Date   

LeShana Tova #poland

ehfurman@...
 

LeShana Tova Tikatevu Ve'Tihatemu

Shalom >from Kiryat Gat, Israel
Chana Furman
Israel Genealogical Society


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland LeShana Tova #poland

ehfurman@...
 

LeShana Tova Tikatevu Ve'Tihatemu

Shalom >from Kiryat Gat, Israel
Chana Furman
Israel Genealogical Society


TWERSKI Family #poland

Alex Girshovich
 

Dear Forum,

I am looking for help to find any records related to Twerski (Tverski)
family.

My grandmother's sister Ida NORKIN >from Bobruisk, Belarus, born around
1898, married Josif (Iosif) TWERSKI >from Warsaw and lived there till
WW2. They had a son Marjan TWERSKI born around 1917.

I know that they lived in Warsaw, and may be for a few years in Bialystok.

During the WW2 they were brought to Treblinka concentration camp. A
survivor informed my grandmother after the war about their death,
stating that Josef who was a doctor(pediatrics) was acting very
worthily in the camp.

Unfortunately, so far i was unable to find any evidences about TWERSKI
family neither >from their pre-war life, nor >from the death camp
period,

I would appreciate any help or reference.

BR,
Alex Girshovich


JRI Poland #Poland TWERSKI Family #poland

Alex Girshovich
 

Dear Forum,

I am looking for help to find any records related to Twerski (Tverski)
family.

My grandmother's sister Ida NORKIN >from Bobruisk, Belarus, born around
1898, married Josif (Iosif) TWERSKI >from Warsaw and lived there till
WW2. They had a son Marjan TWERSKI born around 1917.

I know that they lived in Warsaw, and may be for a few years in Bialystok.

During the WW2 they were brought to Treblinka concentration camp. A
survivor informed my grandmother after the war about their death,
stating that Josef who was a doctor(pediatrics) was acting very
worthily in the camp.

Unfortunately, so far i was unable to find any evidences about TWERSKI
family neither >from their pre-war life, nor >from the death camp
period,

I would appreciate any help or reference.

BR,
Alex Girshovich


Questions About Possible Lithuanian Descent #lithuania

Wendy Hoechstetter
 

Hi, all,

I hope these questions aren't off topic, but I've been trying to figure
out the answers on my own with very little background and have been
unable to.

First, I've recently learned that my father's mother's father's family
(Wolkowski/Wolkowsky/Wolk at different times) came >from Suwalki and
Przerosl and I traced them back to the mid-1700s there. My great
grandfather (Wolf/William) was born in 1862, while others in that
generation were born earlier, and at least one as late as around 1875 or
so. William came to the US around 1879.

At different times, my grandmother reported her parents as being Polish
or Russian on US censuses, or Ruso-Polish.

I realize that this region changed hands quite a bit, and date of birth
would likely determine what the actual legal nationality was, so it
seems as if these discrepancies in reporting may be related to... what?
Reporting what the area was actually called at the time of each
individual census? Differences in just how they felt about where they
came from? The fact that different children in my ggf's generation
probably were of different legal nationalities?

*The kicker* - apparently they actually identify/ied as being
Lithuanian, however, according to recorded interviews of late relatives
who were themselves born abroad, as well as a few surviving ones.

How can this be?

My father always told me they were Polish/German, so this is all totally
new to me.

As best as I've been able to tell, this region was never actually under
Lithuanian control, at least not close enough to the time my ancestors
were born, but I've also read reports that Lithuania actually claimed it
at some periods of time at least near these dates anyways, as if they
really did own it.

I've also read that national identity in that whole region tends to
track more with cultural factors and language than with national
borders, particularly because of the fluidity of the latter, so I do
know that it appears to be common for people who lived their whole lives
in one region to actually consider themselves a different nationality.
It seems like every source I look at reports different dates for
different border configurations, and I have no idea what to believe
about what each area was when, or how this self-identification and
governmental claims intersect with legal realities.

So how do we get people who identify as Lithuanian (although they report
Polish and Russian on the census), especially when they report "Hebrew"
(and sometimes also Polish) as their parents' native languages?
Wouldn't someone at least have been reported as speaking Lithuanian (or
whatever they called that language then; I forget the name)?

**And my main question** - if Lithuania really did think it owned this
region at the time, do I therefore have any claim to Lithuanian descent
via this great grandfather? And most particularly, would the government
of Lithuania today recognize that or not?

Thanks in advance for any clarification anyone can offer.

Wendy Hoechstetter

P.S. I do know I am of clear Lithuanian descent in another branch of
this same family, a generation further back (Morris Nathan Rosenthal -
the parents of Wolf/William's wife Rachel), but I've got particular
reasons to want to establish if this is the case or not with the
Wolkowski line as well.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Questions About Possible Lithuanian Descent #lithuania

Wendy Hoechstetter
 

Hi, all,

I hope these questions aren't off topic, but I've been trying to figure
out the answers on my own with very little background and have been
unable to.

First, I've recently learned that my father's mother's father's family
(Wolkowski/Wolkowsky/Wolk at different times) came >from Suwalki and
Przerosl and I traced them back to the mid-1700s there. My great
grandfather (Wolf/William) was born in 1862, while others in that
generation were born earlier, and at least one as late as around 1875 or
so. William came to the US around 1879.

At different times, my grandmother reported her parents as being Polish
or Russian on US censuses, or Ruso-Polish.

I realize that this region changed hands quite a bit, and date of birth
would likely determine what the actual legal nationality was, so it
seems as if these discrepancies in reporting may be related to... what?
Reporting what the area was actually called at the time of each
individual census? Differences in just how they felt about where they
came from? The fact that different children in my ggf's generation
probably were of different legal nationalities?

*The kicker* - apparently they actually identify/ied as being
Lithuanian, however, according to recorded interviews of late relatives
who were themselves born abroad, as well as a few surviving ones.

How can this be?

My father always told me they were Polish/German, so this is all totally
new to me.

As best as I've been able to tell, this region was never actually under
Lithuanian control, at least not close enough to the time my ancestors
were born, but I've also read reports that Lithuania actually claimed it
at some periods of time at least near these dates anyways, as if they
really did own it.

I've also read that national identity in that whole region tends to
track more with cultural factors and language than with national
borders, particularly because of the fluidity of the latter, so I do
know that it appears to be common for people who lived their whole lives
in one region to actually consider themselves a different nationality.
It seems like every source I look at reports different dates for
different border configurations, and I have no idea what to believe
about what each area was when, or how this self-identification and
governmental claims intersect with legal realities.

So how do we get people who identify as Lithuanian (although they report
Polish and Russian on the census), especially when they report "Hebrew"
(and sometimes also Polish) as their parents' native languages?
Wouldn't someone at least have been reported as speaking Lithuanian (or
whatever they called that language then; I forget the name)?

**And my main question** - if Lithuania really did think it owned this
region at the time, do I therefore have any claim to Lithuanian descent
via this great grandfather? And most particularly, would the government
of Lithuania today recognize that or not?

Thanks in advance for any clarification anyone can offer.

Wendy Hoechstetter

P.S. I do know I am of clear Lithuanian descent in another branch of
this same family, a generation further back (Morris Nathan Rosenthal -
the parents of Wolf/William's wife Rachel), but I've got particular
reasons to want to establish if this is the case or not with the
Wolkowski line as well.


Seeking MENDEL - Ortelsburg (now Szcztyno Poland) East Prussia #germany

Des Petersen <desandrudi@...>
 

Hello,

Some time ago I posted an inquiry regarding family MENDEL from
Ortelsburg (now Szcztyno Poland) East Prussia and the jewry of that
area generally.

As a result of recent information I found via a posting to the Israeli
Genealogy Assn. I now have additional family names for people who
married into, or are related to the MENDEL family.

As my initial posting to gersig didn't bring any results, I
wonder if anyone has information regarding the following: Families:
SCHEYE, ALPERT, SIMOHNSON, MARETZKI, ZWILLENBERG, ZACHARIAS.

Moderator Note: Please enter all of these names and the
towns associated with them in the JGFF at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
You will find other researchers who looking for them.

Thank you- Rudi Petersen, Havelock North, New Zealand desandrudi@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Seeking MENDEL - Ortelsburg (now Szcztyno Poland) East Prussia #germany

Des Petersen <desandrudi@...>
 

Hello,

Some time ago I posted an inquiry regarding family MENDEL from
Ortelsburg (now Szcztyno Poland) East Prussia and the jewry of that
area generally.

As a result of recent information I found via a posting to the Israeli
Genealogy Assn. I now have additional family names for people who
married into, or are related to the MENDEL family.

As my initial posting to gersig didn't bring any results, I
wonder if anyone has information regarding the following: Families:
SCHEYE, ALPERT, SIMOHNSON, MARETZKI, ZWILLENBERG, ZACHARIAS.

Moderator Note: Please enter all of these names and the
towns associated with them in the JGFF at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
You will find other researchers who looking for them.

Thank you- Rudi Petersen, Havelock North, New Zealand desandrudi@gmail.com


Re: German Jews and the Church tax in 19th-century German states #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

For many centuries, the churches, not the state, received 10% of the
agricultural production on the fields and in the stables. One reason why
Jews could not be charged with this payment in kind: they were not
allowed to be farmers or to own land. So the Jewish genealogists can
disregard the files about this tax called "Zehnt" = tenth part.

The "Kirchensteuer" or tax for the Christian churches as a payment of a
certain amount of money was introduced in the 19th century with the end
of the medieval tax system. Since the new monetary tax "Kirchensteuer"
only replaced the old form, Jews still did not pay it. The state did not
receive the money. It only helped and still helps to collect it for the
religious communities. In the course of the 19th century, the rulers of
the many German states, who were also the heads of the majority
churches, started to control the other religious groups, too. They
organized the Jewish communities like the Christian churches. Thus they
also introduced a tax, with which all aspects of Jewish religious life
could be financed. All these payments had nothing to do with any sort of
permission. The new Jewish tax had a different name, of course:
"Kultussteuer". "Kultus" = cult is a neutral word for religion /
religious. Many files relating to this tax still exist in the state
archives and offer information to the genealogist.

Sometimes one has to tell colleagues, where they need not search. That
is the case here.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@t-online.de


German SIG #Germany Re: German Jews and the Church tax in 19th-century German states #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

For many centuries, the churches, not the state, received 10% of the
agricultural production on the fields and in the stables. One reason why
Jews could not be charged with this payment in kind: they were not
allowed to be farmers or to own land. So the Jewish genealogists can
disregard the files about this tax called "Zehnt" = tenth part.

The "Kirchensteuer" or tax for the Christian churches as a payment of a
certain amount of money was introduced in the 19th century with the end
of the medieval tax system. Since the new monetary tax "Kirchensteuer"
only replaced the old form, Jews still did not pay it. The state did not
receive the money. It only helped and still helps to collect it for the
religious communities. In the course of the 19th century, the rulers of
the many German states, who were also the heads of the majority
churches, started to control the other religious groups, too. They
organized the Jewish communities like the Christian churches. Thus they
also introduced a tax, with which all aspects of Jewish religious life
could be financed. All these payments had nothing to do with any sort of
permission. The new Jewish tax had a different name, of course:
"Kultussteuer". "Kultus" = cult is a neutral word for religion /
religious. Many files relating to this tax still exist in the state
archives and offer information to the genealogist.

Sometimes one has to tell colleagues, where they need not search. That
is the case here.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@t-online.de


Resnick #romania

ceteris@...
 

I am trying to trace my maternal grandfather's family in Odessa.
As my Russian is non-existent, I am seeing help.
Jacob Resnick was born in Odessa, Russia about 1874. He moved to
Manchester England with his family in 1910 or 1911.
Any help or tips greatly appreciated

Peter Weinstock


Romania SIG #Romania Resnick #romania

ceteris@...
 

I am trying to trace my maternal grandfather's family in Odessa.
As my Russian is non-existent, I am seeing help.
Jacob Resnick was born in Odessa, Russia about 1874. He moved to
Manchester England with his family in 1910 or 1911.
Any help or tips greatly appreciated

Peter Weinstock


ViewMate translation request - Romanian #romania

ichiro@...
 

Can anyone provide a translation of a postcard I've posted on ViewMate
please? I would like as exact a translation as possible. The ViewMate
address is

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM24354

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you for considering my request.

J. Michael Burke
Portland, Oregon

P.S. This has also been posted to the Bessarabian SIG.


Romania SIG #Romania ViewMate translation request - Romanian #romania

ichiro@...
 

Can anyone provide a translation of a postcard I've posted on ViewMate
please? I would like as exact a translation as possible. The ViewMate
address is

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM24354

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you for considering my request.

J. Michael Burke
Portland, Oregon

P.S. This has also been posted to the Bessarabian SIG.


Need picture from Passaic Junction Cemetery (NJ) #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Hello all,

I would appreciate very much if someone could take a picture of the
tombstone of Benjamin ZENACK (d. 13 sep 1930) located at Passaic Junction
Cemetery in Saddle Brook, NJ. According to the information on JOWBR, the
tombstone plot is on "part 3".

Please answer privately.

Thank you very much and Shana Tova.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris - France

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Nicolas before going to the cemetery in
order to avoid duplication of effort.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need picture from Passaic Junction Cemetery (NJ) #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Hello all,

I would appreciate very much if someone could take a picture of the
tombstone of Benjamin ZENACK (d. 13 sep 1930) located at Passaic Junction
Cemetery in Saddle Brook, NJ. According to the information on JOWBR, the
tombstone plot is on "part 3".

Please answer privately.

Thank you very much and Shana Tova.

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris - France

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Nicolas before going to the cemetery in
order to avoid duplication of effort.


Searching: SHEKHTMAN from Ataki, Mohgilev-Podolski and Beltsi #bessarabia

Elise Goodman <elisesgoodman@...>
 

My father, Avrum SHEKHTMAN, was born in Ataki, and we leave for there
on September 20, so would be grateful for any info asap, or later if
necessary.

My father came to New York in 1909; his brother, Fischel, my uncle
Philip, came a few years later.

I never knew my grandparents, Yehudah Leib SHEKHTMAN, >from Ataki, who
died in1922, or Raise, who died in 1917, or my father's other
siblings. We have hired Natalia Alhazov, >from Kisheniev, to guide us
to Ataki, Mogilev-Podolski and Beltsi, where some of the family may
have lived at some time. We will try to find where they lived and will
look at cemetaries in those towns, too.

We just found out that one of my father's younger brothers, Elia, had
two children who were born in Beltsi: Yitzchak Meer SHEKTMAN, born in
1910, and Sluba Liba SHEKHTMAN, born in 1909.They would have been my
first cousins. I want to find their descendants. Does anyone know how
I can find their children? Where they are buried?

Finally, the archives in Moldova said that a man named Meer Idel
SHEKHTMAN came to America in the 1880's, and I would like to reach his
descendants. His brother, Duvid SHEKHTMAN, born in Ukraine in 1882,
did not emigrate. Neither my father nor uncle ever spoke of Meer
Idel.

Why is my maiden name not SHEKHTMAN? My father bought a visa >from an
Abraham Simon and kept that name in the US.

Any suggestions, tips, or other guidance would be gratefully appreciated.

Elise Simon Goodman
New York

Searching SHEKHTMAN, SCHECTMAN
e-mail: elisesgoodman@gmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE Please reply privately to sender with suggestions


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Searching: SHEKHTMAN from Ataki, Mohgilev-Podolski and Beltsi #bessarabia

Elise Goodman <elisesgoodman@...>
 

My father, Avrum SHEKHTMAN, was born in Ataki, and we leave for there
on September 20, so would be grateful for any info asap, or later if
necessary.

My father came to New York in 1909; his brother, Fischel, my uncle
Philip, came a few years later.

I never knew my grandparents, Yehudah Leib SHEKHTMAN, >from Ataki, who
died in1922, or Raise, who died in 1917, or my father's other
siblings. We have hired Natalia Alhazov, >from Kisheniev, to guide us
to Ataki, Mogilev-Podolski and Beltsi, where some of the family may
have lived at some time. We will try to find where they lived and will
look at cemetaries in those towns, too.

We just found out that one of my father's younger brothers, Elia, had
two children who were born in Beltsi: Yitzchak Meer SHEKTMAN, born in
1910, and Sluba Liba SHEKHTMAN, born in 1909.They would have been my
first cousins. I want to find their descendants. Does anyone know how
I can find their children? Where they are buried?

Finally, the archives in Moldova said that a man named Meer Idel
SHEKHTMAN came to America in the 1880's, and I would like to reach his
descendants. His brother, Duvid SHEKHTMAN, born in Ukraine in 1882,
did not emigrate. Neither my father nor uncle ever spoke of Meer
Idel.

Why is my maiden name not SHEKHTMAN? My father bought a visa >from an
Abraham Simon and kept that name in the US.

Any suggestions, tips, or other guidance would be gratefully appreciated.

Elise Simon Goodman
New York

Searching SHEKHTMAN, SCHECTMAN
e-mail: elisesgoodman@gmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE Please reply privately to sender with suggestions


Re: Researching FERGUSON family - England #general

rv Kaplan
 

There was a Jewish family in Scotland called Ferguson who were
originally Fagerson, but there needn't be any logic whatsoever behind
name changes at this time. For example, some Jews became Smith - go
figure!

Harvey L Kaplan
Scottish Jewish Archives Centre,
Glasgow
www.sjac.org.uk

On 13 September 2012 13:20, Ian <paterson@nsworld.com> wrote:

I am new to Jewish ancestor research as this is the first Jewish
connection I have found.

Solomon FERGUSON was born on 11 March 1884 according to the Manchester
Jewish School Admission Register where Solomon started school on 9 April
1888. His father Simon and mother Eva were born in either Russia or
Poland, it varies in different Census records. Solomon is my family link.
My problem is that I cannot find a birth record for Solomon or his siblings
on the GRO. Ferguson may be an English version of a Russian/Polish surname
and the children may have been registered under that name. Can anyone tell
me what their Russian/Polish names might be?

Janet Paterson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Researching FERGUSON family - England #general

rv Kaplan
 

There was a Jewish family in Scotland called Ferguson who were
originally Fagerson, but there needn't be any logic whatsoever behind
name changes at this time. For example, some Jews became Smith - go
figure!

Harvey L Kaplan
Scottish Jewish Archives Centre,
Glasgow
www.sjac.org.uk

On 13 September 2012 13:20, Ian <paterson@nsworld.com> wrote:

I am new to Jewish ancestor research as this is the first Jewish
connection I have found.

Solomon FERGUSON was born on 11 March 1884 according to the Manchester
Jewish School Admission Register where Solomon started school on 9 April
1888. His father Simon and mother Eva were born in either Russia or
Poland, it varies in different Census records. Solomon is my family link.
My problem is that I cannot find a birth record for Solomon or his siblings
on the GRO. Ferguson may be an English version of a Russian/Polish surname
and the children may have been registered under that name. Can anyone tell
me what their Russian/Polish names might be?

Janet Paterson

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