Date   

Rabbi Who Opened Congress #general

Carol Novick <cnovick@...>
 

A while ago, I asked for help in identifying a relative of my grandmother's
(maiden name POMERANTZ) who was the first rabbi to open the US Congress.
Many thanks to those of you who answered! The historian at Congress informed
me that there are rabbis who open either the House or Senate. My relative
was not the first rabbi ever to do so, but he did open the House. The
historian wrote:
A Rabbi Nachum David Herman opened the House proceedings (not the Senate)
on March 7, 1950. Rabbi Herman was >from Brooklyn, NY, where he was rabbi
of the Congregation Tifereth Israel, Bedford Avenue and Clymer Street, the
largest orthodox synagogue in America at that time.

As I mentioned before, he was not the first rabbi to open a session of Congress
-- that honor goes to Rabbi Morris Jacob Raphall, who opened a session of
the House in 1860.

I have no idea how Rabbi Herman was related to my grandmother. If there
are any Jewishgenners out there with the last names of Herman and
Pomerantz
in their searches, would you please answer me privately?
Thanks,

Carol Novick
St.Johnsbury, Vt
cnovick@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rabbi Who Opened Congress #general

Carol Novick <cnovick@...>
 

A while ago, I asked for help in identifying a relative of my grandmother's
(maiden name POMERANTZ) who was the first rabbi to open the US Congress.
Many thanks to those of you who answered! The historian at Congress informed
me that there are rabbis who open either the House or Senate. My relative
was not the first rabbi ever to do so, but he did open the House. The
historian wrote:
A Rabbi Nachum David Herman opened the House proceedings (not the Senate)
on March 7, 1950. Rabbi Herman was >from Brooklyn, NY, where he was rabbi
of the Congregation Tifereth Israel, Bedford Avenue and Clymer Street, the
largest orthodox synagogue in America at that time.

As I mentioned before, he was not the first rabbi to open a session of Congress
-- that honor goes to Rabbi Morris Jacob Raphall, who opened a session of
the House in 1860.

I have no idea how Rabbi Herman was related to my grandmother. If there
are any Jewishgenners out there with the last names of Herman and
Pomerantz
in their searches, would you please answer me privately?
Thanks,

Carol Novick
St.Johnsbury, Vt
cnovick@...


Jewish Oprhanages Website Update #general

MSpearssol@...
 

Updated August 18, 1999, HNOH Welcome-Jewish Orphanages in the US at
http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh

A new page was created entitled: Archives: Records & Holdings. Some of the
information was taken >from other pages on the web site. A new section was
added of records and holdings of Cornell Medical Center in NY with
information for access.
They have archived medical records >from 1771 to present of many hospitals,
associations and institutions in NYC which are listed on this page by name.

Check out the new section for seeking old "Orphanage Friends" on the Alumni
Reunion Page. Anyone wishing to list a search or add an upcoming reunion,
please follow directions on the page for submission.

Another 50 URL links for research have also been added to the Jewish
Genealogy Page and the Other Genealogical Resources Page. Both pages have
been reformatted into many categories for easier access to finding
information.

Coming soon...many new names of children as well as staff names will be added
to the 191O Federal Census for the HOA/Hebrew Orphan Asylum in New York City.

Marge Spears-Soloff
Orlando, FL
MSpearssol@...
web site: http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh
web site e-mail: HNOHalumni@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Oprhanages Website Update #general

MSpearssol@...
 

Updated August 18, 1999, HNOH Welcome-Jewish Orphanages in the US at
http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh

A new page was created entitled: Archives: Records & Holdings. Some of the
information was taken >from other pages on the web site. A new section was
added of records and holdings of Cornell Medical Center in NY with
information for access.
They have archived medical records >from 1771 to present of many hospitals,
associations and institutions in NYC which are listed on this page by name.

Check out the new section for seeking old "Orphanage Friends" on the Alumni
Reunion Page. Anyone wishing to list a search or add an upcoming reunion,
please follow directions on the page for submission.

Another 50 URL links for research have also been added to the Jewish
Genealogy Page and the Other Genealogical Resources Page. Both pages have
been reformatted into many categories for easier access to finding
information.

Coming soon...many new names of children as well as staff names will be added
to the 191O Federal Census for the HOA/Hebrew Orphan Asylum in New York City.

Marge Spears-Soloff
Orlando, FL
MSpearssol@...
web site: http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh
web site e-mail: HNOHalumni@...


Re: ZELIG #belarus

Mikhoyel Basherives <mikhoyel@...>
 

Zelig, or in more Yiddish pronunciation Zelik, is an old name that was
derived >from the German "selig" meaning, according to my little German
dictionary: "blessed; blissfully happy; deceased,late".

You can see it in the last name Seligman. As far as I know it remains in modern Yiddish only as a male personal name or as a last name & is not used
as an adjective.

Mikhoyel Basherives
No. Calif.
searching RUFER of Bobruisk area


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: SV: ZELIG #belarus

Mikhoyel Basherives <mikhoyel@...>
 

Zelig, or in more Yiddish pronunciation Zelik, is an old name that was
derived >from the German "selig" meaning, according to my little German
dictionary: "blessed; blissfully happy; deceased,late".

You can see it in the last name Seligman. As far as I know it remains in modern Yiddish only as a male personal name or as a last name & is not used
as an adjective.

Mikhoyel Basherives
No. Calif.
searching RUFER of Bobruisk area


Re: CHERNICHOVSKY / MARGOLIN #belarus

Larry Kotz <lkotz@...>
 

I don't know if it's much help, but my father served in the Red Army during
WW2, and his Field Marshall was a very well known Jewish war hero named
CHERNICHOVSKY. He died in a plane crash sometime near the end of the war.
My father survived that crash. I'm sure there are Soviet Army records about
him.

Larry Kotz
Tucson, AZ Tel: 520-747-4417
K-Tech Aviation, Inc. Fax: 520-745-6139
lkotz@...
www.k-techav.com

Amoz Chernoff wrote:

-------------------
..(snip)..Would there be any records or data bases which could pertain to
that time for that city? Census material? Births, deaths, etc.? His
name was CHERNICHOVSKY (TSCHERNICHOVSKY) and I am trying to link him up
with the family of the well known poet, Shaul TSCHERNICHOVSKY.
... (snip)...
Second, my mother was born in 1891 in Minsk, the daughter of a wine
merchant (I believe), Mordechai MARGOLIN.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: CHERNICHOVSKY / MARGOLIN #belarus

Larry Kotz <lkotz@...>
 

I don't know if it's much help, but my father served in the Red Army during
WW2, and his Field Marshall was a very well known Jewish war hero named
CHERNICHOVSKY. He died in a plane crash sometime near the end of the war.
My father survived that crash. I'm sure there are Soviet Army records about
him.

Larry Kotz
Tucson, AZ Tel: 520-747-4417
K-Tech Aviation, Inc. Fax: 520-745-6139
lkotz@...
www.k-techav.com

Amoz Chernoff wrote:

-------------------
..(snip)..Would there be any records or data bases which could pertain to
that time for that city? Census material? Births, deaths, etc.? His
name was CHERNICHOVSKY (TSCHERNICHOVSKY) and I am trying to link him up
with the family of the well known poet, Shaul TSCHERNICHOVSKY.
... (snip)...
Second, my mother was born in 1891 in Minsk, the daughter of a wine
merchant (I believe), Mordechai MARGOLIN.


Re: Farewell to Aaron Feldbaum from the Residents of Bielovesz #belarus

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

Follow-up to the part about the cossacks, I would like to recount that my
grandmother relayed to my mother the fact that when the cossacks were around during pogroms, my grandmother's older brother, Rabbi Aharon BEGUN, and the other brothers would wrap my grandmother and her sister up in
feather blankets (or comforters) so they would be well hidden. It was also
the Rabbi who was responsible for sending them >from Pinsk to New York in l910 to get them out of harms way.

My grandmother never saw her brothers again, but I have recently located
his descendants in Israel.

Diane Glazer Jacobs


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Farewell to Aaron Feldbaum from the Residents of Bielovesz #belarus

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

Follow-up to the part about the cossacks, I would like to recount that my
grandmother relayed to my mother the fact that when the cossacks were around during pogroms, my grandmother's older brother, Rabbi Aharon BEGUN, and the other brothers would wrap my grandmother and her sister up in
feather blankets (or comforters) so they would be well hidden. It was also
the Rabbi who was responsible for sending them >from Pinsk to New York in l910 to get them out of harms way.

My grandmother never saw her brothers again, but I have recently located
his descendants in Israel.

Diane Glazer Jacobs


ZELIG, the Yiddish name #belarus

Leonid Zeliger <lzeliger@...>
 

A lot was told about the name Zelig (see JewishGen Diss.Group message
archive), but the question is coming back again and again.

ZELIG (ZELIK) is a typical and pure Yiddish name, whish derived >from
originally German:
Seele = Soul.

The first letter Z appears in Yiddish (zayin), Slavic and English as a
phonetic substitute of German S.

The Jews,who originated >from Germany, Czech, Romania, use to safe S, while
those,who migrated to East Europe, changed it to Z.

The name Zelig means in Yiddish something like:
"cordial,happy,fortunate,blessed",
so it often, but not necessarily, comes together with Hebrew name
Asher = blessed: Asher-Zelig ("ikar"&"kinuy").

The Jewish surnames SELIGSON, SELIGMAN, SELIGER ZELIGSON, ZELIGMAN, ZELIGER) derive >from that Yiddish name, while non-Jewish German surname is usually spelled SEELIGER (>from Seele).

Seliger in German means "the deceased".

The well known Jewish surname Ducovny (variants: Dukhovny, Dujovny)sounds
like Slavic (Russian, Ukrainian or Belarussian) calque >from Seeliger/Seliger. The author of this letter recalls that once he was
sitting in the bar with Amy Ducovny and one of the guests gave a long
glance and asked suddenly:

"Are you brothers?"

and Amy immediately replied:"Maybe. At least we have the same name".

The name ZELIG gives us a good example of difference between Yiddish and
German language as well as another illustration of Jewish history.

Leonid Zeliger
Jerusalem

lzeliger@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus ZELIG, the Yiddish name #belarus

Leonid Zeliger <lzeliger@...>
 

A lot was told about the name Zelig (see JewishGen Diss.Group message
archive), but the question is coming back again and again.

ZELIG (ZELIK) is a typical and pure Yiddish name, whish derived >from
originally German:
Seele = Soul.

The first letter Z appears in Yiddish (zayin), Slavic and English as a
phonetic substitute of German S.

The Jews,who originated >from Germany, Czech, Romania, use to safe S, while
those,who migrated to East Europe, changed it to Z.

The name Zelig means in Yiddish something like:
"cordial,happy,fortunate,blessed",
so it often, but not necessarily, comes together with Hebrew name
Asher = blessed: Asher-Zelig ("ikar"&"kinuy").

The Jewish surnames SELIGSON, SELIGMAN, SELIGER ZELIGSON, ZELIGMAN, ZELIGER) derive >from that Yiddish name, while non-Jewish German surname is usually spelled SEELIGER (>from Seele).

Seliger in German means "the deceased".

The well known Jewish surname Ducovny (variants: Dukhovny, Dujovny)sounds
like Slavic (Russian, Ukrainian or Belarussian) calque >from Seeliger/Seliger. The author of this letter recalls that once he was
sitting in the bar with Amy Ducovny and one of the guests gave a long
glance and asked suddenly:

"Are you brothers?"

and Amy immediately replied:"Maybe. At least we have the same name".

The name ZELIG gives us a good example of difference between Yiddish and
German language as well as another illustration of Jewish history.

Leonid Zeliger
Jerusalem

lzeliger@...


Re: Introduction #galicia

Hector Mondrik <topt@...>
 

Yoav
there aren't Jewish cemetery in San Miguel. Due the year Leib died probably
hi is buried in Liniers cemetery. I suggest you should contact the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Argentina who probably had the info.
Hector Mondrik


Latin America #LatinAmerica RE: Introduction #latinamerica

Hector Mondrik <topt@...>
 

Yoav
there aren't Jewish cemetery in San Miguel. Due the year Leib died probably
hi is buried in Liniers cemetery. I suggest you should contact the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Argentina who probably had the info.
Hector Mondrik


Re: 19th Jewish Genealogical Conference in New York #belarus

BarMUr@...
 

Although I am a novice in this group, I thank you for the report of the
Belarus SIG in New York.
Murray


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: 19th Jewish Genealogical Conference in New York #belarus

BarMUr@...
 

Although I am a novice in this group, I thank you for the report of the
Belarus SIG in New York.
Murray


*** Report From Belarus - Dave Fox- ShtetlSchlepper *** #belarus

Franklin J. Swartz <eejhp@...>
 

Date Line: Minsk
Dear Belarus SIG Members,

I am writing this message >from the home of Frank Swartz. We arrived in
Minsk on Thursday afternoon and have been going non-stop ever since.
Surviving on four or five hours of sleep. I don't have time to give a
complete report, but I want to tell that this has been one of the most
memorable trips I have ever made and I am so glad that I took the plunge to
go back to where my family left over 80 years ago. All the people, both
Jew and non-Jew alike have been wonderful, friendly, helpful, and just a
delight. I can't even imagine why I should have been apprehensive.
Risa, you will have a wonderful, productive, inspiring, emotional, and
educational experience that you will never forget.

I spent over five hours with the Director to the Belarus National Archives.
We got a complete tour of the facilities and even were allowed into the
records storage areas. I can now understand why it is so difficult to get
research completed in Belarus. There are a lot more records to help Jewish
researchers both in the Minsk and Grodno archives than previously thought.
In addition, we have found other sources in different libraries that are
easier to copy than getting information copied in the Archives, which does
not allow the wholesale coping of pages.
Can't go into complete details at this time.

Have taken lots of pictures and made audio tapes that should be of great
value to the members of the SIG.

I have in my possession, thanks to one of Vitaly Charny's friends, who
provided me a list of people purged (killed) by Stalin. It has the names,
year of birth, charges, place of residence, and sentence. Many, many pages
from the newspapers. Also a list of shtetls in Minsk gubernia, 1923, with
the number of Jews and non-Jews, maps, and a bunch of other stuff.

We visited three shtetls near Minsk today and even had a barbeque in the
forests where the Jewish partisans operated during WW II, or as they say in
Belarus, the Great Patriotic War.

The food in Minsk has been outstanding. The restaurants are clean and the
quality is very good. I don't know what it will be like once we go outside
of Minsk starting tomorrow when I leave for Mogilev and Rogchev.

Today we visited Voloshin, Rokov, and Ivnets (pardon the spellings), none
of which are my shtetls. We saw the old Yeshvia in Voloshin, which was
just returned to the Jewish community and will undergo renovation. We also saw a mass execution site with monument at a site near the river. In Rokov,
we saw the old Jewish cemetery and took lots of video, digital, and regular
photos. Many of the stones are unreadable, but others are OK.

Someone told us that there was an old wooden synaguage in Ivenets. It was a
short ride >from where we were, so off we went. After asking several
residents where to find the old synagugue, we finally located it on a back
street. It was being used a culture center (meeting hall) and the wood
front of the building was covered with stucco. The building was locked, but
we were directed to one of the last Jews living in the town. We did a video
interview with translation and sang a Yiddish song. His surname is KANTOROVICH. Its all recorded on video take.

Our driver located the shtetl museum director and he arrived at the house
of Mr. Kantorvich. He gave me an old map of the shtetl with Jewish sites
marked and numbered. He also presented me with the Memorial Book for the
region written in Belarussian. It had a list of names of Jews and non-Jews
killed by the Nazis. The governments required all regions to produce these
books. Therefore, if your shtetl in Belarus doesn't have a Yizkor Book,
these regional memorial books may provide valuable data. The local museum
director took us to the old and new Jewish cemeteries in Ivenets and
arranged to get us into the old wooden synagogue, where a fresco had just
been discovered under the plaster during some renovation. Many of the
stones in the newer cemetery were readable and the cemetery was undergoing
some renovations. - More on this later. - Again we took lots of
pictures, but members of the SIG who have an interest in Voloshin, Rokov,
and Ivenets, should definitely plan to make a trip to Belarus. Many of the
old Jewish houses are still there. Ivenets and Rokov look very much like
they did in the times when our relatives lived there, except electricity is
now available. However, outdoor plumbing is still the rule.

I can't emphasize how friendly the local population is, even in the
villages. They always had good things to say about the Jews and there is
absolutely nothing to fear.

Belarus and Russia are NOT the same.

Also found out that there are Jewish records about the WW II in the Museum
of the Great Patriotic War, but have no details yet.

I also have been promised a list of Minsk district residents >from the 1895
time frame which includes addresses.

Must go for now.

Dave

David Fox
from Minsk
Belarus SIG Co-Coordinator


Belarus SIG #Belarus *** Report From Belarus - Dave Fox- ShtetlSchlepper *** #belarus

Franklin J. Swartz <eejhp@...>
 

Date Line: Minsk
Dear Belarus SIG Members,

I am writing this message >from the home of Frank Swartz. We arrived in
Minsk on Thursday afternoon and have been going non-stop ever since.
Surviving on four or five hours of sleep. I don't have time to give a
complete report, but I want to tell that this has been one of the most
memorable trips I have ever made and I am so glad that I took the plunge to
go back to where my family left over 80 years ago. All the people, both
Jew and non-Jew alike have been wonderful, friendly, helpful, and just a
delight. I can't even imagine why I should have been apprehensive.
Risa, you will have a wonderful, productive, inspiring, emotional, and
educational experience that you will never forget.

I spent over five hours with the Director to the Belarus National Archives.
We got a complete tour of the facilities and even were allowed into the
records storage areas. I can now understand why it is so difficult to get
research completed in Belarus. There are a lot more records to help Jewish
researchers both in the Minsk and Grodno archives than previously thought.
In addition, we have found other sources in different libraries that are
easier to copy than getting information copied in the Archives, which does
not allow the wholesale coping of pages.
Can't go into complete details at this time.

Have taken lots of pictures and made audio tapes that should be of great
value to the members of the SIG.

I have in my possession, thanks to one of Vitaly Charny's friends, who
provided me a list of people purged (killed) by Stalin. It has the names,
year of birth, charges, place of residence, and sentence. Many, many pages
from the newspapers. Also a list of shtetls in Minsk gubernia, 1923, with
the number of Jews and non-Jews, maps, and a bunch of other stuff.

We visited three shtetls near Minsk today and even had a barbeque in the
forests where the Jewish partisans operated during WW II, or as they say in
Belarus, the Great Patriotic War.

The food in Minsk has been outstanding. The restaurants are clean and the
quality is very good. I don't know what it will be like once we go outside
of Minsk starting tomorrow when I leave for Mogilev and Rogchev.

Today we visited Voloshin, Rokov, and Ivnets (pardon the spellings), none
of which are my shtetls. We saw the old Yeshvia in Voloshin, which was
just returned to the Jewish community and will undergo renovation. We also saw a mass execution site with monument at a site near the river. In Rokov,
we saw the old Jewish cemetery and took lots of video, digital, and regular
photos. Many of the stones are unreadable, but others are OK.

Someone told us that there was an old wooden synaguage in Ivenets. It was a
short ride >from where we were, so off we went. After asking several
residents where to find the old synagugue, we finally located it on a back
street. It was being used a culture center (meeting hall) and the wood
front of the building was covered with stucco. The building was locked, but
we were directed to one of the last Jews living in the town. We did a video
interview with translation and sang a Yiddish song. His surname is KANTOROVICH. Its all recorded on video take.

Our driver located the shtetl museum director and he arrived at the house
of Mr. Kantorvich. He gave me an old map of the shtetl with Jewish sites
marked and numbered. He also presented me with the Memorial Book for the
region written in Belarussian. It had a list of names of Jews and non-Jews
killed by the Nazis. The governments required all regions to produce these
books. Therefore, if your shtetl in Belarus doesn't have a Yizkor Book,
these regional memorial books may provide valuable data. The local museum
director took us to the old and new Jewish cemeteries in Ivenets and
arranged to get us into the old wooden synagogue, where a fresco had just
been discovered under the plaster during some renovation. Many of the
stones in the newer cemetery were readable and the cemetery was undergoing
some renovations. - More on this later. - Again we took lots of
pictures, but members of the SIG who have an interest in Voloshin, Rokov,
and Ivenets, should definitely plan to make a trip to Belarus. Many of the
old Jewish houses are still there. Ivenets and Rokov look very much like
they did in the times when our relatives lived there, except electricity is
now available. However, outdoor plumbing is still the rule.

I can't emphasize how friendly the local population is, even in the
villages. They always had good things to say about the Jews and there is
absolutely nothing to fear.

Belarus and Russia are NOT the same.

Also found out that there are Jewish records about the WW II in the Museum
of the Great Patriotic War, but have no details yet.

I also have been promised a list of Minsk district residents >from the 1895
time frame which includes addresses.

Must go for now.

Dave

David Fox
from Minsk
Belarus SIG Co-Coordinator


Re: ZELIG #belarus

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

Hi all!

The first name Zelig is not Hebrew, but it's Yiddish. Some few Yiddish
male first names was used as ritual names, i.e. the named used when he was
"called up", in marriage documents and on the tombstone. Why there became
this exception for some few Yiddish names I don't now, maybe someone else
in the SIG knows?

At least the name Zelig is linked to the Hebrew first name Asher, I think
both means "luck" in their respective languages.

Best regards

Adam Katzeff
Malmoe, Sweden

adam.katzeff@...

Searching:
GOLDBERG: Papile, Lithuania; Parnu+Tallinn, Estonia; Sweden
KARSON: Glasgow, Scotland
KATSEV/KATZEFF/KATZOFF: Papile, Lithuania; Cesis, Latvia; Parnu+Tallinn,
Estonia; Sweden; Denmark; Glasgow, Scotland; Boston, MA, USA
NEMTSOV/NEMZOFF: Vitebsk, Belarus; Parnu, Estonia; Sweden; Denmark;
St Petersburg, Russia


Belarus SIG #Belarus SV: ZELIG #belarus

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

Hi all!

The first name Zelig is not Hebrew, but it's Yiddish. Some few Yiddish
male first names was used as ritual names, i.e. the named used when he was
"called up", in marriage documents and on the tombstone. Why there became
this exception for some few Yiddish names I don't now, maybe someone else
in the SIG knows?

At least the name Zelig is linked to the Hebrew first name Asher, I think
both means "luck" in their respective languages.

Best regards

Adam Katzeff
Malmoe, Sweden

adam.katzeff@...

Searching:
GOLDBERG: Papile, Lithuania; Parnu+Tallinn, Estonia; Sweden
KARSON: Glasgow, Scotland
KATSEV/KATZEFF/KATZOFF: Papile, Lithuania; Cesis, Latvia; Parnu+Tallinn,
Estonia; Sweden; Denmark; Glasgow, Scotland; Boston, MA, USA
NEMTSOV/NEMZOFF: Vitebsk, Belarus; Parnu, Estonia; Sweden; Denmark;
St Petersburg, Russia