Date   

New research tool developed for Chicago-area Jewish genealogy #general

events@...
 

Family history researchers whose Jewish ancestors lived in the Chicago
area will be interested in exploring the new free online searchable JGSI
Jewish Chicago Database (JJCD). The Jewish Genealogical Society of
Illinois has expanded its existing database of Chicago-area cemetery
burial information to include several other useful collections of
information with the total number of records now more than 80,000.

To access the JJCD, go to http://jgsi.org/databasesearch. Family history
researchers can search the entire database or limit their search to a
single component of the full database.

The cemetery information in the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database comprises
entries that often include date of death, date of birth and plot
location numbers within Chicago-area cemeteries.

Among the additions to the newly expanded database are:
---Memorial plaque transcriptions and photos >from two Chicago
synagogues: B'nai Zion-Shaare Tikvah and Lawn Manor Beth Jacob
Congregation. These entries often include date of death and
transcription of the deceased person's Hebrew name.
---Intake reports >from the Drexel Home for the Jewish Aged, which was
founded in 1891, that record dates of birth and death, cemetery of
burial and photos of the handwritten reports, which often include other
useful information such as place of birth, year of immigration and names
of relatives.
---Death notices published in the JUF News >from 1994 to 2005. These
full-text listings include date of death, names of relatives, funeral
home, cemetery and other information.
---An index with date of birth and date of death information extracted
from Chicago Tribune death notices published in the latter half of the
1990s.

JGSI volunteers are continuing to work to add further valuable
Chicagoland research data to the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database. Database
information is still being processed >from two Chicago orphanages: the
Chicago Jewish Orphans Home, which operated >from 1894 to 1942, and the
Marks Nathan Jewish Orphan Home, which operated >from 1906 to 1948.

If you wish to volunteer for this effort or other JGSI projects, please
email volunteers@jgsi.org.

The JJCD project was conceived by Mike Karsen, JGSI past president, with
the ultimate objective of combining all possible Chicago-area Jewish
genealogical data. A compilation of frequently asked questions related
to the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database, created by JGSI webmaster Ron
Miller, can be found at http://jgs.jgsi.org/acjd/faq.html.

For more information about the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois,
see www.jgsi.org.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois

MODERATOR NOTE: the data will be shared with JewishGen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New research tool developed for Chicago-area Jewish genealogy #general

events@...
 

Family history researchers whose Jewish ancestors lived in the Chicago
area will be interested in exploring the new free online searchable JGSI
Jewish Chicago Database (JJCD). The Jewish Genealogical Society of
Illinois has expanded its existing database of Chicago-area cemetery
burial information to include several other useful collections of
information with the total number of records now more than 80,000.

To access the JJCD, go to http://jgsi.org/databasesearch. Family history
researchers can search the entire database or limit their search to a
single component of the full database.

The cemetery information in the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database comprises
entries that often include date of death, date of birth and plot
location numbers within Chicago-area cemeteries.

Among the additions to the newly expanded database are:
---Memorial plaque transcriptions and photos >from two Chicago
synagogues: B'nai Zion-Shaare Tikvah and Lawn Manor Beth Jacob
Congregation. These entries often include date of death and
transcription of the deceased person's Hebrew name.
---Intake reports >from the Drexel Home for the Jewish Aged, which was
founded in 1891, that record dates of birth and death, cemetery of
burial and photos of the handwritten reports, which often include other
useful information such as place of birth, year of immigration and names
of relatives.
---Death notices published in the JUF News >from 1994 to 2005. These
full-text listings include date of death, names of relatives, funeral
home, cemetery and other information.
---An index with date of birth and date of death information extracted
from Chicago Tribune death notices published in the latter half of the
1990s.

JGSI volunteers are continuing to work to add further valuable
Chicagoland research data to the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database. Database
information is still being processed >from two Chicago orphanages: the
Chicago Jewish Orphans Home, which operated >from 1894 to 1942, and the
Marks Nathan Jewish Orphan Home, which operated >from 1906 to 1948.

If you wish to volunteer for this effort or other JGSI projects, please
email volunteers@jgsi.org.

The JJCD project was conceived by Mike Karsen, JGSI past president, with
the ultimate objective of combining all possible Chicago-area Jewish
genealogical data. A compilation of frequently asked questions related
to the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database, created by JGSI webmaster Ron
Miller, can be found at http://jgs.jgsi.org/acjd/faq.html.

For more information about the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois,
see www.jgsi.org.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois

MODERATOR NOTE: the data will be shared with JewishGen


ViewMate translation request #general

bzk 1114
 

I would appreciate even a partial transalation of the Polish notary
document that I have posted. I want to know what the role of my
Grandparents is in this document. Also there are some additional names
and dates there.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53819

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53820

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53821

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Any response is greatly appreciated

Ben Knobel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request #general

bzk 1114
 

I would appreciate even a partial transalation of the Polish notary
document that I have posted. I want to know what the role of my
Grandparents is in this document. Also there are some additional names
and dates there.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53819

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53820

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53821

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Any response is greatly appreciated

Ben Knobel


Jewish cemeteries in Iowa City? #general

Bob Kosovsky
 

This June I'll be a attending a conference in Iowa City, Iowa. Since I'll have
an extra day, I'm wondering if people know of Jewish cemeteries in the area.
from a web search I see a cemetery associated with the congregation Agudas
Achim.

Are there any others? Thanks!

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Skierniwice: PIFKO, PIWKO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish cemeteries in Iowa City? #general

Bob Kosovsky
 

This June I'll be a attending a conference in Iowa City, Iowa. Since I'll have
an extra day, I'm wondering if people know of Jewish cemeteries in the area.
from a web search I see a cemetery associated with the congregation Agudas
Achim.

Are there any others? Thanks!

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Skierniwice: PIFKO, PIWKO


(Denmark- West Indies) Archives Opens Digitized Records from When Denmark was Colonial Power in West Indies #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Danish Archives has opened its online access to all digitized records
from when Denmark was a colonial power in the Danish West Indies-today known
as the US Virgin Islands. Denmark founded the colony in 1672 until it sold
the islands to the United States in 1917. To read more about the Danish
history of the colony see: https://www.virgin-islands-history.org/en/

There are 5 million image files >from the Danish West Indies across databases
in their national archives. There are tips to learn about the records to
facilitate your searching the records which is recommended to read before
searching. To access the search tips and to search the records see:
https://www.virgin-islands-history.org/en/search-the-records/

One interesting item was the Jewish Congregation, >from the 1880 census in
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas.

Thank you to Dick Eastman and the Eastman Online Genealogy Newsletter for
informing us about this collection.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Denmark- West Indies) Archives Opens Digitized Records from When Denmark was Colonial Power in West Indies #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Danish Archives has opened its online access to all digitized records
from when Denmark was a colonial power in the Danish West Indies-today known
as the US Virgin Islands. Denmark founded the colony in 1672 until it sold
the islands to the United States in 1917. To read more about the Danish
history of the colony see: https://www.virgin-islands-history.org/en/

There are 5 million image files >from the Danish West Indies across databases
in their national archives. There are tips to learn about the records to
facilitate your searching the records which is recommended to read before
searching. To access the search tips and to search the records see:
https://www.virgin-islands-history.org/en/search-the-records/

One interesting item was the Jewish Congregation, >from the 1880 census in
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas.

Thank you to Dick Eastman and the Eastman Online Genealogy Newsletter for
informing us about this collection.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Latvia town sounds like "crook"? #latvia

Joan Goldstein <888jogo888@...>
 

Thanks for conserving our history. My grandmother did not talk about
where she came >from other to say it was a town in Latvia called "crook"
and they were all crooks. So I'm looking for a place that sounds like
crook. She was born in 1896 named Fannie Schwartz. Her father was Jacob,
mother Hannah (Anna)
I appreciate your help.
Thanks,
Joan Goldstein


Latvia SIG #Latvia Latvia town sounds like "crook"? #latvia

Joan Goldstein <888jogo888@...>
 

Thanks for conserving our history. My grandmother did not talk about
where she came >from other to say it was a town in Latvia called "crook"
and they were all crooks. So I'm looking for a place that sounds like
crook. She was born in 1896 named Fannie Schwartz. Her father was Jacob,
mother Hannah (Anna)
I appreciate your help.
Thanks,
Joan Goldstein


Re: Celia Male #austria-czech

Logan Kleinwaks
 

Saddened to hear of Celia Male's passing. She was extremely helpful
to me when I first got started in Jewish genealogy, sharing generously
of her time and knowledge. Thanks to her, several branches of my
family were united. She opened my eyes to the possibilities of
researching Galitzianers in Viennese sources, where we found critical
genealogical information that was not present in Galician sources.
Her numerous posts to Jewish genealogy mailing lists undoubtedly
helped and continue to help many others. Though I only had the
opportunity to meet Celia once, many years ago, at the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., I still remember how passionately
she was researching her family >from Pressburg.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Celia Male #austria-czech

Logan Kleinwaks
 

Saddened to hear of Celia Male's passing. She was extremely helpful
to me when I first got started in Jewish genealogy, sharing generously
of her time and knowledge. Thanks to her, several branches of my
family were united. She opened my eyes to the possibilities of
researching Galitzianers in Viennese sources, where we found critical
genealogical information that was not present in Galician sources.
Her numerous posts to Jewish genealogy mailing lists undoubtedly
helped and continue to help many others. Though I only had the
opportunity to meet Celia once, many years ago, at the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., I still remember how passionately
she was researching her family >from Pressburg.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu


Celia Male #austria-czech

alan.kolnik@...
 

Sad to hear of Celia Male's passing. Like many others, I am sure, I received
much valuable assistance >from her in my research efforts.

Alan Kolnik


Celia Male #austria-czech

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Dear Simon,

I am truly saddened to hear of Celia Male's passing. It has been about
three years since I discovered on-line, the wonderful Sephardic
tombstones she had posted of the Vienna Zentralfriedhof.

It opened a new world of discovery for me in that Sephardic tombstones
had "different things" compared to the Ashkenazic ones. I tried
unsuccessfully to contact her then to ask permission to use some of
her photos in some future conference presentation or a paper. That
is, I sent her two e-mails a month apart, with no response.

In July 2014, I finally contacted Jeff Malka, who has done amazing
work in compiling Sephardic resources into one website. I asked him
about Sephardic cemeteries and tombstones, and told him about the ones
I had seen in the Vienna Zentralfriedhof, and again my inability to
contact Celia Male. He responded that she had had a stroke some 7
years ago. So at least I then understood why I had no response. I
added, "If she is unable to personally grant me permission, I hope it
will be OK to use them but to acknowledge they were hers."

In any case, >from her pages of photography, I then reached out and
contacted others, including the late Mathilde Tagger. I researched
more Sephardic tombstones in other communities and that led to my
first presentation on the differences between Ashkenazi and Sephardi
tombstones at IAJGS 2015 in Jerusalem. Since I was never able to get
Celia Male's permission, Traude Triebel was most generous and
accommodating in re-photographing the examples I wanted to use.
However, in my presentation, I included a slide with Celia Male
standing next to one of the stones, and credited her for being the
first to enlighten me about Sephardic tombstones. I will continue to
use such a slide, but will now have to edit it for her demise.

She may never have known of the indirect influence she had upon me and
subsequently the people who attended my presentations.

May you be comforted among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem and may
her memory be for a blessing.

Regards,

Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Beverly Hills, CA

Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN, STOTTER in various
parts of Galicia, Poland: Nowy Targ, Nowy Sanz, Wachsmund, Dembno,
Lapuszna, Krakow, who migrated into Kezmarok or nearby towns in
northern Slovakia and Czech Republic (i.e., those who lived/had
businesses in Moravska Ostrava).
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena or Szina), Szkaros and Kosice, Slovakia;
Tolcsva and Tokaj, Hungary


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Celia Male #austria-czech

alan.kolnik@...
 

Sad to hear of Celia Male's passing. Like many others, I am sure, I received
much valuable assistance >from her in my research efforts.

Alan Kolnik


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Celia Male #austria-czech

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Dear Simon,

I am truly saddened to hear of Celia Male's passing. It has been about
three years since I discovered on-line, the wonderful Sephardic
tombstones she had posted of the Vienna Zentralfriedhof.

It opened a new world of discovery for me in that Sephardic tombstones
had "different things" compared to the Ashkenazic ones. I tried
unsuccessfully to contact her then to ask permission to use some of
her photos in some future conference presentation or a paper. That
is, I sent her two e-mails a month apart, with no response.

In July 2014, I finally contacted Jeff Malka, who has done amazing
work in compiling Sephardic resources into one website. I asked him
about Sephardic cemeteries and tombstones, and told him about the ones
I had seen in the Vienna Zentralfriedhof, and again my inability to
contact Celia Male. He responded that she had had a stroke some 7
years ago. So at least I then understood why I had no response. I
added, "If she is unable to personally grant me permission, I hope it
will be OK to use them but to acknowledge they were hers."

In any case, >from her pages of photography, I then reached out and
contacted others, including the late Mathilde Tagger. I researched
more Sephardic tombstones in other communities and that led to my
first presentation on the differences between Ashkenazi and Sephardi
tombstones at IAJGS 2015 in Jerusalem. Since I was never able to get
Celia Male's permission, Traude Triebel was most generous and
accommodating in re-photographing the examples I wanted to use.
However, in my presentation, I included a slide with Celia Male
standing next to one of the stones, and credited her for being the
first to enlighten me about Sephardic tombstones. I will continue to
use such a slide, but will now have to edit it for her demise.

She may never have known of the indirect influence she had upon me and
subsequently the people who attended my presentations.

May you be comforted among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem and may
her memory be for a blessing.

Regards,

Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Beverly Hills, CA

Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN, STOTTER in various
parts of Galicia, Poland: Nowy Targ, Nowy Sanz, Wachsmund, Dembno,
Lapuszna, Krakow, who migrated into Kezmarok or nearby towns in
northern Slovakia and Czech Republic (i.e., those who lived/had
businesses in Moravska Ostrava).
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena or Szina), Szkaros and Kosice, Slovakia;
Tolcsva and Tokaj, Hungary


Re: Isac Ignacz PICK from Pecek or Golsch-Jenikau? #austria-czech

peter.lowe@...
 

Gary Binetter enquired as to whether Ignatz Pick was born in Goltsch
Jenikau or in Pecek.

Ignatz's marriage & Birth are recorded in the Golcuv Jenikov Jewish
registers
Birth is in HBMa378 here:
http://www.badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=500&reproId=78610

Marriage is in HBMa383, on these pages ( the left hand & right hand
pages are separated as is quite common in these registers:
Left hand page:
http://www.badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=505&reproId=87905
Right hand page:
http://www.badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=505&reproId=87866

I cannot decipher withcertainty the exact village in which he is born,
but no doubt someone more skilled in German can decipher it. It is on
both birth & marriage records.

In all cases like this I recommend to start with a search on Geni.com
(free to use for basic members). Ignatz (Ignaz) & wife & children were
already on the tree. Though, I have added the names of his parents
there is more that could now be added >from the Golcuv Jenikov registers.


Peter Lowe
Hertford, England


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Isac Ignacz PICK from Pecek or Golsch-Jenikau? #austria-czech

peter.lowe@...
 

Gary Binetter enquired as to whether Ignatz Pick was born in Goltsch
Jenikau or in Pecek.

Ignatz's marriage & Birth are recorded in the Golcuv Jenikov Jewish
registers
Birth is in HBMa378 here:
http://www.badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=500&reproId=78610

Marriage is in HBMa383, on these pages ( the left hand & right hand
pages are separated as is quite common in these registers:
Left hand page:
http://www.badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=505&reproId=87905
Right hand page:
http://www.badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=505&reproId=87866

I cannot decipher withcertainty the exact village in which he is born,
but no doubt someone more skilled in German can decipher it. It is on
both birth & marriage records.

In all cases like this I recommend to start with a search on Geni.com
(free to use for basic members). Ignatz (Ignaz) & wife & children were
already on the tree. Though, I have added the names of his parents
there is more that could now be added >from the Golcuv Jenikov registers.


Peter Lowe
Hertford, England


Re: Looking for Belarusian sources associated with the Partisan Song #belarus

Andrei Burdenkov <andrei.burdenkov@...>
 

The anthem of the Jewish partisans would point to the Bielski team and
I don't think anybody mentioned that in the interviews taken by
Nechama Tech in the 1990s. It's a Jewish partisan anthem, right? That
makes it a bit difficult to find a local source here in Belarus in
light of the time distance.

Andrei
www.graves.by


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Looking for Belarusian sources associated with the Partisan Song #belarus

Andrei Burdenkov <andrei.burdenkov@...>
 

The anthem of the Jewish partisans would point to the Bielski team and
I don't think anybody mentioned that in the interviews taken by
Nechama Tech in the 1990s. It's a Jewish partisan anthem, right? That
makes it a bit difficult to find a local source here in Belarus in
light of the time distance.

Andrei
www.graves.by

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