Date   

Re: US Non-Immgrant Records? #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

The phrase 'bil' or 'b-i-l' is an acronym for 'brother-in-law'.

Zev Griner

On Jan 25, 9:42 pm, mct...@gmail.com (Michael McTeer) wrote:
Arriving New York, 5 Jan 1906, the SS Pennsylvania is a KAHLKOPF family from
Susnowie (Sosnowiec?) going to 'bil'(?) in Philadelphia, PA. The American
relative's name is poorly written starting with "Gsl" on Third St. The
family is Abram, age 26(1880), Liebe, age 25(1881), Awvam, age 3(1903),
Ester, age 2(1904) and "Babie", age "-5" 5 years or 5 months? (1901 or
1905). The ages are a bit off, but I believe this maybe the family of my
great grandparents who name I have as Aaron Irvin KALKOPF and Liba LENCZNER
(b. 1878) and that they were not going to 'bil' but to Liba's uncle Samuel
"Sol" GLICKSMAN who was in business with another relative, Morris TRAGER.


Internal Passport Database Question #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

One of the many questions I receive regarding the Lithuania Internal
Passport Project.

<< I just found one of my Trapido relatives in the Internal Passport
Database. First a big THANKS. Next, should I follow the directions in
order to get a copy of the file or is there another way through you?>>

You have to write a letter (email will not be acceptable) to the Central
archive in Vilnius. Send them the information >from the database and it is
o.k. to tell them you found it in the database. Because of the 100 year
privacy law, be sure and tell them your relationship to the Trapido
person(s). If not a relative, they may not send you the information.

Mention that you would like to receive a copy of all documents that may be
in the file for that person rather than ask for one specific file. The
file may contain documents you are not aware of.

They will respond and tell you the cost for the documents. Their respone
will be written in Lithuanian. They speak English but, by law, their
letter has to be in Lithuanian.

Donations to the Internal Passport Project can be made either online or by
mail. Go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/donate.htm on the LitvakSIG website.

Howard Margol
Coordinator, Internal Passport Project


Meaning of "Zwischendecks"? #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

My cousins >from Kovno came to the U.S. and their passenger manifest
referred to: "zwischendecks."
Does anyone know the exact meaning of "zwischendecks"?
Hi Bob,

In Yiddish (and possibly also German) the word means "intermediate."
Literally it means "in between." And "zwei/tsvei" means "two" in both
Yiddish and German. My guess is that it refers to second class although I do
wonder if these vessels had first class. I don't know whether there was a
third class (sometimes referred to as "tourist class"), but at any rate this
points to something between steerage and two classes above.

Olga Zabludoff
Washington, DC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: US Non-Immgrant Records? #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

The phrase 'bil' or 'b-i-l' is an acronym for 'brother-in-law'.

Zev Griner

On Jan 25, 9:42 pm, mct...@gmail.com (Michael McTeer) wrote:
Arriving New York, 5 Jan 1906, the SS Pennsylvania is a KAHLKOPF family from
Susnowie (Sosnowiec?) going to 'bil'(?) in Philadelphia, PA. The American
relative's name is poorly written starting with "Gsl" on Third St. The
family is Abram, age 26(1880), Liebe, age 25(1881), Awvam, age 3(1903),
Ester, age 2(1904) and "Babie", age "-5" 5 years or 5 months? (1901 or
1905). The ages are a bit off, but I believe this maybe the family of my
great grandparents who name I have as Aaron Irvin KALKOPF and Liba LENCZNER
(b. 1878) and that they were not going to 'bil' but to Liba's uncle Samuel
"Sol" GLICKSMAN who was in business with another relative, Morris TRAGER.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Internal Passport Database Question #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

One of the many questions I receive regarding the Lithuania Internal
Passport Project.

<< I just found one of my Trapido relatives in the Internal Passport
Database. First a big THANKS. Next, should I follow the directions in
order to get a copy of the file or is there another way through you?>>

You have to write a letter (email will not be acceptable) to the Central
archive in Vilnius. Send them the information >from the database and it is
o.k. to tell them you found it in the database. Because of the 100 year
privacy law, be sure and tell them your relationship to the Trapido
person(s). If not a relative, they may not send you the information.

Mention that you would like to receive a copy of all documents that may be
in the file for that person rather than ask for one specific file. The
file may contain documents you are not aware of.

They will respond and tell you the cost for the documents. Their respone
will be written in Lithuanian. They speak English but, by law, their
letter has to be in Lithuanian.

Donations to the Internal Passport Project can be made either online or by
mail. Go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/donate.htm on the LitvakSIG website.

Howard Margol
Coordinator, Internal Passport Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Meaning of "Zwischendecks"? #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

My cousins >from Kovno came to the U.S. and their passenger manifest
referred to: "zwischendecks."
Does anyone know the exact meaning of "zwischendecks"?
Hi Bob,

In Yiddish (and possibly also German) the word means "intermediate."
Literally it means "in between." And "zwei/tsvei" means "two" in both
Yiddish and German. My guess is that it refers to second class although I do
wonder if these vessels had first class. I don't know whether there was a
third class (sometimes referred to as "tourist class"), but at any rate this
points to something between steerage and two classes above.

Olga Zabludoff
Washington, DC


Berks County, Pennsylvania research #general

David Priever
 

Dear fellow Jewishgenners,

Hello! About a month ago I posted a message asking for someone to do some
look-ups for me in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Someone kindly responded and
as I have been extremely busy with job related tasks, I never responded.
Now I can't find their email in my hotmail inbox. I believe I deleted it by
accident.

Please contact me if you are that person.

Thanking you in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

David J. Priever
email: brooklyn1960@hotmail.com


Re: Riga, 1939-1940 #latvia

bgephart@...
 

The Latvian State Archive at Bezdeligu Street 1 keeps some KGB files.
Their e-mail: lv@lvarhivs.gov.lv (at least it was in 2003). A few
years ago I e-mailed them asking what they had about specific members
of my family.

They sent a list of the files and their size, along with the cost for
copies. I believe there was also a requirement to provide proof of
relationship to the person being researched. But there are documents
available. They are, of course, in Russian and the files can be very
large.

Probably the best way to get to them is to go to Riga personally.

The Latvian Historical Archives also has some documents that cover what
you are asking about. The House registers can be used to trace the
residence of people, and can indicate deportations, I think.

I know that the researcher at the archives was able to give me
deportation dates and locations >from sources that they had. They
have records of Soviet Extraordinary State Commission as well as
several other lists of victims >from that time.

I would recommend writing to them first, as they may very well be able to
confirm a last known address, and may have more information that will
help.

The contact for them is Irinwein@latnet.lv

As far as finding survivors, so far my only success has been through the
Internet. I have genealogical material posted on a website and a =
distant relative living in Israel found it several years ago. He directed
me to his family still living in Riga. This family survived everything, though
several members were killed and others deported, and returned to Riga.
So you could get lucky that way!

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,
Betsy Thal Gephart
bgephart@comcast.net


Re: Riga, 1939-1940 #latvia

Evelyn Waldstein
 

"Bea" <blspabas@btinternet.com>asked:
is possible my ancestors/relatives were not victims of the 1941 Nazi
holocaust, but of the killings and/or deportations by Stalin's regime during
1940-1941, before the Nazis arrived yet. All we have to go on is that last
letter received >from Riga, dated January 1940.

The answer is Yes (to some extent).
The Latvian Archives published in 1995 several volumes with lists of people
deported or otherwise repressed in 1941-1953 ("Represeto Saraksts,
1941-1953"). I managed to buy the first two volumes relevant to mass
deportation of people on June 14, 1941.

The main information appears in a Table form for each person in the
following order:

1. Number; 2. Family Head Surname and patronymic: 3. Date of Birth; 4.
Address; 5. Date of deportation (14.06.1941); 6. Place of resettlement; 7.
Date of death; 8. Date of release; 9. File number.

Knowing the Surname, it is possible to find whether the person and people
living with him at the same address have been deported >from a certain town
or some other place knowing its geographical location (i.e. district).

To make it easier to use the lists which has not been published in an
alphabetical order, I prepared my own Excel alphabetical spreadsheets
allowing to In find people according to their number on the Tables.

The vol 2. shows the names and fate of 3941 Riga residents. Each person
appears on the list under his own number. People living at the same address
appear as clusters. The nationality has not been defined. Jewish deportees
can be easily sorted out according to their Surname, name and/or patronymic.
For people with a common surname it is advisable to know their address or
family composition.

The data for Jewish residents of Riga are leading to certain conclusions I
do not wish to go into this message. They are interesting on itself and need
a broader discussion.

In addition there are other more recent publications helping to find data
about certain groups of people in Latvia. Again this might be a theme of
another reply at Latvian SIG.

Evelyn Waldstein.
evewa@post.tau.ac.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Berks County, Pennsylvania research #general

David Priever
 

Dear fellow Jewishgenners,

Hello! About a month ago I posted a message asking for someone to do some
look-ups for me in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Someone kindly responded and
as I have been extremely busy with job related tasks, I never responded.
Now I can't find their email in my hotmail inbox. I believe I deleted it by
accident.

Please contact me if you are that person.

Thanking you in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

David J. Priever
email: brooklyn1960@hotmail.com


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Riga, 1939-1940 #latvia

bgephart@...
 

The Latvian State Archive at Bezdeligu Street 1 keeps some KGB files.
Their e-mail: lv@lvarhivs.gov.lv (at least it was in 2003). A few
years ago I e-mailed them asking what they had about specific members
of my family.

They sent a list of the files and their size, along with the cost for
copies. I believe there was also a requirement to provide proof of
relationship to the person being researched. But there are documents
available. They are, of course, in Russian and the files can be very
large.

Probably the best way to get to them is to go to Riga personally.

The Latvian Historical Archives also has some documents that cover what
you are asking about. The House registers can be used to trace the
residence of people, and can indicate deportations, I think.

I know that the researcher at the archives was able to give me
deportation dates and locations >from sources that they had. They
have records of Soviet Extraordinary State Commission as well as
several other lists of victims >from that time.

I would recommend writing to them first, as they may very well be able to
confirm a last known address, and may have more information that will
help.

The contact for them is Irinwein@latnet.lv

As far as finding survivors, so far my only success has been through the
Internet. I have genealogical material posted on a website and a =
distant relative living in Israel found it several years ago. He directed
me to his family still living in Riga. This family survived everything, though
several members were killed and others deported, and returned to Riga.
So you could get lucky that way!

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,
Betsy Thal Gephart
bgephart@comcast.net


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Riga, 1939-1940 #latvia

Evelyn Waldstein
 

"Bea" <blspabas@btinternet.com>asked:
is possible my ancestors/relatives were not victims of the 1941 Nazi
holocaust, but of the killings and/or deportations by Stalin's regime during
1940-1941, before the Nazis arrived yet. All we have to go on is that last
letter received >from Riga, dated January 1940.

The answer is Yes (to some extent).
The Latvian Archives published in 1995 several volumes with lists of people
deported or otherwise repressed in 1941-1953 ("Represeto Saraksts,
1941-1953"). I managed to buy the first two volumes relevant to mass
deportation of people on June 14, 1941.

The main information appears in a Table form for each person in the
following order:

1. Number; 2. Family Head Surname and patronymic: 3. Date of Birth; 4.
Address; 5. Date of deportation (14.06.1941); 6. Place of resettlement; 7.
Date of death; 8. Date of release; 9. File number.

Knowing the Surname, it is possible to find whether the person and people
living with him at the same address have been deported >from a certain town
or some other place knowing its geographical location (i.e. district).

To make it easier to use the lists which has not been published in an
alphabetical order, I prepared my own Excel alphabetical spreadsheets
allowing to In find people according to their number on the Tables.

The vol 2. shows the names and fate of 3941 Riga residents. Each person
appears on the list under his own number. People living at the same address
appear as clusters. The nationality has not been defined. Jewish deportees
can be easily sorted out according to their Surname, name and/or patronymic.
For people with a common surname it is advisable to know their address or
family composition.

The data for Jewish residents of Riga are leading to certain conclusions I
do not wish to go into this message. They are interesting on itself and need
a broader discussion.

In addition there are other more recent publications helping to find data
about certain groups of people in Latvia. Again this might be a theme of
another reply at Latvian SIG.

Evelyn Waldstein.
evewa@post.tau.ac.il


STEVE MORSE #poland

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

There is a great four-page article "Stepping Up" about Steve Morse and his
one-step search options in the February issue of Family Tree Magazine. It
also includes a personal interview with him.

I have no financial connection with the magazine.
Joanie

Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN/GUDSTEIN (sp), BERGER, JAGODA/YAGODA-Plock,
Poland/Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn, NY; Galveston, TX.
PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno, Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn,
NY.
WEISS-Brooklyn, NY; NEIBERG-Brooklyn, NY; DEL PINO-Brooklyn, NY.
KATZ, GELFAND-Minsk, Belarus; Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Steve Morse's one-step search options, which can
be of invaluable help in researching Polish-Jewish family members
after they left Poland, can be found at www.stevemorse.org


JRI Poland #Poland STEVE MORSE #poland

Joan Parker <joanparker@...>
 

There is a great four-page article "Stepping Up" about Steve Morse and his
one-step search options in the February issue of Family Tree Magazine. It
also includes a personal interview with him.

I have no financial connection with the magazine.
Joanie

Joan Parker, Immediate Past President
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
joanparker@intergate.com
Searching: GOLDBERG, GOODSTEIN/GUDSTEIN (sp), BERGER, JAGODA/YAGODA-Plock,
Poland/Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn, NY; Galveston, TX.
PINKUS, WINOGRAD, ROSEN-Brest, Litovsk; Grodno, Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn,
NY.
WEISS-Brooklyn, NY; NEIBERG-Brooklyn, NY; DEL PINO-Brooklyn, NY.
KATZ, GELFAND-Minsk, Belarus; Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Steve Morse's one-step search options, which can
be of invaluable help in researching Polish-Jewish family members
after they left Poland, can be found at www.stevemorse.org


Success story - Harold HYMAN located #general

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

For a couple of years, I had been searching for a great-uncle, Harold
HYMAN. All I knew was that he was born and lived in Brooklyn, was the
youngest of 3 brothers, and probably died relatively young in the 1970s.

Of the few remaining cousins who knew him, none had solid information about
his whereabouts. I was told his wife moved to California after he died,
but could not locate her. I was told that his two surviving children had
apparently severed connections with the family, and could not locate either
of them. I was told that he lived and died in Brooklyn, or maybe somewhere
in Long Island, and was certainly buried in that area, like the rest of the
extended family.

Polite phone calls to every Jewish cemetery in Brooklyn, Queens and Long
Island turned up no Harold HYMAN of the correct vintage. One cousin was
pretty sure that Gutterman's Funeral Directors had managed the funeral, so
I phoned them, but was told that their records go back only 10 or so years.
Another cousin remembered that her own rabbi at the time had officiated,
so I phoned his synogogue, but the office manager told me he had retired
years ago to Florida, and had not kept records available. I checked the
SSDI and found 3 Harold HYMAN possibilities, but none where I could easily
obtain a copy of a death certificate.

Puzzled and getting frustrated, I decided to just let the problem sit and
focus on other things. After a few days, I went back and reviewed all my
notes. For some reason, I decided to try Gutterman's again -- the worst
that could happen was that someone else there would tell me they had no
records.

But that's not what happened. This time, a gentleman asked for a
guesstimate on the year and place of death, and said he'd get back to me.
And he did: he went into their archives warehouse, found someone who
matched the name, year and town of one of the SSDI Harold HYMANs, and told
me where he is buried -- in Staten Island -- and the contact data for the
cemetery.

When I contacted that cemetery, it turned out that not only was Harold
there, but his son Martin (who died in 1973, almost exactly a year before
his father) was also there.

So, the moral is (for those who do not know it yet), try to avoid
assumptions and never give up. Use all the information you get, put the
puzzle pieces together in different ways until they make sense or at least
give you another clue.

Now, as to why Harold and his son are in Staten Island when the rest of the
extended family are in a couple of Brooklyn cemeteries? Well, that's
another puzzle...

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
Croton-on-Hudson, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success story - Harold HYMAN located #general

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

For a couple of years, I had been searching for a great-uncle, Harold
HYMAN. All I knew was that he was born and lived in Brooklyn, was the
youngest of 3 brothers, and probably died relatively young in the 1970s.

Of the few remaining cousins who knew him, none had solid information about
his whereabouts. I was told his wife moved to California after he died,
but could not locate her. I was told that his two surviving children had
apparently severed connections with the family, and could not locate either
of them. I was told that he lived and died in Brooklyn, or maybe somewhere
in Long Island, and was certainly buried in that area, like the rest of the
extended family.

Polite phone calls to every Jewish cemetery in Brooklyn, Queens and Long
Island turned up no Harold HYMAN of the correct vintage. One cousin was
pretty sure that Gutterman's Funeral Directors had managed the funeral, so
I phoned them, but was told that their records go back only 10 or so years.
Another cousin remembered that her own rabbi at the time had officiated,
so I phoned his synogogue, but the office manager told me he had retired
years ago to Florida, and had not kept records available. I checked the
SSDI and found 3 Harold HYMAN possibilities, but none where I could easily
obtain a copy of a death certificate.

Puzzled and getting frustrated, I decided to just let the problem sit and
focus on other things. After a few days, I went back and reviewed all my
notes. For some reason, I decided to try Gutterman's again -- the worst
that could happen was that someone else there would tell me they had no
records.

But that's not what happened. This time, a gentleman asked for a
guesstimate on the year and place of death, and said he'd get back to me.
And he did: he went into their archives warehouse, found someone who
matched the name, year and town of one of the SSDI Harold HYMANs, and told
me where he is buried -- in Staten Island -- and the contact data for the
cemetery.

When I contacted that cemetery, it turned out that not only was Harold
there, but his son Martin (who died in 1973, almost exactly a year before
his father) was also there.

So, the moral is (for those who do not know it yet), try to avoid
assumptions and never give up. Use all the information you get, put the
puzzle pieces together in different ways until they make sense or at least
give you another clue.

Now, as to why Harold and his son are in Staten Island when the rest of the
extended family are in a couple of Brooklyn cemeteries? Well, that's
another puzzle...

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
Croton-on-Hudson, NY


Re: Romanian names - Please help! #romania

Don Solomon
 

One of my relatives >from Iasi had the first name Jenica -- sounds pretty close!

Don


Subject: Romanian names - Please help!
From: lsaionz@comcast.net
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 19:26:59 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

Can anyone tell me what the equivalent first name
might have been in Rumanian? Is there any common first name in Romanian that
sounds like "Jennie"? Is something like "Janek" a possibility?
--
Don Solomon <dsolomon@post.harvard.edu>


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Romanian names - Please help! #romania

Don Solomon
 

One of my relatives >from Iasi had the first name Jenica -- sounds pretty close!

Don


Subject: Romanian names - Please help!
From: lsaionz@comcast.net
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 19:26:59 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

Can anyone tell me what the equivalent first name
might have been in Rumanian? Is there any common first name in Romanian that
sounds like "Jennie"? Is something like "Janek" a possibility?
--
Don Solomon <dsolomon@post.harvard.edu>


Re: Romanian names - Please help! #romania

s_wiener@...
 

Although only anecdotal, my [American] family referred
to my great-great grandmother >from Bukovina as
Charlotte however she was actually named Charna Leah
in Europe. She never came to the US, but died as a
40-45 year old in about 1864 somewhere in the
Wiznitz/Czernowitz area. Many girls in the family
were named Leah in her memory.

BTW, Charna means 'dark' just as Beila means 'white or
light'. It is a Slavic/Yiddish name and NOT the
kinnui of Leah.

On the other hand, my father's cousin's wife,
Charlotte [whose family was more Hungarian Jewish] had
the Hebrew name of Sarah. So, there's obviously more
to it.

My husband's Russian/Polish great-grandmother Lottie
was actually Zlata [Slavic for 'gold', as in coinage],
which is Golda in Yiddish.

But just as some women used Beckie as an American
replacement for the name Brucha, people start to think
that a Lottie is really a Charlotte or a Beckie is
really a Rebecca and that's how lots of family
confusion starts, especially when the cemetery stone
has to be ordered and the 'offical' name gets changed.

Just my observations,
Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA

Researching just in Romania: FESSLER, HOCHSTADT,
JAFFE, KUPFERSCHMIDT, NEMEROFSKY, PACHT, RUBINGER,
SCHNAPP, TEICHER, WALLACH and WEIGEL

--------

On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 11:15:03 -0500 "Irving Schoenberg"
<irvs5@mindspring.com> wrote:

My grandmother was called Jennie by her friends in my
home state of Missouri. We also knew her as Charna.
Some of her granddaughters are named Sharna. She may
also have been called Charlotte. She came >from a
shtetl in Bessarabia NW of Kishinev/Chisinau (now in
the Republic of Moldova).


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Romanian names - Please help! #romania

s_wiener@...
 

Although only anecdotal, my [American] family referred
to my great-great grandmother >from Bukovina as
Charlotte however she was actually named Charna Leah
in Europe. She never came to the US, but died as a
40-45 year old in about 1864 somewhere in the
Wiznitz/Czernowitz area. Many girls in the family
were named Leah in her memory.

BTW, Charna means 'dark' just as Beila means 'white or
light'. It is a Slavic/Yiddish name and NOT the
kinnui of Leah.

On the other hand, my father's cousin's wife,
Charlotte [whose family was more Hungarian Jewish] had
the Hebrew name of Sarah. So, there's obviously more
to it.

My husband's Russian/Polish great-grandmother Lottie
was actually Zlata [Slavic for 'gold', as in coinage],
which is Golda in Yiddish.

But just as some women used Beckie as an American
replacement for the name Brucha, people start to think
that a Lottie is really a Charlotte or a Beckie is
really a Rebecca and that's how lots of family
confusion starts, especially when the cemetery stone
has to be ordered and the 'offical' name gets changed.

Just my observations,
Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA

Researching just in Romania: FESSLER, HOCHSTADT,
JAFFE, KUPFERSCHMIDT, NEMEROFSKY, PACHT, RUBINGER,
SCHNAPP, TEICHER, WALLACH and WEIGEL

--------

On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 11:15:03 -0500 "Irving Schoenberg"
<irvs5@mindspring.com> wrote:

My grandmother was called Jennie by her friends in my
home state of Missouri. We also knew her as Charna.
Some of her granddaughters are named Sharna. She may
also have been called Charlotte. She came >from a
shtetl in Bessarabia NW of Kishinev/Chisinau (now in
the Republic of Moldova).