Date   

ViewMate translation request - Russian - LINK & SZTERNBLIC #general

Greg Tuckman
 

Hello Group,
I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. It is on
ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52361

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Greg Tuckman
Phoenix, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian - LINK & SZTERNBLIC #general

Greg Tuckman
 

Hello Group,
I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. It is on
ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52361

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Greg Tuckman
Phoenix, AZ


PRIEBE in Dortmund Mengede #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I hope anyone could help with more informations about the following persons:

Hans PRIEBE was born 18.12.1936 in Dortmund Mengede. His parents
married 1933 and Hans was married to Waltraud K=C3=B6hler.

Harald PRIEBE was born 28.03.1935 in Dortmund Mengede

Rita PRIEBE was born 24.09.1938 in Dortmund Mengede

I think they are sisters. Could anyone help with their parents - did
they survived?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany PRIEBE in Dortmund Mengede #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I hope anyone could help with more informations about the following persons:

Hans PRIEBE was born 18.12.1936 in Dortmund Mengede. His parents
married 1933 and Hans was married to Waltraud K=C3=B6hler.

Harald PRIEBE was born 28.03.1935 in Dortmund Mengede

Rita PRIEBE was born 24.09.1938 in Dortmund Mengede

I think they are sisters. Could anyone help with their parents - did
they survived?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


Jewish Detainees from Danzig who were sent to Mauritius #germany

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi all

I am in process of setting up the first Kehilalink [JewishGen Community
web page] for Mauritius, off the east coast of Africa.

If you have any family or contacts who landed up being sent to Mauritius
and have a story to tell or photos to share please contact me at:
eli@elirab.com

I also manage the KehilaLink [community web page] for Gdansk (Danzig)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/gdansk

Thanks & Shabbat Shalom

Eli Rabinowitz, Perth, Australia http://elirab.me elirab@iinet.net.au


German SIG #Germany Jewish Detainees from Danzig who were sent to Mauritius #germany

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi all

I am in process of setting up the first Kehilalink [JewishGen Community
web page] for Mauritius, off the east coast of Africa.

If you have any family or contacts who landed up being sent to Mauritius
and have a story to tell or photos to share please contact me at:
eli@elirab.com

I also manage the KehilaLink [community web page] for Gdansk (Danzig)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/gdansk

Thanks & Shabbat Shalom

Eli Rabinowitz, Perth, Australia http://elirab.me elirab@iinet.net.au


Re: Occupation boucher in Alsace records [and an interesting note on Jewish ritual butchering] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

I agree with Markus here: most likely, those 'bouchers' *were* butchers.

In southern and western Germany, where there were hundreds of tiny rural
communities, Jews generally found butchery profitable only *if* they
could sell to Gentiles as well.

The reason has to do with kosher law, which dictates that the rear half
of the cow is kosher only if certain veins and nerves have been removed.
Kosher slaughter was a profession all its own--and so was the removal of
those pieces. One who did this was called a porger in English, ein
Ausaederer auf Deutsch. Porging correctly was supposedly even more
difficult than slaughter.

Most small Jewish communities had only one "public servant": the cantor,
who was usually also the shochet (slaughterer) and schoolteacher. Few of
them knew how to porge, so half of the cow went uneaten--by the Jews.
The Gentiles in town were happy to buy the non-kosher parts.
Accordingly, many butchers were Jews; and this meshed with the
livestock-trading that was a traditional occupation for Jews in those
regions.

As to the number of butchers: businesses were smaller then. At the
Jebenhausen Jewish museum (highly recommended) I was told that in Swabia
a typical village had one inn per 100 population. (Imagine a large NYC
apartment building with several watering places just for the residents!)
Similarly, one would have needed more butchers then than now to provide
meat to a given number of people.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Ellen Barnett Cleary ellencleary@comcast.net wrote:

In researching my LOEB family in Reichshoffen, Alsace, I found many of
the records listed their occupation as "boucher"..........


German SIG #Germany Re: Occupation boucher in Alsace records [and an interesting note on Jewish ritual butchering] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

I agree with Markus here: most likely, those 'bouchers' *were* butchers.

In southern and western Germany, where there were hundreds of tiny rural
communities, Jews generally found butchery profitable only *if* they
could sell to Gentiles as well.

The reason has to do with kosher law, which dictates that the rear half
of the cow is kosher only if certain veins and nerves have been removed.
Kosher slaughter was a profession all its own--and so was the removal of
those pieces. One who did this was called a porger in English, ein
Ausaederer auf Deutsch. Porging correctly was supposedly even more
difficult than slaughter.

Most small Jewish communities had only one "public servant": the cantor,
who was usually also the shochet (slaughterer) and schoolteacher. Few of
them knew how to porge, so half of the cow went uneaten--by the Jews.
The Gentiles in town were happy to buy the non-kosher parts.
Accordingly, many butchers were Jews; and this meshed with the
livestock-trading that was a traditional occupation for Jews in those
regions.

As to the number of butchers: businesses were smaller then. At the
Jebenhausen Jewish museum (highly recommended) I was told that in Swabia
a typical village had one inn per 100 population. (Imagine a large NYC
apartment building with several watering places just for the residents!)
Similarly, one would have needed more butchers then than now to provide
meat to a given number of people.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Ellen Barnett Cleary ellencleary@comcast.net wrote:

In researching my LOEB family in Reichshoffen, Alsace, I found many of
the records listed their occupation as "boucher"..........


Re: Migration patterns from Lithuania to Latvia #latvia

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Cousins,
I would be interested in whatever people have learned. My only thought here
is that Lithuania is land-locked and Courland/Latvia had a port, so maybe
people migrated so that they could have access to ships. Other than that, I
know that my Edelberg family (paternal grandmother's) went >from Courland to
the Southern Ukraine (Kherson Guberniya) in 1840 while some of the family
stayed in Courland. Also my paternal grandfather's family came >from Odessa
to the US, and there is some DNA evidence that this family may have
originated in Lithuania. Since my paternal grandmother was sent to my
paternal grandfather's family in 1913 when she came to the US, this
indicates that the families had known each other in the old country. For
how long and when and where the families knew each other I do not know.
Sarah L M Christiansen
Georgetown TX 78633
Searching: Hite/Khait/Chait, Edelberg, Perchik, Birgardovsky (all paternal)
and others
http://genealogy.smcactuary.net


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Migration patterns from Lithuania to Latvia #latvia

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Cousins,
I would be interested in whatever people have learned. My only thought here
is that Lithuania is land-locked and Courland/Latvia had a port, so maybe
people migrated so that they could have access to ships. Other than that, I
know that my Edelberg family (paternal grandmother's) went >from Courland to
the Southern Ukraine (Kherson Guberniya) in 1840 while some of the family
stayed in Courland. Also my paternal grandfather's family came >from Odessa
to the US, and there is some DNA evidence that this family may have
originated in Lithuania. Since my paternal grandmother was sent to my
paternal grandfather's family in 1913 when she came to the US, this
indicates that the families had known each other in the old country. For
how long and when and where the families knew each other I do not know.
Sarah L M Christiansen
Georgetown TX 78633
Searching: Hite/Khait/Chait, Edelberg, Perchik, Birgardovsky (all paternal)
and others
http://genealogy.smcactuary.net


JewishGen Education 2017 #france

bounce-3248984-772957@...
 

We are delighted to offer 'genners a range of courses in 2017.

1. Improve Your Organization Skills & Research Online (for Advanced
Beginners)-- Jan 2-29
2. Exploring JewishGen (Basic 1 – tuition waived for Value Added
‘Genners) – Jan 6-20
3. Brick Walls or Dead End-- Feb 3-24
4. Search Strategies – Using Google (Basic 2 – tuition waived for
Value Added ‘Genners) – Mar 17-31
5. Complex Genealogical Research in the U.S. – Apr 3-20

The three and four week classes are taught in our unique FORUM, a
personal mentoring experience, where students have the opportunity to
share their story and work one step at a time with the instructor.
Students are encouraged to post one branch, set goals for their
research and work interactively. Instructors are familiar with a wide
range of resources and offer text lessons to accompany the research
process.

Consider the beginning course for organization and basic research
skills (census, vital records, manifests) then move on to the Complex
U.S. course or the New York course (both cover naturalization,
military, governmental records, and local archival research)

Basic Courses are 2 weeks and text based with exercises; tuition is
waived for Value Added members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to
the General Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage you to look at the course details, instructor's
credentials and student requirements (time, fee, prerequisites) on
www.jewishgen.org/education. Course Registration opens two weeks
before the course start date. If, after reviewing the education page,
you have some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org.

and thanks for "listening"
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education,
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
www.JewishGen.org/education


French SIG #France JewishGen Education 2017 #france

bounce-3248984-772957@...
 

We are delighted to offer 'genners a range of courses in 2017.

1. Improve Your Organization Skills & Research Online (for Advanced
Beginners)-- Jan 2-29
2. Exploring JewishGen (Basic 1 – tuition waived for Value Added
‘Genners) – Jan 6-20
3. Brick Walls or Dead End-- Feb 3-24
4. Search Strategies – Using Google (Basic 2 – tuition waived for
Value Added ‘Genners) – Mar 17-31
5. Complex Genealogical Research in the U.S. – Apr 3-20

The three and four week classes are taught in our unique FORUM, a
personal mentoring experience, where students have the opportunity to
share their story and work one step at a time with the instructor.
Students are encouraged to post one branch, set goals for their
research and work interactively. Instructors are familiar with a wide
range of resources and offer text lessons to accompany the research
process.

Consider the beginning course for organization and basic research
skills (census, vital records, manifests) then move on to the Complex
U.S. course or the New York course (both cover naturalization,
military, governmental records, and local archival research)

Basic Courses are 2 weeks and text based with exercises; tuition is
waived for Value Added members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to
the General Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage you to look at the course details, instructor's
credentials and student requirements (time, fee, prerequisites) on
www.jewishgen.org/education. Course Registration opens two weeks
before the course start date. If, after reviewing the education page,
you have some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org.

and thanks for "listening"
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education,
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
www.JewishGen.org/education


Mogilev, Riga, Odessa, St. Petersburg Archives, Baltic Yearbook, Minsk, Bonn, etc. #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

Hi Genners,
So, here's what's been added to my Jewish genealogy blog over the last
few months (http://yourjewishgem.blogspot.com ):

1913 Jewish Historical Society (#1-4)

1922 Mogilev Melamed
1847-1901 Mogilev Gymnasium Graduates
Mogilev Jewish Cemeteries: The Do Not Forget Project

1862-1912 Riga Politechnical Institute (#1, #2, #3) includes Moscow, Kiev, Odessa,
et al)

1921-1944 Odessa Pharmaceutical Institute: Students Personal Affairs (# 1, #2)

St Petersburg Archives (TsGIA): Synagogue Parish Registers

1910 Baltic Yearbook: Medical
1907 Baltic Yearbook: Midwives

1870 Minsk: Merchants Guild Certificates

Riga: New Jewish Cemetery Smerli

1818- University of Bonn: Jewish Students

Regards,

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mogilev, Riga, Odessa, St. Petersburg Archives, Baltic Yearbook, Minsk, Bonn, etc. #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

Hi Genners,
So, here's what's been added to my Jewish genealogy blog over the last
few months (http://yourjewishgem.blogspot.com ):

1913 Jewish Historical Society (#1-4)

1922 Mogilev Melamed
1847-1901 Mogilev Gymnasium Graduates
Mogilev Jewish Cemeteries: The Do Not Forget Project

1862-1912 Riga Politechnical Institute (#1, #2, #3) includes Moscow, Kiev, Odessa,
et al)

1921-1944 Odessa Pharmaceutical Institute: Students Personal Affairs (# 1, #2)

St Petersburg Archives (TsGIA): Synagogue Parish Registers

1910 Baltic Yearbook: Medical
1907 Baltic Yearbook: Midwives

1870 Minsk: Merchants Guild Certificates

Riga: New Jewish Cemetery Smerli

1818- University of Bonn: Jewish Students

Regards,

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Jewish Detainees from Danzig who were sent to Mauritius #poland

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi all

I am in process of setting up the first Kehilalink for Mauritius, off
the east coast of Africa

If you have any family or contacts who landed up being sent to Mauritius
and have a story to tell or photos to share,

please contact me at eli@elirab.com

I also manage the KehilaLink for Gdansk (Danzig)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/gdansk

Thanks & Shabbat Shalom


Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me


JRI Poland #Poland Jewish Detainees from Danzig who were sent to Mauritius #poland

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi all

I am in process of setting up the first Kehilalink for Mauritius, off
the east coast of Africa

If you have any family or contacts who landed up being sent to Mauritius
and have a story to tell or photos to share,

please contact me at eli@elirab.com

I also manage the KehilaLink for Gdansk (Danzig)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/gdansk

Thanks & Shabbat Shalom


Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me


Occupation boucher in Alsace records #germany

Ellen Barnett Cleary
 

In researching my LOEB family in Reichshoffen, Alsace, I found many of
the records listed their occupation as boucher.

Normally this would not make me wonder. I thought it meant "butcher."

But I discovered so many men in this community with the occupation
"boucher." I could not fathom how this community and even those near to
it could make use of so many butchers.

Do any of you have any insight on what the term "boucher" might have
meant in the period 1793-1882?

Ellen Barnett Cleary, San Francisco ellencleary@comcast.net


German SIG #Germany Occupation boucher in Alsace records #germany

Ellen Barnett Cleary
 

In researching my LOEB family in Reichshoffen, Alsace, I found many of
the records listed their occupation as boucher.

Normally this would not make me wonder. I thought it meant "butcher."

But I discovered so many men in this community with the occupation
"boucher." I could not fathom how this community and even those near to
it could make use of so many butchers.

Do any of you have any insight on what the term "boucher" might have
meant in the period 1793-1882?

Ellen Barnett Cleary, San Francisco ellencleary@comcast.net


Call for Papers - IAJGS 2017 Orlando July 23-28, 2017 #germany

jplowens@...
 

We are very pleased to invite prospective speakers to submit proposals for a
presentation at the 37th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy to be held >from Sunday, July 23 through Friday July 28, 2017
at the Walt Disney Swan Resort on the grounds of Disney World/Epcot Center
in Orlando, FL.

This annual worldwide gathering brings together family researchers, academics,
professional genealogists, historians, and a wide variety of individuals from
around the world who cherish the heritage and the future of the Jewish people.

The submissions deadline is on Sunday, January 15, 2017 at 11:59PM EST. The
committee set this deadline to allow enough time to evaluate many
worthy proposals, to choose the best, and to notify speakers of their
acceptance during the early registration period that ends on Sunday,
April 16, 2017.

All the information you need to get started is in under the Call for
Papers tab on the Conference web site at www.iajgs2017.org.

We hope many of you will feel inspired to attend, present, and
participate with us.

If you know of others who might like to present at the upcoming
conference, please feel free to share this email. After reading
the relevant pages on our web site, you may request further
information via email sent to program@iajgs2017.org.

Many thanks, and we look forward to a great conference next summer.

FROM: IAJGS, Program Committee, program@iajgs2017.org
37th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Orlando, FL


German SIG #Germany Call for Papers - IAJGS 2017 Orlando July 23-28, 2017 #germany

jplowens@...
 

We are very pleased to invite prospective speakers to submit proposals for a
presentation at the 37th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy to be held >from Sunday, July 23 through Friday July 28, 2017
at the Walt Disney Swan Resort on the grounds of Disney World/Epcot Center
in Orlando, FL.

This annual worldwide gathering brings together family researchers, academics,
professional genealogists, historians, and a wide variety of individuals from
around the world who cherish the heritage and the future of the Jewish people.

The submissions deadline is on Sunday, January 15, 2017 at 11:59PM EST. The
committee set this deadline to allow enough time to evaluate many
worthy proposals, to choose the best, and to notify speakers of their
acceptance during the early registration period that ends on Sunday,
April 16, 2017.

All the information you need to get started is in under the Call for
Papers tab on the Conference web site at www.iajgs2017.org.

We hope many of you will feel inspired to attend, present, and
participate with us.

If you know of others who might like to present at the upcoming
conference, please feel free to share this email. After reading
the relevant pages on our web site, you may request further
information via email sent to program@iajgs2017.org.

Many thanks, and we look forward to a great conference next summer.

FROM: IAJGS, Program Committee, program@iajgs2017.org
37th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Orlando, FL

64961 - 64980 of 661984