Date   

Re: What Exactly is Flattan... Thank You #germany

Linda Shefler
 

A big thank you to everyone who responded to my request regarding "Flattan".

It seems I misread the last letter which was actually a sloppy U, and the
town was Flatau/Flatow in the district of Marienwerder, West Prussia.
The town is now called Zlotow in northern Poland. Thanks again. Best,

Linda Silverman Shefler Cary, NC linda.shefler@gmail.com

MOD NOTES: Linda - You can broadcast your "thank you" and enable GerSIG
and JewishGen to continue their free services if you put a thank you
note on the JewishGen Wall of Honor:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp

Thanks for explaining the reason for your research problem.
It teaches a good lesson for other researchers. Also,
it illustrates why JewishGen's "View-Mate" service is so wonderful.
Your Wall of Honor postings help us provide GerSIG, ViewMate
and much more, all free of charge. MOD 1


Addition of Warszawa Data to the JRI-Poland database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

The Jewish Records Indexing -Poland (http://www.jri-poland.org) database
was updated on the first night of Chanukah. Three Warszawa LDS films are
now complete and live on the database. The additions cover over 5000 new
Warszawa Records and include the following:

District IV, Births 1862-63, Deaths 1866
District V, Births, Marriages and Deaths 1863
District VI, Births, Marriages and Deaths 1864
District VII, Births and Marriages 1864

Many thanks to Michael Chen for all his help.

Happy Chanukah to all.

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
JRI-Poland


German SIG #Germany Re: What Exactly is Flattan... Thank You #germany

Linda Shefler
 

A big thank you to everyone who responded to my request regarding "Flattan".

It seems I misread the last letter which was actually a sloppy U, and the
town was Flatau/Flatow in the district of Marienwerder, West Prussia.
The town is now called Zlotow in northern Poland. Thanks again. Best,

Linda Silverman Shefler Cary, NC linda.shefler@gmail.com

MOD NOTES: Linda - You can broadcast your "thank you" and enable GerSIG
and JewishGen to continue their free services if you put a thank you
note on the JewishGen Wall of Honor:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp

Thanks for explaining the reason for your research problem.
It teaches a good lesson for other researchers. Also,
it illustrates why JewishGen's "View-Mate" service is so wonderful.
Your Wall of Honor postings help us provide GerSIG, ViewMate
and much more, all free of charge. MOD 1


JRI Poland #Poland Addition of Warszawa Data to the JRI-Poland database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

The Jewish Records Indexing -Poland (http://www.jri-poland.org) database
was updated on the first night of Chanukah. Three Warszawa LDS films are
now complete and live on the database. The additions cover over 5000 new
Warszawa Records and include the following:

District IV, Births 1862-63, Deaths 1866
District V, Births, Marriages and Deaths 1863
District VI, Births, Marriages and Deaths 1864
District VII, Births and Marriages 1864

Many thanks to Michael Chen for all his help.

Happy Chanukah to all.

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
JRI-Poland


Tarnow records update #poland

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

I am very pleased to announce the availability of more vital records
from Tarnow, now online through the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
database.

There are two sets of Tarnow records online: those transcribed from
the LDS microfilms, and later years that were purchased >from the
Polish State Archives (PSA). There are significant additions to both
of these sets of records.

For the LDS microfilm years, generally 1808 - 1870, these newly added
records represent missing years >from the work that was done a few years
ago by our dedicated group of volunteers, and completes the
transcription of those records available on LDS microfilms 0742702,
0948420, 0948421, and 0948422. This latest work adds Birth records
from for 1825 - 1831, and Death records >from 1848 - 1855. This brings
the total number of Tarnow extracts online >from these LDS microfilms
to over 31000. Because there is no register index for these records
there is no other way to locate people short of examining each record
on the microfilms.

For the PSA data, which previously covered the years up through 1899,
we have added the records spanning 1900 - 1904. These records now
number over 21000.

In both sets of data there are also several corrections that have been
made based on errata analysis and feedback over the past few years,
followed by a re-examination of some of the records.

I would especially like to thank Leonard Schneider for locating the
sections that were missing >from our original LDS microfilm effort.

Please contact me if you would like information about other Tarnow
projects, including School records and nearby towns like Brzesko,
Czchow, Dabrowa Tarnowska, Radlow, Szczucin, Wojnicz and Zabno.

Howard Fink
HowGen@verizon.net
Tarnow Shtetl Coordinator
Tarnow PSA Coordinator


JRI Poland #Poland Tarnow records update #poland

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

I am very pleased to announce the availability of more vital records
from Tarnow, now online through the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
database.

There are two sets of Tarnow records online: those transcribed from
the LDS microfilms, and later years that were purchased >from the
Polish State Archives (PSA). There are significant additions to both
of these sets of records.

For the LDS microfilm years, generally 1808 - 1870, these newly added
records represent missing years >from the work that was done a few years
ago by our dedicated group of volunteers, and completes the
transcription of those records available on LDS microfilms 0742702,
0948420, 0948421, and 0948422. This latest work adds Birth records
from for 1825 - 1831, and Death records >from 1848 - 1855. This brings
the total number of Tarnow extracts online >from these LDS microfilms
to over 31000. Because there is no register index for these records
there is no other way to locate people short of examining each record
on the microfilms.

For the PSA data, which previously covered the years up through 1899,
we have added the records spanning 1900 - 1904. These records now
number over 21000.

In both sets of data there are also several corrections that have been
made based on errata analysis and feedback over the past few years,
followed by a re-examination of some of the records.

I would especially like to thank Leonard Schneider for locating the
sections that were missing >from our original LDS microfilm effort.

Please contact me if you would like information about other Tarnow
projects, including School records and nearby towns like Brzesko,
Czchow, Dabrowa Tarnowska, Radlow, Szczucin, Wojnicz and Zabno.

Howard Fink
HowGen@verizon.net
Tarnow Shtetl Coordinator
Tarnow PSA Coordinator


Re: Tarnow #galicia

ellen moshenberg
 

Hi Linda,

Don't forget to look in Yad Vashem. If the family immigrated to the US
then also check Ellis Island and the big commercial one. Also check
out Steve Lasky's museumoffamilyhistory.com for lots of resources
worldwide.

On our roots trip to Poland we visited Tarnow. It is easy to reach by
train >from Krakow. There are lots of well marked Jewish sites to see
their and the city info center will give you an English map. They have
helpful English speaking advisors in the info center as well. There is
a large intact Jewish cemetary but you need to get a key >from the info
center though my husband and kids jumped the fence.

Happy Hanuka,
Ellen MOSHENBERG

Searching:
Stawiski: CHMIELEWSKI, GRUDZINSKI, REJMER
Lomza & NYC: CHMIELEWSKI, FLATOW
Grajewbo: REJMER
Bialystok: GRUDZINSKI
Tarnow: GELD OR GELT
LODZ & Plonsk: MOSZENBERG
Szczuczn: GRUDZINSKI
Kulbusov: REVITZ, TRAUM
Romni (Lithuania?) & New Haven, CT: DUNN
Tel Aviv: CHMIELEWSKI


JRI Poland #Poland re: Tarnow #poland

ellen moshenberg
 

Hi Linda,

Don't forget to look in Yad Vashem. If the family immigrated to the US
then also check Ellis Island and the big commercial one. Also check
out Steve Lasky's museumoffamilyhistory.com for lots of resources
worldwide.

On our roots trip to Poland we visited Tarnow. It is easy to reach by
train >from Krakow. There are lots of well marked Jewish sites to see
their and the city info center will give you an English map. They have
helpful English speaking advisors in the info center as well. There is
a large intact Jewish cemetary but you need to get a key >from the info
center though my husband and kids jumped the fence.

Happy Hanuka,
Ellen MOSHENBERG

Searching:
Stawiski: CHMIELEWSKI, GRUDZINSKI, REJMER
Lomza & NYC: CHMIELEWSKI, FLATOW
Grajewbo: REJMER
Bialystok: GRUDZINSKI
Tarnow: GELD OR GELT
LODZ & Plonsk: MOSZENBERG
Szczuczn: GRUDZINSKI
Kulbusov: REVITZ, TRAUM
Romni (Lithuania?) & New Haven, CT: DUNN
Tel Aviv: CHMIELEWSKI


RABINOWITZ (ROBBINS) - from Siauliai/Shavel, Lithuania to D.C. #lithuania

Joseph Lonstein
 

I'm searching for a RABINOWITZ family >from or near Siauliai (Shavel, Shavli)
Lithuania. Father was Rabbi Boruch Mordechai RABINOWITZ, and his wife was
named Sarah (she was born ~1835). According to the 1910 Census, Sarah was
a widow and living in Washington, D.C. with her daughter Mary LEVITAN (nee
Miriam Bracha RABINOWITZ, 1864-1937) and the LEVITAN family. These
LEVITANs came to the States around 1885-1890. Also according to the 1910
Census, Boruch Mordechai RABINOWITZ and his wife Sarah had 8 children. In
the 1910 Census, Sarah was going by the name ROBBINS. I have not yet found
Sarah in the 1900 or 1920 censuses.

I am not directly related to this RABINOWITZ family, but am related to the
LEVITANs. I cannot find "my" LEVITANS before 1900, so am hoping
I can find a lead by following the wife, Mary nee RABINOWITZ.

Anyone have this family on their tree? I've looked for info online, but
can't find anything that I can definitively trace back to this particular
RABINOWITZ/ROBBINS family.

Thanks for any help,

Joe Lonstein

East Lansing, MI

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Sugestions for research methods or resources may be shared with the
list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RABINOWITZ (ROBBINS) - from Siauliai/Shavel, Lithuania to D.C. #lithuania

Joseph Lonstein
 

I'm searching for a RABINOWITZ family >from or near Siauliai (Shavel, Shavli)
Lithuania. Father was Rabbi Boruch Mordechai RABINOWITZ, and his wife was
named Sarah (she was born ~1835). According to the 1910 Census, Sarah was
a widow and living in Washington, D.C. with her daughter Mary LEVITAN (nee
Miriam Bracha RABINOWITZ, 1864-1937) and the LEVITAN family. These
LEVITANs came to the States around 1885-1890. Also according to the 1910
Census, Boruch Mordechai RABINOWITZ and his wife Sarah had 8 children. In
the 1910 Census, Sarah was going by the name ROBBINS. I have not yet found
Sarah in the 1900 or 1920 censuses.

I am not directly related to this RABINOWITZ family, but am related to the
LEVITANs. I cannot find "my" LEVITANS before 1900, so am hoping
I can find a lead by following the wife, Mary nee RABINOWITZ.

Anyone have this family on their tree? I've looked for info online, but
can't find anything that I can definitively trace back to this particular
RABINOWITZ/ROBBINS family.

Thanks for any help,

Joe Lonstein

East Lansing, MI

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Sugestions for research methods or resources may be shared with the
list.


Vilna address help #2: Makowa street? #lithuania

MandJMeyers <mandjmeyers@...>
 

Hi folks,

I have another family address >from pre-war Vilna that I am hoping to
identify. The address is in Hebrew on a Yad Vashem Page of Testimony
for Judit Miasnik.

Judit was 4 years old when she was killed in the Ponar woods. She was the
granddaughter of Dwora (nee Landsman) Miasnik, who was my grandmother's
sister.

Dwora and her family (except for one child) were the only Landsman in
Dwora's family not to emigrate to
Boston.

The address can be seen at

http://www.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_2KE/.cmd/acd/.ar/sa.portlet.VictimDetailsSubmitAction/.c/6_0_1L5/.ce/7_0_2KI/.p/5_0_2E6?victim_details_id=971357&victim_details_name=Miasnik+Judith&q1=nA62GNJSt5o%3D&q2=5kVz6eS0ekg%2FuAS7V9Gp%2FGk6wZorpykq&q3=4r6vLOseA9U%3D&q4=4r6vLOseA9U%3D&q5=WkQ9L33Pqao%3D&q6=7eKYwrBQSqQ%3D&q7=1X0AmRKPa%2BHsyCK6TD9al4T3FOJVehHC&frm1_npage=1

or by searching the Vad Vashem Shoah Names Database for 'Judit Miasnik'.

To my eye, it seems like it might be something like Makowa street
#15......anyone familiar with Vilna streets able to confirm or
correct this?

Thanks,

Marty Meyers
researching in Vilna: Landsman, Finberg, Miasnik


Khatskel & Nechamiya #lithuania

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Thank you to all who responded to my inquiry about these names and
their possible relationship to each other.

Interestingly, I had forgotten about another instance in the same
family where I was able to confirm that a man with FOUR different
names in the databases was, indeed, the same person. In that case
the names were Germal / German / Girsh / Irmie. I can't remember off
hand, but I seem to recall that Germal and Irmie were related names
(Yeremiah) but that Girsh was a totally different origin. No idea
about German. Several different records did confirm, however, that
they were the same person.

I think that the gentleman who suggested that Khatskel and Nechamiya
may have been two names used by the same person may have been
correct. Now....if could just find one more record on this guy........

Elaine Bush
erbush@phch.org
http://elainebush.tribalpages.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilna address help #2: Makowa street? #lithuania

MandJMeyers <mandjmeyers@...>
 

Hi folks,

I have another family address >from pre-war Vilna that I am hoping to
identify. The address is in Hebrew on a Yad Vashem Page of Testimony
for Judit Miasnik.

Judit was 4 years old when she was killed in the Ponar woods. She was the
granddaughter of Dwora (nee Landsman) Miasnik, who was my grandmother's
sister.

Dwora and her family (except for one child) were the only Landsman in
Dwora's family not to emigrate to
Boston.

The address can be seen at

http://www.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_2KE/.cmd/acd/.ar/sa.portlet.VictimDetailsSubmitAction/.c/6_0_1L5/.ce/7_0_2KI/.p/5_0_2E6?victim_details_id=971357&victim_details_name=Miasnik+Judith&q1=nA62GNJSt5o%3D&q2=5kVz6eS0ekg%2FuAS7V9Gp%2FGk6wZorpykq&q3=4r6vLOseA9U%3D&q4=4r6vLOseA9U%3D&q5=WkQ9L33Pqao%3D&q6=7eKYwrBQSqQ%3D&q7=1X0AmRKPa%2BHsyCK6TD9al4T3FOJVehHC&frm1_npage=1

or by searching the Vad Vashem Shoah Names Database for 'Judit Miasnik'.

To my eye, it seems like it might be something like Makowa street
#15......anyone familiar with Vilna streets able to confirm or
correct this?

Thanks,

Marty Meyers
researching in Vilna: Landsman, Finberg, Miasnik


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Khatskel & Nechamiya #lithuania

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Thank you to all who responded to my inquiry about these names and
their possible relationship to each other.

Interestingly, I had forgotten about another instance in the same
family where I was able to confirm that a man with FOUR different
names in the databases was, indeed, the same person. In that case
the names were Germal / German / Girsh / Irmie. I can't remember off
hand, but I seem to recall that Germal and Irmie were related names
(Yeremiah) but that Girsh was a totally different origin. No idea
about German. Several different records did confirm, however, that
they were the same person.

I think that the gentleman who suggested that Khatskel and Nechamiya
may have been two names used by the same person may have been
correct. Now....if could just find one more record on this guy........

Elaine Bush
erbush@phch.org
http://elainebush.tribalpages.com


What's in a Name? ~ A LitvakSIG Online Journal E-Publication #lithuania

Judith27
 

Dear LitvakSIGdom,

In "What's in a Name? The Problem of Name Changes in the Search for Family
Roots," a new article e-published by the LitvakSIG Online Journal, Professor
Gilbert Herbert writes about the challenges he confronted and surmounted
researching names, both given names and surnames, in his family.
As the author writes, "Some of these changes to given and family names are
voluntary, some imposed, some cultural adaptations, and some mistakes when
converting >from one language to another. If there is no written account of
these name changes, what will a future family historian, a hundred years
from now, make of our multiple identities? This problem is the central
theme of this article. I do not pretend to be an expert on Jewish names
and their derivations, leaving these topics to the professionals, the
Alexander Beiders and the Jerry Estersons. I deal here with the phenomenon
of name changes in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the
ways in which such changes complicate the task of the amateur genealogist,
from a purely personal point of view, and I am focusing on a specific case
study: the enigma of the derivation of my family name: HERBERT."

To read more about the possible ties between names such as Eta YERUSALIMSKI
and Howard FAST, or Haim Zeev YABLOTCHNIK and Simon HERBERT, including the
All Lithuania Database and even a Trinidad connection, please visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/whatsinaname.htm

The LitvakSIG Online Journal strives to provide you with a wide range of
articles. Some articles,such as "Memorials for Lithuanian Shtetls in Cholon,
Israel," provide a pictorial tour of memorial matzevot. Others, such as "My
Childhood in Trishik: Recollections of a Lithuanian Shtetl,"offer both
background and insight into Lithuanian Jewish Life and History in the late
1800s. The LitvakSIG Online Journal also provides a place for creative
writing, including memoirs, and fiction, as well as a full poetry page.

To peruse the full wealth of additional articles available to you via the
LitvakSIG Online Journal, please consult the Table of Contents at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/Journal.htm
If you have an article or poem you have written you would like to submit to
the LitvakSIG Online Journal during the Fall-Winter Reading Period, please
e-mail me at Judith27@aol.com

Happy Chanukah!
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan, Editor
LitvakSIG Online Journal


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania What's in a Name? ~ A LitvakSIG Online Journal E-Publication #lithuania

Judith27
 

Dear LitvakSIGdom,

In "What's in a Name? The Problem of Name Changes in the Search for Family
Roots," a new article e-published by the LitvakSIG Online Journal, Professor
Gilbert Herbert writes about the challenges he confronted and surmounted
researching names, both given names and surnames, in his family.
As the author writes, "Some of these changes to given and family names are
voluntary, some imposed, some cultural adaptations, and some mistakes when
converting >from one language to another. If there is no written account of
these name changes, what will a future family historian, a hundred years
from now, make of our multiple identities? This problem is the central
theme of this article. I do not pretend to be an expert on Jewish names
and their derivations, leaving these topics to the professionals, the
Alexander Beiders and the Jerry Estersons. I deal here with the phenomenon
of name changes in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the
ways in which such changes complicate the task of the amateur genealogist,
from a purely personal point of view, and I am focusing on a specific case
study: the enigma of the derivation of my family name: HERBERT."

To read more about the possible ties between names such as Eta YERUSALIMSKI
and Howard FAST, or Haim Zeev YABLOTCHNIK and Simon HERBERT, including the
All Lithuania Database and even a Trinidad connection, please visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/whatsinaname.htm

The LitvakSIG Online Journal strives to provide you with a wide range of
articles. Some articles,such as "Memorials for Lithuanian Shtetls in Cholon,
Israel," provide a pictorial tour of memorial matzevot. Others, such as "My
Childhood in Trishik: Recollections of a Lithuanian Shtetl,"offer both
background and insight into Lithuanian Jewish Life and History in the late
1800s. The LitvakSIG Online Journal also provides a place for creative
writing, including memoirs, and fiction, as well as a full poetry page.

To peruse the full wealth of additional articles available to you via the
LitvakSIG Online Journal, please consult the Table of Contents at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/OnlineJournals/Journal.htm
If you have an article or poem you have written you would like to submit to
the LitvakSIG Online Journal during the Fall-Winter Reading Period, please
e-mail me at Judith27@aol.com

Happy Chanukah!
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan, Editor
LitvakSIG Online Journal


Remarriage interval for widower #general

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Audrey Jacobus wrote:
"My very observant zeide re married in a registry office only 6 months after his
2nd wife's death. I believe the "Shulchan Aruch" requires a 3 Tomtov interval for a
widower unless there are special circumstances - he had none: (he was 66) and had
no Beth Din certificate

Yet I am told there is no asolute Halaichic rule requiring the long interval and a
widower can remarry after a short period of mourning - so I am confused: What
weight does the Shulchan Aruch have in this matter ?"

Jewish law is very clear: A man may not marry before the 30 day perscribed mourning
period is over, a woman must wait (whether divorced or widowed) 90 days. The Kitzur
Shulchan Aruch suggests a 3 Yom-Tov wait (excluding the New Year, Day of Atonement
and 8th day of Tabernacles-Shmini Atzeret, which don't count). However this was a
ruling only in those communities that had the custom. Other communities did not
observe this custom. so it would depend where your uncle was >from and what the
norm was in that community. The gold standard was and is, 30 days for a widower.

Happy (end of ) Chanukah

Debbie Lifschitz

MODERATOR NOTE:
Halachic issues are off-topic in this forum and further discussion should take
place privately. Genealogical relevance will, of course, be posted.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Remarriage interval for widower #general

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Audrey Jacobus wrote:
"My very observant zeide re married in a registry office only 6 months after his
2nd wife's death. I believe the "Shulchan Aruch" requires a 3 Tomtov interval for a
widower unless there are special circumstances - he had none: (he was 66) and had
no Beth Din certificate

Yet I am told there is no asolute Halaichic rule requiring the long interval and a
widower can remarry after a short period of mourning - so I am confused: What
weight does the Shulchan Aruch have in this matter ?"

Jewish law is very clear: A man may not marry before the 30 day perscribed mourning
period is over, a woman must wait (whether divorced or widowed) 90 days. The Kitzur
Shulchan Aruch suggests a 3 Yom-Tov wait (excluding the New Year, Day of Atonement
and 8th day of Tabernacles-Shmini Atzeret, which don't count). However this was a
ruling only in those communities that had the custom. Other communities did not
observe this custom. so it would depend where your uncle was >from and what the
norm was in that community. The gold standard was and is, 30 days for a widower.

Happy (end of ) Chanukah

Debbie Lifschitz

MODERATOR NOTE:
Halachic issues are off-topic in this forum and further discussion should take
place privately. Genealogical relevance will, of course, be posted.


travel guide for trip from Kiev to Lubny #ukraine

Gayle Schlissel Riley
 

I am in search of a travel guide to go >from Kiev to
Lubny in the Ukraine.
If you know of someone reasonable response privately
to me. Please
Gayle >from San Gabriel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: You may wish to consider JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers tours.
Check the website at http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSchleppers/


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine travel guide for trip from Kiev to Lubny #ukraine

Gayle Schlissel Riley
 

I am in search of a travel guide to go >from Kiev to
Lubny in the Ukraine.
If you know of someone reasonable response privately
to me. Please
Gayle >from San Gabriel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: You may wish to consider JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers tours.
Check the website at http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSchleppers/