Date   

Article about Label & Runya GOREN of Terespol #general

philafrum
 

Dear Genners:

I just read a story about a Terespol (Poland) couple named Label and Runya GOREN
and their descendants which was submitted this past May. THe name of the author
isn't, however, indicated, and I'd like to get in touch with him/her.

Can anybody help? Thanks.

Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Article about Label & Runya GOREN of Terespol #general

philafrum
 

Dear Genners:

I just read a story about a Terespol (Poland) couple named Label and Runya GOREN
and their descendants which was submitted this past May. THe name of the author
isn't, however, indicated, and I'd like to get in touch with him/her.

Can anybody help? Thanks.

Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net


Re: Galician Maps #galicia

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Karen van Haagen Campbell wrote: "I'm a new genealogist and I was
wondering if you have a detailed map of the Galicia area with
names of towns, cities, and areas you could send a link of to me."

On most of my Galician shtetlinks pages (Rohatyn, Krosno, Zmigrod,
Jaslo, Rymanow, Strzyzow, Frysztak, Dubiecko, Korczyna, Jasienica,
Dukla), I have a link to the LEMKO maps... I think they are the
clearest, easiest to scroll through. These are high resolution
maps (100,000:1), that is, one inch equals approximately 1.5 miles.

The main map is at
<http://www.lemko.org/maps100/index.html>
from there you can click on any of the hundred or so smaller maps.
Happy Hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc. --
PhyllisKramer1@att.net, researching (mostly Galicia):
STECHER, TRACHMAN,>from Zmigrod,Dukla, Krosno
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from Jasienica
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubiecko
LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn(also Iasi, Romania)


looking for information on GELB family from Lviv / Lvov / Lemberg #galicia

Jay Lenefsky <hotdog@...>
 

Dear One and All:

I am looking for information on my GELB family. They lived at
least for a while at 24 Zrodlana Street. In 1910 - 1911 they
immigrated to the USA.

I got the above address >from my grandmother's birth certificate.
The is a Moses GELB (and a Moses LIEBER) listed as being
witnesses to my grandmother's birth.

Thank you very much,

Jay Lenefsky -Israel


New genealogic search book #galicia

Romm Miriam
 

My dear friends,

I am happy to let you know that the English edition of my book
Ostrich Feather was recently published. Please visit the book's
site <http://www.ostrich-feather.com> to learn more about it and
its history in Israel since 2007.

The book will be available around August in the US stores, and in
the meantime, it can be pre-ordered via the Internet in Amazon &
Barnes & Noble and in Israel at Gefen Publishing.

I plan to have my book tour during November. By then, thank you
for you attention and I hope you will soon accompany me in my
adventurous-quest-journey, unfolded in the pages of Ostrich
Feathers.

Yours,

Miriam Romm
Israel
www.ostrich-feather.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Galician Maps #galicia

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Karen van Haagen Campbell wrote: "I'm a new genealogist and I was
wondering if you have a detailed map of the Galicia area with
names of towns, cities, and areas you could send a link of to me."

On most of my Galician shtetlinks pages (Rohatyn, Krosno, Zmigrod,
Jaslo, Rymanow, Strzyzow, Frysztak, Dubiecko, Korczyna, Jasienica,
Dukla), I have a link to the LEMKO maps... I think they are the
clearest, easiest to scroll through. These are high resolution
maps (100,000:1), that is, one inch equals approximately 1.5 miles.

The main map is at
<http://www.lemko.org/maps100/index.html>
from there you can click on any of the hundred or so smaller maps.
Happy Hunting!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Fla
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc. --
PhyllisKramer1@att.net, researching (mostly Galicia):
STECHER, TRACHMAN,>from Zmigrod,Dukla, Krosno
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from Jasienica
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubiecko
LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn(also Iasi, Romania)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia looking for information on GELB family from Lviv / Lvov / Lemberg #galicia

Jay Lenefsky <hotdog@...>
 

Dear One and All:

I am looking for information on my GELB family. They lived at
least for a while at 24 Zrodlana Street. In 1910 - 1911 they
immigrated to the USA.

I got the above address >from my grandmother's birth certificate.
The is a Moses GELB (and a Moses LIEBER) listed as being
witnesses to my grandmother's birth.

Thank you very much,

Jay Lenefsky -Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia New genealogic search book #galicia

Romm Miriam
 

My dear friends,

I am happy to let you know that the English edition of my book
Ostrich Feather was recently published. Please visit the book's
site <http://www.ostrich-feather.com> to learn more about it and
its history in Israel since 2007.

The book will be available around August in the US stores, and in
the meantime, it can be pre-ordered via the Internet in Amazon &
Barnes & Noble and in Israel at Gefen Publishing.

I plan to have my book tour during November. By then, thank you
for you attention and I hope you will soon accompany me in my
adventurous-quest-journey, unfolded in the pages of Ostrich
Feathers.

Yours,

Miriam Romm
Israel
www.ostrich-feather.com


Lviv Photography Project #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

The Lviv house photography project is now closed to any new
submissions.

Thanks to everyone who put in a request with their personal
stories. Results will be publicized in late August.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Lviv Photography Project #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

The Lviv house photography project is now closed to any new
submissions.

Thanks to everyone who put in a request with their personal
stories. Results will be publicized in late August.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Re: Were there quotas to US emigration around 1912? #general

Susan&David
 

Quota legislation is summarized on this web-site:
http://www-lib.iupui.edu/kade/adams/chap10.html
Does not appear to be anything significant to limit immigration >from
Europe 1912 or earlier

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Evan Fishman wrote:

Were there any quotas in existence which would have limited emigration to
the US around 1912?
Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Were there quotas to US emigration around 1912? #general

Susan&David
 

Quota legislation is summarized on this web-site:
http://www-lib.iupui.edu/kade/adams/chap10.html
Does not appear to be anything significant to limit immigration >from
Europe 1912 or earlier

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Evan Fishman wrote:

Were there any quotas in existence which would have limited emigration to
the US around 1912?
Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net


Re: Tips for Archival Research #galicia

Jules Levin
 

At 07:10 AM 7/5/2009, you wrote:
Dear Karen,

You've written an absolutely wonderful post and reminder to us all.
Behave well and with basic courtesies - how hard can that be?
I agree, but among the basic courtesies I would add one more.
Learn how to say, "please", "thank you", "hello", "goodbye" in the language
of the country you are in!!!
Yes, even in Lithuanian!
It is not difficult, and in places like Poland, the Baltic republics,
etc., their expectations of Americans are so low that even those few words
will go a long way. In fact, in myopinion, if you can't say thank you in the
language of the country you are in, you've lost half your courtesy.
And by the way, I am shocked by how many people think not to even learn the
Cyrillic alphabet before going to Russia. When I taught Russian it took me 20
minutes to teach it.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Tips for Archival Research #general

Jules Levin
 

At 07:10 AM 7/5/2009, you wrote:
Dear Karen,

You've written an absolutely wonderful post and reminder to us all.
Behave well and with basic courtesies - how hard can that be?
I agree, but among the basic courtesies I would add one more.
Learn how to say, "please", "thank you", "hello", "goodbye" in the language
of the country you are in!!!
Yes, even in Lithuanian!
It is not difficult, and in places like Poland, the Baltic republics,
etc., their expectations of Americans are so low that even those few words
will go a long way. In fact, in myopinion, if you can't say thank you in the
language of the country you are in, you've lost half your courtesy.
And by the way, I am shocked by how many people think not to even learn the
Cyrillic alphabet before going to Russia. When I taught Russian it took me 20
minutes to teach it.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


LANE, COHEN, KUMENS, HIRSCHHORN, GREENWALD #lithuania

Jeff Miller
 

I am researching several surnames of families >from Panevezys (Ponievezh)
and Pumpenai in Lithuania, most of whom probably first lived in New York,
and later in the Roosevelt Boulevard section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. Today, related families living midway
between Philadelphia and Allentown, Pennsylvania are the KAHN and HAUSER
families.

I am seeking family connections to the following:
David LANE
Sadie (Scheine Leah) COHEN
Belle KUMENS
Gertrude HIRSHHORN
Bruce (Gertrude's son) HIRSHHORN
any GREENWALD

I will be attending Philadelphia '09 and can connect with anyone interested
in these families, either at a BOF, or at a meeting that we can prearrange.

Jeff Miller, President, JGSGW
Washington, DC area
SingingTM@comcast.net

Researching towns of Seta (Shat), Vilijampole (Slobodka), Panevezys
(Ponievezh), Pumpenai, Sirvintos (Shirvint), all in Lithuania, for names
WIENER, FINKELSTEIN, LAN, YUDELOWITZ, COHEN, WHITEMAN/WEISSMAN,
BLANKFURT/BLANKFORT, and those listed above

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods and resources may be shared with
the list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania LANE, COHEN, KUMENS, HIRSCHHORN, GREENWALD #lithuania

Jeff Miller
 

I am researching several surnames of families >from Panevezys (Ponievezh)
and Pumpenai in Lithuania, most of whom probably first lived in New York,
and later in the Roosevelt Boulevard section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. Today, related families living midway
between Philadelphia and Allentown, Pennsylvania are the KAHN and HAUSER
families.

I am seeking family connections to the following:
David LANE
Sadie (Scheine Leah) COHEN
Belle KUMENS
Gertrude HIRSHHORN
Bruce (Gertrude's son) HIRSHHORN
any GREENWALD

I will be attending Philadelphia '09 and can connect with anyone interested
in these families, either at a BOF, or at a meeting that we can prearrange.

Jeff Miller, President, JGSGW
Washington, DC area
SingingTM@comcast.net

Researching towns of Seta (Shat), Vilijampole (Slobodka), Panevezys
(Ponievezh), Pumpenai, Sirvintos (Shirvint), all in Lithuania, for names
WIENER, FINKELSTEIN, LAN, YUDELOWITZ, COHEN, WHITEMAN/WEISSMAN,
BLANKFURT/BLANKFORT, and those listed above

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods and resources may be shared with
the list.


Re: Tips for Archival Research #galicia

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

Dear Karen,

You've written an absolutely wonderful post and reminder to us all.
Behave well and with basic courtesies - how hard can that be?

Best Regards,
Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272)
California, USA
FISHER/FISCHER/FISZER, FISZEL (Warszawa& Bedzin, Poland),S(Z)PRINGER,
HERSZLIKOWICZ, HAMBURGER (Bedzin, Lagiza, Zarki, Poland), GERSTEN (Obertyn,
Galacia) BARSKA/BARSKY/BARSKIY(Odessa), GOLDBERG (Sokolka?), FELDMAN
(Veliuona,Kaunas), CAHN (Koln), FRIEDSAM (Bodendorf, Coln? Germany,
Pittsburgh, PA), NEWHAN/NEUHAN/NEUHAHN (Hesse Cassel, Meimbressen, Germany,
Baltimore, MD), BOHORODCZANER (Potok Zloty, Ukraine), LEVINE, BLUM, ROTH,
ROCKOVITZ, ABRAMS, RABINOWITZ

In a message dated 7/4/2009 9:30:32 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
roekard@lmi.net writes:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Last Sunday (6/28/09) I gave a talk entitled: WARSAW, JERUSALEM,
LVOV: Adventures in Archiveland and Beyond, in which I described (in
an interesting way) how to use different archives and how to integrate
the esoteric material you find. I had been told to expect around five
attendees because it was summer, a Sunday, and happening mid-day on a
glorious day in San Francisco Bay. Amazingly ~20 people came.

I gave my talk and afterwards, in the Q &A, one of the attendees
pointed out and questioned the amount of times I expressed gratitude
to the different people who have helped me or given me ideas, and
especially the archivist/librarians globally. Someone else remarked
about how challenging the experience with employees of archives can
be. Other people then made similar comments and the discussion veered
in the direction of the problems genealogists have with employees of
archives.

After folks finished what they had to say I reminded them of the
perspective >from the other side of the archivist's desk. I pointed out
that for many archivist/librarians, and especially in the formerly
Communist countries, the pay is fairly low, the workload high and
there may be little encouragement to work harder than a good day's
work.

What must it be like for them to have people show up at their desk who
don't speak the language, have no idea how to find documents but are
then insistent that they be helped IMMEDIATELY to find their
grandfather who came to America >from "somewhere" in Russia, (for
example). What must these archivist/librarians think when some of
these same people who come demanding help also manifest behavior that
is entitled, huffy and ungrateful? And we can wonder if bad
experiences with folks whom they identify as "Jewish" then carry
over to the next "Jew" who shows up manifesting even slight amounts of
impatience. You get the idea.

I pointed out that as a human, as the child of a Chassidish-valued
home with a Holocaust (refugee) Survivor father, I learned the
importance of acknowledging anyone who helps me and/or behaves as my
Rebbe, my teacher - to give them credit; that no one has to do
anything to help me even if it is their job; that I MUST express my
gratitude both in my behavior towards them in the moment (in material
and non-material ways) and afterwards, to their bosses and to others.

I believe that this moment-to-moment, day-to-day behavior (spiritual
practice) on my part is at least part of the reason why I have had
such incredible luck, ease and success in my use of archives.

The participants in this discussion encouraged me to make this point
often and publicly; hence this note.

Some suggestions:

(1) I encourage you all to BEHAVE WITH GRACE AND GRATITUDE when you
visit archives this summer: bad and ungrateful behavior will reflect
badly on all of us and affect the experience we each have in doing
archival research;

(2) I encourage you to plan your visit to an archive beforehand - have
your guide/researcher do some archival research and ORDER RECORDS
BEFORE you get there, any ones that they think might be valuable or
interesting for you to look at;

(3) I encourage you to LEAVE ENOUGH TIME and have patience: NOTHING
WILL HAPPEN QUICKLY no matter what you say and especially if you get
huffy - I have seen folks who acted badly get nothing and be told that
they could not be helped even as the same archivist/librarians went to
get me record after record;

(4) I encourage you to remember to WATCH WHAT YOU SAY and follow the
Jewish path of avoiding speaking "lashon ha'rah" and "rechilut" -
gossip and tale bearing and honor the path of "right speech" - ENGLISH
SPEAKERS ARE EVERYWHERE even if they don't let on that they speak
English. I once spent two weeks in an archive and it was only as I was
getting ready to leave that the archivist/librarian started speaking
to me in English!

(5) I encourage you to let your guide know that you understand how
overworked and underpaid archivist/librarians can be and ask what an
APPROPRIATE GIFT OF GRATITUDE for them might be - just as you would
bring when you visit someone's home (and then remember to give a gift
of gratitude to your guide, additional to what you pay them:
ultimately, they make or break your trip by their attention to detail!)

The most basic and universal of spiritual practices is gratitude: I
encourage you all to take it on as your own. It will change your life
for the better .... completely.

Thank you.

Shabbat shalom,
Karen ROSENFELD ROEKARD aka Gitel Chaye Eta ROSENFELD ROKART


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Tips for Archival Research #poland

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

Dear Karen,

You've written an absolutely wonderful post and reminder to us all.
Behave well and with basic courtesies - how hard can that be?

Best Regards,
Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272)
California, USA
FISHER/FISCHER/FISZER, FISZEL (Warszawa& Bedzin, Poland),S(Z)PRINGER,
HERSZLIKOWICZ, HAMBURGER (Bedzin, Lagiza, Zarki, Poland), GERSTEN (Obertyn,
Galacia) BARSKA/BARSKY/BARSKIY(Odessa), GOLDBERG (Sokolka?), FELDMAN
(Veliuona,Kaunas), CAHN (Koln), FRIEDSAM (Bodendorf, Coln? Germany,
Pittsburgh, PA), NEWHAN/NEUHAN/NEUHAHN (Hesse Cassel, Meimbressen, Germany,
Baltimore, MD), BOHORODCZANER (Potok Zloty, Ukraine), LEVINE, BLUM, ROTH,
ROCKOVITZ, ABRAMS, RABINOWITZ

In a message dated 7/4/2009 9:30:32 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
roekard@lmi.net writes:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Last Sunday (6/28/09) I gave a talk entitled: WARSAW, JERUSALEM,
LVOV: Adventures in Archiveland and Beyond, in which I described (in
an interesting way) how to use different archives and how to integrate
the esoteric material you find. I had been told to expect around five
attendees because it was summer, a Sunday, and happening mid-day on a
glorious day in San Francisco Bay. Amazingly ~20 people came.

I gave my talk and afterwards, in the Q &A, one of the attendees
pointed out and questioned the amount of times I expressed gratitude
to the different people who have helped me or given me ideas, and
especially the archivist/librarians globally. Someone else remarked
about how challenging the experience with employees of archives can
be. Other people then made similar comments and the discussion veered
in the direction of the problems genealogists have with employees of
archives.

After folks finished what they had to say I reminded them of the
perspective >from the other side of the archivist's desk. I pointed out
that for many archivist/librarians, and especially in the formerly
Communist countries, the pay is fairly low, the workload high and
there may be little encouragement to work harder than a good day's
work.

What must it be like for them to have people show up at their desk who
don't speak the language, have no idea how to find documents but are
then insistent that they be helped IMMEDIATELY to find their
grandfather who came to America >from "somewhere" in Russia, (for
example). What must these archivist/librarians think when some of
these same people who come demanding help also manifest behavior that
is entitled, huffy and ungrateful? And we can wonder if bad
experiences with folks whom they identify as "Jewish" then carry
over to the next "Jew" who shows up manifesting even slight amounts of
impatience. You get the idea.

I pointed out that as a human, as the child of a Chassidish-valued
home with a Holocaust (refugee) Survivor father, I learned the
importance of acknowledging anyone who helps me and/or behaves as my
Rebbe, my teacher - to give them credit; that no one has to do
anything to help me even if it is their job; that I MUST express my
gratitude both in my behavior towards them in the moment (in material
and non-material ways) and afterwards, to their bosses and to others.

I believe that this moment-to-moment, day-to-day behavior (spiritual
practice) on my part is at least part of the reason why I have had
such incredible luck, ease and success in my use of archives.

The participants in this discussion encouraged me to make this point
often and publicly; hence this note.

Some suggestions:

(1) I encourage you all to BEHAVE WITH GRACE AND GRATITUDE when you
visit archives this summer: bad and ungrateful behavior will reflect
badly on all of us and affect the experience we each have in doing
archival research;

(2) I encourage you to plan your visit to an archive beforehand - have
your guide/researcher do some archival research and ORDER RECORDS
BEFORE you get there, any ones that they think might be valuable or
interesting for you to look at;

(3) I encourage you to LEAVE ENOUGH TIME and have patience: NOTHING
WILL HAPPEN QUICKLY no matter what you say and especially if you get
huffy - I have seen folks who acted badly get nothing and be told that
they could not be helped even as the same archivist/librarians went to
get me record after record;

(4) I encourage you to remember to WATCH WHAT YOU SAY and follow the
Jewish path of avoiding speaking "lashon ha'rah" and "rechilut" -
gossip and tale bearing and honor the path of "right speech" - ENGLISH
SPEAKERS ARE EVERYWHERE even if they don't let on that they speak
English. I once spent two weeks in an archive and it was only as I was
getting ready to leave that the archivist/librarian started speaking
to me in English!

(5) I encourage you to let your guide know that you understand how
overworked and underpaid archivist/librarians can be and ask what an
APPROPRIATE GIFT OF GRATITUDE for them might be - just as you would
bring when you visit someone's home (and then remember to give a gift
of gratitude to your guide, additional to what you pay them:
ultimately, they make or break your trip by their attention to detail!)

The most basic and universal of spiritual practices is gratitude: I
encourage you all to take it on as your own. It will change your life
for the better .... completely.

Thank you.

Shabbat shalom,
Karen ROSENFELD ROEKARD aka Gitel Chaye Eta ROSENFELD ROKART


Posen,Prussia #poland

Barbara Siegel
 

Attention prospective Philadelphia Conference attendees with interests in
the area of Posen, Prussia:

For various reasons, I did not organize a scheduled Posen,Prussia BOF this
year. However, I am now wondering if those with interests in the area would
care to meet on a more informal basis so we could touch base with each
other, share some experiences, etc. As I am always eager to interface
with others involved with Posen, Prussia I assume that there must be others
like me as well. Anyone interested in this idea please respond to me
privately and we can take it >from there; and hopefully arrange something.

Very much looking forward to Philly2009.

Barbara Siegel
bsiegel@netvision.net.il

Researching: HERTZBERG; Posen,Prussia; Latvia; USA.


JRI Poland #Poland Posen,Prussia #poland

Barbara Siegel
 

Attention prospective Philadelphia Conference attendees with interests in
the area of Posen, Prussia:

For various reasons, I did not organize a scheduled Posen,Prussia BOF this
year. However, I am now wondering if those with interests in the area would
care to meet on a more informal basis so we could touch base with each
other, share some experiences, etc. As I am always eager to interface
with others involved with Posen, Prussia I assume that there must be others
like me as well. Anyone interested in this idea please respond to me
privately and we can take it >from there; and hopefully arrange something.

Very much looking forward to Philly2009.

Barbara Siegel
bsiegel@netvision.net.il

Researching: HERTZBERG; Posen,Prussia; Latvia; USA.