Date   

Basic U.S. Genealogy Class to begin april 1 #hungary

Phyllis Kramer
 

Be our 1400th student! Want to fill in the gaps in your knowledge?
Basic Genealogy focuses on your immigrant ancestors lifetime in the
United States. The online text lessons begin with data collection,
organization and search techniques, and focus on researching census,
vital records and Ellis Island passenger arrivals; there is a section
on Computer Basics for Genealogy.

Basic Genealogy features a personal mentoring program using our online
FORUM where students are encouraged to post an ancestral branch, set
goals for their research, and work one on one with the instructor.

The courses is open for enrollment. Remember that the courses do not
include research beyond what is available online and in United States
libraries and archives. PLEASE read the course descriptions and
requirements on
www.jewishgen.org/education
before enrolling in any course. If you are a Value Added member of
JewishGen, you can enroll at no charge. Questions? send an email to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org See you there!
Phyllis Kramer, V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager: www.JewishGen.org/education


Hungary SIG #Hungary Basic U.S. Genealogy Class to begin april 1 #hungary

Phyllis Kramer
 

Be our 1400th student! Want to fill in the gaps in your knowledge?
Basic Genealogy focuses on your immigrant ancestors lifetime in the
United States. The online text lessons begin with data collection,
organization and search techniques, and focus on researching census,
vital records and Ellis Island passenger arrivals; there is a section
on Computer Basics for Genealogy.

Basic Genealogy features a personal mentoring program using our online
FORUM where students are encouraged to post an ancestral branch, set
goals for their research, and work one on one with the instructor.

The courses is open for enrollment. Remember that the courses do not
include research beyond what is available online and in United States
libraries and archives. PLEASE read the course descriptions and
requirements on
www.jewishgen.org/education
before enrolling in any course. If you are a Value Added member of
JewishGen, you can enroll at no charge. Questions? send an email to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org See you there!
Phyllis Kramer, V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager: www.JewishGen.org/education


Basic U.S. Genealogy Class to begin april 1 #romania

bounce-2195392-772976@...
 

Be our 1400th student! Want to fill in the gaps in your knowledge?
Basic Genealogy focuses on your immigrant ancestors lifetime in the
United States. The online text lessons begin with data collection,
organization and search techniques, and focus on researching census,
vital records and Ellis Island passenger arrivals; there is a section
on Computer Basics for Genealogy.

Basic Genealogy features a personal mentoring program using our online
FORUM where students are encouraged to post an ancestral branch, set
goals for their research, and work one on one with the instructor.

The courses is open for enrollment. Remember that the courses do not
include research beyond what is available online and in United States
libraries and archives. PLEASE read the course descriptions and
requirements on
www.jewishgen.org/education
before enrolling in any course. If you are a Value Added member of
JewishGen, you can enroll at no charge. Questions? send an email to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org See you there!
Phyllis Kramer, V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager: www.JewishGen.org/education


Romania SIG #Romania Basic U.S. Genealogy Class to begin april 1 #romania

bounce-2195392-772976@...
 

Be our 1400th student! Want to fill in the gaps in your knowledge?
Basic Genealogy focuses on your immigrant ancestors lifetime in the
United States. The online text lessons begin with data collection,
organization and search techniques, and focus on researching census,
vital records and Ellis Island passenger arrivals; there is a section
on Computer Basics for Genealogy.

Basic Genealogy features a personal mentoring program using our online
FORUM where students are encouraged to post an ancestral branch, set
goals for their research, and work one on one with the instructor.

The courses is open for enrollment. Remember that the courses do not
include research beyond what is available online and in United States
libraries and archives. PLEASE read the course descriptions and
requirements on
www.jewishgen.org/education
before enrolling in any course. If you are a Value Added member of
JewishGen, you can enroll at no charge. Questions? send an email to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org See you there!
Phyllis Kramer, V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager: www.JewishGen.org/education


Basic U.S. Genealogy Class to begin april 1 #latvia

Phyllis Kramer
 

Be our 1400th student! Want to fill in the gaps in your knowledge?
Basic Genealogy focuses on your immigrant ancestors lifetime in the
United States. The online text lessons begin with data collection,
organization and search techniques, and focus on researching census,
vital records and Ellis Island passenger arrivals; there is a section
on Computer Basics for Genealogy.

Basic Genealogy features a personal mentoring program using our online
FORUM where students are encouraged to post an ancestral branch, set
goals for their research, and work one on one with the instructor.

The courses is open for enrollment. Remember that the courses do not
include research beyond what is available online and in United States
libraries and archives. PLEASE read the course descriptions and
requirements on

www.jewishgen.org/education

before enrolling in any course. If you are a Value Added member of
JewishGen, you can enroll at no charge. Questions? send an email to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org See you there!

Phyllis Kramer, V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager: www.JewishGen.org/education


Latvia SIG #Latvia Basic U.S. Genealogy Class to begin april 1 #latvia

Phyllis Kramer
 

Be our 1400th student! Want to fill in the gaps in your knowledge?
Basic Genealogy focuses on your immigrant ancestors lifetime in the
United States. The online text lessons begin with data collection,
organization and search techniques, and focus on researching census,
vital records and Ellis Island passenger arrivals; there is a section
on Computer Basics for Genealogy.

Basic Genealogy features a personal mentoring program using our online
FORUM where students are encouraged to post an ancestral branch, set
goals for their research, and work one on one with the instructor.

The courses is open for enrollment. Remember that the courses do not
include research beyond what is available online and in United States
libraries and archives. PLEASE read the course descriptions and
requirements on

www.jewishgen.org/education

before enrolling in any course. If you are a Value Added member of
JewishGen, you can enroll at no charge. Questions? send an email to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org See you there!

Phyllis Kramer, V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager: www.JewishGen.org/education


Brody Cemetery Project #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Brody & Galicia Researchers:

A group of Jewish genealogists researching their Brody
(Ukraine/Galicia) roots have
created a long-overdue project to photograph, translate and index
the 5000+ headstones in Brody's main Jewish cemetery. This
cemetery was in use >from 1834-1939. Upon completion of the
project all data and photos will be donated to JewishGen's Jewish
Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) and to Gesher Galicia for
free searching by the genealogical community. To complete this
work in a timely manner we need to raise funds quickly. A
JewishGenerosity account has been established for that purpose.

The project will be done in two phases:

Phase one: The project coordinator and photographer will survey
the site to determine the extent of the work. Following the survey
analysis, an on-site project coordinator and photographer will be
hired and a few weeks later, the photography will commence along
with the GPS mapping of the headstone. (Targeted completion date
- May 2011.)

Phase two: Transcribing/translating the inscriptions into the
JOWBR format in English. This includes the given name, surname,
and parent's names, Cohanim, Levi, etc. and date of death. If we
have funding remaining >from Phase 1 we will be able to hire
transcribers, and the balance will be completed by volunteers.
(Targeted completion date - February 2012.)

The timing of doing the photography is critical: it must be done
after the snow has melted and before spring growth begins. Jewish
cemeteries throughout the world are threatened with vandalism
and even extinction. It is vitally important to preserve information
about existing Jewish cemeteries so future generations will have
the benefit of this aspect of our cultural heritage. In addition, for
many Jews, knowledge of their family history perished in the
Holocaust. This project will allow Brody researchers to create or fill
gaps in their family trees. Where vital records may no longer exist,
cemetery records are often the only remaining evidence of a
person's life. The material has the potential to be of broader
interest to scholars and educators specializing in Jewish history and
the Holocaust and specifically in the history of eastern Galicia and
the town of Brody.

Please consider giving generously so that the work may begin
soon. Donations can be through our JewishGenerosity account on
either Gesher Galicia's page.

<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat >

Or on the Jewish Online Worldwide Burial Records (JOWBR) page:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat2>

click on the box that reads: "Brody Cemetery Project."
Contributions are tax deductible for U.S. citizens. You contribute
online with a credit card or print up a form to fax or mail in with a
check or credit card number. (US currency only.)

Higher levels of donations will give you early access to these
records and the Excel files:

$100+ Donations: you will receive an Excel spreadsheet with all
the information >from the headstones collected that will be going
to JOWBR in advance of the data being posted online.

$250+ Donations: you will be given access to a
password-protected site to view all of the cemetery photographs
and the Excel spreadsheet.

$500+ Donation: You will receive a copy of all the photographs
taken at the cemetery, online access and the Excel spreadsheet.
(Please note that all data provided to you is for private use only,
and cannot be posted online, published, or used for any other
purpose.)

Why Brody Is Important to Those With and Without Brody Roots:

Many Galician towns cemeteries no longer exist or many of the
headstones were destroyed. Brody is unique in that the matzevahs
exist in the same place as the bodies were buried. For those
interested in Galician history this is a unique opportunity to
document what remains of an important part of Galician history.
Brody has a very interesting and compelling history that makes the
city important not only to those who can trace their ancestral roots
to Brody, but to others in that part of the world. The city was
ideally located near the southeastern Russian border, had access
to good oxen-roads, later supplanted by railroads, and developed
into the most successful commercial center in Eastern Europe
outside of Lemberg (Lviv). During the 19th century, Brody's Jewish
population reached 88% of the city, was organized around the
centrally located synagogue but its Jewish population decreased
starting after 1880 and the mass migration out of Brody began.
After the partitions of Poland, restrictive trade laws were passed
causing wealthier Jews to leave. The remaining poor >from both the
east and west fled to Brody as it was a transportation hub and it
took months if not years for many to immigrate >from Brody. Most
Jews were merchants and laborers. Additionally, Brody was known
for its rabbinical families, including the Katzenellenbogen, Babad,
Rokach, Horowitz and Kristianpoller families and its great Kloyz
scholars.

Please, if you have Brody ancestors or are interested in the Galician
history this is a unique opportunity to help us preserve our
ancestors' memories by photographing the 5,000+ headstones
and placing them on JOWBR for all to access.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact any
member of the Brody Cemetery Project Committee:

Ami Elyasaf - Project Coordinator
ami.elyasaf@gmail.com
Rehovat, Israel

Pamela Weisberger - President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com

Jan Meisels Allen
janmallen@att.net

Heidi Urich
hurich@comcast.net

Benjamin Solomowitz
BenJaye@aol.com

Thank you for joining with us to preserve and document Brody's
rich history!

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
Brody Shtetllinks Page:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/brody/brody.htm


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Brody Cemetery Project #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Brody & Galicia Researchers:

A group of Jewish genealogists researching their Brody
(Ukraine/Galicia) roots have
created a long-overdue project to photograph, translate and index
the 5000+ headstones in Brody's main Jewish cemetery. This
cemetery was in use >from 1834-1939. Upon completion of the
project all data and photos will be donated to JewishGen's Jewish
Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) and to Gesher Galicia for
free searching by the genealogical community. To complete this
work in a timely manner we need to raise funds quickly. A
JewishGenerosity account has been established for that purpose.

The project will be done in two phases:

Phase one: The project coordinator and photographer will survey
the site to determine the extent of the work. Following the survey
analysis, an on-site project coordinator and photographer will be
hired and a few weeks later, the photography will commence along
with the GPS mapping of the headstone. (Targeted completion date
- May 2011.)

Phase two: Transcribing/translating the inscriptions into the
JOWBR format in English. This includes the given name, surname,
and parent's names, Cohanim, Levi, etc. and date of death. If we
have funding remaining >from Phase 1 we will be able to hire
transcribers, and the balance will be completed by volunteers.
(Targeted completion date - February 2012.)

The timing of doing the photography is critical: it must be done
after the snow has melted and before spring growth begins. Jewish
cemeteries throughout the world are threatened with vandalism
and even extinction. It is vitally important to preserve information
about existing Jewish cemeteries so future generations will have
the benefit of this aspect of our cultural heritage. In addition, for
many Jews, knowledge of their family history perished in the
Holocaust. This project will allow Brody researchers to create or fill
gaps in their family trees. Where vital records may no longer exist,
cemetery records are often the only remaining evidence of a
person's life. The material has the potential to be of broader
interest to scholars and educators specializing in Jewish history and
the Holocaust and specifically in the history of eastern Galicia and
the town of Brody.

Please consider giving generously so that the work may begin
soon. Donations can be through our JewishGenerosity account on
either Gesher Galicia's page.

<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat >

Or on the Jewish Online Worldwide Burial Records (JOWBR) page:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat2>

click on the box that reads: "Brody Cemetery Project."
Contributions are tax deductible for U.S. citizens. You contribute
online with a credit card or print up a form to fax or mail in with a
check or credit card number. (US currency only.)

Higher levels of donations will give you early access to these
records and the Excel files:

$100+ Donations: you will receive an Excel spreadsheet with all
the information >from the headstones collected that will be going
to JOWBR in advance of the data being posted online.

$250+ Donations: you will be given access to a
password-protected site to view all of the cemetery photographs
and the Excel spreadsheet.

$500+ Donation: You will receive a copy of all the photographs
taken at the cemetery, online access and the Excel spreadsheet.
(Please note that all data provided to you is for private use only,
and cannot be posted online, published, or used for any other
purpose.)

Why Brody Is Important to Those With and Without Brody Roots:

Many Galician towns cemeteries no longer exist or many of the
headstones were destroyed. Brody is unique in that the matzevahs
exist in the same place as the bodies were buried. For those
interested in Galician history this is a unique opportunity to
document what remains of an important part of Galician history.
Brody has a very interesting and compelling history that makes the
city important not only to those who can trace their ancestral roots
to Brody, but to others in that part of the world. The city was
ideally located near the southeastern Russian border, had access
to good oxen-roads, later supplanted by railroads, and developed
into the most successful commercial center in Eastern Europe
outside of Lemberg (Lviv). During the 19th century, Brody's Jewish
population reached 88% of the city, was organized around the
centrally located synagogue but its Jewish population decreased
starting after 1880 and the mass migration out of Brody began.
After the partitions of Poland, restrictive trade laws were passed
causing wealthier Jews to leave. The remaining poor >from both the
east and west fled to Brody as it was a transportation hub and it
took months if not years for many to immigrate >from Brody. Most
Jews were merchants and laborers. Additionally, Brody was known
for its rabbinical families, including the Katzenellenbogen, Babad,
Rokach, Horowitz and Kristianpoller families and its great Kloyz
scholars.

Please, if you have Brody ancestors or are interested in the Galician
history this is a unique opportunity to help us preserve our
ancestors' memories by photographing the 5,000+ headstones
and placing them on JOWBR for all to access.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact any
member of the Brody Cemetery Project Committee:

Ami Elyasaf - Project Coordinator
ami.elyasaf@gmail.com
Rehovat, Israel

Pamela Weisberger - President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com

Jan Meisels Allen
janmallen@att.net

Heidi Urich
hurich@comcast.net

Benjamin Solomowitz
BenJaye@aol.com

Thank you for joining with us to preserve and document Brody's
rich history!

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
Brody Shtetllinks Page:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/brody/brody.htm


JGSCT meeting March 20, 2011 #general

Marcia Indianer Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings,

The Jewish Genealogical Society of CT will meet on Sunday, March 20, 2011, at 1:30.
The Beginner's genealogy program will be held at Godfrey Memorial Library in
Middletown.

Visit our web site for more information at www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org

Marcia Indianer Meyers
JGSCT Program chair
marciarthur@sbcglobal.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT meeting March 20, 2011 #general

Marcia Indianer Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Greetings,

The Jewish Genealogical Society of CT will meet on Sunday, March 20, 2011, at 1:30.
The Beginner's genealogy program will be held at Godfrey Memorial Library in
Middletown.

Visit our web site for more information at www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org

Marcia Indianer Meyers
JGSCT Program chair
marciarthur@sbcglobal.net


Puzzle with name "Majrem" and sex indicated as male #poland

MERYL RIZZOTTI
 

I recently had help in translating a Polish birth record for a child of
my gggrandparents. The name of the child was Majrem Krzewin. I had assumed
it was a female name and I was thinking Marjem which I know is a female
name. However, in the translation it said the child was MALE and was named
Majrem. However, there was no indication of a circumcision.

I then did a search on JRI Poland and looked for records with the exact
spelling of the name Majrem. All of the records seemed to refer to a
female. Has anyone heard of the name Majrem being a male name? Is it
possible that the circumcision would not have been indicated if the child
was male?

Any help would be appreciated.
Meryl Rizzotti
Researching: CYMES, TEPEROWICZ, SLEPAK, SPECTER, BASOI, POVLOTSKY,
DAWIDOWICZ


JRI Poland #Poland Puzzle with name "Majrem" and sex indicated as male #poland

MERYL RIZZOTTI
 

I recently had help in translating a Polish birth record for a child of
my gggrandparents. The name of the child was Majrem Krzewin. I had assumed
it was a female name and I was thinking Marjem which I know is a female
name. However, in the translation it said the child was MALE and was named
Majrem. However, there was no indication of a circumcision.

I then did a search on JRI Poland and looked for records with the exact
spelling of the name Majrem. All of the records seemed to refer to a
female. Has anyone heard of the name Majrem being a male name? Is it
possible that the circumcision would not have been indicated if the child
was male?

Any help would be appreciated.
Meryl Rizzotti
Researching: CYMES, TEPEROWICZ, SLEPAK, SPECTER, BASOI, POVLOTSKY,
DAWIDOWICZ


Polish Army Papers from circa 1925 of my great-uncle from Zaleszczyki, Poland #general

m.steinberg@utoronto.ca <m.steinberg@...>
 

Hello All,

I would be most grateful if someone would be kind enough to translate the Polish
information filled out on my great-uncles Polish Army Id papers which can be found
at the following links:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18346
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18347
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18348

I am also wondering why, if he was conscripted in 1917 according to a page which I
dod not provide, this document is in Polish not in German under the
Austro-Hungarian regime....


Thank you in advance,
Moshe Steinberg

Vancouver, CANADA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Army Papers from circa 1925 of my great-uncle from Zaleszczyki, Poland #general

m.steinberg@utoronto.ca <m.steinberg@...>
 

Hello All,

I would be most grateful if someone would be kind enough to translate the Polish
information filled out on my great-uncles Polish Army Id papers which can be found
at the following links:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18346
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18347
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18348

I am also wondering why, if he was conscripted in 1917 according to a page which I
dod not provide, this document is in Polish not in German under the
Austro-Hungarian regime....


Thank you in advance,
Moshe Steinberg

Vancouver, CANADA


Boston City Directories on Ancestry.com #general

Stephen Katz
 

I'd like to alert readers to an apparent anomaly in the Boston City Directory
collections on Ancestry.com. There are actually two ways to get to Boston City
Directories via the Ancestry.com "card catalog": one is via the collection
"Schools, Directories & Church Histories" > "Massachusetts City Directories" >
"Boston" > [year]; the other is via "Schools, Directories & Church Histories" >
"US City Directories" > "Massachusetts" > "Boston" [year]. The second route links
to many more years of the Boston Directory than the first. In my case, I had used
the first route to trace my ancestor, and was able to find listings for her in the
Boston Directories only up to 1924. A responder to my recent posting in this
discussion group alerted me to the fact that there were listings for her in the
Boston City Directories up to 1941, and he kindly forwarded me the image >from
the 1941 Directory >from Ancestry.com. It was then that I discovered the anomaly
in the Ancestry.com collection. The first route did not link to the 1941 Directory
but the second route did. The information was critical in that it enabled me to
pinpoint my ancestor's probable date of death at around 1940/1941, which I hadn't
previously known. With this information I can now seek her death or burial
records. I don't know whether the same problem exists with the other City
Directories collections on Ancestry.

Stephen Katz
New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Boston City Directories on Ancestry.com #general

Stephen Katz
 

I'd like to alert readers to an apparent anomaly in the Boston City Directory
collections on Ancestry.com. There are actually two ways to get to Boston City
Directories via the Ancestry.com "card catalog": one is via the collection
"Schools, Directories & Church Histories" > "Massachusetts City Directories" >
"Boston" > [year]; the other is via "Schools, Directories & Church Histories" >
"US City Directories" > "Massachusetts" > "Boston" [year]. The second route links
to many more years of the Boston Directory than the first. In my case, I had used
the first route to trace my ancestor, and was able to find listings for her in the
Boston Directories only up to 1924. A responder to my recent posting in this
discussion group alerted me to the fact that there were listings for her in the
Boston City Directories up to 1941, and he kindly forwarded me the image >from
the 1941 Directory >from Ancestry.com. It was then that I discovered the anomaly
in the Ancestry.com collection. The first route did not link to the 1941 Directory
but the second route did. The information was critical in that it enabled me to
pinpoint my ancestor's probable date of death at around 1940/1941, which I hadn't
previously known. With this information I can now seek her death or burial
records. I don't know whether the same problem exists with the other City
Directories collections on Ancestry.

Stephen Katz
New York City


Gratitude for responses re Celia Harris #general

Stephen Katz
 

The responses I've received to my request for assistance concerning Celia Harris have
been exceptional. Each responder took time and effort to provide thoughtful insights,
suggestions and information that have significantly advanced my research. Although
I've thanked each one individually, I'd like also to publicly express my gratitude to
them and to jewishgen (which will also be thanked by means of a financial
contribution) for making this possible.Stephen Katz New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gratitude for responses re Celia Harris #general

Stephen Katz
 

The responses I've received to my request for assistance concerning Celia Harris have
been exceptional. Each responder took time and effort to provide thoughtful insights,
suggestions and information that have significantly advanced my research. Although
I've thanked each one individually, I'd like also to publicly express my gratitude to
them and to jewishgen (which will also be thanked by means of a financial
contribution) for making this possible.Stephen Katz New York City


Hebrew translation: verification or correction #general

jel@lipmanson.net <jel@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate a correction or verification of the English translation
of the top line (Hebrew) of a headstone inscription. I've posted a picture at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18324

A friend translated it as: "Miriam, daughter of Rabbi Mordechai Shalom." The word
in question is the surname of the deceased's father. It was not Shalom as far as I
know. The "Rabbi" part is an honorific I believe, as I have never heard that he was
an ordained Rabbi. Did my friend mis-translate his surname as "Shalom," or is that
another honorific?

Thank you for any expertise offered.

Judith Lipmanson
Smyrna, Delaware, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately or using the viewmate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hebrew translation: verification or correction #general

jel@lipmanson.net <jel@...>
 

I would greatly appreciate a correction or verification of the English translation
of the top line (Hebrew) of a headstone inscription. I've posted a picture at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18324

A friend translated it as: "Miriam, daughter of Rabbi Mordechai Shalom." The word
in question is the surname of the deceased's father. It was not Shalom as far as I
know. The "Rabbi" part is an honorific I believe, as I have never heard that he was
an ordained Rabbi. Did my friend mis-translate his surname as "Shalom," or is that
another honorific?

Thank you for any expertise offered.

Judith Lipmanson
Smyrna, Delaware, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately or using the viewmate response form.

192601 - 192620 of 663971