Date   

The September issue of the "Galitzianer" #poland

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to release the September 2017 issue of the
"Galitzianer."

The featured articles in the current issue are:

from the Editor's Desk by Andrew Zalewski
Research Corner (Vital Records, Holocaust and Jewish Taxpayers
Projects) by Tony Kahane
Project Updates (Josephine & Franciscan Surveys and Jewish
Marriage Permissions 1807) by Andrew Zalewski
Brody's Memorial Books by Boerries Kuzmany
World War II in the Interview with Julian Bussgang
Synagogues of Galicia and Bukovina by Sergey Kravtsov
Map Corner by Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia-AGAD Symposium by Tony Kahane
38th Jewish Genealogy Conference by Michal Majewski

We hope you will enjoy the new issue of the journal.
The "Galitzianer" is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia.

Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia
--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


JRI Poland #Poland The September issue of the "Galitzianer" #poland

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to release the September 2017 issue of the
"Galitzianer."

The featured articles in the current issue are:

from the Editor's Desk by Andrew Zalewski
Research Corner (Vital Records, Holocaust and Jewish Taxpayers
Projects) by Tony Kahane
Project Updates (Josephine & Franciscan Surveys and Jewish
Marriage Permissions 1807) by Andrew Zalewski
Brody's Memorial Books by Boerries Kuzmany
World War II in the Interview with Julian Bussgang
Synagogues of Galicia and Bukovina by Sergey Kravtsov
Map Corner by Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia-AGAD Symposium by Tony Kahane
38th Jewish Genealogy Conference by Michal Majewski

We hope you will enjoy the new issue of the journal.
The "Galitzianer" is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia.

Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia
--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


ViewMate Posting 58895 - Russian #poland

mmelmed1@...
 

Hi,

This is the marriage record of Lajzer Machel Reichbart and Itta
in 1877. It is in Russian.

This record has already been translated, but it leaves me with
a question. Is Itta RAJCHBART's mother's name "Hinda" or "Anna"?

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Thank you so much,

Mark Melmed
Mark@Melmed.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The direct link to the image of the record is
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58895


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate Posting 58895 - Russian #poland

mmelmed1@...
 

Hi,

This is the marriage record of Lajzer Machel Reichbart and Itta
in 1877. It is in Russian.

This record has already been translated, but it leaves me with
a question. Is Itta RAJCHBART's mother's name "Hinda" or "Anna"?

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Thank you so much,

Mark Melmed
Mark@Melmed.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The direct link to the image of the record is
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58895


ViewMate Translation Request - Polish #poland

Susan Rosin
 

I've posted several birth records in Polish for which I need a translation.
I am interested in as many details as possible. They are all on ViewMate at
the following addresses:

My GF - Moses Oher (b. 1880)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59020

My GF's sister - Reche Oher (b. 1882)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59021

My father's oldest sister - Maria Oher (b. 1907)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59022

My father's second sister - Anna Oher (b. 1911)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59023

My Father - Jozef Joachim Oher (b. 1914)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59024

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you in advance,

Susan Oher - Rosin
Brea, CA
Researching Allerhand, Bardach, Morgenstern, Oher all >from Galicia:
Stryj, Boryslaw, Knihinicze, Schodnica


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate Translation Request - Polish #poland

Susan Rosin
 

I've posted several birth records in Polish for which I need a translation.
I am interested in as many details as possible. They are all on ViewMate at
the following addresses:

My GF - Moses Oher (b. 1880)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59020

My GF's sister - Reche Oher (b. 1882)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59021

My father's oldest sister - Maria Oher (b. 1907)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59022

My father's second sister - Anna Oher (b. 1911)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59023

My Father - Jozef Joachim Oher (b. 1914)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM59024

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you in advance,

Susan Oher - Rosin
Brea, CA
Researching Allerhand, Bardach, Morgenstern, Oher all >from Galicia:
Stryj, Boryslaw, Knihinicze, Schodnica


Finding lost relatives from Zwolen, Poland #poland

avivahpinski <avivahpinski@...>
 

In response to the messages below. You might contact the
Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw.*http://www.jhi.pl/en/genealogy*

The Institute has a genealogy department and they have records
from survivors immediately after WWII that are not available anyplace
else. Amongst other things, survivors filled out cards stating names
of relatives and where they would like to go. The Institute has the
originals. It is possible that you may find some information there.

You might also check the International Red Cross International
Tracing records that are at the Holocaust Museum in Washington.
These records are not on line and you will have to check with the
Holocaust Museum for information and assistance.

Good luck!

Avivah R. Z. Pinski
near Philadelphia, USA

Researching: Zuchman in Sarnaki, Karczew, and Warsaw Poland
Reznik in Drohiczyn, Siemiatische, Poland
Kopekin & Rifczes in Lemberg, Vienna, Polatsk, and Besonkovich
Familiant and Koifman in Bessarabia and Ukraine
Sondak in Vitebsk, Belarus and Rehitza, Latvia
Aginsky and Slonimsky in Minsk

--------------------- ORIGINAL MESSAGE ------------------

Subject: WEINTRAUB >from ZWOLEN, POLAND
From: tina levine<tsl553@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2017 23:05:58 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 2

I was told by my mother in law that none of her family survived the holocaust.
While searching on a genealogy website today I found a gentleman with
the same surname as her and >from the same town in Poland (Zwolen, near
Radom.) Now I'm wondering if they might have been cousins.

Her parents were Isaak and Feiga Weintraub.
The gentleman's name was Josef Weintraub, >from Zwolen Poland, born 1922
to Shulem and Malka, nee Zeidenbaum. He immigrated to Sao Paulo, Brazil
in 1946 >from Italy.

Anyone have suggestions for searching his descendants to see if there
is a link to my mother-in-law's family?

Tina Pachter Levine
NYC

Searching: Weintraub >from Zwolen, Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Finding lost relatives from Zwolen, Poland #poland

avivahpinski <avivahpinski@...>
 

In response to the messages below. You might contact the
Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw.*http://www.jhi.pl/en/genealogy*

The Institute has a genealogy department and they have records
from survivors immediately after WWII that are not available anyplace
else. Amongst other things, survivors filled out cards stating names
of relatives and where they would like to go. The Institute has the
originals. It is possible that you may find some information there.

You might also check the International Red Cross International
Tracing records that are at the Holocaust Museum in Washington.
These records are not on line and you will have to check with the
Holocaust Museum for information and assistance.

Good luck!

Avivah R. Z. Pinski
near Philadelphia, USA

Researching: Zuchman in Sarnaki, Karczew, and Warsaw Poland
Reznik in Drohiczyn, Siemiatische, Poland
Kopekin & Rifczes in Lemberg, Vienna, Polatsk, and Besonkovich
Familiant and Koifman in Bessarabia and Ukraine
Sondak in Vitebsk, Belarus and Rehitza, Latvia
Aginsky and Slonimsky in Minsk

--------------------- ORIGINAL MESSAGE ------------------

Subject: WEINTRAUB >from ZWOLEN, POLAND
From: tina levine<tsl553@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2017 23:05:58 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 2

I was told by my mother in law that none of her family survived the holocaust.
While searching on a genealogy website today I found a gentleman with
the same surname as her and >from the same town in Poland (Zwolen, near
Radom.) Now I'm wondering if they might have been cousins.

Her parents were Isaak and Feiga Weintraub.
The gentleman's name was Josef Weintraub, >from Zwolen Poland, born 1922
to Shulem and Malka, nee Zeidenbaum. He immigrated to Sao Paulo, Brazil
in 1946 >from Italy.

Anyone have suggestions for searching his descendants to see if there
is a link to my mother-in-law's family?

Tina Pachter Levine
NYC

Searching: Weintraub >from Zwolen, Poland


SITE CITE reminder - Jewish cemeteries in Hessen #germany

Reuven Stern
 

Moderator note: The following link appears at the end of
every GerSIG list message.
Message ARCHIVES - http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop

Use it to search all GerSIG messages posted since 1998. The archives
include many references to the Hessen Cemetery website which went on line
circa 2007. Some of these messages include user guides and tips.

from the link below, you can be taken to the sub-site for each included
Jewish cemetery in Hessen by entering the name of the cemetery location
in the search box and clicking " Einfache Suche " [ simple search ].

Dear Fellow GerSIGers,
I have been following the messages in this SIG for some time
and found the data flow quite interesting and useful.
This is my first post. A friend gave me this link to
Landesgeschichtliches informations sysyem (LAGIS) Hessen
I found this resource very useful in particular the section titled

Juedisch Grabstaetten (Jewish Cemeteries [in Hessen])

http://www.lagis-hessen.de/de/subjects/index/sn/juf

Here you can find photos of all Jewish gravestones in the land of Hessen.
Most gravestones are transcribed and the Hebrew text translated
into German. The cemetery and the location for each gravestone is mentioned.
Some of the entries also have a brief biography and
cross reference to other persons who's gravestones are in this database.

I found the gravestones of several of my ancestors and was able to close
some gaps in my family tree. I have not yet explored other entries in
the database but it seems there is a lot of information there in
a relatively easy to use interface. There is an "English button"
but only a small part of the text is available in English.

Reuven Stern <restern@013.net>


German SIG #Germany SITE CITE reminder - Jewish cemeteries in Hessen #germany

Reuven Stern
 

Moderator note: The following link appears at the end of
every GerSIG list message.
Message ARCHIVES - http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop

Use it to search all GerSIG messages posted since 1998. The archives
include many references to the Hessen Cemetery website which went on line
circa 2007. Some of these messages include user guides and tips.

from the link below, you can be taken to the sub-site for each included
Jewish cemetery in Hessen by entering the name of the cemetery location
in the search box and clicking " Einfache Suche " [ simple search ].

Dear Fellow GerSIGers,
I have been following the messages in this SIG for some time
and found the data flow quite interesting and useful.
This is my first post. A friend gave me this link to
Landesgeschichtliches informations sysyem (LAGIS) Hessen
I found this resource very useful in particular the section titled

Juedisch Grabstaetten (Jewish Cemeteries [in Hessen])

http://www.lagis-hessen.de/de/subjects/index/sn/juf

Here you can find photos of all Jewish gravestones in the land of Hessen.
Most gravestones are transcribed and the Hebrew text translated
into German. The cemetery and the location for each gravestone is mentioned.
Some of the entries also have a brief biography and
cross reference to other persons who's gravestones are in this database.

I found the gravestones of several of my ancestors and was able to close
some gaps in my family tree. I have not yet explored other entries in
the database but it seems there is a lot of information there in
a relatively easy to use interface. There is an "English button"
but only a small part of the text is available in English.

Reuven Stern <restern@013.net>


Prague questions #austria-czech

T R
 

Dear friends,

I am searching for any information on the following people:
My great aunt and uncle, Valerie Roth Schwarz and Hugo Schwarz.
They were >from Vienna and ended up in Prague where I've yet to
find any further information on them. I believe Hugo was an engineer.

Valerie's mother, Berta Steinmann Roth, I recently discovered died in Prague.
Her death or burial date is Feb. 1942. She was buried in the New Jewish Cemetery.
While some of the family got out of Wien before the Anschluss, and some
were able to obtain visas elsewhere, these three somehow ended up in Prague.
Given the horrible conditions as of early 1942, how could Berta have been
buried in the new cemetery with an accurate record?
Any insights to these mysteries are very welcome.
Many thanks,
Tanya Roland

Researching ROTH, ROSENBERG, STEINMANN, SPERLING, REICH, ROTHENBERG, ROSENSWEIG,
ROLAND, SCHWARZ, LEER, ZEIMER, ROSEWICZ, LATEK, CZERNY








"To do is to be - Sartre
To be is to do - Heidegger
Do be do be do - Sinatra"
O.E.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Prague questions #austria-czech

T R
 

Dear friends,

I am searching for any information on the following people:
My great aunt and uncle, Valerie Roth Schwarz and Hugo Schwarz.
They were >from Vienna and ended up in Prague where I've yet to
find any further information on them. I believe Hugo was an engineer.

Valerie's mother, Berta Steinmann Roth, I recently discovered died in Prague.
Her death or burial date is Feb. 1942. She was buried in the New Jewish Cemetery.
While some of the family got out of Wien before the Anschluss, and some
were able to obtain visas elsewhere, these three somehow ended up in Prague.
Given the horrible conditions as of early 1942, how could Berta have been
buried in the new cemetery with an accurate record?
Any insights to these mysteries are very welcome.
Many thanks,
Tanya Roland

Researching ROTH, ROSENBERG, STEINMANN, SPERLING, REICH, ROTHENBERG, ROSENSWEIG,
ROLAND, SCHWARZ, LEER, ZEIMER, ROSEWICZ, LATEK, CZERNY








"To do is to be - Sartre
To be is to do - Heidegger
Do be do be do - Sinatra"
O.E.


Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Conference Update #3 -- Technology & DNA #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear Friends,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During the weeks following the conference, we
are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some of
the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.

Today I would like to focus on technology. As previously announced,
this past February, JewishGen began implementing a comprehensive,
system-wide, technological modernization plan, which will propel us
into a new growth phase, grant us the ability to leverage new
technologies, and dramatically improve the user interface and how we
present information. As part of this plan, we are seeking an
additional software developer/engineer. This position was first
announced at the IAJGS conference, and will be based in NY at
JewishGen headquarters (at the Museum of Jewish Heritage). More
information about this job can be found here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/jobs.html

The first phase of the modernization effort is scheduled to be completed
by early spring of 2018. Many components of this project have already
been completed, such as improvements to the JewishGen Family Finder and
Jewish Communities database. Upon completion of the first phase, we will
begin to focus on improving efficiency and the user experience. This is
an extremely exciting time for JewishGen. This new focus on our
technological infrastructure will help set the stage for many years of
growth and productivity on behalf of the broader Jewish community, and
we are truly privileged to be engaged in this work.

On the topic of technology --
In recent years, much progress and many success stories have occurred
due to a combination of technological advancements in the field of
genetic genealogy, coupled with a dramatic reduction in cost to access
such services. For this reason, genetic genealogy has become a powerful
tool in the arsenal of dedicated family historians, and JewishGen has
taken steps to assist JewishGenners take a deeper dive in this area. As
a result, we have amplified our agreement with FamilyTreeDNA to more
easily and effectively connect JewishGen users with the information
from genetic genealogical research.
As many long-time members of the JewishGen family are aware,
FamilyTreeDNA and JewishGen have a long history together. So we are
very pleased to continue our relationship. Here is how it will work.

(1) We have created a new page at www.JewishGen.org/DNA
(2) Visitors to this page will be able to learn a little about DNA
research and purchase a test.
(3) We will be adding additional explanatory InfoFiles about DNA
testing in the coming months.

While this is exciting and just the beginning of what we expect will
be further opportunities for JewishGen and FamilyTreeDNA to work
together, it is important to stress that genetic genealogy is still
most effectively employed in conjunction with traditional research.
Genetic similarities can often lead to confusing and/or misleading
results. This is a particularly acute challenge when taking into
consideration the fact that Jews traditionally marry other Jews,
thus creating multiple family connections between individuals, and
thousands of possible matches when performing DNA testing.

We therefore encourage JewishGen users who wish to explore DNA
research to take full advantage of this new opportunity with
FamilyTreeDNA, but to do so in conjunction with traditional research
on JewishGen.

I would like to thank Bennett Greenspan (President of Family Tree DNA)
and his team for their incredible cooperation -- we look forward to
announcing further integrated initiatives with them in the months ahead.

Please stay tuned for more updates!

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org
646-437-4326 (Direct)
646-494-5972 (Main)
845-558-1948 (Cell)
agroll@JewishGen.org


Early American SIG #USA Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Early American SIG #USA Conference Update #3 -- Technology & DNA #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear Friends,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During the weeks following the conference, we
are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some of
the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.

Today I would like to focus on technology. As previously announced,
this past February, JewishGen began implementing a comprehensive,
system-wide, technological modernization plan, which will propel us
into a new growth phase, grant us the ability to leverage new
technologies, and dramatically improve the user interface and how we
present information. As part of this plan, we are seeking an
additional software developer/engineer. This position was first
announced at the IAJGS conference, and will be based in NY at
JewishGen headquarters (at the Museum of Jewish Heritage). More
information about this job can be found here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/jobs.html

The first phase of the modernization effort is scheduled to be completed
by early spring of 2018. Many components of this project have already
been completed, such as improvements to the JewishGen Family Finder and
Jewish Communities database. Upon completion of the first phase, we will
begin to focus on improving efficiency and the user experience. This is
an extremely exciting time for JewishGen. This new focus on our
technological infrastructure will help set the stage for many years of
growth and productivity on behalf of the broader Jewish community, and
we are truly privileged to be engaged in this work.

On the topic of technology --
In recent years, much progress and many success stories have occurred
due to a combination of technological advancements in the field of
genetic genealogy, coupled with a dramatic reduction in cost to access
such services. For this reason, genetic genealogy has become a powerful
tool in the arsenal of dedicated family historians, and JewishGen has
taken steps to assist JewishGenners take a deeper dive in this area. As
a result, we have amplified our agreement with FamilyTreeDNA to more
easily and effectively connect JewishGen users with the information
from genetic genealogical research.
As many long-time members of the JewishGen family are aware,
FamilyTreeDNA and JewishGen have a long history together. So we are
very pleased to continue our relationship. Here is how it will work.

(1) We have created a new page at www.JewishGen.org/DNA
(2) Visitors to this page will be able to learn a little about DNA
research and purchase a test.
(3) We will be adding additional explanatory InfoFiles about DNA
testing in the coming months.

While this is exciting and just the beginning of what we expect will
be further opportunities for JewishGen and FamilyTreeDNA to work
together, it is important to stress that genetic genealogy is still
most effectively employed in conjunction with traditional research.
Genetic similarities can often lead to confusing and/or misleading
results. This is a particularly acute challenge when taking into
consideration the fact that Jews traditionally marry other Jews,
thus creating multiple family connections between individuals, and
thousands of possible matches when performing DNA testing.

We therefore encourage JewishGen users who wish to explore DNA
research to take full advantage of this new opportunity with
FamilyTreeDNA, but to do so in conjunction with traditional research
on JewishGen.

I would like to thank Bennett Greenspan (President of Family Tree DNA)
and his team for their incredible cooperation -- we look forward to
announcing further integrated initiatives with them in the months ahead.

Please stay tuned for more updates!

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org
646-437-4326 (Direct)
646-494-5972 (Main)
845-558-1948 (Cell)
agroll@JewishGen.org


JewishGen Ignition & Signature Grants - Applications Now Open! #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

We are very pleased to announce that the application for JewishGen
Ignition & Signature Grants is now open. The goal of this program is
to stimulate and unleash a variety of new initiatives, productivity
and creativity which will result in additional records being
accessible on JewishGen's award-winning databases, and to expand this
effort beyond our traditional sources of material. As a result, all
Jewish genealogical and historical societies, as well as any
community based organizations, such as a synagogues, schools and
libraries, are encouraged to apply.

JewishGen will be offering ignition grants up to $5,000 and signature
grants of up to $25,000 for exceptional applications. Projects can
focus on primary or secondary records, and are not restricted by any
specific geographic location.

from the beginning, JewishGen has been the pioneer and the leader of
Jewish genealogy. Our databases are unmatched, and we have innovated
new tools, new methods, and new concepts which have benefited
thousands of people. This new program follows in that tradition, and
we look forward to seeing what type of applications come in.

Applications are being accepted now through November 15, 2017.
Winners will be announced in January of 2018.

Then online grant application can be accessed by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/grants2017.html

Wishing you all the best,

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Early American SIG #USA JewishGen Ignition & Signature Grants - Applications Now Open! #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

We are very pleased to announce that the application for JewishGen
Ignition & Signature Grants is now open. The goal of this program is
to stimulate and unleash a variety of new initiatives, productivity
and creativity which will result in additional records being
accessible on JewishGen's award-winning databases, and to expand this
effort beyond our traditional sources of material. As a result, all
Jewish genealogical and historical societies, as well as any
community based organizations, such as a synagogues, schools and
libraries, are encouraged to apply.

JewishGen will be offering ignition grants up to $5,000 and signature
grants of up to $25,000 for exceptional applications. Projects can
focus on primary or secondary records, and are not restricted by any
specific geographic location.

from the beginning, JewishGen has been the pioneer and the leader of
Jewish genealogy. Our databases are unmatched, and we have innovated
new tools, new methods, and new concepts which have benefited
thousands of people. This new program follows in that tradition, and
we look forward to seeing what type of applications come in.

Applications are being accepted now through November 15, 2017.
Winners will be announced in January of 2018.

Then online grant application can be accessed by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/grants2017.html

Wishing you all the best,

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


OPPENHEIMERs of 16-17th century Worms #general

David Dubin <davidmdubin@...>
 

Hi all,

Please help with some stumbling blocks in two families >from which many
of us are descended: the OPPENHEIMERs and the BALLINs of Worms,
Germany. Please help me understand the following about the OPPENHEIMERs:

1- Ettlinger's Ele Toldot, a fantastic source of information about
Frankfurt Jewry of the 12th -18th centuries, has two contemporary
listings for Loeb OPPENHEIMER, one (died 1574) who was the son of
Majer & Gutlin and who became an apostate named Paulus Renatus, and
one (died 1572 or 1573) without parents listed who was married to
Sorle. All OPPENHEIMER trees that I have come across seem to conflate
the two, making one person, married to Sorle and son of Majer &
Gutlin, thereby extending the ancestor tree a few more generations.
Where is the source for doing so?

2- In the Gruener buch >from Worms (Rosenthal's transcription), two
major figures named (Simon) Wolf OPPENHEIM appear. Both are lauded in
the highest terms. One died in 1596, and one was likely born in about
that year (his parents Josef Jehuda and Frumet married in the 1590s)
and died in 1664. The latter is the grandfather of his namesake of
even greater renown, the banker who died in Hanover in 1726. It stands
to reason that there was a family connection between the two earlier
Simon Wolfs, and it even is likely that the second was named for the
first. Yet I see no listing of the earlier Simon Wolf in any
OPPENHEIMER tree. Does anyone know where he belongs in the family?

Thank you for your help. I will ask about my BALLIN issues in a subsequent post.

David Dubin
Teaneck, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen OPPENHEIMERs of 16-17th century Worms #general

David Dubin <davidmdubin@...>
 

Hi all,

Please help with some stumbling blocks in two families >from which many
of us are descended: the OPPENHEIMERs and the BALLINs of Worms,
Germany. Please help me understand the following about the OPPENHEIMERs:

1- Ettlinger's Ele Toldot, a fantastic source of information about
Frankfurt Jewry of the 12th -18th centuries, has two contemporary
listings for Loeb OPPENHEIMER, one (died 1574) who was the son of
Majer & Gutlin and who became an apostate named Paulus Renatus, and
one (died 1572 or 1573) without parents listed who was married to
Sorle. All OPPENHEIMER trees that I have come across seem to conflate
the two, making one person, married to Sorle and son of Majer &
Gutlin, thereby extending the ancestor tree a few more generations.
Where is the source for doing so?

2- In the Gruener buch >from Worms (Rosenthal's transcription), two
major figures named (Simon) Wolf OPPENHEIM appear. Both are lauded in
the highest terms. One died in 1596, and one was likely born in about
that year (his parents Josef Jehuda and Frumet married in the 1590s)
and died in 1664. The latter is the grandfather of his namesake of
even greater renown, the banker who died in Hanover in 1726. It stands
to reason that there was a family connection between the two earlier
Simon Wolfs, and it even is likely that the second was named for the
first. Yet I see no listing of the earlier Simon Wolf in any
OPPENHEIMER tree. Does anyone know where he belongs in the family?

Thank you for your help. I will ask about my BALLIN issues in a subsequent post.

David Dubin
Teaneck, NJ

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