making a steady progress.
Recently I came twice across a phenomenon of a
child(male) which died very early,within a year from
birth, and then the next child which was born was
given the same name.
I would like to hear how common such custom was,if
at
all.
Thanks.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Reunion of First Cousins After 67 Years #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

My late father Leon Rosner(1903-1999) >from Krakow lost
all his siblings(and their offspring)during WW2: a
brother and 4 sisters. He barely spoke about them and
we never knew their given names or married names.

In June 2004 I found on JRI-PL names of 2 Rosner
persons (Abraham and Hanna) >from Krakow whose parents
had the same given names as my grandparents.I assumed
that they were my father's siblings. It gave the
sister's married name and I rather quickly found out
that she had a son, Reuven Orschutzer (b.1925 in
Krakow) who survived and lives in Israel.

Last December I checked the Yad Vashem PoTs which went
on the Internet .There were 355 pages of "Rosner and
Krakow". On page 324 I got a testimony which was filled
in the US in 1980 by Rudolph (Reuven) Rosner(b. 1920 in
Berlin and returned with his parents to Krakow in
1933). He is the son of Abraham. With the help of the
Genners I found him in Florida.

Rudy Rosner came today to Jerusalem and I organized a
reunion between him and our other first cousin. They
have not seen each other since 1938!!!! and were sure
that the other perished as well (I was born in 1948
so of course they had no idea about my existence).
The Mayor of Jerusalem, Uri Polanski,who greeted last
year's IAJGS Conference, was present at the reunion.
After a year of search I have 2 first cousins!!!
I'll continue the search for the other members of my
father's family.

It would not have been possible without the Internet.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland Reunion of First Cousins After 67 Years #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

My late father Leon Rosner(1903-1999) >from Krakow lost
all his siblings(and their offspring)during WW2: a
brother and 4 sisters. He barely spoke about them and
we never knew their given names or married names.

In June 2004 I found on JRI-PL names of 2 Rosner
persons (Abraham and Hanna) >from Krakow whose parents
had the same given names as my grandparents.I assumed
that they were my father's siblings. It gave the
sister's married name and I rather quickly found out
that she had a son, Reuven Orschutzer (b.1925 in
Krakow) who survived and lives in Israel.

Last December I checked the Yad Vashem PoTs which went
on the Internet .There were 355 pages of "Rosner and
Krakow". On page 324 I got a testimony which was filled
in the US in 1980 by Rudolph (Reuven) Rosner(b. 1920 in
Berlin and returned with his parents to Krakow in
1933). He is the son of Abraham. With the help of the
Genners I found him in Florida.

Rudy Rosner came today to Jerusalem and I organized a
reunion between him and our other first cousin. They
have not seen each other since 1938!!!! and were sure
that the other perished as well (I was born in 1948
so of course they had no idea about my existence).
The Mayor of Jerusalem, Uri Polanski,who greeted last
year's IAJGS Conference, was present at the reunion.
After a year of search I have 2 first cousins!!!
I'll continue the search for the other members of my
father's family.

It would not have been possible without the Internet.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Re: How can a Yisroyl have the name 'Levi'? #rabbinic

PM <phminden@...>
 

On 2005.06.14, Dr. Michael Bernet <MBernet@aol.com> wrote:

Levi sometimes slips in for the name Loewe or Loewy which is the
German "translation" of the name Aryeh, or Yehuda. (Jean-maker
Levi Straus was actually known as Loewi Strauss before he came to
the USA.)
I'd say the jeans are on the other leg: He had the regular and not
uncommon first name of "Leivi", and Bavarian officials
hypercorrectly changed it into Loewi, just like there are people
with the first or family name Loeser, a hypercorrection of Leizer
from Eliezer. Most German dialects as well as all Yiddish dialects
don't have the oe sound, but Standard German has, and so people
automatically presumed an "oe" when they heard a Bavarian or a Yid
pronounce e or ei.

Probably no connection to Arye, Yehude, Leib, Leibman, Leiman,
Lehman...

Lipman Phillip Minden

[Moderator's Note: Please follow up through direct private
communication on issues unrelated to rabbinic genealogy.]


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: How can a Yisroyl have the name 'Levi'? #rabbinic

PM <phminden@...>
 

On 2005.06.14, Dr. Michael Bernet <MBernet@aol.com> wrote:

Levi sometimes slips in for the name Loewe or Loewy which is the
German "translation" of the name Aryeh, or Yehuda. (Jean-maker
Levi Straus was actually known as Loewi Strauss before he came to
the USA.)
I'd say the jeans are on the other leg: He had the regular and not
uncommon first name of "Leivi", and Bavarian officials
hypercorrectly changed it into Loewi, just like there are people
with the first or family name Loeser, a hypercorrection of Leizer
from Eliezer. Most German dialects as well as all Yiddish dialects
don't have the oe sound, but Standard German has, and so people
automatically presumed an "oe" when they heard a Bavarian or a Yid
pronounce e or ei.

Probably no connection to Arye, Yehude, Leib, Leibman, Leiman,
Lehman...

Lipman Phillip Minden

[Moderator's Note: Please follow up through direct private
communication on issues unrelated to rabbinic genealogy.]


Re: Naming a newborn after a sibling who died earlier #galicia

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners and Galicianers,
I would like to thank all you who responded either
privately or via the different lists to my query. I
got more than 20 answers and I believe that it is my
humble duty to summarize them for the sake of all of
us.The Jewishgen archives contain some references to
this issue but the responsa I got are more focused.
Almost all those who responded were acquainted with
this phenomenon/practice and came across it,however
they differ in their iterpretation.
Few made the comment that because of the bad fortune
people would refrain >from renaming a newborn after a
sibling who died earlier.
However, the majority of those who responded made the
comment that traditionally a newborn was named after a
relative who passed away. It was a Mitzvah to do it.
If a baby who carried this name died,they would name
the next one after the same relative,sometimes addind
an additional name or a "kinui".
Whatever the reasoning,the net result is that one
finds in the same household successive children with
the same given name!!! More important,it is not a
mistake of the registering clerk and it vshould not
cofuse us.
I hope it helps.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem

--- Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com> wrote:

Dear Genners and Galicianers,
I am searching my maternal family KOENIGSBUCH from
Brzesko, Galicia and am making a steady progress.
Recently I came twice across a phenomenon of a
child(male) which died very early,within a year from
birth, and then the next child which was born was
given the same name.
I would like to hear how common such custom was,if
at
all.
Thanks.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming a newborn after a sibling who died earlier #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners and Galicianers,
I would like to thank all you who responded either
privately or via the different lists to my query. I
got more than 20 answers and I believe that it is my
humble duty to summarize them for the sake of all of
us.The Jewishgen archives contain some references to
this issue but the responsa I got are more focused.
Almost all those who responded were acquainted with
this phenomenon/practice and came across it,however
they differ in their iterpretation.
Few made the comment that because of the bad fortune
people would refrain >from renaming a newborn after a
sibling who died earlier.
However, the majority of those who responded made the
comment that traditionally a newborn was named after a
relative who passed away. It was a Mitzvah to do it.
If a baby who carried this name died,they would name
the next one after the same relative,sometimes addind
an additional name or a "kinui".
Whatever the reasoning,the net result is that one
finds in the same household successive children with
the same given name!!! More important,it is not a
mistake of the registering clerk and it vshould not
cofuse us.
I hope it helps.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem

--- Abuwasta Abuwasta <abuwasta@yahoo.com> wrote:

Dear Genners and Galicianers,
I am searching my maternal family KOENIGSBUCH from
Brzesko, Galicia and am making a steady progress.
Recently I came twice across a phenomenon of a
child(male) which died very early,within a year from
birth, and then the next child which was born was
given the same name.
I would like to hear how common such custom was,if
at
all.
Thanks.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Reunion of First Cousins After 67 Years #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners and Siggers,
My late father Leon Rosner(1903-1999) >from Krakow lost
all his siblings(and their offspring)during WW2: a
brother and 4 sisters. He barely spoke about them and
we never knew their given names or married names.
In June 2004 I found on JRI-PL names of 2 Rosner
persons(Abraham and Hanna) >from Krakow whose parents
had the same given names as my grandparents.I assumed
that they were my father's siblings.It gave the
sister's married name and I rather quickly found out
that she had a son, Reuven Orschutzer(b.1925 in
Krakow) who survived and lives in Israel.
Last December I checked the Yad Vashem PoTs which went
on the Internet .There were 355 pages of "Rosner and
Krakow".On page 324 I got a testimony which was filled
in the US in 1980 by Rudolph(Reuven) Rosner(b. 1920 in
Berlin and returned with his parents to Krakow in
1933).He is the son of Abraham.With the help of the
Genners I found him in Florida.
Rudy Rosner came today to Jerusalem and I organized a
reunion between him and our other first cousin.They
have not seen each other since 1938!!!! and were sure
that the other perished as well(I was born in 1948
so of course they had no idea about my existence).
The Mayor of Jerusalem, Uri Polanski,who greeted last
year's IAJGS Conference was present at the reunion.
After a year of search I have 2 first cousins!!!
I'll continue the search for the other members of my
father's family.
It would not have been possible without the Internet.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reunion of First Cousins After 67 Years #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners and Siggers,
My late father Leon Rosner(1903-1999) >from Krakow lost
all his siblings(and their offspring)during WW2: a
brother and 4 sisters. He barely spoke about them and
we never knew their given names or married names.
In June 2004 I found on JRI-PL names of 2 Rosner
persons(Abraham and Hanna) >from Krakow whose parents
had the same given names as my grandparents.I assumed
that they were my father's siblings.It gave the
sister's married name and I rather quickly found out
that she had a son, Reuven Orschutzer(b.1925 in
Krakow) who survived and lives in Israel.
Last December I checked the Yad Vashem PoTs which went
on the Internet .There were 355 pages of "Rosner and
Krakow".On page 324 I got a testimony which was filled
in the US in 1980 by Rudolph(Reuven) Rosner(b. 1920 in
Berlin and returned with his parents to Krakow in
1933).He is the son of Abraham.With the help of the
Genners I found him in Florida.
Rudy Rosner came today to Jerusalem and I organized a
reunion between him and our other first cousin.They
have not seen each other since 1938!!!! and were sure
that the other perished as well(I was born in 1948
so of course they had no idea about my existence).
The Mayor of Jerusalem, Uri Polanski,who greeted last
year's IAJGS Conference was present at the reunion.
After a year of search I have 2 first cousins!!!
I'll continue the search for the other members of my
father's family.
It would not have been possible without the Internet.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem


Re: Title of "Reverend" #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Stephanie Weiner wrote on 16 jun 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Lenn Zonder's posting

1. the reverend in question was a chazzan and not a
rabbi. If he was serving as the cantor of a synagogue,
he might not have been entitled to marry people in the
synagogue, so he laid aside his cantorial title in
favor of "Reverend." Such was the case in the marriage
of my in-laws in the 1930's. They were married by a
cantor who used the title "Reverend"

supports a similar case in my own family:

My grandmother's nephew was married in NYC in 1917 by "Rev. Aaron
Hafner" [the signature on the marriage record]. Aaron Hafner's
occupation is listed in census records as "Cantor." Since the bride's
maiden name was also Hafner, I suspect the Cantor was her uncle.
I know nothing of US habits of that time,
but over here, rev. could have been an abreviation
of "Rabbi", most likely in the sense of:

"Sir", "Mister", "Honorable gentleman", etc.

and so the connection with "Reverend"
would be only circumstantial "folk etymology/lore".

A chazan, cantor, would certainly be a rabbi in that sense.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please note Evertjan's instructions for replying
to him. Do not hit reply.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Title of "Reverend" #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Stephanie Weiner wrote on 16 jun 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Lenn Zonder's posting

1. the reverend in question was a chazzan and not a
rabbi. If he was serving as the cantor of a synagogue,
he might not have been entitled to marry people in the
synagogue, so he laid aside his cantorial title in
favor of "Reverend." Such was the case in the marriage
of my in-laws in the 1930's. They were married by a
cantor who used the title "Reverend"

supports a similar case in my own family:

My grandmother's nephew was married in NYC in 1917 by "Rev. Aaron
Hafner" [the signature on the marriage record]. Aaron Hafner's
occupation is listed in census records as "Cantor." Since the bride's
maiden name was also Hafner, I suspect the Cantor was her uncle.
I know nothing of US habits of that time,
but over here, rev. could have been an abreviation
of "Rabbi", most likely in the sense of:

"Sir", "Mister", "Honorable gentleman", etc.

and so the connection with "Reverend"
would be only circumstantial "folk etymology/lore".

A chazan, cantor, would certainly be a rabbi in that sense.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please note Evertjan's instructions for replying
to him. Do not hit reply.


Re: Cantor performs marriages #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/16/2005 2:53:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
laguna@sciti.com writes:

< Lenn Zonder's posting

1. the reverend in question was a chazzan and not a
rabbi. If he was serving as the cantor of a synagogue,
he might not have been entitled to marry people in the
synagogue, so he laid aside his cantorial title in
favor of "Reverend." Such was the case in the marriage
of my in-laws in the 1930's. They were married by a
cantor who used the title "Reverend"

supports a similar case in my own family:

My grandmother's nephew was married in NYC in 1917 by "Rev. Aaron
Hafner" [the signature on the marriage record]. Aaron Hafner's
occupation is listed in census records as "Cantor." Since the bride's
maiden name was also Hafner, I suspect the Cantor was her uncle. >

==According to Jewish religious law, a rabbi is not needed to perform a
wedding; any observant (male) Jew will do.

==According to civil law in most US jurisdictions, a cantor can qualify to
arrange Jewish (or probably any) weddings. Fill out a form at the registry
office, pay the fee, get the certificate, and you can perform a marriage. Taking
the title Reverend is not required, you can be an immam, an ayatollah, a
swami, a witch . . . .

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cantor performs marriages #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/16/2005 2:53:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
laguna@sciti.com writes:

< Lenn Zonder's posting

1. the reverend in question was a chazzan and not a
rabbi. If he was serving as the cantor of a synagogue,
he might not have been entitled to marry people in the
synagogue, so he laid aside his cantorial title in
favor of "Reverend." Such was the case in the marriage
of my in-laws in the 1930's. They were married by a
cantor who used the title "Reverend"

supports a similar case in my own family:

My grandmother's nephew was married in NYC in 1917 by "Rev. Aaron
Hafner" [the signature on the marriage record]. Aaron Hafner's
occupation is listed in census records as "Cantor." Since the bride's
maiden name was also Hafner, I suspect the Cantor was her uncle. >

==According to Jewish religious law, a rabbi is not needed to perform a
wedding; any observant (male) Jew will do.

==According to civil law in most US jurisdictions, a cantor can qualify to
arrange Jewish (or probably any) weddings. Fill out a form at the registry
office, pay the fee, get the certificate, and you can perform a marriage. Taking
the title Reverend is not required, you can be an immam, an ayatollah, a
swami, a witch . . . .

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: What are Moyles? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/16/2005 2:52:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
PJL427@aol.com writes:

< For Hundreds of Years, the Honorific Reb and Rav has been used by Jews.

==That has nothing to do with the (initially) Christian title for a
clergyman. It is pure coincidence that the Hebrew Rav and the Yiddish Reb have
similar starting letters as the clerical "reverend." There is a similar
coincidence in modern titles: In modern Israel usage, the Aramaic terms "mar" (and
"marat", f.) are the equivalents of Mr. and Mrs.

< . . . Sholem Alechem's Tevya the Milkman. . . . He was called Reb Tevya.

==That is a Yiddish honorific for "mister." You'll fin that on virtually
every Ashkenazi tombstone where it refers to an adult male.

< In many congregations, when a physician is called up to the Torah, he
might be called Yonatan ben Mordechai Ha'Rav. It is an honorific. >

==I've davvened in over a hundred different congregations, and was public
Torah reader in many additional. I have n e v e r encountered such usage,
except joculalry on Simhat Torah. The title haRav always precedes the name,
and always refers to an ordained (not necessarily "pulpit") rabbi.

< A Shochet and a Moyle is often addressed in writing as Rev. So&So >

==What's a Moyle? Neither my English, Yiddish or Hebrew dictionaries have
any such word. Are you by any chance referring to a "mohel," the person who
performs circumcisions (milah or Brit Milah)?

< So If it is OK to translate Tevya to its English form Tobias and Moshe to
Moses, Why is it any more assimilating to use the English honorific of Rav
or Reb to become Reverend. >

==I don't see the connection with Tuyah and Moshe. Neither Rav nor Reb is an
"English honorific"

< Although Reverend has fallen into disuse in currrent times .... we don't
call pople Reb or Rev Goldman or Rav Marcus either. >

==You say "we don't call pople . . . " You would have done better to limit
this to the first person singular. I certainly come across "Reb" whenever
there's an aufruf to an aliyah (reading a Torah portion) (11 on a given Shabbat,
oten many more mentions of "Reb"), and Rav or haRav when the person is an
ordained rabbi. And judging by ads and synagogue announcements, Rev or Reverend
hasn't completely fallen out of grace in Jewish circles.

< That is certainly no more assimilated than calling someone by the
English translation for a Jewish clergyman .... Rabbi. >

==Rabbi ("my master" is the correct Hebrew term for addressing or referring
to a rabbi. It is not an "English translation."

==Please don't get me wrong. I fully agree with all your other statements.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What are Moyles? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/16/2005 2:52:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
PJL427@aol.com writes:

< For Hundreds of Years, the Honorific Reb and Rav has been used by Jews.

==That has nothing to do with the (initially) Christian title for a
clergyman. It is pure coincidence that the Hebrew Rav and the Yiddish Reb have
similar starting letters as the clerical "reverend." There is a similar
coincidence in modern titles: In modern Israel usage, the Aramaic terms "mar" (and
"marat", f.) are the equivalents of Mr. and Mrs.

< . . . Sholem Alechem's Tevya the Milkman. . . . He was called Reb Tevya.

==That is a Yiddish honorific for "mister." You'll fin that on virtually
every Ashkenazi tombstone where it refers to an adult male.

< In many congregations, when a physician is called up to the Torah, he
might be called Yonatan ben Mordechai Ha'Rav. It is an honorific. >

==I've davvened in over a hundred different congregations, and was public
Torah reader in many additional. I have n e v e r encountered such usage,
except joculalry on Simhat Torah. The title haRav always precedes the name,
and always refers to an ordained (not necessarily "pulpit") rabbi.

< A Shochet and a Moyle is often addressed in writing as Rev. So&So >

==What's a Moyle? Neither my English, Yiddish or Hebrew dictionaries have
any such word. Are you by any chance referring to a "mohel," the person who
performs circumcisions (milah or Brit Milah)?

< So If it is OK to translate Tevya to its English form Tobias and Moshe to
Moses, Why is it any more assimilating to use the English honorific of Rav
or Reb to become Reverend. >

==I don't see the connection with Tuyah and Moshe. Neither Rav nor Reb is an
"English honorific"

< Although Reverend has fallen into disuse in currrent times .... we don't
call pople Reb or Rev Goldman or Rav Marcus either. >

==You say "we don't call pople . . . " You would have done better to limit
this to the first person singular. I certainly come across "Reb" whenever
there's an aufruf to an aliyah (reading a Torah portion) (11 on a given Shabbat,
oten many more mentions of "Reb"), and Rav or haRav when the person is an
ordained rabbi. And judging by ads and synagogue announcements, Rev or Reverend
hasn't completely fallen out of grace in Jewish circles.

< That is certainly no more assimilated than calling someone by the
English translation for a Jewish clergyman .... Rabbi. >

==Rabbi ("my master" is the correct Hebrew term for addressing or referring
to a rabbi. It is not an "English translation."

==Please don't get me wrong. I fully agree with all your other statements.

Michael Bernet, New York