Date   

Re: KRIS Family #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear Sarah:

Search the JRI-Poland database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm

Two hints will make the search easier.

1. When entering the surname, enter as "[K]RIS" with the square brackets
around the "K", which forces only results that start in the letter "K."
And always use "sounds like" to capture spelling variations. KRIS could
also be KRYZ.

2. Set geographical region to Grodno Gubernia to capture only results for
Bialystok and nearby towns.

The names of your grandmother Sophia and her two sister, Faye and Jean,
are their "American" names. They most likely used Yiddish or Hebrew names
in Bialystok. Finding their graves and their matzevah inscriptions will
give you a better idea of their "Bialystok" given names and that of their
father. I think your great grandmother's matzevah inscription is probably
Chaya Lea, not Chaim Lev. You can search the JRI-Poland database for
"Chaya" and the given name of the father (without a surname). This given
name search may turn up some clues for you.

Good hunting.

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----
Hello,
I need some help locating my maternal grandmother's (Sophia Kross
Kass) family. According to my mother they lived in Bialystok, she
believes in the actual city. She said when her mother came here the
last name sounded like Kris, but Sophia changed it to Kross. My mother
said Sophia's family was well off, that she believes there were 13
siblings, but not that many lived, and that her mother's father was a
Colonel in the Czar's army. Additionally, one of her mother's brothers
was a Rabbi.
Sophia came here approx. 1909 and then she brought over her two
sisters, Faye & Jean and their mother, Chaya Leah, came a few years
later. But their father & brother stayed because America wasn't
religious enough.
I am trying to find the original last name and what became of the
remaining family. ( I can't find my grandmother in Ellis Island, and she
did come through there). Their Hebrew names were Chaim Lev (at least
that's what is on my grandmother's headstone).
Any help would be appreciated.


Thank you in advance,

Shelah Feldman
St. Louis, MO


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: KRIS Family #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear Sarah:

Search the JRI-Poland database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm

Two hints will make the search easier.

1. When entering the surname, enter as "[K]RIS" with the square brackets
around the "K", which forces only results that start in the letter "K."
And always use "sounds like" to capture spelling variations. KRIS could
also be KRYZ.

2. Set geographical region to Grodno Gubernia to capture only results for
Bialystok and nearby towns.

The names of your grandmother Sophia and her two sister, Faye and Jean,
are their "American" names. They most likely used Yiddish or Hebrew names
in Bialystok. Finding their graves and their matzevah inscriptions will
give you a better idea of their "Bialystok" given names and that of their
father. I think your great grandmother's matzevah inscription is probably
Chaya Lea, not Chaim Lev. You can search the JRI-Poland database for
"Chaya" and the given name of the father (without a surname). This given
name search may turn up some clues for you.

Good hunting.

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----
Hello,
I need some help locating my maternal grandmother's (Sophia Kross
Kass) family. According to my mother they lived in Bialystok, she
believes in the actual city. She said when her mother came here the
last name sounded like Kris, but Sophia changed it to Kross. My mother
said Sophia's family was well off, that she believes there were 13
siblings, but not that many lived, and that her mother's father was a
Colonel in the Czar's army. Additionally, one of her mother's brothers
was a Rabbi.
Sophia came here approx. 1909 and then she brought over her two
sisters, Faye & Jean and their mother, Chaya Leah, came a few years
later. But their father & brother stayed because America wasn't
religious enough.
I am trying to find the original last name and what became of the
remaining family. ( I can't find my grandmother in Ellis Island, and she
did come through there). Their Hebrew names were Chaim Lev (at least
that's what is on my grandmother's headstone).
Any help would be appreciated.


Thank you in advance,

Shelah Feldman
St. Louis, MO


Info Needed on Siemiatycze Street Address: Ulitza Polska 20 #poland

Sheldon Rabin
 

I am trying to track down any information possible on an address in
Siemiatycze, where my grandfather, Louis Sotnick, lived until emigrating
to the US and Brooklyn in 1912. The address is Ulitza Polska 20.

I've identified a few maps online that contain some street
designations, but they are mostly >from modern day Siemiatycze and contain
relatively little detail. Six months ago I wrote to the Siemiatycze city
government, asking for their help, at the least hoping they could advise
me in which section of the city this street exists, or existed a century
ago. So far, no reply.

I am at a dead end, and am asking Bialygeners if they have some info
on the address, or perhaps can point me in the right direction.

Thanks,

Sheldon Rabin
Aurora, Illinois
sheldonrabin@yahoo.com

Siemiatycze: Sotnick
Rozwadow: Rebensaft


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Info Needed on Siemiatycze Street Address: Ulitza Polska 20 #poland

Sheldon Rabin
 

I am trying to track down any information possible on an address in
Siemiatycze, where my grandfather, Louis Sotnick, lived until emigrating
to the US and Brooklyn in 1912. The address is Ulitza Polska 20.

I've identified a few maps online that contain some street
designations, but they are mostly >from modern day Siemiatycze and contain
relatively little detail. Six months ago I wrote to the Siemiatycze city
government, asking for their help, at the least hoping they could advise
me in which section of the city this street exists, or existed a century
ago. So far, no reply.

I am at a dead end, and am asking Bialygeners if they have some info
on the address, or perhaps can point me in the right direction.

Thanks,

Sheldon Rabin
Aurora, Illinois
sheldonrabin@yahoo.com

Siemiatycze: Sotnick
Rozwadow: Rebensaft


Rabbi Moshe Hai Eliaqim in Tiberias #rabbinic

Jeff at SG
 

Does anyone have information about Rabbi Moshe Hai Eliaqim who lived
and taught in Tiberias around the 1890-1910? He had been a longtime
president of the Rabbinic Tribunal of Casablanca before coming to
Tiberias.

I am particularly interested in some of his students, specifically a
Rabbi Shlomo MALKA who became a judge at the Tiberias (or Safed) Bet
Din before becoming the Chief Rabbi of the Sudan.

Any sources for researching Sephardic rabbis living in Tiberias
during the period 1890 to 1910 would be greatly appreciated. Lists
of names, etc. Anything that could yield information would be
appreciated.

Jeff Malka
"SephardicGen Resources" website: http://www.sephardicgen.com/


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Moshe Hai Eliaqim in Tiberias #rabbinic

Jeff at SG
 

Does anyone have information about Rabbi Moshe Hai Eliaqim who lived
and taught in Tiberias around the 1890-1910? He had been a longtime
president of the Rabbinic Tribunal of Casablanca before coming to
Tiberias.

I am particularly interested in some of his students, specifically a
Rabbi Shlomo MALKA who became a judge at the Tiberias (or Safed) Bet
Din before becoming the Chief Rabbi of the Sudan.

Any sources for researching Sephardic rabbis living in Tiberias
during the period 1890 to 1910 would be greatly appreciated. Lists
of names, etc. Anything that could yield information would be
appreciated.

Jeff Malka
"SephardicGen Resources" website: http://www.sephardicgen.com/


Grossverdeiner Ruv #rabbinic

Chaya minna sapirman
 

Dear Genners,

Would anyone have information about the Grossverdeiner Ruv-Rabbi
(who would have been in Roumania in the 1920s-1940s aprox.)? I was
told that he said he was connected to Rabbi Josef KARO through a
STEIN family.

Any leads would be very appreciated.

Thank you,
M.Sapirman
Toronto


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Grossverdeiner Ruv #rabbinic

Chaya minna sapirman
 

Dear Genners,

Would anyone have information about the Grossverdeiner Ruv-Rabbi
(who would have been in Roumania in the 1920s-1940s aprox.)? I was
told that he said he was connected to Rabbi Josef KARO through a
STEIN family.

Any leads would be very appreciated.

Thank you,
M.Sapirman
Toronto


Name Translations #poland

Crilly <crilly@...>
 

I found what may be my great-grandmother, grandmother and my grandmother's
siblings on the ships manifest on the Ellis Island Web site. The ship is
the Caronia, which sailed >from Liverpool, arriving in New York on April
10th, 1905. The timing is right, as I was told by my grandmother's cousin
that they arrived around 1906. However, there are some discrepancies that I
hope someone can help me clear up. The "Place of Residence" is given as
"Grodno", while they were all born in Krynki. Are these towns close to each
other? In addition, though the surname is correct (Goldman), the first
names both match and don't match. What I'm wondering is if the
Anglicization of their first names may be causing this, or if I simply have
the wrong family. Can anyone who is familiar with Jewish names >from this
area of Poland tell me if the names might actually align, or if it's too
much of a stretch? Matching known ages of my family in 1906, here are the
match-ups:

Known Name Manifest Name
Gitel Goldman Gitel Goldman
Mike Goldman Meyer Goldman
Sara Goldman Schoose Goldman
Anne Goldman Hene Goldman
Samuel Goldman Samuel Goldman
Nathan Goldman Miske Goldman

I know that my great-grandfather (Gitel's husband) arrived two years
earlier, which is why he's not on the manifest. Any input would be
greatly appreciated!

Crilly Butler


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Name Translations #poland

Crilly <crilly@...>
 

I found what may be my great-grandmother, grandmother and my grandmother's
siblings on the ships manifest on the Ellis Island Web site. The ship is
the Caronia, which sailed >from Liverpool, arriving in New York on April
10th, 1905. The timing is right, as I was told by my grandmother's cousin
that they arrived around 1906. However, there are some discrepancies that I
hope someone can help me clear up. The "Place of Residence" is given as
"Grodno", while they were all born in Krynki. Are these towns close to each
other? In addition, though the surname is correct (Goldman), the first
names both match and don't match. What I'm wondering is if the
Anglicization of their first names may be causing this, or if I simply have
the wrong family. Can anyone who is familiar with Jewish names >from this
area of Poland tell me if the names might actually align, or if it's too
much of a stretch? Matching known ages of my family in 1906, here are the
match-ups:

Known Name Manifest Name
Gitel Goldman Gitel Goldman
Mike Goldman Meyer Goldman
Sara Goldman Schoose Goldman
Anne Goldman Hene Goldman
Samuel Goldman Samuel Goldman
Nathan Goldman Miske Goldman

I know that my great-grandfather (Gitel's husband) arrived two years
earlier, which is why he's not on the manifest. Any input would be
greatly appreciated!

Crilly Butler


How to find maiden name? #poland

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

One of the mysteries in my family is the maiden name of Sarah (Chaja
Sora) Weisberg.

Chaja Sora married Benjamin Dobroniewski in about 1869 in Bialystok -
or some town near-by.
They had 10 children (8 survived childhood) and then immigrated to New
York City where they had 3 more children.
Upon landing in NY they promptly changed their surname to Weisberg.

I have collected many birth, marriage, and death documents for the
family which give the following maiden names for Sarah: Benjamin,
Wulinsky, Apelbaum, Farber, Weiss, Werner, Malkin, Rose.

I have put all the information on a web site at
http://bobby1st.googlepages.com/sarah%27smaidenname%3F

All suggestions on how to find her "real" maiden name are welcome.

Bobby Furst
familymysteries@gmail.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland How to find maiden name? #poland

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

One of the mysteries in my family is the maiden name of Sarah (Chaja
Sora) Weisberg.

Chaja Sora married Benjamin Dobroniewski in about 1869 in Bialystok -
or some town near-by.
They had 10 children (8 survived childhood) and then immigrated to New
York City where they had 3 more children.
Upon landing in NY they promptly changed their surname to Weisberg.

I have collected many birth, marriage, and death documents for the
family which give the following maiden names for Sarah: Benjamin,
Wulinsky, Apelbaum, Farber, Weiss, Werner, Malkin, Rose.

I have put all the information on a web site at
http://bobby1st.googlepages.com/sarah%27smaidenname%3F

All suggestions on how to find her "real" maiden name are welcome.

Bobby Furst
familymysteries@gmail.com


Bialystoker Center Yahrzeit Card Index Now Online #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear BialyGenners:

It has been three years since this project to index the Bialystoker
Center Yahrzeit Cards was announced. Many of you may not be familiar
with this project, so I will explain.

The Yahrzeit Card database contains 3,984 index entries >from cards
maintained by The Bialystoker Center in New York City >from about 1880
through about 1994. Many Jews -- Bialystokers and non-Bialystokers alike --
memorialized their departed relatives and friends with Yahrzeit plaques in
the Center's sanctuary and community rooms. The Yahrzeit Card was a record
of the person's death and also served as an administrative reference
enabling the Center's office to send notifications of upcoming Yahrzeits to
relatives and friends of the departed.

This database is now online and can be accessed via links at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/BialyGen/Yahrzeit.htm. This webpage
explains the database and the project, shows some samples of the cards, and
gives some background of The Bialystoker Center. The entire database can
also be downloaded as an Excel file. The fields captured in this database
are:

Surname of Deceased
Given Names of Deceased
Date of Death (Secular)
Hebrew Given Name
Hebrew Name of Father
Other Surnames >from Card (relatives notified of Yahrzeit date)
US States/Countries (of relatives)

To obtain JPEG images of Yahrzeit cards for your family, please email me at
bialystoker@comcast.net with the full names of the memorialized people and
their dates of death. Please place "Yahrzeit" in the subject of the message.

I would like to thank The Bialystoker Center for their help and permission
and the following individuals who helped create this database: Tilford
Bartman, Steve Denker, Stephanie Carson Feldman, Lynn Franklin, Bobby Furst,
J. Michael Gilbreath, Henry Kaplan, Barbara Meyers, Gary Mokotoff, Greg
Stone, Kathryn Wallach, and Sid Zabludoff.

I hope this database provides some help with your search.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystoker Center Yahrzeit Card Index Now Online #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear BialyGenners:

It has been three years since this project to index the Bialystoker
Center Yahrzeit Cards was announced. Many of you may not be familiar
with this project, so I will explain.

The Yahrzeit Card database contains 3,984 index entries >from cards
maintained by The Bialystoker Center in New York City >from about 1880
through about 1994. Many Jews -- Bialystokers and non-Bialystokers alike --
memorialized their departed relatives and friends with Yahrzeit plaques in
the Center's sanctuary and community rooms. The Yahrzeit Card was a record
of the person's death and also served as an administrative reference
enabling the Center's office to send notifications of upcoming Yahrzeits to
relatives and friends of the departed.

This database is now online and can be accessed via links at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/BialyGen/Yahrzeit.htm. This webpage
explains the database and the project, shows some samples of the cards, and
gives some background of The Bialystoker Center. The entire database can
also be downloaded as an Excel file. The fields captured in this database
are:

Surname of Deceased
Given Names of Deceased
Date of Death (Secular)
Hebrew Given Name
Hebrew Name of Father
Other Surnames >from Card (relatives notified of Yahrzeit date)
US States/Countries (of relatives)

To obtain JPEG images of Yahrzeit cards for your family, please email me at
bialystoker@comcast.net with the full names of the memorialized people and
their dates of death. Please place "Yahrzeit" in the subject of the message.

I would like to thank The Bialystoker Center for their help and permission
and the following individuals who helped create this database: Tilford
Bartman, Steve Denker, Stephanie Carson Feldman, Lynn Franklin, Bobby Furst,
J. Michael Gilbreath, Henry Kaplan, Barbara Meyers, Gary Mokotoff, Greg
Stone, Kathryn Wallach, and Sid Zabludoff.

I hope this database provides some help with your search.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


An autumn visit to PFUNGSTADT town and ALSBACH burial ground in HESSEN GERMANY #germany

Jonathan Grodzinski
 

The town >from which my JEIDEL ancestors come, Pfungstadt in Hessen, Germany, is
putting on an exhibition about the Jews of the area in October / November, 2008.

I am arranging a two day trip >from London to coincide with this .
Leaving London Heathrow two and a half hours after Shabbat on November
1st, stay overnight in Frankfurt and spend Sunday touring the cemetery
in ALSBACH-HAHNLEIN *, meeting the StadtArchivist as well as a local
historian, both of whom who will be talking to us during the day about
our family and the Jewish communities in ESCHOLLBRUECKEN and
PFUNGSTADT, the local school will be doing a play about the same, and I
hope to have a trip round FRANKFURT AM MAIN on the following morning,
prior to returning to London for Monday afternoon.

Currently flights can be had for [ ? Euros - the Euro symbol garbled this text ]
return London - Frankfurt London.

Additional costs will be hotel (two nights), transportation and food.

Anyone with connections to PFUNGSTADT is welcome to join us, and should
contact me soon.

Jonathan Grodzinski 4th generation master baker - London UK

please respond soon privately to jgrodz@aol.com

PS ** Alsbach ** is the burial ground for many Jewish communities of the
South Hesse region, namely: Alsbach, Auerbach
Bensheim, Biblis, Biebesheim, Burstadt, Crumstade
Eberstadt, Elmshausen, Eschollbruecken, Gernsheim, Goddelau, Grosshausen
Grossrohrheim, Hahn, Haehnlein, Heppenheim, Hofheim
Jugenheim, Kleinhausen, Lorsch, Pfungstadt, Nordheim, Reichenbach, Schoenberg
Seeheim, Schwanheim, Stockstadt, Zwingenberg


German SIG #Germany An autumn visit to PFUNGSTADT town and ALSBACH burial ground in HESSEN GERMANY #germany

Jonathan Grodzinski
 

The town >from which my JEIDEL ancestors come, Pfungstadt in Hessen, Germany, is
putting on an exhibition about the Jews of the area in October / November, 2008.

I am arranging a two day trip >from London to coincide with this .
Leaving London Heathrow two and a half hours after Shabbat on November
1st, stay overnight in Frankfurt and spend Sunday touring the cemetery
in ALSBACH-HAHNLEIN *, meeting the StadtArchivist as well as a local
historian, both of whom who will be talking to us during the day about
our family and the Jewish communities in ESCHOLLBRUECKEN and
PFUNGSTADT, the local school will be doing a play about the same, and I
hope to have a trip round FRANKFURT AM MAIN on the following morning,
prior to returning to London for Monday afternoon.

Currently flights can be had for [ ? Euros - the Euro symbol garbled this text ]
return London - Frankfurt London.

Additional costs will be hotel (two nights), transportation and food.

Anyone with connections to PFUNGSTADT is welcome to join us, and should
contact me soon.

Jonathan Grodzinski 4th generation master baker - London UK

please respond soon privately to jgrodz@aol.com

PS ** Alsbach ** is the burial ground for many Jewish communities of the
South Hesse region, namely: Alsbach, Auerbach
Bensheim, Biblis, Biebesheim, Burstadt, Crumstade
Eberstadt, Elmshausen, Eschollbruecken, Gernsheim, Goddelau, Grosshausen
Grossrohrheim, Hahn, Haehnlein, Heppenheim, Hofheim
Jugenheim, Kleinhausen, Lorsch, Pfungstadt, Nordheim, Reichenbach, Schoenberg
Seeheim, Schwanheim, Stockstadt, Zwingenberg


Neue Freie Presse #austria-czech

Guy Falkenau <gf002d7224@...>
 

Joachim Modern refered to finding an obituary for a member of the WERTHEIMER
family on the Neue Freie Presse website.

My great uncle, Marcel ROOST's mother's maiden name was Jenny WERTHEIMER
and her family came >from Mannheim. She married Emile ROOST, a lawyer from
Antwerp, Belgium where she lived after her marriage. Her parents were
Moses, also known as Max WERTHEIMER and her mother's maiden name was Fanny
DREYFUS. Both parents had been born in Germany, but settled in Brussels, where
they died. Jenny had two sisters, one named Caroline (1865 - 1933) and
Clara, who appears to have died very young in 1890. I have been exchanging
information concerning the Wertheimer family with Robert De Bauw who is also
related to the Wertheimers on his mother's side of the family. We would both
be most interested if the information Joachim obtained was linked to our
branches of the Wertheimer family. Unfortunately I had deleted the e-mail
that linked to the Neue Freie Presse website and if anyone could give me the
web address that might be of some help.

Guy Falkenau, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Neue Freie Presse #austria-czech

Guy Falkenau <gf002d7224@...>
 

Joachim Modern refered to finding an obituary for a member of the WERTHEIMER
family on the Neue Freie Presse website.

My great uncle, Marcel ROOST's mother's maiden name was Jenny WERTHEIMER
and her family came >from Mannheim. She married Emile ROOST, a lawyer from
Antwerp, Belgium where she lived after her marriage. Her parents were
Moses, also known as Max WERTHEIMER and her mother's maiden name was Fanny
DREYFUS. Both parents had been born in Germany, but settled in Brussels, where
they died. Jenny had two sisters, one named Caroline (1865 - 1933) and
Clara, who appears to have died very young in 1890. I have been exchanging
information concerning the Wertheimer family with Robert De Bauw who is also
related to the Wertheimers on his mother's side of the family. We would both
be most interested if the information Joachim obtained was linked to our
branches of the Wertheimer family. Unfortunately I had deleted the e-mail
that linked to the Neue Freie Presse website and if anyone could give me the
web address that might be of some help.

Guy Falkenau, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK


...wonderful genealogic results and Czech census #austria-czech

Joseph Lonstein
 

Irene Jalowayski tells us about her very fruitful trip to the Brno archives, and that "The interesting thing is
that when someone lived in the Austro Hungarian Empire, no matter where they lived, their census records
all were sent back to their original home (in this case it was Brno)...".

I don't know if Irene's statement above is true for all Czech communities, but I have had extremely good
success receiving information about my extended family that lived in Prostejov/Prossnitz, Moravia through
census and other records held directly in the Prostejov archives. Over the years, I repeatedly came across
a website offering services to go through Czech census and other records, but at that time had not seen
this website mentioned on the SIG (but have since seen a brief mention). I was very hesitant, but decided
to try them for the first time last year, and have since used them about 5 times. Every time, they were
prompt, were clear about what they're going to search for, made useful suggestions about the best records
to search (including declining to search through records I suggested, but they believed would not yield the
particular details I wanted). Their prices are noted on their webpage. They have a San Francisco address,
but the researchers are apparently located in the Czech Republic. The researcher I use communicates via
email in English, and accepts personal checks drawn >from a U.S. bank that I mail directly to his address in
the Czech Republic. Note that they do not send copies of the original records, but transcripts of the
information. This is no different >from the highly-recommended researcher based in Prague who did some
searching for me a few years ago, so I figure this is typical.

What have been particularly useful to me are the Prostejov "Police Family Lists" starting >from the mid-
1800s, and going through the *late* 1940s. These seem to be similar to the Viennese Meldezettel, and
note birth dates, birth place, maiden names, and list of addresses. Because these family lists are cross-
listed across generations, they have let me identify many female relatives whose married names I had never
been able to find because the marriage records could not be found for various reasons in the Prague
Jewish records (including intermarriage). In each of these cases, the daughters were mentioned as children
on their parents' family lists, but with an unique code number indicating them as heads of households of
their own families. This next-generation family list could then be found though this code number. People
on these next-generation lists had code numbers relating them back to their own natal family list, thus
reconfirming someone's parentage at two life stages (as children on their parents' list, and again as adults
and heads of their own households).

I have no connection with these researchers, have no financial interest in their work, and do not know them
personally. Their website is: http://czechcensus.tripod.com/

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, MI


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ...wonderful genealogic results and Czech census #austria-czech

Joseph Lonstein
 

Irene Jalowayski tells us about her very fruitful trip to the Brno archives, and that "The interesting thing is
that when someone lived in the Austro Hungarian Empire, no matter where they lived, their census records
all were sent back to their original home (in this case it was Brno)...".

I don't know if Irene's statement above is true for all Czech communities, but I have had extremely good
success receiving information about my extended family that lived in Prostejov/Prossnitz, Moravia through
census and other records held directly in the Prostejov archives. Over the years, I repeatedly came across
a website offering services to go through Czech census and other records, but at that time had not seen
this website mentioned on the SIG (but have since seen a brief mention). I was very hesitant, but decided
to try them for the first time last year, and have since used them about 5 times. Every time, they were
prompt, were clear about what they're going to search for, made useful suggestions about the best records
to search (including declining to search through records I suggested, but they believed would not yield the
particular details I wanted). Their prices are noted on their webpage. They have a San Francisco address,
but the researchers are apparently located in the Czech Republic. The researcher I use communicates via
email in English, and accepts personal checks drawn >from a U.S. bank that I mail directly to his address in
the Czech Republic. Note that they do not send copies of the original records, but transcripts of the
information. This is no different >from the highly-recommended researcher based in Prague who did some
searching for me a few years ago, so I figure this is typical.

What have been particularly useful to me are the Prostejov "Police Family Lists" starting >from the mid-
1800s, and going through the *late* 1940s. These seem to be similar to the Viennese Meldezettel, and
note birth dates, birth place, maiden names, and list of addresses. Because these family lists are cross-
listed across generations, they have let me identify many female relatives whose married names I had never
been able to find because the marriage records could not be found for various reasons in the Prague
Jewish records (including intermarriage). In each of these cases, the daughters were mentioned as children
on their parents' family lists, but with an unique code number indicating them as heads of households of
their own families. This next-generation family list could then be found though this code number. People
on these next-generation lists had code numbers relating them back to their own natal family list, thus
reconfirming someone's parentage at two life stages (as children on their parents' list, and again as adults
and heads of their own households).

I have no connection with these researchers, have no financial interest in their work, and do not know them
personally. Their website is: http://czechcensus.tripod.com/

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, MI