Date   

FOINQUINOS family in Brazil and elsewhere #latinamerica

Alice Josephs
 

Hi

I've just joined this group to help a lady in England who does not have
access to the internet. In the past she has done research on her
ancestral FOINQUINOS (variations FOLLINQUINOS, FOYINQUINOS)who she has
traced back to Morocco and Gibraltar. However after a search of the
internet, it looks as if some FOINQUINOS families settled in Brazil in
the Amazon Basin. If there is anyone researching this family either in
Brazil or elsewhere could you please contact me privately and I will
pass on your emails to this lady.

Thanks so much!

Alice Josephs
UK
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genealice/

MODERATOR NOTE: Please check the JGFF as there are two researchers listed searching FOINQUINOS in Brazil and elsewhere. All you need do is contact them on behalf of your friend since neither of them are subscribed to this mailing list....unfortunately.


Latin America #LatinAmerica FOINQUINOS family in Brazil and elsewhere #latinamerica

Alice Josephs
 

Hi

I've just joined this group to help a lady in England who does not have
access to the internet. In the past she has done research on her
ancestral FOINQUINOS (variations FOLLINQUINOS, FOYINQUINOS)who she has
traced back to Morocco and Gibraltar. However after a search of the
internet, it looks as if some FOINQUINOS families settled in Brazil in
the Amazon Basin. If there is anyone researching this family either in
Brazil or elsewhere could you please contact me privately and I will
pass on your emails to this lady.

Thanks so much!

Alice Josephs
UK
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genealice/

MODERATOR NOTE: Please check the JGFF as there are two researchers listed searching FOINQUINOS in Brazil and elsewhere. All you need do is contact them on behalf of your friend since neither of them are subscribed to this mailing list....unfortunately.


Re: latvia digest: September 02, 2004 #latvia

Robin Joffe <jofferobin@...>
 

Dear All:

Thanks for your responses. I am still slightly confused. I mean Latvia
was occupied so of course I believe if you are born in an occupied
country you would get that citizenship but once the country reverted
then you would no longer be a citizen of that country and become a
citizen of the country of birth. >from what I know, my family, although
Jewish, have lived in Latvia hundreds of years. My grandfather never
became a US citizen so before he died in 1978 would he have had a
Russian Passport or Latvian? To find his birth certificate am I looking
in the wrong place with the Latvian archives or should I be checking
under Russian Archives?

Thanks again.

Robin Joffe


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: latvia digest: September 02, 2004 #latvia

Robin Joffe <jofferobin@...>
 

Dear All:

Thanks for your responses. I am still slightly confused. I mean Latvia
was occupied so of course I believe if you are born in an occupied
country you would get that citizenship but once the country reverted
then you would no longer be a citizen of that country and become a
citizen of the country of birth. >from what I know, my family, although
Jewish, have lived in Latvia hundreds of years. My grandfather never
became a US citizen so before he died in 1978 would he have had a
Russian Passport or Latvian? To find his birth certificate am I looking
in the wrong place with the Latvian archives or should I be checking
under Russian Archives?

Thanks again.

Robin Joffe


Re: Name equivalents #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

prof esterson's message really doesn't change my view of hungarian naming, that there is often *no* discernable connection between the hebrew and hungarian name.

the example that he gives of "adolf" to "avraham" is relatively trivial - the following pairs of names, >from just my immediate family, are not so simple:

lajos -> shlomo
geza -> moshe yaakov
eva -> sarah
erzsebet -> feigele
simon -> yehoshiyahu

as you can see, all the books of gittin cannot explain any one of them. (even the biblical names, "eva" and "simon" do not "correspond".) i would be most surprised if someone could find "geza hamechune moshe yaakov" for example.

particularly hungarian names such as aladar, attila, arpad, bela, geza, gyula, or zoltan, as opposed to hungarian versions of names >from german or hebrew, really have no equivalents outside of hungary. why jews gave their children these names is an interesting study in and of itself, but for the purposes of genealogy, it's enough that they did.

....... tom klein, toronto

"Prof. G. L. Esterson" <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il> wrote:


Jacob Michel of Israel posted as follows:

"Usually there is an equivalency of names but in the case of
Hungarian Jewry very often there is none."

This statement perhaps deserves a bit of clarification.

The concept of "equivalency" usually refers to names in different
languages "corresponding" to one another in common usage. Thus, the
Hungarian secular given name SAROLTA is "equivalent" to the German
secular given name CHARLOTTE. For Jews who lived in Hungary, this
means that some used the German name CHARLOTTE (German names were
very popular in most European countries during the 19th century),
some preferred to use the Hungarian name SAROLTA, and yet others used
both names at one time or another.

In the case of the Hungarian secular name LAJOS, the "equivalent"
German secular name recognized by the rabbis of the time was LUDWIG.
By "recognized by the rabbis" I mean, that the rabbis who wrote the
Jewish divorce laws (Hilchot Gitin) for Hungary found in their
research that (statistically) some Hungarian Jews used the German
name LUDWIG, others substituted for it the Hungarian name LAJOS, and
even others were found to use both of these names in various venues.

More importantly, as Jews we are interested in how our Hungarian
ancestors used Jewish and secular names in combination in various
venues. Statistically, the rabbis found for example that German names
like ADOLF, ALFONS, ALFRED, and ARNOLD were preferentially linked to
the Hebrew name AVRAHAM to such an extent, that the rabbis ended up
defining these German secular names as secular kinuim for the name
AVRAHAM. This meant that a man's name would be written in a Get
(Jewish divorce contract) as Avraham haMechune Adolf, for example --
his legal name. (haMechune means "alias".) This is in every respect
parallel to the use of Yiddish kinuim in double names like Yehuda
haMechune Leyb.

For the most part, it is true that throughout Europe, except for a
few special cases like Avraham and the German secular names mentioned
above, Jews felt quite free to choose any combination of Hebrew and
secular names that they wished, whether they seemed to "correspond"
to one another, whether they both began with the same consonant, or
whatever. Thus, one might expect to see the same person using LAJOS
in one civil venue, LOUIS, in another, and Mordechay within the
Jewish community.

You can see many of these "equivalents" in the Hungary Given Names
Data Base on the JewishGen web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

by searching for a few sample names like Lajos, Charlotte, Jeno,
Agathe, Alois, Bertalan, Rosanna, Balint, Amalia, Andras, Antal,
Desiderius, Edward, Gabor, and a number of other secular names from
Hungary and other European countries.


Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re: Name equivalents #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

prof esterson's message really doesn't change my view of hungarian naming, that there is often *no* discernable connection between the hebrew and hungarian name.

the example that he gives of "adolf" to "avraham" is relatively trivial - the following pairs of names, >from just my immediate family, are not so simple:

lajos -> shlomo
geza -> moshe yaakov
eva -> sarah
erzsebet -> feigele
simon -> yehoshiyahu

as you can see, all the books of gittin cannot explain any one of them. (even the biblical names, "eva" and "simon" do not "correspond".) i would be most surprised if someone could find "geza hamechune moshe yaakov" for example.

particularly hungarian names such as aladar, attila, arpad, bela, geza, gyula, or zoltan, as opposed to hungarian versions of names >from german or hebrew, really have no equivalents outside of hungary. why jews gave their children these names is an interesting study in and of itself, but for the purposes of genealogy, it's enough that they did.

....... tom klein, toronto

"Prof. G. L. Esterson" <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il> wrote:


Jacob Michel of Israel posted as follows:

"Usually there is an equivalency of names but in the case of
Hungarian Jewry very often there is none."

This statement perhaps deserves a bit of clarification.

The concept of "equivalency" usually refers to names in different
languages "corresponding" to one another in common usage. Thus, the
Hungarian secular given name SAROLTA is "equivalent" to the German
secular given name CHARLOTTE. For Jews who lived in Hungary, this
means that some used the German name CHARLOTTE (German names were
very popular in most European countries during the 19th century),
some preferred to use the Hungarian name SAROLTA, and yet others used
both names at one time or another.

In the case of the Hungarian secular name LAJOS, the "equivalent"
German secular name recognized by the rabbis of the time was LUDWIG.
By "recognized by the rabbis" I mean, that the rabbis who wrote the
Jewish divorce laws (Hilchot Gitin) for Hungary found in their
research that (statistically) some Hungarian Jews used the German
name LUDWIG, others substituted for it the Hungarian name LAJOS, and
even others were found to use both of these names in various venues.

More importantly, as Jews we are interested in how our Hungarian
ancestors used Jewish and secular names in combination in various
venues. Statistically, the rabbis found for example that German names
like ADOLF, ALFONS, ALFRED, and ARNOLD were preferentially linked to
the Hebrew name AVRAHAM to such an extent, that the rabbis ended up
defining these German secular names as secular kinuim for the name
AVRAHAM. This meant that a man's name would be written in a Get
(Jewish divorce contract) as Avraham haMechune Adolf, for example --
his legal name. (haMechune means "alias".) This is in every respect
parallel to the use of Yiddish kinuim in double names like Yehuda
haMechune Leyb.

For the most part, it is true that throughout Europe, except for a
few special cases like Avraham and the German secular names mentioned
above, Jews felt quite free to choose any combination of Hebrew and
secular names that they wished, whether they seemed to "correspond"
to one another, whether they both began with the same consonant, or
whatever. Thus, one might expect to see the same person using LAJOS
in one civil venue, LOUIS, in another, and Mordechay within the
Jewish community.

You can see many of these "equivalents" in the Hungary Given Names
Data Base on the JewishGen web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

by searching for a few sample names like Lajos, Charlotte, Jeno,
Agathe, Alois, Bertalan, Rosanna, Balint, Amalia, Andras, Antal,
Desiderius, Edward, Gabor, and a number of other secular names from
Hungary and other European countries.


Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Stamfer, Mohrer, and Zerkovitz -- Budapest #hungary

Robert Hanscom <rodihan@...>
 

Thanks to a recent posting by Itzik Katz referencing the Klarsfeld
website (http://www.neveklarsfeld.org/) I have been able to successfully
track down two nieces of my great-grandfather, Simon TAUBER (1844-1930).
One of them was Ella (DEUTSCH), b. c.1896, wife of Jozsef STAMFER, b.
1893. The Klarsfeld database lists both Ella and Jozsef Stamfer as
"survivors" and provides an address of 48 Posa Lajos, presumably in
Budapest. Ella was the daughter of Simon Tauber's youngest sister,
Helena [Ilona] / "Leni" (TAUBER), b. Trencin, 1860, wife of Leopold
DEUTSCH of Budapest.

The other relative I discovered was Edith MOHRER, b. in Budapest in the
1920s, daughter of Aranka (ZERKOVITZ) MOHRER, b. Budapest, 1891. Aranka
was the daughter of Simon's other sister, Katharina (TAUBER), b. Trencin,
1854, d. Budapest, 1926, wife of Philip ZERKOVITZ. Edith Mohrer is also
listed as a survivor, and was residing at 10 Dohany, Budapest, with her
two unmarried aunts, Frida Zerkovitz (b. 1885) and Josefa Zerkovitz
(1894-1959), following the war.

Is anyone familiar with the STAMFER, MOHRER, and ZERKOVITZ families of
Budapest? I would like to continue my efforts to locate descendants of
these people. Please reply privately.

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts USA

Researching (all >from Trencin Co.): Tauber, Zerkowitz, Knopfelmacher,
Kohn, Frankl-Kohn, Teschner, Lazar, Wilhelm, Popper, Zwillinger


Hungary SIG #Hungary Stamfer, Mohrer, and Zerkovitz -- Budapest #hungary

Robert Hanscom <rodihan@...>
 

Thanks to a recent posting by Itzik Katz referencing the Klarsfeld
website (http://www.neveklarsfeld.org/) I have been able to successfully
track down two nieces of my great-grandfather, Simon TAUBER (1844-1930).
One of them was Ella (DEUTSCH), b. c.1896, wife of Jozsef STAMFER, b.
1893. The Klarsfeld database lists both Ella and Jozsef Stamfer as
"survivors" and provides an address of 48 Posa Lajos, presumably in
Budapest. Ella was the daughter of Simon Tauber's youngest sister,
Helena [Ilona] / "Leni" (TAUBER), b. Trencin, 1860, wife of Leopold
DEUTSCH of Budapest.

The other relative I discovered was Edith MOHRER, b. in Budapest in the
1920s, daughter of Aranka (ZERKOVITZ) MOHRER, b. Budapest, 1891. Aranka
was the daughter of Simon's other sister, Katharina (TAUBER), b. Trencin,
1854, d. Budapest, 1926, wife of Philip ZERKOVITZ. Edith Mohrer is also
listed as a survivor, and was residing at 10 Dohany, Budapest, with her
two unmarried aunts, Frida Zerkovitz (b. 1885) and Josefa Zerkovitz
(1894-1959), following the war.

Is anyone familiar with the STAMFER, MOHRER, and ZERKOVITZ families of
Budapest? I would like to continue my efforts to locate descendants of
these people. Please reply privately.

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts USA

Researching (all >from Trencin Co.): Tauber, Zerkowitz, Knopfelmacher,
Kohn, Frankl-Kohn, Teschner, Lazar, Wilhelm, Popper, Zwillinger


Given name of SCHEI #hungary

Robert Hanscom <rodihan@...>
 

Can anyone help me with context on the given name of "Schei"? I am
trying to determine if a resident of the city of Trencin in 1782 was
identical with one of my ancestors. Here is the entry >from the Jewish
census, taken on 16 January 1782:

Name: Schei Feitl, "ivcestor pauper"
Wife: Eszter
Daughter: Gidtll

I am trying to make the case that Schei Feitl was Simon KOHN-ZERKOWITZ, a
native of Weisskirchen, Moravia. Simon moved to Trencin sometime between
1772 and 1782, and was robbed and murdered -- prior to 1795 -- on a
journey to Leipzig. His father's name was Feitel KOHN-ZERKOWITZ
(1726-1809), so that part fits. What I'm trying to learn is whether
"Schei" might have been an equivalent to the given name of "Simon". Any
help with this would be appreciated.

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts

Researching (all in Trencin Co.): Tauber, Zerkowitz, Knopfelmacher,
Kohn, Frankl-Kohn, Teschner, Lazar, Wilhelm, Popper, Zwillinger


Hungary SIG #Hungary Given name of SCHEI #hungary

Robert Hanscom <rodihan@...>
 

Can anyone help me with context on the given name of "Schei"? I am
trying to determine if a resident of the city of Trencin in 1782 was
identical with one of my ancestors. Here is the entry >from the Jewish
census, taken on 16 January 1782:

Name: Schei Feitl, "ivcestor pauper"
Wife: Eszter
Daughter: Gidtll

I am trying to make the case that Schei Feitl was Simon KOHN-ZERKOWITZ, a
native of Weisskirchen, Moravia. Simon moved to Trencin sometime between
1772 and 1782, and was robbed and murdered -- prior to 1795 -- on a
journey to Leipzig. His father's name was Feitel KOHN-ZERKOWITZ
(1726-1809), so that part fits. What I'm trying to learn is whether
"Schei" might have been an equivalent to the given name of "Simon". Any
help with this would be appreciated.

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts

Researching (all in Trencin Co.): Tauber, Zerkowitz, Knopfelmacher,
Kohn, Frankl-Kohn, Teschner, Lazar, Wilhelm, Popper, Zwillinger


Re: ukraine digest: September 01, 2004 #ukraine

SonyaMSKP@...
 

My mother Faige/Fannie SCHREIBER, born in Vakhnovka, Podolia Gubernia, who
lived with an older sister's family in Vinnitsa, Ukraine, for ca. ten years
before emigrating to the U.S. said that she missed the boat in Bremen and had to
remain there about six weeks until the next boat sailed. The story is that
some lady she met on the train >from Russia invited her to stay in her home - on a
cot in the kitchen, taking care of the family's children until she could
leave. Her ship's manifest, which I have, gives her last place of residence as
Vinnitsa, c/o her sister's BORISOV family.

Sonia Pasis
Rockville, Md

Searching:
Berdichev-KURTZ, PASIS/PASSIS
Buchne/Medzibodz/Letichev/Rovno-COHEN/KLATZ,
CUPCOW/KUPSOW (diff. spellings), FISHMAN, SOKOLOFF
Kalinovka, Vakhnovka-CHERNOV, FURMAN, MUCHNIK, SCHREIBER
Lutsk-SOKOLOFF
Ukraine-COHEN/KAGAN
Vinnitsa-BORISOV/BORISHEVSKY, GORDON/GORDISHEFSKY

Original Message: I wonder if many Jews took up residence briefly in locations other than their
actual shtetlach of origin before departing for the US or other
countries. Did they move somewhere in order to earn money for passage? Did
they escape to border areas in order to elude Russian government authorities
and avoid passport hassles? Or did they simply indicate the town where they
lodged a few nights before sailing as their "last residence"?
Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net
Cherry Hill, NJ


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: ukraine digest: September 01, 2004 #ukraine

SonyaMSKP@...
 

My mother Faige/Fannie SCHREIBER, born in Vakhnovka, Podolia Gubernia, who
lived with an older sister's family in Vinnitsa, Ukraine, for ca. ten years
before emigrating to the U.S. said that she missed the boat in Bremen and had to
remain there about six weeks until the next boat sailed. The story is that
some lady she met on the train >from Russia invited her to stay in her home - on a
cot in the kitchen, taking care of the family's children until she could
leave. Her ship's manifest, which I have, gives her last place of residence as
Vinnitsa, c/o her sister's BORISOV family.

Sonia Pasis
Rockville, Md

Searching:
Berdichev-KURTZ, PASIS/PASSIS
Buchne/Medzibodz/Letichev/Rovno-COHEN/KLATZ,
CUPCOW/KUPSOW (diff. spellings), FISHMAN, SOKOLOFF
Kalinovka, Vakhnovka-CHERNOV, FURMAN, MUCHNIK, SCHREIBER
Lutsk-SOKOLOFF
Ukraine-COHEN/KAGAN
Vinnitsa-BORISOV/BORISHEVSKY, GORDON/GORDISHEFSKY

Original Message: I wonder if many Jews took up residence briefly in locations other than their
actual shtetlach of origin before departing for the US or other
countries. Did they move somewhere in order to earn money for passage? Did
they escape to border areas in order to elude Russian government authorities
and avoid passport hassles? Or did they simply indicate the town where they
lodged a few nights before sailing as their "last residence"?
Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net
Cherry Hill, NJ


Seek NATHAN and LEIDESDORF (various spellings) Hamburg #germany

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I am looking for information about LEIDERSDORFFs (various spellings) from
Hamburg or somewhere near Hamburg.

Family legend has it that a Jewish banker >from Hamburg around 1800 by the
name of Nathan / NATHAN (given name or surname?) lent money to the Swedish
king Gustav IV....

Has anyone come across the name LEIDERSDORF(F) / LEIDESDORF(F) /
LEITESSTORFF or the like - then I would be most grateful to hear >from you.

Just as I would be grateful for any information about a Jewish banker by
the name Nathan ..?.. or ..?.. NATHAN.

In Denmark there are four LEIDERSDORFFs buried in the Old Jewish Cemetery:

Aron Moses Leidesdorf (d. 1747)
Elchana Leidesdorf, child (d. 1744)
David Samuel Leidesdorf, >from Altona (d. 1793)
Moses Nathan Leidesdorf, >from Stockholm (d. 1826) - 72 years old.

Best regards Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk
Coordinator & webmaster of JewishGen's SCANDINAVIA SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia http://home.worldonline.dk/~epaikin/


German SIG #Germany Seek NATHAN and LEIDESDORF (various spellings) Hamburg #germany

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I am looking for information about LEIDERSDORFFs (various spellings) from
Hamburg or somewhere near Hamburg.

Family legend has it that a Jewish banker >from Hamburg around 1800 by the
name of Nathan / NATHAN (given name or surname?) lent money to the Swedish
king Gustav IV....

Has anyone come across the name LEIDERSDORF(F) / LEIDESDORF(F) /
LEITESSTORFF or the like - then I would be most grateful to hear >from you.

Just as I would be grateful for any information about a Jewish banker by
the name Nathan ..?.. or ..?.. NATHAN.

In Denmark there are four LEIDERSDORFFs buried in the Old Jewish Cemetery:

Aron Moses Leidesdorf (d. 1747)
Elchana Leidesdorf, child (d. 1744)
David Samuel Leidesdorf, >from Altona (d. 1793)
Moses Nathan Leidesdorf, >from Stockholm (d. 1826) - 72 years old.

Best regards Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk
Coordinator & webmaster of JewishGen's SCANDINAVIA SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia http://home.worldonline.dk/~epaikin/


New Yizkor project: "The Holocaust in Belarus" #general

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Long-term members may recall that late last year, I asked for volunteers to
help translate >from Russian Dr. Leonid Smilovitsky's "The Holocaust in
Belarus". Although there was some response, the rate of progress has been
slow, so the next step has been taken: all of you with an interest in
Belarus who wish to be able to read the book in its entirety in English now
have the opportunity to make (US) tax-deductible donations towards its
translation by professional translators. A total of $2000 should do the
job.

The project is described at

http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/YB_Belarus.html

& is linked >from
http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html and
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Belarus.html

The table of contents, bibliography and a few other sections of the book are
already on the Yizkor Project website.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei Hawaii USA
Project Coordinator
Sefer Lida translation coordinator
Lida District ShtetLink webmaster


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Yizkor project: "The Holocaust in Belarus" #general

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Long-term members may recall that late last year, I asked for volunteers to
help translate >from Russian Dr. Leonid Smilovitsky's "The Holocaust in
Belarus". Although there was some response, the rate of progress has been
slow, so the next step has been taken: all of you with an interest in
Belarus who wish to be able to read the book in its entirety in English now
have the opportunity to make (US) tax-deductible donations towards its
translation by professional translators. A total of $2000 should do the
job.

The project is described at

http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/YB_Belarus.html

& is linked >from
http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html and
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Belarus.html

The table of contents, bibliography and a few other sections of the book are
already on the Yizkor Project website.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei Hawaii USA
Project Coordinator
Sefer Lida translation coordinator
Lida District ShtetLink webmaster


Abraham WENGER #yiddish

Sara Lynns
 

my uncle (Abraham WENGER) >from Russia is
listed in the 1920 census as a musician.
I am a member of my Jewish gen group and
tried several venues with my search.
no success YET.

appreciate your help
Jackie Lerner-Aderman

Moderator's note: Please reply privately.


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Abraham WENGER #yiddish

Sara Lynns
 

my uncle (Abraham WENGER) >from Russia is
listed in the 1920 census as a musician.
I am a member of my Jewish gen group and
tried several venues with my search.
no success YET.

appreciate your help
Jackie Lerner-Aderman

Moderator's note: Please reply privately.


Re: interim residences before leaving for the US, etc. #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

People moved around a lot more than most of us think! My grandfather was
supposed to have been born in Berdichev, and his brother, just a year or 2
younger said Odessa.

A lot depends on the exact question which was asked, also. 'Where were you
born' is different than'Where are you from' and both might get a different
answer than 'Where did you last live [before getting on this ship, perhaps].
For one cousin of mine, born 1868 or so, the first would be Marseilles,
France, the second, Augustow, Poland, the third, England. I have his
written answers to go on >from various documents.

So don't give up hope. Think about the answers and the questions and look
in all the places you might find more records.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"Since I never heard mention of
Lipkany before and since it is over 100 miles >from Starokonstantinov
(Ukraine), the place I've heretofore believed to be my ancestral home town,
I wonder if many Jews took up residence briefly in locations other than
their actual shtetlach of origin before departing for the US or other
countries."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: interim residences before leaving for the US, etc. #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

People moved around a lot more than most of us think! My grandfather was
supposed to have been born in Berdichev, and his brother, just a year or 2
younger said Odessa.

A lot depends on the exact question which was asked, also. 'Where were you
born' is different than'Where are you from' and both might get a different
answer than 'Where did you last live [before getting on this ship, perhaps].
For one cousin of mine, born 1868 or so, the first would be Marseilles,
France, the second, Augustow, Poland, the third, England. I have his
written answers to go on >from various documents.

So don't give up hope. Think about the answers and the questions and look
in all the places you might find more records.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"Since I never heard mention of
Lipkany before and since it is over 100 miles >from Starokonstantinov
(Ukraine), the place I've heretofore believed to be my ancestral home town,
I wonder if many Jews took up residence briefly in locations other than
their actual shtetlach of origin before departing for the US or other
countries."