Date   

Tombstone Viewmate request #germany

Sherry <shery1@...>
 

I have posted to viewmate my m3ggm, Regina ROSENSWEIG SCHWARTZ buried
in the US, headstone. I need help deciphering the name of the town
shown. Can someone please help. Thank you
It is on ViewMate at the following address ..

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM39137

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Sherry Hines


German SIG #Germany Tombstone Viewmate request #germany

Sherry <shery1@...>
 

I have posted to viewmate my m3ggm, Regina ROSENSWEIG SCHWARTZ buried
in the US, headstone. I need help deciphering the name of the town
shown. Can someone please help. Thank you
It is on ViewMate at the following address ..

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM39137

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Sherry Hines


New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #warsaw #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #warsaw #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


The escape of Medzilaborce (district), Slovakia citizens to Switzerland on charcoal trains #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

My father's mother's family WEISBERGER and WEIL, and possibly GROSZMAN,
are >from Mikova and Mala Polana and they also lived in Medzilborce. My
great-grandmother and a great uncle and his family were deported to
Poland and murdered. Several siblings of my grandmother made US Aliyah
well before the Shoah an she and a brother and their families, including
my EDELMAN father, left Slovakia in 1946.

I am just finishing the very interesting English-translation "The
Holocaust in Slovakia: The Story of Jews the Jews of Medzilaborce
District" (original: "Zidovska komunita v okrese Medzilaborce v rokoch
1938-1945" by Jan Hlavnika. I learnt that a small number of people,
perhaps just over a dozen, escaped to Switzerland in 1942 by hiding on
charcoal trains.

In addition to the survival of these people, what's also compelling for
me is that these irregular trains* were a tool for liberation instead of
deportation, and also that many non-Jewish citizens helped.

I would love some help finding the following people or their
descendants. More difficult I suppose - because they are anonymous - I
would like to find out the names and descendants of the people who helped.

At a minimum I would like to learn more about Medzilaborce and even my
family, but my longer-term goal is establish a memorial in Medzilaborce
focused not just on the survivors and their saviours, but the larger
(and going forward idea) project of encouraging people to make a
positive difference in the future.

I will probably find some of the following people via other sources
fairly soon, but contacting them and getting a reply will take time, so
perhaps someone in this forum has some ideas to speed things up. Indeed
the author might be related to some of these persons or at least have
notes >from his research. Some of the names comes >from Yad Vashem
testimonies, so hopefully can find more there.

I know that there was also a gathering of survivors of the descendants
in 2008, and I have already written to Meyer Denn via Facebook who
posted the following at the time. (If someone has an email address for
him, it would be much appreciated).
Gathering notice: http://tinyurl.com/mwbfg2c
Original url:
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2008-07/msg00144.html

* Rather than scheduled passenger services which people bought tickets
for when they were able to safely and legally emigrate

***

The temporary escapees and survivors include (names taken >from book):

Two brothers:
BALBIRER (male, caught on same train with WILLNER, Chana, below. Fate
unknown)
BALBIRER (male, caught on same train WILLNER, Chana, below. Fate unknown)

GRUNFELD, Eugen (>from Humenne)
HERSKOVIC, Hermann (>from Sterkovce)

MENDLOVIC, Leopold (brother of Lea ROCHLITZ, below)
MENDLOVIC, Nandor (brother of Lea ROCHLITZ, below)

REICH, Hugo (Chajim)

ROCHLITZ, Josef (father)
ROCHLITZ, Lea (wife)
ROCHLITZ, Hella (daughter, d.o.b. c.1932)

RUBIN, Miriam (daugher of RUBIN, Zsigmund)

RUDER, Henrich
RUDER, Moses
RUDER, Sarlota (Tsirna)

SCHWARZ, Alexander
SCHWARZ, Leopold
STERN, Jozef (caught on same train with WILLNER, Chana, below. Fate unknown)
TRENK, Samuel
WILLNER, Chana (>from Wzdow, Poland -- she was caught by Germans but
presumably survived deportation as she later provided testimony)

Thanks!

--
Todd Edelman
(near Los Angeles)

edelman@greenidea.eu


New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #hungary

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


Hungary SIG #Hungary The escape of Medzilaborce (district), Slovakia citizens to Switzerland on charcoal trains #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

My father's mother's family WEISBERGER and WEIL, and possibly GROSZMAN,
are >from Mikova and Mala Polana and they also lived in Medzilborce. My
great-grandmother and a great uncle and his family were deported to
Poland and murdered. Several siblings of my grandmother made US Aliyah
well before the Shoah an she and a brother and their families, including
my EDELMAN father, left Slovakia in 1946.

I am just finishing the very interesting English-translation "The
Holocaust in Slovakia: The Story of Jews the Jews of Medzilaborce
District" (original: "Zidovska komunita v okrese Medzilaborce v rokoch
1938-1945" by Jan Hlavnika. I learnt that a small number of people,
perhaps just over a dozen, escaped to Switzerland in 1942 by hiding on
charcoal trains.

In addition to the survival of these people, what's also compelling for
me is that these irregular trains* were a tool for liberation instead of
deportation, and also that many non-Jewish citizens helped.

I would love some help finding the following people or their
descendants. More difficult I suppose - because they are anonymous - I
would like to find out the names and descendants of the people who helped.

At a minimum I would like to learn more about Medzilaborce and even my
family, but my longer-term goal is establish a memorial in Medzilaborce
focused not just on the survivors and their saviours, but the larger
(and going forward idea) project of encouraging people to make a
positive difference in the future.

I will probably find some of the following people via other sources
fairly soon, but contacting them and getting a reply will take time, so
perhaps someone in this forum has some ideas to speed things up. Indeed
the author might be related to some of these persons or at least have
notes >from his research. Some of the names comes >from Yad Vashem
testimonies, so hopefully can find more there.

I know that there was also a gathering of survivors of the descendants
in 2008, and I have already written to Meyer Denn via Facebook who
posted the following at the time. (If someone has an email address for
him, it would be much appreciated).
Gathering notice: http://tinyurl.com/mwbfg2c
Original url:
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2008-07/msg00144.html

* Rather than scheduled passenger services which people bought tickets
for when they were able to safely and legally emigrate

***

The temporary escapees and survivors include (names taken >from book):

Two brothers:
BALBIRER (male, caught on same train with WILLNER, Chana, below. Fate
unknown)
BALBIRER (male, caught on same train WILLNER, Chana, below. Fate unknown)

GRUNFELD, Eugen (>from Humenne)
HERSKOVIC, Hermann (>from Sterkovce)

MENDLOVIC, Leopold (brother of Lea ROCHLITZ, below)
MENDLOVIC, Nandor (brother of Lea ROCHLITZ, below)

REICH, Hugo (Chajim)

ROCHLITZ, Josef (father)
ROCHLITZ, Lea (wife)
ROCHLITZ, Hella (daughter, d.o.b. c.1932)

RUBIN, Miriam (daugher of RUBIN, Zsigmund)

RUDER, Henrich
RUDER, Moses
RUDER, Sarlota (Tsirna)

SCHWARZ, Alexander
SCHWARZ, Leopold
STERN, Jozef (caught on same train with WILLNER, Chana, below. Fate unknown)
TRENK, Samuel
WILLNER, Chana (>from Wzdow, Poland -- she was caught by Germans but
presumably survived deportation as she later provided testimony)

Thanks!

--
Todd Edelman
(near Los Angeles)

edelman@greenidea.eu


Hungary SIG #Hungary New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #hungary

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


Frankel family of Rockland County #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with members of the Yeshiva University
benefactor family of Bruno (Baruch Pinchas) Frankel, an outstanding
industrialist and respected philanthropist, born in 1927 in Vienna and
died in September 2013, and his brothers, Emanuel (Elimelech) Frankel,
born in 1932 in Vienna, Max, Abraham and Daniel Chaim.
--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Private responses only please.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Frankel family of Rockland County #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with members of the Yeshiva University
benefactor family of Bruno (Baruch Pinchas) Frankel, an outstanding
industrialist and respected philanthropist, born in 1927 in Vienna and
died in September 2013, and his brothers, Emanuel (Elimelech) Frankel,
born in 1932 in Vienna, Max, Abraham and Daniel Chaim.
--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Private responses only please.


Vital Records from 1925 to 1927 for Wilno #poland

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

The Vilnius District Research Group of LitvakSIG has translated another
batch of records for Vilnius / Wilno during the interwar period. The
city of Vilnius was part of Poland during this period. This data set
contains marriage, divorce and death records for the years 1925 to 1927,
including over 1500 marriage and divorce records and almost 2200 death
records.

The most common names in these records are LEWIN (94 records), KAC (69),
SZAPIRO (61), GURWICZ (56), GORDON (40), KAPLAN (31), SEGAL (28), BLOCH
(26), ARONOWICZ (24).

I have posted surname lists for all these records with a count of the
number of times a surname appears on the public part of our Shutterfly
website at:
https://vilnius.shutterfly.com/
The file is an excel spreadsheet called "Extracted Surnames Vilnius
City." These spreadsheets include surnames >from many of the lists we
have translated, not just these new records.

To find out more about these vital record translations for Wilno,
please write me privately.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Coordinator, Vilnius District Research Group

MODERATOR'S NOTE: During the period between the two World Wars,
Wilno was considered part of Poland.


JRI Poland #Poland Vital Records from 1925 to 1927 for Wilno #poland

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

The Vilnius District Research Group of LitvakSIG has translated another
batch of records for Vilnius / Wilno during the interwar period. The
city of Vilnius was part of Poland during this period. This data set
contains marriage, divorce and death records for the years 1925 to 1927,
including over 1500 marriage and divorce records and almost 2200 death
records.

The most common names in these records are LEWIN (94 records), KAC (69),
SZAPIRO (61), GURWICZ (56), GORDON (40), KAPLAN (31), SEGAL (28), BLOCH
(26), ARONOWICZ (24).

I have posted surname lists for all these records with a count of the
number of times a surname appears on the public part of our Shutterfly
website at:
https://vilnius.shutterfly.com/
The file is an excel spreadsheet called "Extracted Surnames Vilnius
City." These spreadsheets include surnames >from many of the lists we
have translated, not just these new records.

To find out more about these vital record translations for Wilno,
please write me privately.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Coordinator, Vilnius District Research Group

MODERATOR'S NOTE: During the period between the two World Wars,
Wilno was considered part of Poland.


Polish Jews in Uzbekistan #poland

Carol Rombro Rider
 

There were an INCREDIBLE number of Polish Jews that ended up
in Uzbekistan as they were scattered through WWII.

My own in-laws went to Samarkand, Uzbekistan after being released
from a Siberian work camp only because word had spread
that so many Polish Jews were heading there.

Carol Rombro RiderBaltimore, Maryland USA

<< they are not listed in any of the online databases (Jewishgen, USHMM,
ancestry etc.
)We are thinking to address the archive itself in Uzbekistan, if
anyone did it before can he please share >from his
personal account about dealing with the archive there? >>


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Jews in Uzbekistan #poland

Carol Rombro Rider
 

There were an INCREDIBLE number of Polish Jews that ended up
in Uzbekistan as they were scattered through WWII.

My own in-laws went to Samarkand, Uzbekistan after being released
from a Siberian work camp only because word had spread
that so many Polish Jews were heading there.

Carol Rombro RiderBaltimore, Maryland USA

<< they are not listed in any of the online databases (Jewishgen, USHMM,
ancestry etc.
)We are thinking to address the archive itself in Uzbekistan, if
anyone did it before can he please share >from his
personal account about dealing with the archive there? >>


did anyone ever was in contact with the Tashkent archives? #poland

Eli Brauner
 

Many many Jews >from Poland fled to Uzbekistan. Many more were expelled to
these area by the Soviets.

Uzbekistan was the main base of the Anders Army. I'm researching this
episode in order to locate data sources on the Jewish soldiers
that serve in the army.

It is possible that one of the family was with the army. Not to mention the
fact that almost 40,000 civilians were evacuated with the army to Persia
and the Middle East.

As so it is wise to look in the lists of the 115, 000 Polish persons that
left Uzbekistan in 1942.

And last remark...in Tashkent exist a unique archive. In the center of the
city on metal plates are the details of tens of thousands of citizens
of the country - victims of WW2.

Eli Brauner
Israel


Ariel Kubi wrote
our family arrived to Uzbekistan during the 1940's but surprisingly they are
not listed in any of the online databases (Jewishgen, USHMM, ancestry etc.)

We are thinking to address the archive itself in Uzbekistan, if anyone did
it before can he please share >from his personal account about dealing with
the archive there?


JRI Poland #Poland did anyone ever was in contact with the Tashkent archives? #poland

Eli Brauner
 

Many many Jews >from Poland fled to Uzbekistan. Many more were expelled to
these area by the Soviets.

Uzbekistan was the main base of the Anders Army. I'm researching this
episode in order to locate data sources on the Jewish soldiers
that serve in the army.

It is possible that one of the family was with the army. Not to mention the
fact that almost 40,000 civilians were evacuated with the army to Persia
and the Middle East.

As so it is wise to look in the lists of the 115, 000 Polish persons that
left Uzbekistan in 1942.

And last remark...in Tashkent exist a unique archive. In the center of the
city on metal plates are the details of tens of thousands of citizens
of the country - victims of WW2.

Eli Brauner
Israel


Ariel Kubi wrote
our family arrived to Uzbekistan during the 1940's but surprisingly they are
not listed in any of the online databases (Jewishgen, USHMM, ancestry etc.)

We are thinking to address the archive itself in Uzbekistan, if anyone did
it before can he please share >from his personal account about dealing with
the archive there?


Re: VIEWING ONLINE RECORD #poland

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

When various Archives in Poland started placing digital images of vital
records online, JRI-Poland began a volunteer effort to go back to our
extensive index of over 5 million records and add links to these images.
The Archives publishing the images do not have any name index; using
these web sites is similar to the days of scrolling through microfilm to
find a record (except that you can do it >from your own computer).

Establishing an exact one-to-one correspondence with millions of records
is obviously a labor intensive process. Rather than delay providing
image links for the huge volume of images that suddenly became available
JRI-Poland made the decision to provide approximate links for many of
the new images. In those cases you will see the links annotated with the
VIEW NEARBY IMAGE label. Since we have not examined every record and
image in those collections yet the link is a guess based on the number
of records and the number of images in each set. Sometimes the Archives
skip pages or post multiple images of the same page, or include blank
pages, and the number of records as written on each page varies. So you
may have to scroll back or forward a few images to find the exact
record. Because the Archives' web sites have proved difficult for
researchers to navigate on their own we felt this would be a rapid way
to get many, many researchers quickly to very close to their records of
interest.

HINT: When using the image links we have added users should first make a
note of the Year and Akt (record) number, and then they can quickly know
whether to advance or back up in cases where the specific record number
is not on the initial image they are presented with.

Please keep in mind that there are basically four states of linking
JRI-Poland's vital records to images:

1) Images are not yet online,
2) Images are online, but no links created yet,
3) Images are online with approximate links,
4) Images are online and have exact links.

At this point we have linked a few hundred thousand records to exact
images, but there are many more to do. If you would like to volunteer to
help with this work please contact me directly.

Howard Fink
HowGen@verizon.net
Digital Archives Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

On Apr 17, 2015, spdenker@rcn.com wrote:

Subject: VIEWING ONLINE RECORD
From: spdenker@rcn.com
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 03:49:57 -0400 (EDT)

Town records spreadsheet data column one has in the CLICK TO VIEW=2
COLUMN link - VIEW NEARBY IMAGE. What does this mean? The
record that appears does not contain the name of the person in
that data row I want to see. What do I have to do to find
the person named?

Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: To find the specific page, use the arrows on the
page to move the images backward or forward.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: VIEWING ONLINE RECORD #poland

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

When various Archives in Poland started placing digital images of vital
records online, JRI-Poland began a volunteer effort to go back to our
extensive index of over 5 million records and add links to these images.
The Archives publishing the images do not have any name index; using
these web sites is similar to the days of scrolling through microfilm to
find a record (except that you can do it >from your own computer).

Establishing an exact one-to-one correspondence with millions of records
is obviously a labor intensive process. Rather than delay providing
image links for the huge volume of images that suddenly became available
JRI-Poland made the decision to provide approximate links for many of
the new images. In those cases you will see the links annotated with the
VIEW NEARBY IMAGE label. Since we have not examined every record and
image in those collections yet the link is a guess based on the number
of records and the number of images in each set. Sometimes the Archives
skip pages or post multiple images of the same page, or include blank
pages, and the number of records as written on each page varies. So you
may have to scroll back or forward a few images to find the exact
record. Because the Archives' web sites have proved difficult for
researchers to navigate on their own we felt this would be a rapid way
to get many, many researchers quickly to very close to their records of
interest.

HINT: When using the image links we have added users should first make a
note of the Year and Akt (record) number, and then they can quickly know
whether to advance or back up in cases where the specific record number
is not on the initial image they are presented with.

Please keep in mind that there are basically four states of linking
JRI-Poland's vital records to images:

1) Images are not yet online,
2) Images are online, but no links created yet,
3) Images are online with approximate links,
4) Images are online and have exact links.

At this point we have linked a few hundred thousand records to exact
images, but there are many more to do. If you would like to volunteer to
help with this work please contact me directly.

Howard Fink
HowGen@verizon.net
Digital Archives Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

On Apr 17, 2015, spdenker@rcn.com wrote:

Subject: VIEWING ONLINE RECORD
From: spdenker@rcn.com
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 03:49:57 -0400 (EDT)

Town records spreadsheet data column one has in the CLICK TO VIEW=2
COLUMN link - VIEW NEARBY IMAGE. What does this mean? The
record that appears does not contain the name of the person in
that data row I want to see. What do I have to do to find
the person named?

Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: To find the specific page, use the arrows on the
page to move the images backward or forward.


Recent article in the Forward #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

In a recent issue of the FORWARD, is a review of the book,
The clandestine history of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police.
The most important parts of the book describe eyewitness
accounts of the life of Jews in the Kovno ghetto >from 1942
until the end of 1943. The manuscript, buried in a metal box,
was found in 1964 during a construction project.

The book contained 249 pages of typed text in Yiddish. The
book was translated into English and edited by Samuel Schalkowsky.
Indiana University Press, 416 pages, $35.

This is a one time message allowed by the digests. However, its
historical value lies far beyond the commercial aspect of the book.
There is no doubt about the history's authenticity.

Howard Margol

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The review Howard is citing can be found at
http://forward.com/culture/217887/the-life-and-death-of-jewish-lithuania/


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Recent article in the Forward #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

In a recent issue of the FORWARD, is a review of the book,
The clandestine history of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police.
The most important parts of the book describe eyewitness
accounts of the life of Jews in the Kovno ghetto >from 1942
until the end of 1943. The manuscript, buried in a metal box,
was found in 1964 during a construction project.

The book contained 249 pages of typed text in Yiddish. The
book was translated into English and edited by Samuel Schalkowsky.
Indiana University Press, 416 pages, $35.

This is a one time message allowed by the digests. However, its
historical value lies far beyond the commercial aspect of the book.
There is no doubt about the history's authenticity.

Howard Margol

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The review Howard is citing can be found at
http://forward.com/culture/217887/the-life-and-death-of-jewish-lithuania/

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