Date   

Does anyone recognize these ladies? From Latvia 1906-1920 #latvia

virginia everett <virginiaeverett@...>
 

I am hoping someone may recognize the two portrait photos my
grandmother Tatiana Holzmann (name she used in America) brought
with her >from Latvia in 1909.
The picture of two ladies was taken in Pskov in 1906, the other
taken in Rezekne also abt 1906. (nothing written on back of photos)
The picture of my grandmother (with hat) was taken in New York in
1920. She lost all contact with her family during the World Wars.
I have been trying to reconnect with relatives for so many years!
Thanks for taking a look at these pictures! They are on ViewMate at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35191
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35192 and
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35193 .

Virginia Everett

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Latvia SIG #Latvia Does anyone recognize these ladies? From Latvia 1906-1920 #latvia

virginia everett <virginiaeverett@...>
 

I am hoping someone may recognize the two portrait photos my
grandmother Tatiana Holzmann (name she used in America) brought
with her >from Latvia in 1909.
The picture of two ladies was taken in Pskov in 1906, the other
taken in Rezekne also abt 1906. (nothing written on back of photos)
The picture of my grandmother (with hat) was taken in New York in
1920. She lost all contact with her family during the World Wars.
I have been trying to reconnect with relatives for so many years!
Thanks for taking a look at these pictures! They are on ViewMate at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35191
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35192 and
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35193 .

Virginia Everett

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Re: 64 out of 67 Marker Match #dna

Barry S. Finkel
 

On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:27:14 +0300 Michael Waas <mwaas1989@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

My father recently did DNA testing through FamilyTreeDNA. I would like
to better understand what a 64/67 Y marker match means on FTDNA. For
the sake of full disclosure, the markers which were different DYS454
(1-step mutation), DYS576 (1-step), and DYS570 (1-step). As I
understand it, it indicates the high probability of our common
ancestor being within the past 400-600 years.

Thanks for your help and information, I want to be able to explain it
to my father's match, and what it indicates of our
genealogical/genetic relationship. And just so it is also clear, my
father's family, the paper trail takes us to the end of the 17th
century in Amsterdam and his match, the paper trail takes him to early
19th century Sephardic Aleppo.

Best,

Michael Waas
Haifa, Israel
Michael, I am not sure that I can answer your query successfully.
I can explain what I have learned >from my FTDNA Y-67 (and Y-12, Y-25,
and Y-37) tests. What haplogroup are you? What does the haplogroup
predictor - http://www.hprg.com/hapest5/ - show?

My haplogroup is G2b1 (formerly G2c, before the recent renumbering).
This haplogroup is historically placed in 1490 Sicily. In 1490
Sicily was controlled by Spain, and all of the Jews would have had to
emigrate >from Sicily or convert to Roman Catholic. I have produced
a Tip file for each of my matches (for each of the four tests). In my
67-marker matches file I have these entries for the first and last
match in each category (minus the names, SNP, and STR values):

---
In our tree, we have 12 generations in one branch, and the top of that
branch is ca. 1650. That means that 12 generations is 350 years, and
24 generations is 700 years (ca. 1300).

In comparing 67 markers, the probability that BSF and someone with M
mismatches shared a common ancestor with the last G generations is:

Approx Yr 1883 1766 1650 1533 1416 1300 1184

M ## 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 Lastname
- -- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ------ ------ --------
67-0 0
--------------------------------------------------------
67-1 2 69.74 94.43 99.12 99.87 99.98 100.00 .
67-1 2 69.74 94.43 99.12 99.87 99.98 100.00 100.00
--------------------------------------------------------
67-2 2 45.89 85.22 96.98 99.47 99.92 99.97 100.00
67-2 2 44.22 83.96 96.53 99.35 99.89 99.97 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-3 7 46.65 85.76 97.17 99.52 99.93 99.99 100.00
67-3 7 22.32 66.70 90.09 97.61 99.49 99.90 99.98
--------------------------------------------------------
67-4 17 24.83 70.31 92.00 98.26 99.67 99.94 99.99
67-4 17 3.87 26.88 57.69 80.05 91.86 97.01 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-5 32 24.81 70.29 91.98 98.26 99.67 99.94 99.99
67-5 32 3.04 27.61 61.12 84.91 95.04 98.58 99.63
--------------------------------------------------------
67-6 54 9.66 47.87 79.78 93.93 98.46 99.65 99.93
67-6 54 .00 .37 4.75 19.08 41.86 64.79 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-7 53 3.58 30.69 65.96 87.43 96.20 99.00 99.76
67-7 53 .00 0.28 3.78 16.01 38.86 59.46 .
--------------------------------------------------------

The percentages vary in the same number of mismatches based on which
markers mismatch. A difference of two in one marker is counted as
two mismatches.
---

Note that in the past, the Tip report used to contain 28-generation
percentages; now the report does not contain those. You can see that
with differences up through 5, at 24 generations I have almost a
100% expectation that these persons are related to me. But I can
trace my paternal ancestry back to around 1790 in Opole-Lubelskie, in
present-day Poland. In 1790, families did not have family names, and
Napoleon had not yet decreed that civil records had to be kept by the
government. The 1790 date is calculated to about 20 years before the
approximate birth year of my gggfather, and that date I got from
records that the LDS microfilmed in 1954. Assuming that I really am a
G2b1 (and I have not had a full sequencing of my Y-DNA to see if I
really have the one-letter mutation that officially defines the G2b1
haplogroup), I have no way of tracing my paternal ancestry from
1790 Opole-Lubelskie back to 1490 Sicily. So, in summary, I have
a huge number of persons who are probably related to me, but I have no
way of taking my tree back far enough to find a common ancestor.

I had created the match file for Y-67 and Y-37, and in the past few
weeks I created match files for Y-12 and Y-25. I can tell >from the
files if two persons are really closely related, because they have
the same percentages. The two persons who are one marker different
from me have the same last name, so I know that they are more closely
related than 12 or 16 generations.

The Athey predictor site says that my Y-12 STR values show that
I am with 100% certainty a G2b1. But I do not know the sample size
used by Athey to calculate his results. I have not had my sample
checked for Y-111 STR values, as it would not tell me anything that
I do not already know.

You might learn something by creating a Y-67 Tip report, as I did.

--Barry S. Finkel
Chicago

MODERATOR NOTE: The table above may not line up properly for all
readers. If that is the case, copy and paste the table into a word
processor and change the font to a monospaced font such as Courier.


DNA Research #DNA Re: 64 out of 67 Marker Match #dna

Barry S. Finkel
 

On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:27:14 +0300 Michael Waas <mwaas1989@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

My father recently did DNA testing through FamilyTreeDNA. I would like
to better understand what a 64/67 Y marker match means on FTDNA. For
the sake of full disclosure, the markers which were different DYS454
(1-step mutation), DYS576 (1-step), and DYS570 (1-step). As I
understand it, it indicates the high probability of our common
ancestor being within the past 400-600 years.

Thanks for your help and information, I want to be able to explain it
to my father's match, and what it indicates of our
genealogical/genetic relationship. And just so it is also clear, my
father's family, the paper trail takes us to the end of the 17th
century in Amsterdam and his match, the paper trail takes him to early
19th century Sephardic Aleppo.

Best,

Michael Waas
Haifa, Israel
Michael, I am not sure that I can answer your query successfully.
I can explain what I have learned >from my FTDNA Y-67 (and Y-12, Y-25,
and Y-37) tests. What haplogroup are you? What does the haplogroup
predictor - http://www.hprg.com/hapest5/ - show?

My haplogroup is G2b1 (formerly G2c, before the recent renumbering).
This haplogroup is historically placed in 1490 Sicily. In 1490
Sicily was controlled by Spain, and all of the Jews would have had to
emigrate >from Sicily or convert to Roman Catholic. I have produced
a Tip file for each of my matches (for each of the four tests). In my
67-marker matches file I have these entries for the first and last
match in each category (minus the names, SNP, and STR values):

---
In our tree, we have 12 generations in one branch, and the top of that
branch is ca. 1650. That means that 12 generations is 350 years, and
24 generations is 700 years (ca. 1300).

In comparing 67 markers, the probability that BSF and someone with M
mismatches shared a common ancestor with the last G generations is:

Approx Yr 1883 1766 1650 1533 1416 1300 1184

M ## 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 Lastname
- -- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ------ ------ --------
67-0 0
--------------------------------------------------------
67-1 2 69.74 94.43 99.12 99.87 99.98 100.00 .
67-1 2 69.74 94.43 99.12 99.87 99.98 100.00 100.00
--------------------------------------------------------
67-2 2 45.89 85.22 96.98 99.47 99.92 99.97 100.00
67-2 2 44.22 83.96 96.53 99.35 99.89 99.97 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-3 7 46.65 85.76 97.17 99.52 99.93 99.99 100.00
67-3 7 22.32 66.70 90.09 97.61 99.49 99.90 99.98
--------------------------------------------------------
67-4 17 24.83 70.31 92.00 98.26 99.67 99.94 99.99
67-4 17 3.87 26.88 57.69 80.05 91.86 97.01 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-5 32 24.81 70.29 91.98 98.26 99.67 99.94 99.99
67-5 32 3.04 27.61 61.12 84.91 95.04 98.58 99.63
--------------------------------------------------------
67-6 54 9.66 47.87 79.78 93.93 98.46 99.65 99.93
67-6 54 .00 .37 4.75 19.08 41.86 64.79 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-7 53 3.58 30.69 65.96 87.43 96.20 99.00 99.76
67-7 53 .00 0.28 3.78 16.01 38.86 59.46 .
--------------------------------------------------------

The percentages vary in the same number of mismatches based on which
markers mismatch. A difference of two in one marker is counted as
two mismatches.
---

Note that in the past, the Tip report used to contain 28-generation
percentages; now the report does not contain those. You can see that
with differences up through 5, at 24 generations I have almost a
100% expectation that these persons are related to me. But I can
trace my paternal ancestry back to around 1790 in Opole-Lubelskie, in
present-day Poland. In 1790, families did not have family names, and
Napoleon had not yet decreed that civil records had to be kept by the
government. The 1790 date is calculated to about 20 years before the
approximate birth year of my gggfather, and that date I got from
records that the LDS microfilmed in 1954. Assuming that I really am a
G2b1 (and I have not had a full sequencing of my Y-DNA to see if I
really have the one-letter mutation that officially defines the G2b1
haplogroup), I have no way of tracing my paternal ancestry from
1790 Opole-Lubelskie back to 1490 Sicily. So, in summary, I have
a huge number of persons who are probably related to me, but I have no
way of taking my tree back far enough to find a common ancestor.

I had created the match file for Y-67 and Y-37, and in the past few
weeks I created match files for Y-12 and Y-25. I can tell >from the
files if two persons are really closely related, because they have
the same percentages. The two persons who are one marker different
from me have the same last name, so I know that they are more closely
related than 12 or 16 generations.

The Athey predictor site says that my Y-12 STR values show that
I am with 100% certainty a G2b1. But I do not know the sample size
used by Athey to calculate his results. I have not had my sample
checked for Y-111 STR values, as it would not tell me anything that
I do not already know.

You might learn something by creating a Y-67 Tip report, as I did.

--Barry S. Finkel
Chicago

MODERATOR NOTE: The table above may not line up properly for all
readers. If that is the case, copy and paste the table into a word
processor and change the font to a monospaced font such as Courier.


ViewMate translation request - Russian (Lomazy and Lublin, Poland) #general

Yaron Pedhazur
 

Dear fellow researchers,
I've posted a few vital records in Russian for which I need an extraction.
It is of my ancestors of the LEYZERSOHN family, living in Lomazy, Poland,
and one marriage record in Lublin.  
The records can be found on ViewMate at the following links:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35339

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35340

Please respond via the forms provided in the ViewMate site.
Thank you very much,
Yaron Pedhazur
Tel Aviv, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian (Lomazy and Lublin, Poland) #general

Yaron Pedhazur
 

Dear fellow researchers,
I've posted a few vital records in Russian for which I need an extraction.
It is of my ancestors of the LEYZERSOHN family, living in Lomazy, Poland,
and one marriage record in Lublin.  
The records can be found on ViewMate at the following links:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35339

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35340

Please respond via the forms provided in the ViewMate site.
Thank you very much,
Yaron Pedhazur
Tel Aviv, Israel


ViewMate translation request - Polish (Lomazy, Poland) #general

Yaron Pedhazur
 

Dear fellow researchers, 

I've posted a few vital records in Polish for which I need an extraction.
It is of my ancestors of the GOLDBERG and LEYZERSOHN families,
living in Lomazy, Poland. 

The records can be found on ViewMate at the following links: 

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35336

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35337

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35338

Please respond via the forms provided in the ViewMate site. 

Thank you very much, 
Yaron Pedhazur 
Tel Aviv, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Polish (Lomazy, Poland) #general

Yaron Pedhazur
 

Dear fellow researchers, 

I've posted a few vital records in Polish for which I need an extraction.
It is of my ancestors of the GOLDBERG and LEYZERSOHN families,
living in Lomazy, Poland. 

The records can be found on ViewMate at the following links: 

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35336

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35337

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35338

Please respond via the forms provided in the ViewMate site. 

Thank you very much, 
Yaron Pedhazur 
Tel Aviv, Israel


(Austria) AKM Index of Musicians Found- Red-Lined Out Jewish Composers #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Carla Shapreau, a violin maker, attorney and lecturer at UC Berkeley School
of Law researches Nazi persecution of Jewish musicians. Shapreau looks for
valuable musical instruments and collections of sheet music that the Nazis
confiscated, and anything else that will add to the world's knowledge about
how Jewish musicians were treated during the Holocaust and WWII
years--including emigration.

Several years ago she found in the Vienna City Library a small book that had
2,000 printed names (33 pages) -published in the 1930s. The book is a
membership list of artists -mostly composers represented by AKM, a
performing arts society. AKM's function was to collect royalties earned in
Austria >from performances or recordings and give them to the composers. Red
slashes were made across 500 of the names marking them as Jews. By having
the names crossed out, AKM 's intent was to end their careers across the
world--not just in Austria. This was a prelude of what was to come in
Austria during WWII. Some of the composers' whose names were crossed off in
red include: Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Eric Zeisl, and Joseph Beer but not
others such as Irving Berlin and Alexander Zemlinsky. Shapreau comments some
composers initially avoided being branded as Jews. Unfortunately they were
later "fingered" by Helmut Wobisch, a trumpeter in the Vienna Philharmonic.
All copyrights in the EU expire 70 years after the artist's death.

Most important is the history that the index portrays and gives a view of
what happened to Jewish musicians. The Vienna index was uncovered by
Austrian scholars Christoph Lind and Georg Traska,

Part of the article addresses possible compensation for unpaid royalties due
to AKM's. actions. Randy Schoenberg, member, JewishGen Advisory Board,
Austria-CzechSIG Coordinator and President of the Los Angeles Holocaust
Museum is mentioned in the Los Angeles Times article. Randy was able to win
a case in Austria that returned Nazi-looted art-the Klimt painting be
returned to the family. Both of Randy's grandfathers were composers-one
was listed in the book and the other not. Randy believes it unlikely that
such royalties will be able to be get far. In the 2000s the U.S. struck an
agreement with Germany and Austria to pre-empt most U.S. lawsuits by
Holocaust victims and their heirs. Instead, Germany, Austria and
corporations based there paid $4.7 billion into special accounts set aside
to settle claims for monetary damages. To read the Los Angeles Times article
go to: http://tinyurl.com/koh65ao

Original url:
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-cm-ca-holocaust-composers-20
140824-story.html#page=1

Shapreau also wrote an article posted to the website of the OREL Foundation*
in Los Angeles that includes the images of the AKM index. Note there is not
a search engine for the index so you will have to review the index which is
alphabetical. The images may be viewed at: http://tinyurl.com/lcnrpxu
Original url:
http://orel.pmhclients.com/images/articles/AKMSTAGMA_Blacklist_City_of_Vienn
a_Library_Shapreau.pdf

The article may be read at: http://tinyurl.com/outbhrw
original url:
http://orelfoundation.org/index.php/journal/journalArticle/the_austrian_copy
right_society_and_blacklisting_during_the_nazi_era/

*The OREL Foundation's mission is to encourage interest in and, especially,
the performance of works by composers suppressed as a result of Nazi
policies >from 1933 to 1945 in order to allow the greater musical community
of today and tomorrow the opportunity to determine the place of these
composers and their works in the history and canon of twentieth-century
music.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Austria) AKM Index of Musicians Found- Red-Lined Out Jewish Composers #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Carla Shapreau, a violin maker, attorney and lecturer at UC Berkeley School
of Law researches Nazi persecution of Jewish musicians. Shapreau looks for
valuable musical instruments and collections of sheet music that the Nazis
confiscated, and anything else that will add to the world's knowledge about
how Jewish musicians were treated during the Holocaust and WWII
years--including emigration.

Several years ago she found in the Vienna City Library a small book that had
2,000 printed names (33 pages) -published in the 1930s. The book is a
membership list of artists -mostly composers represented by AKM, a
performing arts society. AKM's function was to collect royalties earned in
Austria >from performances or recordings and give them to the composers. Red
slashes were made across 500 of the names marking them as Jews. By having
the names crossed out, AKM 's intent was to end their careers across the
world--not just in Austria. This was a prelude of what was to come in
Austria during WWII. Some of the composers' whose names were crossed off in
red include: Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Eric Zeisl, and Joseph Beer but not
others such as Irving Berlin and Alexander Zemlinsky. Shapreau comments some
composers initially avoided being branded as Jews. Unfortunately they were
later "fingered" by Helmut Wobisch, a trumpeter in the Vienna Philharmonic.
All copyrights in the EU expire 70 years after the artist's death.

Most important is the history that the index portrays and gives a view of
what happened to Jewish musicians. The Vienna index was uncovered by
Austrian scholars Christoph Lind and Georg Traska,

Part of the article addresses possible compensation for unpaid royalties due
to AKM's. actions. Randy Schoenberg, member, JewishGen Advisory Board,
Austria-CzechSIG Coordinator and President of the Los Angeles Holocaust
Museum is mentioned in the Los Angeles Times article. Randy was able to win
a case in Austria that returned Nazi-looted art-the Klimt painting be
returned to the family. Both of Randy's grandfathers were composers-one
was listed in the book and the other not. Randy believes it unlikely that
such royalties will be able to be get far. In the 2000s the U.S. struck an
agreement with Germany and Austria to pre-empt most U.S. lawsuits by
Holocaust victims and their heirs. Instead, Germany, Austria and
corporations based there paid $4.7 billion into special accounts set aside
to settle claims for monetary damages. To read the Los Angeles Times article
go to: http://tinyurl.com/koh65ao

Original url:
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-cm-ca-holocaust-composers-20
140824-story.html#page=1

Shapreau also wrote an article posted to the website of the OREL Foundation*
in Los Angeles that includes the images of the AKM index. Note there is not
a search engine for the index so you will have to review the index which is
alphabetical. The images may be viewed at: http://tinyurl.com/lcnrpxu
Original url:
http://orel.pmhclients.com/images/articles/AKMSTAGMA_Blacklist_City_of_Vienn
a_Library_Shapreau.pdf

The article may be read at: http://tinyurl.com/outbhrw
original url:
http://orelfoundation.org/index.php/journal/journalArticle/the_austrian_copy
right_society_and_blacklisting_during_the_nazi_era/

*The OREL Foundation's mission is to encourage interest in and, especially,
the performance of works by composers suppressed as a result of Nazi
policies >from 1933 to 1945 in order to allow the greater musical community
of today and tomorrow the opportunity to determine the place of these
composers and their works in the history and canon of twentieth-century
music.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Russian Translation of 2 Marriage Documents- One Groom Two Brides #general

Mady Land <madyland@...>
 

Hello Genners,
I've posted two Russian marriage documents (1875 and 1880)on Viewmate
for the same groom, Icek Landsznejder.

They are with two different brides who I believe are sisters. I would
appreciate full translations, especially the ages of each bride if given,
names of parents, occupation, towns etc. I'd also like the surname of the
brides, as there have been different suggestions-- Gorna, Gornaya, Gurk.

The images can be found at:

1. (1875) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35312

2. (1880) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35313

Thanks as always for your help.

Mady Land
New York, NY

MODERATOR NOTE: responses should be made privately or via the Viewmate
application

Researching:
KELMAN/KIELMAN/Nowe Miasto nad Pilica, New York;
LANDSZNEJDER/LANDSCHNEIDER/KLAMRA/ZAROSLA/Plock, Bodzanow, Gabin, Zychlin,
New York;
ZYLBER/KARAS/DOBRZYNSKA/Dobrzyn nad Wisla;
GEJDYGIER/EIDEGER/Nowe Miasto nad Pilica, Lodz, Aleksandrow Lodski, New
York, Winnipeg, Calgary;
FOGEL/FOGIEL/FOJGEL/HERYING/HAJDENBLIT/Hrubieszow, Ratno, Lublin, Poland;
New York;
LADZINSKI/LADYSINSKA/LADIZINSKY/Myastowka/Gorodkivka Ukraine, New York;
MANDELBAUM/Grabens, Offenbach Germany
BOROWSKI/KIELER/Aleksandrow Lodzki;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian Translation of 2 Marriage Documents- One Groom Two Brides #general

Mady Land <madyland@...>
 

Hello Genners,
I've posted two Russian marriage documents (1875 and 1880)on Viewmate
for the same groom, Icek Landsznejder.

They are with two different brides who I believe are sisters. I would
appreciate full translations, especially the ages of each bride if given,
names of parents, occupation, towns etc. I'd also like the surname of the
brides, as there have been different suggestions-- Gorna, Gornaya, Gurk.

The images can be found at:

1. (1875) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35312

2. (1880) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35313

Thanks as always for your help.

Mady Land
New York, NY

MODERATOR NOTE: responses should be made privately or via the Viewmate
application

Researching:
KELMAN/KIELMAN/Nowe Miasto nad Pilica, New York;
LANDSZNEJDER/LANDSCHNEIDER/KLAMRA/ZAROSLA/Plock, Bodzanow, Gabin, Zychlin,
New York;
ZYLBER/KARAS/DOBRZYNSKA/Dobrzyn nad Wisla;
GEJDYGIER/EIDEGER/Nowe Miasto nad Pilica, Lodz, Aleksandrow Lodski, New
York, Winnipeg, Calgary;
FOGEL/FOGIEL/FOJGEL/HERYING/HAJDENBLIT/Hrubieszow, Ratno, Lublin, Poland;
New York;
LADZINSKI/LADYSINSKA/LADIZINSKY/Myastowka/Gorodkivka Ukraine, New York;
MANDELBAUM/Grabens, Offenbach Germany
BOROWSKI/KIELER/Aleksandrow Lodzki;


Cemetery Project Coordinator! #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All,

It is with much pleasure that we announce that Eric Feinstein has agreed
to take on the position of Cemetery Project Coordinator for the FrenchSIG!

We have been very fortunate that the Cercle de Genealogie Juive in Paris
has graciously agreed to share with us the cemetery records >from the
formidable work of J-P Bernard and his wife, who traveled across France
to document the large number of cemeteries in the Moselle region. We
are most grateful for their generosity!

While work has been done for some of those cemeteries, it has been
obvious that help was needed to coordinate the many sources, as well as
to obtain volunteers to assist with the data entry and proofreading of
the spreadsheets used to place this valuable information on the
JewishGen JOWBR website.

If you would be interested in helping us with this large project please:
contact Eric DIRECTLY at: <ericfeinstein@yahoo.com>

We hope that there will be many among our 830 members (!) who wish to
help with this first major project for the FrenchSIG!

Rosanne Leeson
Pierre Hahn
Co-Coordinators FrenchSIG


French SIG #France Cemetery Project Coordinator! #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All,

It is with much pleasure that we announce that Eric Feinstein has agreed
to take on the position of Cemetery Project Coordinator for the FrenchSIG!

We have been very fortunate that the Cercle de Genealogie Juive in Paris
has graciously agreed to share with us the cemetery records >from the
formidable work of J-P Bernard and his wife, who traveled across France
to document the large number of cemeteries in the Moselle region. We
are most grateful for their generosity!

While work has been done for some of those cemeteries, it has been
obvious that help was needed to coordinate the many sources, as well as
to obtain volunteers to assist with the data entry and proofreading of
the spreadsheets used to place this valuable information on the
JewishGen JOWBR website.

If you would be interested in helping us with this large project please:
contact Eric DIRECTLY at: <ericfeinstein@yahoo.com>

We hope that there will be many among our 830 members (!) who wish to
help with this first major project for the FrenchSIG!

Rosanne Leeson
Pierre Hahn
Co-Coordinators FrenchSIG


Viewmate Polish translation request 35343 #poland

Martin Fischer
 

I am hoping someone familiar with Polish can translate my great-grandfather
Eliezar Kagan's 1928 death record >from Pinsk.

It is Viewmate photo No. 35343.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35343

Thanks in advance.

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois, USA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


JRI Poland #Poland Viewmate Polish translation request 35343 #poland

Martin Fischer
 

I am hoping someone familiar with Polish can translate my great-grandfather
Eliezar Kagan's 1928 death record >from Pinsk.

It is Viewmate photo No. 35343.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35343

Thanks in advance.

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois, USA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


Re: World War I records #germany

Neustaedter David <davidn@...>
 

Hi Irene, Tobias,
If your gfather had a Gestapo file, there's a good chance that you can
find information.

I found my grandfather's Gestapo file at the Wurzburg staatarchiv,
which noted his entire Military WW1 service. Good luck,

David Neustaedter, Nazareth Illit, Israel davidn@towersemi.com

Irene asked: "I would like to know if there is a way to find out
my grandfather's unit. I have a citation he received in the 1930s
that was given to all WWI participants, but it does not list his unit."

Tobias A. Kemper [mailto:kemper@lenz-kemper.de] replied on
Sunday, August 25, 2013:

Hello Irene, you can find the unit only by chance. The Prussian
MIlitary Archives are destroyed in 1945. If your grandfather was
from Saxony, Bavaria or Wuerttemberg, then you can address to
the archives in Dresden, Munich or Stuttgart.
If he was Prussian, then you need to find a citation in another
document, f.e. in a birth record or marriage record.

If your grandfather was unlucky and was wounded during the
war, then you are lucky because you will find the name and the
unit in the "Verlustlisten", which I have mentioned before.


German SIG #Germany RE: World War I records #germany

Neustaedter David <davidn@...>
 

Hi Irene, Tobias,
If your gfather had a Gestapo file, there's a good chance that you can
find information.

I found my grandfather's Gestapo file at the Wurzburg staatarchiv,
which noted his entire Military WW1 service. Good luck,

David Neustaedter, Nazareth Illit, Israel davidn@towersemi.com

Irene asked: "I would like to know if there is a way to find out
my grandfather's unit. I have a citation he received in the 1930s
that was given to all WWI participants, but it does not list his unit."

Tobias A. Kemper [mailto:kemper@lenz-kemper.de] replied on
Sunday, August 25, 2013:

Hello Irene, you can find the unit only by chance. The Prussian
MIlitary Archives are destroyed in 1945. If your grandfather was
from Saxony, Bavaria or Wuerttemberg, then you can address to
the archives in Dresden, Munich or Stuttgart.
If he was Prussian, then you need to find a citation in another
document, f.e. in a birth record or marriage record.

If your grandfather was unlucky and was wounded during the
war, then you are lucky because you will find the name and the
unit in the "Verlustlisten", which I have mentioned before.


64 out of 67 Marker Match #dna

Michael Waas
 

Hi,

My father recently did DNA testing through FamilyTreeDNA. I would like
to better understand what a 64/67 Y marker match means on FTDNA. For
the sake of full disclosure, the markers which were different DYS454
(1-step mutation), DYS576 (1-step), and DYS570 (1-step). As I
understand it, it indicates the high probability of our common
ancestor being within the past 400-600 years.

Thanks for your help and information, I want to be able to explain it
to my father's match, and what it indicates of our
genealogical/genetic relationship. And just so it is also clear, my
father's family, the paper trail takes us to the end of the 17th
century in Amsterdam and his match, the paper trail takes him to early
19th century Sephardic Aleppo.

Best,

Michael Waas
Haifa, Israel


DNA Research #DNA 64 out of 67 Marker Match #dna

Michael Waas
 

Hi,

My father recently did DNA testing through FamilyTreeDNA. I would like
to better understand what a 64/67 Y marker match means on FTDNA. For
the sake of full disclosure, the markers which were different DYS454
(1-step mutation), DYS576 (1-step), and DYS570 (1-step). As I
understand it, it indicates the high probability of our common
ancestor being within the past 400-600 years.

Thanks for your help and information, I want to be able to explain it
to my father's match, and what it indicates of our
genealogical/genetic relationship. And just so it is also clear, my
father's family, the paper trail takes us to the end of the 17th
century in Amsterdam and his match, the paper trail takes him to early
19th century Sephardic Aleppo.

Best,

Michael Waas
Haifa, Israel

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