Date   

Success Stories - July 2012 #warsaw #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

We are pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/ .

In this issue, Jacob Koff is surprised to find a hand-written family
tree in the probate file of his great-grandmother's brother, which
opens new avenues of research and family connections. Marilen Pitler
unites with newly found cousins via JewishGen's Family Finder and
greatly expands her family tree. Zack Oryan helps an old friend
discover the history of his father and the family he never knew.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We are sure you will be
inspired by these stories and we encourage you to send us your own
success stories to: success@lyris.jewishgen.org.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.


IAJGS Conference - Paris 2012 - Newsletter # 13 #poland #warsaw

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

JULY 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on JEWISH GENEALOGY hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@paris2012.eu )
Newsletter # 13 – June 29, 2012
***
!!!!! ONLY TWO WEEKS LEFT UNTIL D-Day!!!!!

Quickly join the Conference more than 600 attendees – Sign-up and make your
friends sign-up

***
EARLY REGISTRATION
will be opened
on Saturday, July 14
from 4pm to 10pm
at the Conference Centre (Foyer, ground floor level).

If you can, do not wait until Sunday morning to register and receive your
materials: you will save time.

***
REMINDERS
***Last days to sign up for workshops (www.paris2012.eu/products)***

Get trained and learn about softwares and research bases of Family Tree
Maker, MyHeritage, JewishGen, FamilySearch or use Word and Excel for
genealogy. Fee: 15 euros.

***Sign up for the Gala evening***

Only some seats left if you want to participate to this beautiful evening.

***Sign up today for an EXCEPTIONAL post-conference trip to Normandy***

Giverny (made famous by Claude Monet), Elbeuf and a rare visit to the
Factory of Knowledges (former textile factory "Blin & Blin "), and to the
synagogue, Rouen where we will be authorized - and ONLY FOR US - for special
tour of the Sublime Abode (11th century Yeshiva), Caen Memorial and the
landing beaches.
€ 350; information: Joubert-Voyages, 01 48 74 December 30

***

PURCHASE AUDIO FILES OF THE CONFERENCE

Save $15.00 (€ 12.00): Pay now and pick up at the conference the single
flash drive of the recorded lectures. Go to Conference Resource Website :
http://www.myconferenceresource.com/products/32-iajgs-international-conference-on-jewish-genealogy-2012.aspx
or http://tinyurl.com/paris2012audio

You will pay US $154 (€117) instead of US $169.00 (€129.00) if you buy it on
site or after the conference.

***
YAHAD IN UNUM

Take advantage of the Conference to take an appointment to visit their
Archives and to fill out a witness form. Contact: : Patrice Bensimon :
P.bensimon@yahadinunum.org

***
ALEXANDRE BEIDER COMMUNICATES

If you wish to purchase one of his books at the Conference, you can contact
Françoise Darmon (darmon.francoise@wanadoo.fr).
He will bring the book on the bookshop of the Conference.


Yizkor Book Project, June 2012 #warsaw #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

As our ultimate aim in the Yizkor Book Project is to see complete
translations of books online, it's particularly gratifying when we do reach
this goal and, in this past month, we managed to achieve it twice. The first
project was the Csenger, Hungary Yizkor book (Memorial Book of the Martyrs
of Csenger, Porcsalma and Vicinity) whose translation was gratefully donated
by Renee and Stan Fishkind, and the second was the Gorodets, Belarus Yizkor
book (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942) which was translated in its
entirety by Hannah Kadmon and Eugene Sucov and my high praise goes out to
all these people for seeing these projects to their successful completion.

This means that we now have just over 80 projects that are complete books
and there are many others now that are close to completion, with yet many
others for which the road ahead to reach this goal is long and winding. Of
course, reaching this goal requires many, many hours of volunteer and
professional work but actually achieving this is very, very gratifying and
will provide a fountain of knowledge to so many. These days we are also
offering the option to print hardcopies of the completed translations,
something which has proven to be very popular and we're very encouraged by
the positive response received, so far, to these carefully prepared and
presented volumes. If you wish to learn more about the YBIP (Yizkor Books in
Print) Project, you are welcome to visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Over the last month or so, a number of new Translation Fund projects have
been set up to enable people to help some of the Yizkor Book projects along
financially. The projects recently added were for the following books:

- Dumbraveni, Moldova (There once was a town - a descriptive monograph of
the town of Dombroven)
- Glinyany, Ukraine (In the Diaspora and in the Homeland)
- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)

If you would like to know more about these projects or any of the others
that are currently running, you are invited to visit the JewishGen-erosity
page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Finally, I would assume that this report finds many of you preparing for
their trip to the 32nd IAJGS International Conference. Unfortunately, I will
not be there but Jan Meisels Allen has kindly agreed to lead the Yizkor Book
Birds of a Feather meeting and hope as many of you will take part and be
enriched by Jan's wide knowledge in this field. Other than that, I do wish
all of the participants in the conference a very fruitful and rewarding
experience.

Now to facts and figures As far as the June figures go, during this last
month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The Bialystoker memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok1/Bialystok1.html

- Bonyhad, Hungary (Bonyhad: a destroyed community; the Jews of Bonyhad,
Hungary) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bonyhad/Bonyhad.html

- Gyor, Hungary (Victims of Fascism in Gyor and Environs 1944-45)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gyor1/gyor1.html

- Hajduboszormeny, Hungary (Out of the depth)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hajduboszormeny/Hajduboszormeny.html

Added in 6 new entries:

- Causeni, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00394.html

- Kupiskis, Lithuania (Jewish Cities, Towns and Villages in Lithuania until
1918) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yidishe_shtet/yid453.html

- Snyatyn, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00516.html

- Spisska Nova Ves, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in
Slovakia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo405.html

- Tarutyne, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00357.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00359.html

We have continued to update 30 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Berezhany, Ukraine (Brzezany Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berezhany/Berezhany.html

- Csenger, Hungary (Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Csenger, Porcsalma and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Csenger/Csenger.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/demp000.html [Polish]

- Disna, Belarus (Disna; memorial book of the community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/disna/disna.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw, and
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Galicia, Poland (Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Galicia3/galicia3.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Halmeu, Romania (In memory of the communities of Halmin-Turcz and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Halmeu/Halmeu.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Sacz, Poland (Sandzer Memorial Journal)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_sacz1/nowy_sacz1.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Przedecz, Poland (Memorial book to the Holocaust victims of the city of
Pshaytsh) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przedecz/Przedecz.html

- Rava-Ruska, Ukraine (Rawa Ruska Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rava-Ruska/Rava-Ruska.html

- Rubiezewicze, Belarus (Rubiezewicze, Derevna and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rubiezewicze/Rubiezewicze.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Success Stories - July 2012 #warsaw #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

We are pleased to announce the publication of the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" button on our homepage or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/ .

In this issue, Jacob Koff is surprised to find a hand-written family
tree in the probate file of his great-grandmother's brother, which
opens new avenues of research and family connections. Marilen Pitler
unites with newly found cousins via JewishGen's Family Finder and
greatly expands her family tree. Zack Oryan helps an old friend
discover the history of his father and the family he never knew.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We are sure you will be
inspired by these stories and we encourage you to send us your own
success stories to: success@lyris.jewishgen.org.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland IAJGS Conference - Paris 2012 - Newsletter # 13 #warsaw #poland

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

JULY 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on JEWISH GENEALOGY hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@paris2012.eu )
Newsletter # 13 – June 29, 2012
***
!!!!! ONLY TWO WEEKS LEFT UNTIL D-Day!!!!!

Quickly join the Conference more than 600 attendees – Sign-up and make your
friends sign-up

***
EARLY REGISTRATION
will be opened
on Saturday, July 14
from 4pm to 10pm
at the Conference Centre (Foyer, ground floor level).

If you can, do not wait until Sunday morning to register and receive your
materials: you will save time.

***
REMINDERS
***Last days to sign up for workshops (www.paris2012.eu/products)***

Get trained and learn about softwares and research bases of Family Tree
Maker, MyHeritage, JewishGen, FamilySearch or use Word and Excel for
genealogy. Fee: 15 euros.

***Sign up for the Gala evening***

Only some seats left if you want to participate to this beautiful evening.

***Sign up today for an EXCEPTIONAL post-conference trip to Normandy***

Giverny (made famous by Claude Monet), Elbeuf and a rare visit to the
Factory of Knowledges (former textile factory "Blin & Blin "), and to the
synagogue, Rouen where we will be authorized - and ONLY FOR US - for special
tour of the Sublime Abode (11th century Yeshiva), Caen Memorial and the
landing beaches.
€ 350; information: Joubert-Voyages, 01 48 74 December 30

***

PURCHASE AUDIO FILES OF THE CONFERENCE

Save $15.00 (€ 12.00): Pay now and pick up at the conference the single
flash drive of the recorded lectures. Go to Conference Resource Website :
http://www.myconferenceresource.com/products/32-iajgs-international-conference-on-jewish-genealogy-2012.aspx
or http://tinyurl.com/paris2012audio

You will pay US $154 (€117) instead of US $169.00 (€129.00) if you buy it on
site or after the conference.

***
YAHAD IN UNUM

Take advantage of the Conference to take an appointment to visit their
Archives and to fill out a witness form. Contact: : Patrice Bensimon :
P.bensimon@yahadinunum.org

***
ALEXANDRE BEIDER COMMUNICATES

If you wish to purchase one of his books at the Conference, you can contact
Françoise Darmon (darmon.francoise@wanadoo.fr).
He will bring the book on the bookshop of the Conference.


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Yizkor Book Project, June 2012 #warsaw #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

As our ultimate aim in the Yizkor Book Project is to see complete
translations of books online, it's particularly gratifying when we do reach
this goal and, in this past month, we managed to achieve it twice. The first
project was the Csenger, Hungary Yizkor book (Memorial Book of the Martyrs
of Csenger, Porcsalma and Vicinity) whose translation was gratefully donated
by Renee and Stan Fishkind, and the second was the Gorodets, Belarus Yizkor
book (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942) which was translated in its
entirety by Hannah Kadmon and Eugene Sucov and my high praise goes out to
all these people for seeing these projects to their successful completion.

This means that we now have just over 80 projects that are complete books
and there are many others now that are close to completion, with yet many
others for which the road ahead to reach this goal is long and winding. Of
course, reaching this goal requires many, many hours of volunteer and
professional work but actually achieving this is very, very gratifying and
will provide a fountain of knowledge to so many. These days we are also
offering the option to print hardcopies of the completed translations,
something which has proven to be very popular and we're very encouraged by
the positive response received, so far, to these carefully prepared and
presented volumes. If you wish to learn more about the YBIP (Yizkor Books in
Print) Project, you are welcome to visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Over the last month or so, a number of new Translation Fund projects have
been set up to enable people to help some of the Yizkor Book projects along
financially. The projects recently added were for the following books:

- Dumbraveni, Moldova (There once was a town - a descriptive monograph of
the town of Dombroven)
- Glinyany, Ukraine (In the Diaspora and in the Homeland)
- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)

If you would like to know more about these projects or any of the others
that are currently running, you are invited to visit the JewishGen-erosity
page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Finally, I would assume that this report finds many of you preparing for
their trip to the 32nd IAJGS International Conference. Unfortunately, I will
not be there but Jan Meisels Allen has kindly agreed to lead the Yizkor Book
Birds of a Feather meeting and hope as many of you will take part and be
enriched by Jan's wide knowledge in this field. Other than that, I do wish
all of the participants in the conference a very fruitful and rewarding
experience.

Now to facts and figures As far as the June figures go, during this last
month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The Bialystoker memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok1/Bialystok1.html

- Bonyhad, Hungary (Bonyhad: a destroyed community; the Jews of Bonyhad,
Hungary) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bonyhad/Bonyhad.html

- Gyor, Hungary (Victims of Fascism in Gyor and Environs 1944-45)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gyor1/gyor1.html

- Hajduboszormeny, Hungary (Out of the depth)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hajduboszormeny/Hajduboszormeny.html

Added in 6 new entries:

- Causeni, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00394.html

- Kupiskis, Lithuania (Jewish Cities, Towns and Villages in Lithuania until
1918) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yidishe_shtet/yid453.html

- Snyatyn, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00516.html

- Spisska Nova Ves, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in
Slovakia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo405.html

- Tarutyne, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00357.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00359.html

We have continued to update 30 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Berezhany, Ukraine (Brzezany Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berezhany/Berezhany.html

- Csenger, Hungary (Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Csenger, Porcsalma and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Csenger/Csenger.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/demp000.html [Polish]

- Disna, Belarus (Disna; memorial book of the community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/disna/disna.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw, and
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Galicia, Poland (Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Galicia3/galicia3.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Halmeu, Romania (In memory of the communities of Halmin-Turcz and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Halmeu/Halmeu.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Sacz, Poland (Sandzer Memorial Journal)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_sacz1/nowy_sacz1.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Przedecz, Poland (Memorial book to the Holocaust victims of the city of
Pshaytsh) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przedecz/Przedecz.html

- Rava-Ruska, Ukraine (Rawa Ruska Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rava-Ruska/Rava-Ruska.html

- Rubiezewicze, Belarus (Rubiezewicze, Derevna and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rubiezewicze/Rubiezewicze.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Shtetl identification #general

Ken Falkson <mokmanrs@...>
 

Hello all,

I am trying to identify the birthplace of my great grandmother. This image comes
from the Petition for Naturalization of my great grandfather. Can anyone make
out the handwriting and match it to a shtetl?

The image can be seen at the following ViewMate address.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23560


Thank you.

Ken Falkson
Cary, IL


Logmeadow MA synagogue Beth Israel #general

susiestree@...
 

I am trying to find a contact at Beth Israel Longmeadow MA that merged
with a congregation in Springfield MA in the 1980s.

Thanks Susan Boyer
Sherman Oaks CA


Cemetery QR codes #general

Bob Kosovsky
 

The Wikimedia Foundation (the organization which is responsible for Wikipedia
and other projects) has an interesting project which has implications for those
involved with genealogy.

They've enlisted volunteers to have QR codes posted next to gravestones, so that
when a visitor scans the QR code with their smartphone, the Wikipedia article
on the deceased comes up.

http://outreach.wikimedia.org/wiki/GLAM/QR_codes/Congressional_Cemetery

A QR code can lead to any web document. For example, if one has an online
family tree or other documentation, you can have a QR code direct someone to
that document.

Of course, I'm not sure that many family members would want a QR code posted
near the gravestone of their loved ones, but it does suggest possible ways to
enhance gravestones, or other memorial sites.


Bob Kosovsky, New York City,
seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Shtetl identification #general

Ken Falkson <mokmanrs@...>
 

Hello all,

I am trying to identify the birthplace of my great grandmother. This image comes
from the Petition for Naturalization of my great grandfather. Can anyone make
out the handwriting and match it to a shtetl?

The image can be seen at the following ViewMate address.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23560


Thank you.

Ken Falkson
Cary, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Logmeadow MA synagogue Beth Israel #general

susiestree@...
 

I am trying to find a contact at Beth Israel Longmeadow MA that merged
with a congregation in Springfield MA in the 1980s.

Thanks Susan Boyer
Sherman Oaks CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery QR codes #general

Bob Kosovsky
 

The Wikimedia Foundation (the organization which is responsible for Wikipedia
and other projects) has an interesting project which has implications for those
involved with genealogy.

They've enlisted volunteers to have QR codes posted next to gravestones, so that
when a visitor scans the QR code with their smartphone, the Wikipedia article
on the deceased comes up.

http://outreach.wikimedia.org/wiki/GLAM/QR_codes/Congressional_Cemetery

A QR code can lead to any web document. For example, if one has an online
family tree or other documentation, you can have a QR code direct someone to
that document.

Of course, I'm not sure that many family members would want a QR code posted
near the gravestone of their loved ones, but it does suggest possible ways to
enhance gravestones, or other memorial sites.


Bob Kosovsky, New York City,
seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


New BMD databases online for Maramaros megye (county), Hungary, now northern Romania and sub-Carpathian Ukraine #general

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

JewishGen's Hungarian Special Interest Group (H-SIG) is excited to
announce that more than 12,200 birth, marriage, and death records from
the former Hungarian county of Maramaros have just been released as
three new databases on JewishGen. This represents the first live
searchable data >from the Maramaros/Maramures Jewish Records Project
(www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com).

Maramaros megye (county) was located in far northeastern Hungary until
1920, but the territory is today split up between Zakarpattiya
(sub-Carpathian) oblast in southwestern Ukraine and Maramures judet
(county) in northern Romania. Because the official languages and
spellings used in the area have changed dramatically over time, as did
the borders, all of the town names in these databases include both
their original Hungarian town names and their modern-day Romanian or
Ukrainian town names, to make searching the data much easier.

These books were kept by rabbis in the Jewish community from
approximately 1851 until October 1895, at which time the Hungarian
government started keeping new civil records that recorded the events
of everyone in each town, regardless of their religion. A few of
these solely-Jewish record books continued being kept after 1895, but
only unofficially. And a few record books, not yet online, actually
date back to the late 18th Century, predating the Hungarian
government's requirements (and in some cases predating local Jews
having surnames).

These record books are today stored in a regional branch of the
Romanian National Archives in the city of Baia Mare, Maramures county,
Romania. Between 2009 and 2011, the books were digitally photographed
by a fabulous Romanian photographer and researcher named Dan Jurca,
who traveled to Baia Mare -- first on behalf of Maramaros researcher
Brooke Schreier Ganz and then on behalf of this newly-formed H-SIG
project -- to digitally photograph every surviving Jewish record book
stored at the archives, all 113 of them.

The photographs he took are being transcribed by a host of volunteers,
and these three new databases represent approximately one quarter of
the eventual record total -- more than 12,200 completed records out of
an eventual estimated 52,000 records. Given that each record has at
least three to six names in it (parents, spouses, the Sendak at each
Bris (!), witnesses, etc.), we think there will be about 200,000
indexed names when the project is eventually completed.

Because the borders of this area have changed so much over the past
century, there are even some records in these databases >from a few
towns that were formerly located in Szatmar (Satmar) megye, Hungary
but which are now located in Maramures county, Romania.

But unfortunately, most records for the towns >from the northwestern
part of Maramaros megye -- the areas in and near the city of Huszt
(now Khust, Ukraine) and westwards -- were not found in the Baia Mare
archives and therefore are not in this records set. We assume that
those records, if they still exist, are stored in one of the Ukrainian
archives.

You can search these three new Maramaros databases in their entirety
from JewishGen's Hungary Database, here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/

Furthermore, for the record books where the "town of registration" is
today in Ukraine, you can also search those as part of JewishGen's
Ukraine Database, and for the record books where the "town of
registration" is today in Romania, you can also search those as part
of JewishGen's Romania Database. But if you want to make sure you can
see all of the data, regardless of the town's modern location, use the
Hungary Database interface.

To see which towns and which years are included in this first release,
you can check out the data table here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Maramaros.htm

That link also has a few sample photos of what the old record books look like.

Finally, for the most up-to-date project updates and listing of what
records survived >from which towns and which years, and which ones are
available for transcribers, or have a transcription in progress, or
have a transcription completed, the project's official website is
located here:

http://www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com/

Much thanks and gratitude go to our tireless volunteers who have
worked on these old records for quite a while now, and to the more
than thirty volunteers still working on indexing books at the moment.
(We're always looking for more volunteers, so if you like pretty
pictures of old vital records, feel free to join!) Thanks also go to
project co-coordinator Sandy Malek and to H-SIG leader Vivian Kahn for
their help and forbearance. And thanks also go to Romanian researcher
Dan Jurca for photographing all the records, to Budapest-based
researcher Beth Long for originally putting me in touch with Dan and
for all her good advice, to all the generous people who made donations
to the project's fund at JewishGen to help pay for the photography,
and to Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias and everyone at JewishGen for
helping to make this possible.

Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New BMD databases online for Maramaros megye (county), Hungary, now northern Romania and sub-Carpathian Ukraine #general

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

JewishGen's Hungarian Special Interest Group (H-SIG) is excited to
announce that more than 12,200 birth, marriage, and death records from
the former Hungarian county of Maramaros have just been released as
three new databases on JewishGen. This represents the first live
searchable data >from the Maramaros/Maramures Jewish Records Project
(www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com).

Maramaros megye (county) was located in far northeastern Hungary until
1920, but the territory is today split up between Zakarpattiya
(sub-Carpathian) oblast in southwestern Ukraine and Maramures judet
(county) in northern Romania. Because the official languages and
spellings used in the area have changed dramatically over time, as did
the borders, all of the town names in these databases include both
their original Hungarian town names and their modern-day Romanian or
Ukrainian town names, to make searching the data much easier.

These books were kept by rabbis in the Jewish community from
approximately 1851 until October 1895, at which time the Hungarian
government started keeping new civil records that recorded the events
of everyone in each town, regardless of their religion. A few of
these solely-Jewish record books continued being kept after 1895, but
only unofficially. And a few record books, not yet online, actually
date back to the late 18th Century, predating the Hungarian
government's requirements (and in some cases predating local Jews
having surnames).

These record books are today stored in a regional branch of the
Romanian National Archives in the city of Baia Mare, Maramures county,
Romania. Between 2009 and 2011, the books were digitally photographed
by a fabulous Romanian photographer and researcher named Dan Jurca,
who traveled to Baia Mare -- first on behalf of Maramaros researcher
Brooke Schreier Ganz and then on behalf of this newly-formed H-SIG
project -- to digitally photograph every surviving Jewish record book
stored at the archives, all 113 of them.

The photographs he took are being transcribed by a host of volunteers,
and these three new databases represent approximately one quarter of
the eventual record total -- more than 12,200 completed records out of
an eventual estimated 52,000 records. Given that each record has at
least three to six names in it (parents, spouses, the Sendak at each
Bris (!), witnesses, etc.), we think there will be about 200,000
indexed names when the project is eventually completed.

Because the borders of this area have changed so much over the past
century, there are even some records in these databases >from a few
towns that were formerly located in Szatmar (Satmar) megye, Hungary
but which are now located in Maramures county, Romania.

But unfortunately, most records for the towns >from the northwestern
part of Maramaros megye -- the areas in and near the city of Huszt
(now Khust, Ukraine) and westwards -- were not found in the Baia Mare
archives and therefore are not in this records set. We assume that
those records, if they still exist, are stored in one of the Ukrainian
archives.

You can search these three new Maramaros databases in their entirety
from JewishGen's Hungary Database, here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/

Furthermore, for the record books where the "town of registration" is
today in Ukraine, you can also search those as part of JewishGen's
Ukraine Database, and for the record books where the "town of
registration" is today in Romania, you can also search those as part
of JewishGen's Romania Database. But if you want to make sure you can
see all of the data, regardless of the town's modern location, use the
Hungary Database interface.

To see which towns and which years are included in this first release,
you can check out the data table here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Maramaros.htm

That link also has a few sample photos of what the old record books look like.

Finally, for the most up-to-date project updates and listing of what
records survived >from which towns and which years, and which ones are
available for transcribers, or have a transcription in progress, or
have a transcription completed, the project's official website is
located here:

http://www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com/

Much thanks and gratitude go to our tireless volunteers who have
worked on these old records for quite a while now, and to the more
than thirty volunteers still working on indexing books at the moment.
(We're always looking for more volunteers, so if you like pretty
pictures of old vital records, feel free to join!) Thanks also go to
project co-coordinator Sandy Malek and to H-SIG leader Vivian Kahn for
their help and forbearance. And thanks also go to Romanian researcher
Dan Jurca for photographing all the records, to Budapest-based
researcher Beth Long for originally putting me in touch with Dan and
for all her good advice, to all the generous people who made donations
to the project's fund at JewishGen to help pay for the photography,
and to Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias and everyone at JewishGen for
helping to make this possible.

Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


JACOBSON from Bausk #latvia

Jules Feldman
 

I am preparing an album for the 100th birthday of Luba Neuberg nee Rivlin.
Luba was born in Jelgava and before the Holocaust lived in Riga.

Her parents were Alexander Rivlin and Sara Hershowitz both >from Bausk.
Alexander's parents were Avigdor Rivlin and Chaya Ita Jacobson of Bausk.
Chaya Ita was one of 8 children of Wolf and Nechama Jacobson, 5 of whom
migrated to South Africa .

If this family is known to any of you I will be grateful for further
information .

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


Latvia SIG #Latvia JACOBSON from Bausk #latvia

Jules Feldman
 

I am preparing an album for the 100th birthday of Luba Neuberg nee Rivlin.
Luba was born in Jelgava and before the Holocaust lived in Riga.

Her parents were Alexander Rivlin and Sara Hershowitz both >from Bausk.
Alexander's parents were Avigdor Rivlin and Chaya Ita Jacobson of Bausk.
Chaya Ita was one of 8 children of Wolf and Nechama Jacobson, 5 of whom
migrated to South Africa .

If this family is known to any of you I will be grateful for further
information .

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


HERSHOWITZ photographer in Bausk #latvia

Jules Feldman
 

I am preparing an album for the 100th birthday of Luba Neuberg nee Rivlin.
Luba was born in Jelgava and before the Holocaust lived in Riga.

Her parents were Alexander Rivlin and Sara Hershowitz both >from Bausk.
Sara's father was Leib or Lev Hershowitz who had a photogapher's shop in
Bausk before WW2.

If anyone in this forum can add I will be grateful. If anyone has
connections with this Hershowitz family ...

I request anyone who has photographs >from Bausk to check if they have this
photogapher's stamp on it and if yes I would be grateful for a copy.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


Latvia SIG #Latvia HERSHOWITZ photographer in Bausk #latvia

Jules Feldman
 

I am preparing an album for the 100th birthday of Luba Neuberg nee Rivlin.
Luba was born in Jelgava and before the Holocaust lived in Riga.

Her parents were Alexander Rivlin and Sara Hershowitz both >from Bausk.
Sara's father was Leib or Lev Hershowitz who had a photogapher's shop in
Bausk before WW2.

If anyone in this forum can add I will be grateful. If anyone has
connections with this Hershowitz family ...

I request anyone who has photographs >from Bausk to check if they have this
photogapher's stamp on it and if yes I would be grateful for a copy.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


Research Assistance in Philadelphia PA #general

Jerry Schneider <jerry.schneider@...>
 

I have hit a brick wall in finding birth and marriage records
supposedly in Philadelphia, PA.

According to her second marriage record in Ohio, Sarah FEDERMAN was
born about 1872 in Philadelphia, PA. Her parents were Jacob Federman
and Bessie LEFKOWITZ. I would like to find both the birth record of
Sarah and a marriage record for her parents Jacob and Bessie (or any
other record substantiating their whereabouts.

Also, Sarah Federman married Jacob EIMAS in Philadelphia PA around
1887. They had two daughters, both born in Philadelphia PA: Bertha,
born 21 Oct 1887, and Florence "Flora", born 15 Apr
1890. Unfortunately, I have found no records to substantiate this
information, If possible, I would like to get copies of their
respective birth certificates.

Although Philadelphia PA is identified as the place of births and
marriages, I don't know whether this is the city itself, the county,
or an adjacent PA county.

Any research assistance or recommendations are greatly
appreciated. (I have already sent queries to the Philadelphia
Archives and their limited, but expensive, search did not find any records.)

Thank you for listening.

Jerry Schneider
Burke, VA USA
Izbica, Poland
Zolkiewka, Poland
jerry.schneider@verizon.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research Assistance in Philadelphia PA #general

Jerry Schneider <jerry.schneider@...>
 

I have hit a brick wall in finding birth and marriage records
supposedly in Philadelphia, PA.

According to her second marriage record in Ohio, Sarah FEDERMAN was
born about 1872 in Philadelphia, PA. Her parents were Jacob Federman
and Bessie LEFKOWITZ. I would like to find both the birth record of
Sarah and a marriage record for her parents Jacob and Bessie (or any
other record substantiating their whereabouts.

Also, Sarah Federman married Jacob EIMAS in Philadelphia PA around
1887. They had two daughters, both born in Philadelphia PA: Bertha,
born 21 Oct 1887, and Florence "Flora", born 15 Apr
1890. Unfortunately, I have found no records to substantiate this
information, If possible, I would like to get copies of their
respective birth certificates.

Although Philadelphia PA is identified as the place of births and
marriages, I don't know whether this is the city itself, the county,
or an adjacent PA county.

Any research assistance or recommendations are greatly
appreciated. (I have already sent queries to the Philadelphia
Archives and their limited, but expensive, search did not find any records.)

Thank you for listening.

Jerry Schneider
Burke, VA USA
Izbica, Poland
Zolkiewka, Poland
jerry.schneider@verizon.net

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