Date   

Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #galicia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #galicia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


JRI Poland #Poland Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Russian Translation Help Needed #poland

Greg Tuckman
 

Hello group,
I have posted on ViewMate the 1904 marriage record of my grandfather's
eldest brother, Majer Firer, and his wife Gena Rajzla Bronleder.
Because of its size it is in two parts.
I would very much appreciate your help with a translation.

Please e-mail me privately.
The direct links are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7922
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7923

Thank you so much for your help.
Greg Tuckman
Arizona, USA


JRI Poland #Poland Russian Translation Help Needed #poland

Greg Tuckman
 

Hello group,
I have posted on ViewMate the 1904 marriage record of my grandfather's
eldest brother, Majer Firer, and his wife Gena Rajzla Bronleder.
Because of its size it is in two parts.
I would very much appreciate your help with a translation.

Please e-mail me privately.
The direct links are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7922
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7923

Thank you so much for your help.
Greg Tuckman
Arizona, USA


Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Request for old photos of Lomza before the War #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

If anyone has any old photos or picture postcards >from the city of Lomza
Poland, pictures of Jewish residents,and/or the Jewish community >from the
time before WWIIand would care to donate them for public use and
preservation in an archive, please contact me as these photos are needed
forpedagogic use in schools, etc., primarily in Israel. Acknowledgement
will be given to donors. Suggestions as to other sources, if known, are
also welcome.

Thanks, and Good Yom Tov!

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Pedagogic and Information Center
Kedumim, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Request for old photos of Lomza before the War #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

If anyone has any old photos or picture postcards >from the city of Lomza
Poland, pictures of Jewish residents,and/or the Jewish community >from the
time before WWIIand would care to donate them for public use and
preservation in an archive, please contact me as these photos are needed
forpedagogic use in schools, etc., primarily in Israel. Acknowledgement
will be given to donors. Suggestions as to other sources, if known, are
also welcome.

Thanks, and Good Yom Tov!

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Pedagogic and Information Center
Kedumim, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


Re: My lost uncle #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear Moshe,

I could not find your uncle in any of the business or address directories
with Danzig coverage. However, I believe the street in the address on his
postcard is St.-Bartholomaei-Kirchengasse (according to the table of
correspondence between German and Polish street names at
www.narodowa.pl/narodowa/Ksiazki/21/zd1.htm, this street no longer exists!).
The following people are listed at #12 in the 1936/1937 directory. Perhaps,
you can find one of them or a descendant (who might have been a child living
there), who might know something about your uncle.

WEISSGERBER Konstantia (owner of the building, who actually resided at
Reitergasse 2)
GERHARDT Hellmuth Arb.
MACH Leo Arb.
MEYER Frieda Frl
MIELKE Walt. Anstreich.
SIEGLER Artur Fleischer

WEISSGERBER, GERHARDT, and MIELKE were still there in 1942, so they were
probably not Jewish.

I could not find any businesses at this address in the 1923-1930
directories.

The 1930 business directory does not list any barbershops on this street.
According to the 1942 directory, the only barbershop on this street then was
at #2, run by Hermann KOSCHING.

There might be information about your uncle, at least indicating when, if
ever, he left Danzig, at the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish
People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. The Danzig collection there includes community
membership lists, financial records, and synagogue seat ownership records
from the 1930s, among many other genealogically useful documents >from 1720
to 1939. I have mentioned this in a few recent messages, but I believe it
is worth mentioning again: we have a need for volunteers to visit CAHJP to
help us prepare to extract genealogical information >from this collection.
If you or someone you know might be interested, please contact me for
details.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


-----Original Message-----
From: Moshe [mailto:y_moshe@zahav.net.il]
Sent: Mon, May 29, 2006 12:37 PM
To: Danzig SIG
Subject: [danzig] My lost uncle



Shalom,

I was wondering if someone can help me look and trace where my uncle,
Roman JACOBOWITZ >from Danzig may be. Contact with him was lost during
1932. I finally found a postcard >from him, >from Danzig, dated 1932,
written by him, where he writes where his barbershop (Frizeur) is.
I tried figuring out the address. It looks like "Frizeur-Kircheneug
(or Kirchenweg) 12, Danzig, in the St. Bauth??? area?
More than that I don't know, and as can be seen, not even that is clear.

Is there anyone who can help me trace, and help me out on this?

Thanks in advance,
Moshe Yaakobi ISRAEL


Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #lithuania

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland RE: My lost uncle #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear Moshe,

I could not find your uncle in any of the business or address directories
with Danzig coverage. However, I believe the street in the address on his
postcard is St.-Bartholomaei-Kirchengasse (according to the table of
correspondence between German and Polish street names at
www.narodowa.pl/narodowa/Ksiazki/21/zd1.htm, this street no longer exists!).
The following people are listed at #12 in the 1936/1937 directory. Perhaps,
you can find one of them or a descendant (who might have been a child living
there), who might know something about your uncle.

WEISSGERBER Konstantia (owner of the building, who actually resided at
Reitergasse 2)
GERHARDT Hellmuth Arb.
MACH Leo Arb.
MEYER Frieda Frl
MIELKE Walt. Anstreich.
SIEGLER Artur Fleischer

WEISSGERBER, GERHARDT, and MIELKE were still there in 1942, so they were
probably not Jewish.

I could not find any businesses at this address in the 1923-1930
directories.

The 1930 business directory does not list any barbershops on this street.
According to the 1942 directory, the only barbershop on this street then was
at #2, run by Hermann KOSCHING.

There might be information about your uncle, at least indicating when, if
ever, he left Danzig, at the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish
People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. The Danzig collection there includes community
membership lists, financial records, and synagogue seat ownership records
from the 1930s, among many other genealogically useful documents >from 1720
to 1939. I have mentioned this in a few recent messages, but I believe it
is worth mentioning again: we have a need for volunteers to visit CAHJP to
help us prepare to extract genealogical information >from this collection.
If you or someone you know might be interested, please contact me for
details.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


-----Original Message-----
From: Moshe [mailto:y_moshe@zahav.net.il]
Sent: Mon, May 29, 2006 12:37 PM
To: Danzig SIG
Subject: [danzig] My lost uncle



Shalom,

I was wondering if someone can help me look and trace where my uncle,
Roman JACOBOWITZ >from Danzig may be. Contact with him was lost during
1932. I finally found a postcard >from him, >from Danzig, dated 1932,
written by him, where he writes where his barbershop (Frizeur) is.
I tried figuring out the address. It looks like "Frizeur-Kircheneug
(or Kirchenweg) 12, Danzig, in the St. Bauth??? area?
More than that I don't know, and as can be seen, not even that is clear.

Is there anyone who can help me trace, and help me out on this?

Thanks in advance,
Moshe Yaakobi ISRAEL


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #lithuania

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Re: Zelda SKLAREK #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Lou Finn asked about a Zelda SKLAREK (married name) who, supposedly, died
in Danzig in 1913. Lou, do you know that she died in Danzig in 1913, or
only that she died there before the First World War? Do you have any other
information about Zelda or her husband's family? Do you know where in
Danzig they lived, occupations, whether they had children, etc.? Do you
know when and where her husband died?

I believe SKLAREK is a surname not native to Danzig, and have not found
it in Danzig in any of the business or address directories with Danzig
converage 1923-1942, or in any other Danzig sources. (However, if you
search at www.kalter.org/search, you will find soundex matches in and near
Warszawa and in Krotoszyn. You can also find matches in JewishGen's
All-Poland Database at www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland.)

There are other sources of information that might mention your relative,
such as the Danzig community's massive internal archives kept at the Central
Archives for the History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem and the material
on Family History Library microfilms. See the Resources section of our SIG
website for more information. None of the information >from these sources is
available online, but I hope we will soon be able to change this. In
connection with this, we have a strong need for volunteers in Jerusalem --
please contact me for details if you know someone who might like to help.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,,but raises questions #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,
but raises questions

Schelly Talalay Dardashti has written an article on today's JTA (Jewish
Telegraphic Agency) web site
http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=16659&intcategoryid=5

titled "Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families, but raises
questions" .

This is based on the paper Herb Huebscher and I are presenting at the
26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy (The official
Conference website is <http://www.jgsny2006.org/> )
on Wednesday, August 16 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM and describes the 25
disparate families, 22 of them now Jewish, that have been identified
via DNA testing as descendants of a common paternal ancestor who lived
several hundred years ago. These families were connected through Family
Tree DNA www.familytreedna.com.
A summary of the paper is on Session Summary
http://www.jgsny2006.org/e_pop_profiles.cfm?session=1&session_id=54498&class
_id=51063

The Genetics and genealgoy programme is : Wednesday, August 16
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
423 Genes for Genealogists: Genetics, Inheritance, and DNA Made Simple
Sitron

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
425 Genetic Genealogy: Using DNA to Connect -- What DNA Testing Can, and
Can't, Tell a Modern Genealogist Greenspan

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
430 Our Foremothers: Researching the Common Ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews
Behar

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
130 A Genealogical Puzzle: Twenty-one Disparate Families with a Common
Ancestor Huebscher Issroff

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
248 Sephardic DNA Study: Les Fleurs de l'Orient. Farhi

4:45 PM - 6:00 PM
247 How Do Jewish People Use Genetic Information? Ostrer, Harmon ,
Zajac Kleinhandler


Thursday, August 17
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
445 Medical and Genetic Family History: The Role of the Jewish
Genealogist Diamond

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
447 Genetics Panel: Using DNA to Enrich Our Research and Our Health
Sitron
Diamond, Behar, Feinberg , Huebscher and Issroff

Saul Issroff (London)


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland RE: Zelda SKLAREK #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Lou Finn asked about a Zelda SKLAREK (married name) who, supposedly, died
in Danzig in 1913. Lou, do you know that she died in Danzig in 1913, or
only that she died there before the First World War? Do you have any other
information about Zelda or her husband's family? Do you know where in
Danzig they lived, occupations, whether they had children, etc.? Do you
know when and where her husband died?

I believe SKLAREK is a surname not native to Danzig, and have not found
it in Danzig in any of the business or address directories with Danzig
converage 1923-1942, or in any other Danzig sources. (However, if you
search at www.kalter.org/search, you will find soundex matches in and near
Warszawa and in Krotoszyn. You can also find matches in JewishGen's
All-Poland Database at www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland.)

There are other sources of information that might mention your relative,
such as the Danzig community's massive internal archives kept at the Central
Archives for the History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem and the material
on Family History Library microfilms. See the Resources section of our SIG
website for more information. None of the information >from these sources is
available online, but I hope we will soon be able to change this. In
connection with this, we have a strong need for volunteers in Jerusalem --
please contact me for details if you know someone who might like to help.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,,but raises questions #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,
but raises questions

Schelly Talalay Dardashti has written an article on today's JTA (Jewish
Telegraphic Agency) web site
http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=16659&intcategoryid=5

titled "Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families, but raises
questions" .

This is based on the paper Herb Huebscher and I are presenting at the
26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy (The official
Conference website is <http://www.jgsny2006.org/> )
on Wednesday, August 16 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM and describes the 25
disparate families, 22 of them now Jewish, that have been identified
via DNA testing as descendants of a common paternal ancestor who lived
several hundred years ago. These families were connected through Family
Tree DNA www.familytreedna.com.
A summary of the paper is on Session Summary
http://www.jgsny2006.org/e_pop_profiles.cfm?session=1&session_id=54498&class
_id=51063

The Genetics and genealgoy programme is : Wednesday, August 16
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
423 Genes for Genealogists: Genetics, Inheritance, and DNA Made Simple
Sitron

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
425 Genetic Genealogy: Using DNA to Connect -- What DNA Testing Can, and
Can't, Tell a Modern Genealogist Greenspan

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
430 Our Foremothers: Researching the Common Ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews
Behar

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
130 A Genealogical Puzzle: Twenty-one Disparate Families with a Common
Ancestor Huebscher Issroff

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
248 Sephardic DNA Study: Les Fleurs de l'Orient. Farhi

4:45 PM - 6:00 PM
247 How Do Jewish People Use Genetic Information? Ostrer, Harmon ,
Zajac Kleinhandler


Thursday, August 17
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
445 Medical and Genetic Family History: The Role of the Jewish
Genealogist Diamond

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
447 Genetics Panel: Using DNA to Enrich Our Research and Our Health
Sitron
Diamond, Behar, Feinberg , Huebscher and Issroff

Saul Issroff (London)