Date   

German Cemetery in Latvia #latvia

Emily Rosenberg
 

Last week one of you asked about a Riga cemetery where someone with a German
sounding name might be buried. I was in Latvia a year ago and went to a the
Livas Cemetery in Liiepaja/Libau that had many well maintained German Jewish
burials >from 1889 to the last couple of decades. I am sorry I can't remember
more and don't have a way to check now, but I would be glad to put you in
touch with our guide.
Emily Rosenberg in Oakland California


Latvia SIG #Latvia German Cemetery in Latvia #latvia

Emily Rosenberg
 

Last week one of you asked about a Riga cemetery where someone with a German
sounding name might be buried. I was in Latvia a year ago and went to a the
Livas Cemetery in Liiepaja/Libau that had many well maintained German Jewish
burials >from 1889 to the last couple of decades. I am sorry I can't remember
more and don't have a way to check now, but I would be glad to put you in
touch with our guide.
Emily Rosenberg in Oakland California


Shmuel der Maggid #general

David Brostoff
 

Looking for descendants of Shmuel der MAGGID, b. ca. 1760.=20

A son was Mashe ben Shmuel ALPERT/HALPERT.

A granddaughter, Sheine Mashe Maggid ALPERT/HALPERT (1832-1917), married Chaim
Yankev BROSTOFF, and lived in Trzcianne (Yid. Trestany), northwest of Bialystok.

Thank you,
David Brostoff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Shmuel der Maggid #general

David Brostoff
 

Looking for descendants of Shmuel der MAGGID, b. ca. 1760.=20

A son was Mashe ben Shmuel ALPERT/HALPERT.

A granddaughter, Sheine Mashe Maggid ALPERT/HALPERT (1832-1917), married Chaim
Yankev BROSTOFF, and lived in Trzcianne (Yid. Trestany), northwest of Bialystok.

Thank you,
David Brostoff


Looking for a source for acquiring US immigration & naturalization documents #general

Palekaiko
 

In the past, I have used the USCIS website to obtain these documents. In order to
save some money, I am now looking for an alternative method of obtaining these
documents.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Michael Diamant
Research Aleksandrowicz
Hawaii


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for a source for acquiring US immigration & naturalization documents #general

Palekaiko
 

In the past, I have used the USCIS website to obtain these documents. In order to
save some money, I am now looking for an alternative method of obtaining these
documents.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Michael Diamant
Research Aleksandrowicz
Hawaii


Tombstone Translation Request-Hebrew-Harry WOOLBERT #general

Herbert Danziger
 

I've posted a photo of my great uncle's tombstone. His name was Harry Woolbert..
I would be grateful if someone could provide me with a translation of the Hebrew
inscription.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54189
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Herbert Danziger


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tombstone Translation Request-Hebrew-Harry WOOLBERT #general

Herbert Danziger
 

I've posted a photo of my great uncle's tombstone. His name was Harry Woolbert..
I would be grateful if someone could provide me with a translation of the Hebrew
inscription.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54189
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Herbert Danziger


Re: ViewMate Translation Request - Yiddish #general

Spencer Fuller
 

Hello,

I've posted a letter written in Yiddish by my great-great grandfather
for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54190

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you!
Spencer Fuller
Portland, OR


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ViewMate Translation Request - Yiddish #general

Spencer Fuller
 

Hello,

I've posted a letter written in Yiddish by my great-great grandfather
for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54190

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you!
Spencer Fuller
Portland, OR


ViewMate translation request, German language #general

Beverley Davis
 


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request, German language #general

Beverley Davis
 


Searching: ROZINKO-SGRAGOVICH in Latvia #general

Lois Rosen
 

Family in Russia and the United States are looking for information about, and
contacts for, descendants of Hirsch ROZINKO and wife Pesya SGRAGOVICH. They survived
the war and died in Riga in the 1980s, as did their daughter Ruth. Parents of Hirsch
are Michael/Mendel and Sarah ROZINKO and parents of Pesya are Meier Eliasch and
Baschewa SGRAGOVICH.

Lois ROSEN
Researching ROZINKO in Daugavpils and Riga, Latvia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: ROZINKO-SGRAGOVICH in Latvia #general

Lois Rosen
 

Family in Russia and the United States are looking for information about, and
contacts for, descendants of Hirsch ROZINKO and wife Pesya SGRAGOVICH. They survived
the war and died in Riga in the 1980s, as did their daughter Ruth. Parents of Hirsch
are Michael/Mendel and Sarah ROZINKO and parents of Pesya are Meier Eliasch and
Baschewa SGRAGOVICH.

Lois ROSEN
Researching ROZINKO in Daugavpils and Riga, Latvia


Re: Great Grandmother's surname #general

Sylvia FRanks
 

Many thanks to everyone who contacted me - I will gradually work my way through the
list of suggestions.

Sylvia Franks

Her father's forenames were Moshe Chaim and her name was Golda Hannah. She was born
in 1853 - I don't know where, possibly in Belarus, and died in Hampstead in 1943.
She arrived in the UK in 1906 having travelled here with 4 of her 7 children all of
whom were born in Belarus. She was married to Abraham Lieb Andrusier, a Shochet
(1853-1922), and their children's names were - Mirka, Yankel, Sarah Rifka, Julius
(my grandfather) Andresier, Malka (Millie), Esther and Monty.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Great Grandmother's surname #general

Sylvia FRanks
 

Many thanks to everyone who contacted me - I will gradually work my way through the
list of suggestions.

Sylvia Franks

Her father's forenames were Moshe Chaim and her name was Golda Hannah. She was born
in 1853 - I don't know where, possibly in Belarus, and died in Hampstead in 1943.
She arrived in the UK in 1906 having travelled here with 4 of her 7 children all of
whom were born in Belarus. She was married to Abraham Lieb Andrusier, a Shochet
(1853-1922), and their children's names were - Mirka, Yankel, Sarah Rifka, Julius
(my grandfather) Andresier, Malka (Millie), Esther and Monty.


searching for Percy Cown #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Genners,
I am hoping someone knows the name Percy Cowen born Cohen, my late mother's cousin.
I am researching the many children of her Polish Irish uncles, Baron Jacob and
Marks Leon COHEN. Percy now COWEN, a son of Baron Jacob and Dora Cohen is
identified in the London JC as a headmaster of a Jewish school in London /area
about 1910.. Born about 1886, I cannot find children or his death record in the UK.
Wife was Stella Guttmann

Then I found a Percy Cowen , the secretary of the Johannesburg Jewish Board of
Deputies around the time of the First World War.

In fact there are Percy Cowens in Australia and Canada and Massachusetts USA.
Does anyone recognize him and his wife? Or other children of the two uncles
mentioned above.

Thank you for any information
Ros Romem
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen searching for Percy Cown #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Genners,
I am hoping someone knows the name Percy Cowen born Cohen, my late mother's cousin.
I am researching the many children of her Polish Irish uncles, Baron Jacob and
Marks Leon COHEN. Percy now COWEN, a son of Baron Jacob and Dora Cohen is
identified in the London JC as a headmaster of a Jewish school in London /area
about 1910.. Born about 1886, I cannot find children or his death record in the UK.
Wife was Stella Guttmann

Then I found a Percy Cowen , the secretary of the Johannesburg Jewish Board of
Deputies around the time of the First World War.

In fact there are Percy Cowens in Australia and Canada and Massachusetts USA.
Does anyone recognize him and his wife? Or other children of the two uncles
mentioned above.

Thank you for any information
Ros Romem
Israel


Issue 129 of Genealo-J has just been published #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 129, spring 2017, has just been published

France (Graner)
Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 129, spring 2017

This issue opens with an editorial by Bruno Bloch, the president of our
society for the past 6 years, who is ending his term of office according
to our statutes. In his editorial, he summarizes all the successes of
the past six years, especially the 2012 International Conference in
Paris, the monthly lectures, the new databases, the quarterly 50 page
journal, and the interesting publications every year. Max Polonovski has
been elected to succeed Bruno Bloch as president. He has been one of the
founders of our society in 1984.
Pierre-Andre Meyer writes about the baptism of a Jew in Alsace in the
18th century. On February 7th, 1752, the parish priest of Ribeauville,
in Alsace, celebrated the wedding of a young freshly baptised Jew,
François Joseph Coblentz (1728-1803) with Catherine Müthwillig, daughter
of a baker of the city. A descendent of this couple, Vincent Meyer,
discovering his Jewish origin through this marriage certificate,
addressed P.-A. Meyer in order to learn more his ancestor. The father of
François Joseph is Gaston Coblentz who comes >from an ancient line of
rabbis and leaders of the Jewish community of Metz, originally called
Zay. Garçon Coblentz was not well accepted by the dominant family of the
Jewish community of Ribeauville, that of Rabbi Samuel Sanvill Weill who
did not make life easy for him. His long life was punctuated by
disappointments, the conversion of his son not being the least. Is the
failure of the father one of the keys to the conversion of the son?
While wondering about the motives of the conversion, one sought to know
what his destiny in his community of adoption has been. This is almost a
century of family history that this paper brings to life again through
several successive generations of Coblentz confronted with the difficult
condition of the Jews in the age of Enlightment.

Anne-Marie Fribourg was intrigued by the couple of Caroline May (ca.
1809-1864) and Henri Fischer (1801-1861). In the 1836 census at
Schirrhoffen, in Alsace, Caroline (who is called Judith Jelle in this
census) is declared as an unmarried girl with two sons, Jacques and
Wolfgang. In his birth certificate of 1835, Wolfgang is effectively said
of unknown father and we have to wait until 1860 to find the recognition
of Wolfgang by his father Henri. This is strange because in many other
acts, in many different places, Caroline and Henri say they are married.
Should we assume that only a religious marriage took place and that the
official marriage at the town hall, which is compulsory under the French
law, was omitted? Henry, Wolfgang and their offsprings became optician
oculists touring throughout France. Later, we find an architect, an
artist close to the surrealists and several people associated with the
famous Chanel firm.

We all know that Eve Line Blum has been working for years to establish
the names and fates of the deportees of convoy 73 >from Drancy to Kaunas
(Lituania). More recently, she began to study the history of all the
Jewish victims during WW2 in Franche-Comté. A problem was found for
Henri Waltz born June 3, 1865 in Belfort and deceased in the Drancy
camp, near Paris, on February 23, 1944. No birth certificate could be
found for him in Belfort. Eve Line asked for his death certificate in
Drancy. There was a marginal note on this certificate, mentioning that
it was rectified in 1949 : the name was Weill and not Waltz and he was
actually born on May 1, 1865 in Reguisheim (Haut-Rhin, Alsace). Eve Line
Blum draws attention to the fact that when doing genealogical research
about people interned in France or deported during WW2, on should not
take the data recorded at their admission into French internment camps
at face value, because many people tried to hide their real identity.
She was also shocked that the death place is given as “Drancy, cite de
la Muette”, not mentioning at all that Henri was in an internment camp.

Eliane Roos Schuhl is our specialist in deciphering and interpreting
Hebrew inscriptions. This time, she was shown a matrix seal with a pail
written on it (for those who understand French, there is a pun : un seau
sur un sceau). Why a pail? Eliane thinks that it is a zodiacal sign,
since the same Hebrew word Deli is used for a pail and also for
Aquarius. Such zodiacal sign are not rare in old synagogues and old
Hebrew books. Around the seal, on can read Yokev bar Nathan Zal >from
Kembs. Yokev is a nickname for Jacob. Kembs is an Alsatian city on the
bank of the Rhine river. She easily identified the owner as Jacob
Brunschwig (1733-1815) son of Nathan and Sara Gugenheim. In the 1784
census of the Jews, he declares a son named Nathan, as his deceased father.

Colette Clement-Zimmermann is the organizer of our sub-group on Eastern
Europe. In a short but dense paper, she describes the methodology and
the sources for genealogical research in this part of the World. She
provides many tips and many links to sources and concludes that a trip
to these countries is also almost a must.

Georges Graner (Paris, France)
www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 129 of Genealo-J has just been published #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 129, spring 2017, has just been published

France (Graner)
Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 129, spring 2017

This issue opens with an editorial by Bruno Bloch, the president of our
society for the past 6 years, who is ending his term of office according
to our statutes. In his editorial, he summarizes all the successes of
the past six years, especially the 2012 International Conference in
Paris, the monthly lectures, the new databases, the quarterly 50 page
journal, and the interesting publications every year. Max Polonovski has
been elected to succeed Bruno Bloch as president. He has been one of the
founders of our society in 1984.
Pierre-Andre Meyer writes about the baptism of a Jew in Alsace in the
18th century. On February 7th, 1752, the parish priest of Ribeauville,
in Alsace, celebrated the wedding of a young freshly baptised Jew,
François Joseph Coblentz (1728-1803) with Catherine Müthwillig, daughter
of a baker of the city. A descendent of this couple, Vincent Meyer,
discovering his Jewish origin through this marriage certificate,
addressed P.-A. Meyer in order to learn more his ancestor. The father of
François Joseph is Gaston Coblentz who comes >from an ancient line of
rabbis and leaders of the Jewish community of Metz, originally called
Zay. Garçon Coblentz was not well accepted by the dominant family of the
Jewish community of Ribeauville, that of Rabbi Samuel Sanvill Weill who
did not make life easy for him. His long life was punctuated by
disappointments, the conversion of his son not being the least. Is the
failure of the father one of the keys to the conversion of the son?
While wondering about the motives of the conversion, one sought to know
what his destiny in his community of adoption has been. This is almost a
century of family history that this paper brings to life again through
several successive generations of Coblentz confronted with the difficult
condition of the Jews in the age of Enlightment.

Anne-Marie Fribourg was intrigued by the couple of Caroline May (ca.
1809-1864) and Henri Fischer (1801-1861). In the 1836 census at
Schirrhoffen, in Alsace, Caroline (who is called Judith Jelle in this
census) is declared as an unmarried girl with two sons, Jacques and
Wolfgang. In his birth certificate of 1835, Wolfgang is effectively said
of unknown father and we have to wait until 1860 to find the recognition
of Wolfgang by his father Henri. This is strange because in many other
acts, in many different places, Caroline and Henri say they are married.
Should we assume that only a religious marriage took place and that the
official marriage at the town hall, which is compulsory under the French
law, was omitted? Henry, Wolfgang and their offsprings became optician
oculists touring throughout France. Later, we find an architect, an
artist close to the surrealists and several people associated with the
famous Chanel firm.

We all know that Eve Line Blum has been working for years to establish
the names and fates of the deportees of convoy 73 >from Drancy to Kaunas
(Lituania). More recently, she began to study the history of all the
Jewish victims during WW2 in Franche-Comté. A problem was found for
Henri Waltz born June 3, 1865 in Belfort and deceased in the Drancy
camp, near Paris, on February 23, 1944. No birth certificate could be
found for him in Belfort. Eve Line asked for his death certificate in
Drancy. There was a marginal note on this certificate, mentioning that
it was rectified in 1949 : the name was Weill and not Waltz and he was
actually born on May 1, 1865 in Reguisheim (Haut-Rhin, Alsace). Eve Line
Blum draws attention to the fact that when doing genealogical research
about people interned in France or deported during WW2, on should not
take the data recorded at their admission into French internment camps
at face value, because many people tried to hide their real identity.
She was also shocked that the death place is given as “Drancy, cite de
la Muette”, not mentioning at all that Henri was in an internment camp.

Eliane Roos Schuhl is our specialist in deciphering and interpreting
Hebrew inscriptions. This time, she was shown a matrix seal with a pail
written on it (for those who understand French, there is a pun : un seau
sur un sceau). Why a pail? Eliane thinks that it is a zodiacal sign,
since the same Hebrew word Deli is used for a pail and also for
Aquarius. Such zodiacal sign are not rare in old synagogues and old
Hebrew books. Around the seal, on can read Yokev bar Nathan Zal >from
Kembs. Yokev is a nickname for Jacob. Kembs is an Alsatian city on the
bank of the Rhine river. She easily identified the owner as Jacob
Brunschwig (1733-1815) son of Nathan and Sara Gugenheim. In the 1784
census of the Jews, he declares a son named Nathan, as his deceased father.

Colette Clement-Zimmermann is the organizer of our sub-group on Eastern
Europe. In a short but dense paper, she describes the methodology and
the sources for genealogical research in this part of the World. She
provides many tips and many links to sources and concludes that a trip
to these countries is also almost a must.

Georges Graner (Paris, France)
www.genealoj.org

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