Date   

Naturalization 1935 #general

Robin Sherman <strathtch@...>
 

Does anyone know if where the original intent papers would be filed for a
Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, resident naturalized in 1935? I ordered the
indexes for the US Court Southern and Eastern to nail down the date, but
really want the intent form. How about prior to 1927 for the same?
Brooklyn courts?? Would Varick St. have any of this? I emailed them, but
got no response.

Robin Sherman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization 1935 #general

Robin Sherman <strathtch@...>
 

Does anyone know if where the original intent papers would be filed for a
Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, resident naturalized in 1935? I ordered the
indexes for the US Court Southern and Eastern to nail down the date, but
really want the intent form. How about prior to 1927 for the same?
Brooklyn courts?? Would Varick St. have any of this? I emailed them, but
got no response.

Robin Sherman


Start with books #belarus

Yackov & Lena Berkun <berkun@...>
 

I'm glad to see that we have passed the questioning stage. I suggest to
start with the translation of printed material. In  libraries of
Universities there must be books called "Gubernskie vedomosti" for Minsk
and other gubernias with Duma voiter lists, "Pamyatnaya knizhka" for
Minsk and other, and a book either called "Ves Minsk" or "Vsia
Bellorussia."
I didn't find anything in the library of the Hebrew University.
 I'll be glad to participate in any translation needed once these books
are found.
 
Yackov
Jerusalem

Researching:
          SHEICHET, GETS >from Mozyr,    Minsk gubernia, Belorussia
          KATSENELSON >from Rechytsa,  Minsk gubernia, Belorussia

Moderator's Note: Yockov, thank you for your offer to help with the
translation of books. Is there anyone in this group that has access to
a library that has the above books?


Belarus SIG #Belarus Start with books #belarus

Yackov & Lena Berkun <berkun@...>
 

I'm glad to see that we have passed the questioning stage. I suggest to
start with the translation of printed material. In  libraries of
Universities there must be books called "Gubernskie vedomosti" for Minsk
and other gubernias with Duma voiter lists, "Pamyatnaya knizhka" for
Minsk and other, and a book either called "Ves Minsk" or "Vsia
Bellorussia."
I didn't find anything in the library of the Hebrew University.
 I'll be glad to participate in any translation needed once these books
are found.
 
Yackov
Jerusalem

Researching:
          SHEICHET, GETS >from Mozyr,    Minsk gubernia, Belorussia
          KATSENELSON >from Rechytsa,  Minsk gubernia, Belorussia

Moderator's Note: Yockov, thank you for your offer to help with the
translation of books. Is there anyone in this group that has access to
a library that has the above books?


Re: Naturalization Question #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Chuck Vollman <spindizzy2@...> wrote:

I found that my grandfather (father's side) was naturalized
on Oct 10, 1876 yet in the 1900 census it states that he
arrived in New York City in 1875. Is this possible? I
thought that a peson had to be in the U.S. 5 years to be
eligible for naturalization.
The problem here is the Census information. Census information
is notoriously unreliable. It is not documented or verified or
authenticated in any way. The census enumerator simply writes
down what someone tells him... the responder might have been
your grandfather himself, or his wife, or one of the children
that were at home when the enumerator called... or even a
neighbor, if no one was home. "1875" was just a guess that
someone told the enumerator.

If I can pinpoint the years he arrived this would help in
possibly finding what ship he arrived in. I am told that
during the late 1800 most immigrants arrived through Castle
Gardens at the south end of Manhatten.
Has any of that information been indexed?
See the JewishGen FAQ ("Frequently Asked Question") document:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>, section #10,
on Passenger Arrival Lists.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naturalization Question #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Chuck Vollman <spindizzy2@...> wrote:

I found that my grandfather (father's side) was naturalized
on Oct 10, 1876 yet in the 1900 census it states that he
arrived in New York City in 1875. Is this possible? I
thought that a peson had to be in the U.S. 5 years to be
eligible for naturalization.
The problem here is the Census information. Census information
is notoriously unreliable. It is not documented or verified or
authenticated in any way. The census enumerator simply writes
down what someone tells him... the responder might have been
your grandfather himself, or his wife, or one of the children
that were at home when the enumerator called... or even a
neighbor, if no one was home. "1875" was just a guess that
someone told the enumerator.

If I can pinpoint the years he arrived this would help in
possibly finding what ship he arrived in. I am told that
during the late 1800 most immigrants arrived through Castle
Gardens at the south end of Manhatten.
Has any of that information been indexed?
See the JewishGen FAQ ("Frequently Asked Question") document:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>, section #10,
on Passenger Arrival Lists.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@...>


Re: Hebrew lettering #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <LYR6197-4861--approved-soc-genealogy-jewish@...>, ESES@... writes:

|> One additional question could the name Toba be Temma

In connection with names it's hard to give a categorical "no". But as far
as I know these are different names. On the other hand, Toba could very
well be Gittel (Tova is Hebrew for "good", and Gittel is a Yiddish diminutive
for "good").

I had a great-grandmother Tema. Her name was spelled tet-ayin-mem-ayin in
her obituary in a Yiddish newspaper, but tet-ayin-mem-yud on her headstone.

Robert Israel
Department of Mathematics
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z2
israel@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hebrew lettering #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <LYR6197-4861--approved-soc-genealogy-jewish@...>, ESES@... writes:

|> One additional question could the name Toba be Temma

In connection with names it's hard to give a categorical "no". But as far
as I know these are different names. On the other hand, Toba could very
well be Gittel (Tova is Hebrew for "good", and Gittel is a Yiddish diminutive
for "good").

I had a great-grandmother Tema. Her name was spelled tet-ayin-mem-ayin in
her obituary in a Yiddish newspaper, but tet-ayin-mem-yud on her headstone.

Robert Israel
Department of Mathematics
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z2
israel@...


First Name: Szapse? #general

Mjgreenb@...
 

Shalom!
I am looking for a translation as to the firstname of Szapse. The origin is
from Austria and the Hebrew Name would be Yitzchak. Thank you
Mike Greenberg

SEARCHING:
FROMER/FRUMET/FRUMETH : Snyatyn
GREENBERG: Snyatyn


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen First Name: Szapse? #general

Mjgreenb@...
 

Shalom!
I am looking for a translation as to the firstname of Szapse. The origin is
from Austria and the Hebrew Name would be Yitzchak. Thank you
Mike Greenberg

SEARCHING:
FROMER/FRUMET/FRUMETH : Snyatyn
GREENBERG: Snyatyn


Re: " The Goldstein Variations " #general

Alexander Sharon <sharon@...>
 

Ed Goldstein wrote:

I have easily found my Goldstein records in and around
Bialystok-Tykocin-Warsaw. The problem of the name being "Transported" or
taken
as a surname when arriving in the USA or Canada comes >from the many
spellings
of GOLDSTEIN in Eastern Europe as well as the translation >from the
Russian
alphabet. This is not to mention the difficulty of pronouncing the name
properly to the Anglo-Immigration officers upon arrival. I have seen
Goldstein
spelled: Khaltzshtein, Julzhtein, et.al. Do you see the schism in the
translation?
It would appear that the name of Goldstein is like some fine wines: It
does
not necessarily travel well.
For those of you who want to follow up on my message there are oodles of
such
Goldstein spelling " Errors " in the FAMILY FINDER section of
Jewishgen.org.

Ed Goldstein
adifbey@...

Ther is another "popular" Polish variation in Goldstein and other Jewish
surnames ending with the "stein" (engl."stone") - Goldsztajn, Rubinsztajn,
Epsztajn, and so on. Another yet Polish Jewish names variations is
associated with the "klein" (engl. "small") = Klajnberg, Klajndorp,
Klajnszul, etc.

Alexander Sharon
Clgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: " The Goldstein Variations " #general

Alexander Sharon <sharon@...>
 

Ed Goldstein wrote:

I have easily found my Goldstein records in and around
Bialystok-Tykocin-Warsaw. The problem of the name being "Transported" or
taken
as a surname when arriving in the USA or Canada comes >from the many
spellings
of GOLDSTEIN in Eastern Europe as well as the translation >from the
Russian
alphabet. This is not to mention the difficulty of pronouncing the name
properly to the Anglo-Immigration officers upon arrival. I have seen
Goldstein
spelled: Khaltzshtein, Julzhtein, et.al. Do you see the schism in the
translation?
It would appear that the name of Goldstein is like some fine wines: It
does
not necessarily travel well.
For those of you who want to follow up on my message there are oodles of
such
Goldstein spelling " Errors " in the FAMILY FINDER section of
Jewishgen.org.

Ed Goldstein
adifbey@...

Ther is another "popular" Polish variation in Goldstein and other Jewish
surnames ending with the "stein" (engl."stone") - Goldsztajn, Rubinsztajn,
Epsztajn, and so on. Another yet Polish Jewish names variations is
associated with the "klein" (engl. "small") = Klajnberg, Klajndorp,
Klajnszul, etc.

Alexander Sharon
Clgary, Ab.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "All Lithuania" Database Intros Needed #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

We are in the process of cleaning up and restructuring data already
in the "All Lithuania" database, and we need your help.

For those who have submitted databases, please complete an
introduction and send it to <Litvaks@...> For those who have
completed and sent introductions, please read them over, and see
if they fit the following criteria:

To paraphrase Warren Blatt:

<<Please follow the database documentation requirements, as
outlined below. There needs to be enough information in the
database description to enable users to understand the results and
proceed without further intervention >from LitvakSIG. All
abbreviations and cryptic notations must be explained. Things that
are obvious to you are likely not obvious to novice researchers from
around the world.

**********************
Requirements for database contributors:

For each database we need a database description, which should
include:

WHAT data is included? :
What is/are the SOURCE(s) of the data?
In what language(s) does the original data appear?
What FIELDS are in the database?
What additional data might be in the original source but is not part of
the database (i.e., why should they follow up)?
HOW can the original source(s) be accessed?
WHO created the original data?
WHOM did the extraction?
WHEN (what time period is covered by the data)?
WHERE (what geographic locations are covered by the data)?
HOW MANY records are in the database?

Anything else that you can think of the might be useful to users of the
database.

The objective of this description is to eliminate the hundreds of "what
does this mean?" and "what do I do now?" questions that arise after
users get a hit in the database. The introduction should be a full
explanation that allows the user to follow up on their finds
independently.

Here's the test:

At the next genealogical meeting, go up to an average Yossel/Yentl
genealogist, in Litvak terms), and show him/her the results of a
database search, and your explanatory matter. Ask him/her to follow
up on that find. You aren't allowed to say another word -- that's
simulating the Internet environment, which users will be dealing
within our reality. If that person can follow up without asking you
any questions, you've succeeded. If they can't, you've failed.

Remember, we're talking average Yossel/Yentl genealogists here,
not a Judaic scholar steeped in rabbinic works and Litvak traditions.
Our target audience will be, for the most part, newcomers to
genealogical research. Many have no connection with their Jewish
roots; many do not have English as their first language.

Abbreviations and terms that are familiar or common knowledge to
you are NOT to them. "Who's 'Vsia Rossia' and what's his email
address?" "Where's 'Duma'?"

You could provide a one or two-sentence explanation of each source,
with a full bibliographic citation, and a reference to further
explanations. For example, for 'Vsia Rossia', you could refer people
to relevant articles (Avotaynu or other) for more information.

You've got to keep this test in mind -- and you have to remain silent
while they puzzle over it. The explanations need to be
self-contained, or give pointers to other sources with additional
explanation.>>

Thanks Warren, I think you've hit every contingency.

Davida Noyek Handler
Co-coordinator, LitvakSIG


"All Lithuania" Database Intros Needed #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

We are in the process of cleaning up and restructuring data already
in the "All Lithuania" database, and we need your help.

For those who have submitted databases, please complete an
introduction and send it to <Litvaks@...> For those who have
completed and sent introductions, please read them over, and see
if they fit the following criteria:

To paraphrase Warren Blatt:

<<Please follow the database documentation requirements, as
outlined below. There needs to be enough information in the
database description to enable users to understand the results and
proceed without further intervention >from LitvakSIG. All
abbreviations and cryptic notations must be explained. Things that
are obvious to you are likely not obvious to novice researchers from
around the world.

**********************
Requirements for database contributors:

For each database we need a database description, which should
include:

WHAT data is included? :
What is/are the SOURCE(s) of the data?
In what language(s) does the original data appear?
What FIELDS are in the database?
What additional data might be in the original source but is not part of
the database (i.e., why should they follow up)?
HOW can the original source(s) be accessed?
WHO created the original data?
WHOM did the extraction?
WHEN (what time period is covered by the data)?
WHERE (what geographic locations are covered by the data)?
HOW MANY records are in the database?

Anything else that you can think of the might be useful to users of the
database.

The objective of this description is to eliminate the hundreds of "what
does this mean?" and "what do I do now?" questions that arise after
users get a hit in the database. The introduction should be a full
explanation that allows the user to follow up on their finds
independently.

Here's the test:

At the next genealogical meeting, go up to an average Yossel/Yentl
genealogist, in Litvak terms), and show him/her the results of a
database search, and your explanatory matter. Ask him/her to follow
up on that find. You aren't allowed to say another word -- that's
simulating the Internet environment, which users will be dealing
within our reality. If that person can follow up without asking you
any questions, you've succeeded. If they can't, you've failed.

Remember, we're talking average Yossel/Yentl genealogists here,
not a Judaic scholar steeped in rabbinic works and Litvak traditions.
Our target audience will be, for the most part, newcomers to
genealogical research. Many have no connection with their Jewish
roots; many do not have English as their first language.

Abbreviations and terms that are familiar or common knowledge to
you are NOT to them. "Who's 'Vsia Rossia' and what's his email
address?" "Where's 'Duma'?"

You could provide a one or two-sentence explanation of each source,
with a full bibliographic citation, and a reference to further
explanations. For example, for 'Vsia Rossia', you could refer people
to relevant articles (Avotaynu or other) for more information.

You've got to keep this test in mind -- and you have to remain silent
while they puzzle over it. The explanations need to be
self-contained, or give pointers to other sources with additional
explanation.>>

Thanks Warren, I think you've hit every contingency.

Davida Noyek Handler
Co-coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Poor Jews' Temporary Shelter (London) #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

Eric Goldstein <ELGOLD1> writes:

<<Does anyone know if the database for the records of the Poor Jews' Temporary
Shelter (London) is still on the internet? If so, what is the address? I can't
seem to find it.>>

Dear Eric:

I just tried the URL, and its still working. Here it is:

<http://www.hrm.uct.ac.za/cgi/cgi_shelter.exe>

Davida Noyek Handler
Co-coordinator, LitvakSIG


Re: Poor Jews' Temporary Shelter (London) #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

Eric Goldstein <ELGOLD1> writes:

<<Does anyone know if the database for the records of the Poor Jews' Temporary
Shelter (London) is still on the internet? If so, what is the address? I can't
seem to find it.>>

Dear Eric:

I just tried the URL, and its still working. Here it is:

<http://www.hrm.uct.ac.za/cgi/cgi_shelter.exe>

Davida Noyek Handler
Co-coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Klaipeda (Memel) #lithuania

Leonard Harris <cara@...>
 

Sorry if this is common knowledge to many, but in what guberniya and uyzed
is Klaipeda (formerly Memel)? I did not see it in the uyzed list. Please
reply directly to my e-mail address, or kindly send me a copy if you reply
to the list.

Thanks very much.

Brent Harris <cara@...>
Kingston, Ontario, Canada

RESEARCHING:
COHEN - >from Gomel, Belarus --> Toronto
GINSBERG - >from Gomel, Belarus --> Toronto
HERSCOVITCH - >from Burdujeni, Romania --> Montreal
LAYMAN - >from Odessa, Ukraine --> Toronto
ORNSTEIN - >from Romania --> Montreal
PARADIES - >from Vilnius, Klaipeda & Skuodas, Lithuania; --> London
>from Liepaja, Latvia "
ROSENBLATT - >from Vienna, Austria --> Montreal
SCHULTZ - >from Vilnius, Lithuania --> London
SLAVUTSKY - >from Slavuta, Cherkassy & Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine --> London
SOLOMON - >from Suceava (formerly in Bukovina), Romania --> Montreal
WAHL - >from Suceava (formerly in Bukovina), Romania --> Montreal


Yossele Rosenblatt #general

SJBlau <sjblau@...>
 

I'm trying to research a possible family connection with Yossele
ROSENBLATT's wife, Taube. Does anyone have any information regarding
Taube Rosenblatt's genealogy?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you.

Seth J. Blau
SJBlau@...


Klaipeda (Memel) #lithuania

Leonard Harris <cara@...>
 

Sorry if this is common knowledge to many, but in what guberniya and uyzed
is Klaipeda (formerly Memel)? I did not see it in the uyzed list. Please
reply directly to my e-mail address, or kindly send me a copy if you reply
to the list.

Thanks very much.

Brent Harris <cara@...>
Kingston, Ontario, Canada

RESEARCHING:
COHEN - >from Gomel, Belarus --> Toronto
GINSBERG - >from Gomel, Belarus --> Toronto
HERSCOVITCH - >from Burdujeni, Romania --> Montreal
LAYMAN - >from Odessa, Ukraine --> Toronto
ORNSTEIN - >from Romania --> Montreal
PARADIES - >from Vilnius, Klaipeda & Skuodas, Lithuania; --> London
>from Liepaja, Latvia "
ROSENBLATT - >from Vienna, Austria --> Montreal
SCHULTZ - >from Vilnius, Lithuania --> London
SLAVUTSKY - >from Slavuta, Cherkassy & Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine --> London
SOLOMON - >from Suceava (formerly in Bukovina), Romania --> Montreal
WAHL - >from Suceava (formerly in Bukovina), Romania --> Montreal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yossele Rosenblatt #general

SJBlau <sjblau@...>
 

I'm trying to research a possible family connection with Yossele
ROSENBLATT's wife, Taube. Does anyone have any information regarding
Taube Rosenblatt's genealogy?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you.

Seth J. Blau
SJBlau@...