Date   

Fleeing the Nazis: Austrian Jewish Refugees to the United States Symposium #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

Thank goodness my parents, grandparents and other family members escaped >from
Vienna between 1938 and 1940 after the Anschluss.

Tony Hausner


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Fleeing the Nazis: Austrian Jewish Refugees to the United States Symposium #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

Thank goodness my parents, grandparents and other family members escaped >from
Vienna between 1938 and 1940 after the Anschluss.

Tony Hausner


Re: BERNSTEIN, BARER - Podkamen and Ihrowica #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Bonnie Birns wrote:

(...)

2 questions I have for the group:

1. Josef and Sam were born in the neighboring town of Ihrowica, not
Podkamen. Since their father Sholom was a vintner, I believe he may have
been farming land outside of Podkamen.

2. Their house number in Ihrowica has the phrase "obszar dworski".
Does anyone have an explanation of what this means? Did they own the
land or just farm it for a landlord?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Bonnie,

Polish "Obszar dworski" translates literally as the territory of a manorial
estate.

This territory was excluded >from the borders of rural communes in which
the landowner performed administrative and judicial functions.

In 1869 Onufry Turkell was a major landowner in Ihrowica. Data shows
1,225 residents in Ihrowica commune and 84 residents located on the
manorial estate.

According to 1900 census, Ihrowica had 1,954 residents, including 42
Jews, and manorial estate had 99 residents, including 38 Jews.

Post WWI, first independent Poland census in 1921 shows total Ihrowice
population of 2,301 folks, including 46 Jews. The manorial estate
population was not counted separately. The landowner during this period
was Polish aristocrat Jerzy Grocholski who was also listed as owner of
the land in Zarudzie near Tarnopol.

Jewish people residing within the manorial estate were known as
"economs" and were engaged in the estate management.

Sholom, the vintner was most probably engaged in an alcohol distillery
business located within the estate. Alcohol production was the main
industrial activity in this part of the world.

Hope this helps,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: BERNSTEIN, BARER - Podkamen and Ihrowica #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Bonnie Birns wrote:

(...)

2 questions I have for the group:

1. Josef and Sam were born in the neighboring town of Ihrowica, not
Podkamen. Since their father Sholom was a vintner, I believe he may have
been farming land outside of Podkamen.

2. Their house number in Ihrowica has the phrase "obszar dworski".
Does anyone have an explanation of what this means? Did they own the
land or just farm it for a landlord?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Bonnie,

Polish "Obszar dworski" translates literally as the territory of a manorial
estate.

This territory was excluded >from the borders of rural communes in which
the landowner performed administrative and judicial functions.

In 1869 Onufry Turkell was a major landowner in Ihrowica. Data shows
1,225 residents in Ihrowica commune and 84 residents located on the
manorial estate.

According to 1900 census, Ihrowica had 1,954 residents, including 42
Jews, and manorial estate had 99 residents, including 38 Jews.

Post WWI, first independent Poland census in 1921 shows total Ihrowice
population of 2,301 folks, including 46 Jews. The manorial estate
population was not counted separately. The landowner during this period
was Polish aristocrat Jerzy Grocholski who was also listed as owner of
the land in Zarudzie near Tarnopol.

Jewish people residing within the manorial estate were known as
"economs" and were engaged in the estate management.

Sholom, the vintner was most probably engaged in an alcohol distillery
business located within the estate. Alcohol production was the main
industrial activity in this part of the world.

Hope this helps,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: Visit JewishGen’s New Website!

Phyllis Kramer
 

alan posted:
Also, a Radius Search requires starting from a particular latitude and longitude, which makes sense. But if, for instance, I have found a good starting point by locating what I think is a town in the same area and have its latitude and longitude, I cannot copy and paste those coordinates into the Radius Search dialog.

but alan...the latitude/longitude is 4 digits. just type them in...no need to paste.

On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 9:49 PM Alan Shuchat <ahs613@...> wrote:
Here are two suggestions about searching for towns that I hope can be implemented as the website is developed. If I want to look for a town that's more than 10 miles from a given place, I need to do a Radius Search. But I think the only way to get to the Radius Search page is from https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/, the Communities main page. Neither the Communities page nor the Radius Search page is on the list of all databases (perhaps because they do not involve different databases). The Communities page is accessible from https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp, the Town Finder page.

Also, a Radius Search requires starting from a particular latitude and longitude, which makes sense. But if, for instance, I have found a good starting point by locating what I think is a town in the same area and have its latitude and longitude, I cannot copy and paste those coordinates into the Radius Search dialog.

Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA


Parents Birth Records in Warsaw Archives #poland

Fred Huss
 

Hello Siggers,

I recently sent an email to the Polish archives in Warsaw to ask for
help locating the birth records for both of my parents.
I received an answer >from them that stated a birth record was found
for my mother, and I would need to send evidence of who her parents
were and documents proving she is my mother. That I'll be able to
do.
What they also stated is that I would need to have a correspondent
from Europe or Poland who would represent my interests in order to
pursue the retrieval if the records. (They attached a form for
someone to sign, I guess to agree to be my representative).
Any ideas how I could best move forward with this.

Send answers to my private email

Fred Huss
Chicago, IL

HUSS, SILBER, GLOGER, LADENHEIM, FETTNER, WITTES, JURMANN, DIENER
All >from Horodenka, Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Parents Birth Records in Warsaw Archives #poland

Fred Huss
 

Hello Siggers,

I recently sent an email to the Polish archives in Warsaw to ask for
help locating the birth records for both of my parents.
I received an answer >from them that stated a birth record was found
for my mother, and I would need to send evidence of who her parents
were and documents proving she is my mother. That I'll be able to
do.
What they also stated is that I would need to have a correspondent
from Europe or Poland who would represent my interests in order to
pursue the retrieval if the records. (They attached a form for
someone to sign, I guess to agree to be my representative).
Any ideas how I could best move forward with this.

Send answers to my private email

Fred Huss
Chicago, IL

HUSS, SILBER, GLOGER, LADENHEIM, FETTNER, WITTES, JURMANN, DIENER
All >from Horodenka, Poland


NEINKEN-searching country of origin #general

Elizabeth Scofield
 

Is there a source that identifies countries of origin for last names?
Online, I've traced NEINKEN to Lithuania, but personal belongings
indicate Latvia. Recently, I saw a document suggesting Neinken is of
German origin.

Any suggestions? Thank you.

Liz Scofield
Bethlehem, PA, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NEINKEN-searching country of origin #general

Elizabeth Scofield
 

Is there a source that identifies countries of origin for last names?
Online, I've traced NEINKEN to Lithuania, but personal belongings
indicate Latvia. Recently, I saw a document suggesting Neinken is of
German origin.

Any suggestions? Thank you.

Liz Scofield
Bethlehem, PA, USA


This week's Yizkor book spotlight on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Anne Vaccari
 

At the end of each week, we have been featuring excerpts >from Yizkor
books in JewishGen's archive. (If you are not familiar with the
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project, please click on this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/faq.html )

"The Past Revisited" >from the Yizkor book of Piotrkow, Poland is
another story of a return "home" after the war and the Holocaust. Ben
Giladi walked the streets that had once been alive with Jewish shops
and street life but "now everything was closed and empty." He
remembered the delicatessen where "delicious wursht and parovkes had
been a gastronomical treat." He saw the schoolyard where he had seen
Jews being killed. The synagogue still stood but was roofless and with
its interior destroyed. "Such are the memories we cherish," he wrote.
"They are more than nostalgia for a home town. They are the memories
of our earliest beginnings. Earliest beginnings may not always be
pleasant, but they remind us of our youth and of our flesh and blood.
We honor these all the days of our lives." You can find it here:
https://tinyurl.com/y3wdma63
[MOD. NOTE: the original URL for the FaceBook post may be found at:
https://www.facebook.com/196931900328973/posts/2411474692208005/ ]

Anne Vaccari


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book spotlight on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Anne Vaccari
 

At the end of each week, we have been featuring excerpts >from Yizkor
books in JewishGen's archive. (If you are not familiar with the
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project, please click on this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/faq.html )

"The Past Revisited" >from the Yizkor book of Piotrkow, Poland is
another story of a return "home" after the war and the Holocaust. Ben
Giladi walked the streets that had once been alive with Jewish shops
and street life but "now everything was closed and empty." He
remembered the delicatessen where "delicious wursht and parovkes had
been a gastronomical treat." He saw the schoolyard where he had seen
Jews being killed. The synagogue still stood but was roofless and with
its interior destroyed. "Such are the memories we cherish," he wrote.
"They are more than nostalgia for a home town. They are the memories
of our earliest beginnings. Earliest beginnings may not always be
pleasant, but they remind us of our youth and of our flesh and blood.
We honor these all the days of our lives." You can find it here:
https://tinyurl.com/y3wdma63
[MOD. NOTE: the original URL for the FaceBook post may be found at:
https://www.facebook.com/196931900328973/posts/2411474692208005/ ]

Anne Vaccari


2019 JewishGen conference in Cleveland (2) #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Here is the second post about conference. There are going to be two
more following.

Discovering the Treasures of the Yizkor Books: Using Yizkor Books in
Genealogy Family Research (Tuesday), presented by Sheli Fain and Yefim
Kogan. Yizkor Books are compilation of articles about history of a town
or shteitl or a district, family stories, maps and photos, created by
former residents of these places. For many families it could be the
only source of information about them. Sheli Fain translated a number
of Yizkor books in to English, especially I would name one: Jews of
Kishinev. That is a terrific example of what such books consist of.
It was also published by JewishGen, and is available to purchase.

This presentation showed where the Yizkor books can be founded in the
original languages, and also some books in Translation into English.
Sheli gave an overview of a structure and content of the books.

I (Yefim K.) gave a few example of how Yizkor books helped me in my
personal genealogical research.

Why Jews >from the Former Soviet Union Often Called Russians?
(Thursday), presented by Yefim Kogan. I thought about this for some
time, but the idea to present it at the conference came last year,
when I read a label at Marc Chagall works at Fine Arts Museum. It
says Marc Chagall French, Belarussian... and in the online version:
French, born Belarus... How come Chagall became Belarus...
Belarussia was not a contry until late 20 century, he could not be a
citizen of Belarus, and if this is his ethnicity, not sure if I agree
with people who wrote it. Why not to put that he was Jewish or of
Jewish origin?

We talked about Nationality, Passport and what that meant back in the
Soviet Union and in the United States.

Texts of all presentations are going to be available soon online at
the Bessarabia SIG website. If you want to continue discussion this
and possible other questions/issues, please do so at the Bessarabia
SIG Discussion group.

To be continued... see more about other presentations I participated
and my personal experience at the conference and in Cleveland.

For our members who participated at the conference: please post your
view about the conference, presentations you liked, or not. What did
you learn in Cleveland? Also send me photos if you have >from the
conference.

Yefim Kogan and Inna Vayner
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 2019 JewishGen conference in Cleveland (2) #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Here is the second post about conference. There are going to be two
more following.

Discovering the Treasures of the Yizkor Books: Using Yizkor Books in
Genealogy Family Research (Tuesday), presented by Sheli Fain and Yefim
Kogan. Yizkor Books are compilation of articles about history of a town
or shteitl or a district, family stories, maps and photos, created by
former residents of these places. For many families it could be the
only source of information about them. Sheli Fain translated a number
of Yizkor books in to English, especially I would name one: Jews of
Kishinev. That is a terrific example of what such books consist of.
It was also published by JewishGen, and is available to purchase.

This presentation showed where the Yizkor books can be founded in the
original languages, and also some books in Translation into English.
Sheli gave an overview of a structure and content of the books.

I (Yefim K.) gave a few example of how Yizkor books helped me in my
personal genealogical research.

Why Jews >from the Former Soviet Union Often Called Russians?
(Thursday), presented by Yefim Kogan. I thought about this for some
time, but the idea to present it at the conference came last year,
when I read a label at Marc Chagall works at Fine Arts Museum. It
says Marc Chagall French, Belarussian... and in the online version:
French, born Belarus... How come Chagall became Belarus...
Belarussia was not a contry until late 20 century, he could not be a
citizen of Belarus, and if this is his ethnicity, not sure if I agree
with people who wrote it. Why not to put that he was Jewish or of
Jewish origin?

We talked about Nationality, Passport and what that meant back in the
Soviet Union and in the United States.

Texts of all presentations are going to be available soon online at
the Bessarabia SIG website. If you want to continue discussion this
and possible other questions/issues, please do so at the Bessarabia
SIG Discussion group.

To be continued... see more about other presentations I participated
and my personal experience at the conference and in Cleveland.

For our members who participated at the conference: please post your
view about the conference, presentations you liked, or not. What did
you learn in Cleveland? Also send me photos if you have >from the
conference.

Yefim Kogan and Inna Vayner
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators


test list

Juliana Berland <juliana.berland@...>
 

Hello everyone. In fact, I received an invitation to join the list & wasn't sure what it was. I thought it was attached to some administrative database work I'm doing for JewishGen, so I accepted. It took me a while to realize that this was a sort of beta testing group. So I'd like to suggest that this be made clear to folks before (as part of the invitation mail) & perhaps also afterwards (in a follow-up email), as I assume I am not the only one who didn't know what I was joining!

As for the topics/hashtags/replies... I never go online to look at lists, I only see them in my email client (Firefox, Outlook, whatever). When I reply to messages, the original message is automatically quoted below my message (see for instance here, altho I did snip out some of the message from Dick). This is set in my email client settings. Out of the 7000+ folks in the general list, is there a way to know how many read online, or is this impossible?

regards,
Juliana

On 09/08/2019 13:37, Dick Plotz wrote:
this is not the JewishGen Discussion Group. It is a test list with only 100 or so subscribers.


Re: family name

Dick Plotz
 

Sylvia, this is not the JewishGen Discussion Group. It is a test list
with only 100 or so subscribers. Send your message to
jewishgen@..., where it will go out to over 7000
subscribers.

Dick Plotz


On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 7:01 AM <sylvia.vanderhoeft@...> wrote:

Hi everyone,
I have a question. On the 1869 census of the "Footsteps of the wonder Rabbis" in Màd our ancestors are listed with the name STEIN ( only mother and children) on the Jewish Gen census 1869 they are listed as STERN and father too, this is really strange because they are obviously the same family. But this is sowing confusion in the family today, they are called STEIN. Any ideas?


Re: Nephew/aunt marriage - ASHKENAZI-TREVES/SHAPIRA #general

Dovie Gelerinter
 

All, based on the replies I'm getting, it is apparent that my request
was not clear. I will try again.

I know that Jewish law allows uncles and nieces to marry and does not
allow aunts and nephews to marry. I wasn't asking if this union was
permitted. I was specifically asking about it since it seemed
impossible to me for this to happen. I'm wondering if anyone has
specific information about this family that would shed light on the
situation.

Perhaps the aunt was only a stepsister. Perhaps the son was adopted.
Perhaps the information is wrong. I don't know.

This all happened in the 1300s and I'm not sure of locale, so not even
sure where to start looking for actual documents.

Dovie Gelerinter

On 8 Aug 2019 Dovie Gelerinter <gelerinter13@gmail.com> wrote:
I was tracing my line and ended up at the same place, two different
ways and was scratching my head over how. I finally took a step back
and figured out that I have a nephew and aunt marrying each other.

Matityahu and Marianne ASHKENAZI-TREVES, based on my info (and Geni
seems to confirm) had two daughters: Miriam and Vergentlin. Miriam
married Shmuel SHAPIRA. They had a son Shlomo. Shlomo married
Vergentlin.

Does this make sense? Can anyone verify that they know about this from
elsewhere? If so, fine, I can move on. Geni.com seems to imply this is
the case as well. It just strikes me as odd so I wanted to call it out
and ask if anyone has any information one way or the other regarding
this.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Nephew/aunt marriage - ASHKENAZI-TREVES/SHAPIRA #general

Dovie Gelerinter
 

All, based on the replies I'm getting, it is apparent that my request
was not clear. I will try again.

I know that Jewish law allows uncles and nieces to marry and does not
allow aunts and nephews to marry. I wasn't asking if this union was
permitted. I was specifically asking about it since it seemed
impossible to me for this to happen. I'm wondering if anyone has
specific information about this family that would shed light on the
situation.

Perhaps the aunt was only a stepsister. Perhaps the son was adopted.
Perhaps the information is wrong. I don't know.

This all happened in the 1300s and I'm not sure of locale, so not even
sure where to start looking for actual documents.

Dovie Gelerinter

On 8 Aug 2019 Dovie Gelerinter <gelerinter13@gmail.com> wrote:
I was tracing my line and ended up at the same place, two different
ways and was scratching my head over how. I finally took a step back
and figured out that I have a nephew and aunt marrying each other.

Matityahu and Marianne ASHKENAZI-TREVES, based on my info (and Geni
seems to confirm) had two daughters: Miriam and Vergentlin. Miriam
married Shmuel SHAPIRA. They had a son Shlomo. Shlomo married
Vergentlin.

Does this make sense? Can anyone verify that they know about this from
elsewhere? If so, fine, I can move on. Geni.com seems to imply this is
the case as well. It just strikes me as odd so I wanted to call it out
and ask if anyone has any information one way or the other regarding
this.


Looking for Belarus ELKIN \ ELKIND Searchers #general

Shel
 

Hi All,

Looking for the above who might have a female named "Siva Rina (Sylvia)" in
their tree.

There's greater likelihood the family name for which I'm looking ended with
the "d" as her son spelled it that way on a U.S. Soc. Sec. application.

Siva Rina was likely born between 1860 & 1870 in or near Borizov (Barysaw)
or Minsk, Belarus.

Siva Rina was married to a Mordechai LIPKIND & is thought to have had
between 8 and 10 children. Only 2 of the children emigrated to the U.S.
The rest appear to have been lost, either in pogroms or in the Holocaust.

There are a large number of ELKIND Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem, but I
couldn't connect any of them to "mine".

There are a number of ELKIN \ ELKIND searchers in the JGFF, so I thought
I'd start this way.

Hopefully,

Shel Bercovich
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Belarus ELKIN \ ELKIND Searchers #general

Shel
 

Hi All,

Looking for the above who might have a female named "Siva Rina (Sylvia)" in
their tree.

There's greater likelihood the family name for which I'm looking ended with
the "d" as her son spelled it that way on a U.S. Soc. Sec. application.

Siva Rina was likely born between 1860 & 1870 in or near Borizov (Barysaw)
or Minsk, Belarus.

Siva Rina was married to a Mordechai LIPKIND & is thought to have had
between 8 and 10 children. Only 2 of the children emigrated to the U.S.
The rest appear to have been lost, either in pogroms or in the Holocaust.

There are a large number of ELKIND Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem, but I
couldn't connect any of them to "mine".

There are a number of ELKIN \ ELKIND searchers in the JGFF, so I thought
I'd start this way.

Hopefully,

Shel Bercovich
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


family name

sylvia.vanderhoeft@...
 

Hi everyone,
I have a question. On the 1869 census of the "Footsteps of the wonder Rabbis" in Màd our ancestors are listed with the name STEIN ( only mother and children) on the Jewish Gen census 1869 they are listed as STERN and father too, this is really strange because they are obviously the same family. But this is sowing confusion in the family today, they are called STEIN. Any ideas?

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