Date   

Re: litvaksig digest: March 21, 1999 #lithuania

HBArkoff@...
 

Regarding eye Witness Project.
I am sending extra check for this project. I have Lurie relatives
that vanished during holocaust >from that area and could you please tell me how
I can find additional info on Lurie names >from Siauliai area that are on eye
witness list? Thank you.
Harold Arkoff HBArkoff@aol.com


Re: HARRIS #lithuania

richard_wolpoe@...
 

Dear Jill,

Ger = convert
Latin H becomes G in Russian and Russian G becomes H in English (sometimes)
Therefore Ger becomes Her,

Harris, probably an ellis Island type of Aglicization of Her....

Rich Wolpoe
Teaneck, NJ

Researching Max Nochum-Mendel Levin of Bialystok





Hi,

my family in Lithuania apparently had a name like
Heir...Ger...but when they came to America it was Harris...would anyone
know which surname would be most likely?

Jill Kamenetz
Hyattsville, MD


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: litvaksig digest: March 21, 1999 #lithuania

HBArkoff@...
 

Regarding eye Witness Project.
I am sending extra check for this project. I have Lurie relatives
that vanished during holocaust >from that area and could you please tell me how
I can find additional info on Lurie names >from Siauliai area that are on eye
witness list? Thank you.
Harold Arkoff HBArkoff@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: HARRIS #lithuania

richard_wolpoe@...
 

Dear Jill,

Ger = convert
Latin H becomes G in Russian and Russian G becomes H in English (sometimes)
Therefore Ger becomes Her,

Harris, probably an ellis Island type of Aglicization of Her....

Rich Wolpoe
Teaneck, NJ

Researching Max Nochum-Mendel Levin of Bialystok





Hi,

my family in Lithuania apparently had a name like
Heir...Ger...but when they came to America it was Harris...would anyone
know which surname would be most likely?

Jill Kamenetz
Hyattsville, MD


Re: English Transliteration of Jewish Names #general

Don Mopsick <mophandl@...>
 

One can approach this subject assuming either a Yiddish or Hebrew
spelling and pronounciation. It's interesting that the choice sometimes
has to do with the outlook of the ancestor him/herself: Zionist, Bundist
(Yiddishist), religious, or whatever.

Both are of course equally valid >from a genealogy point of view,
although the Yiddish approach may be more helpful for identifying an
ancestor's name as it appears on steamship or census records (a
knowledge of the Russian version also helps: i.e. Berka for Dov Ber,
Yevsey for Yeshia, Girsh for Tsvi Hersh, etc. The rest of this message
concerns the Yiddish approach:

In general, I prefer to use the standard YIVO orthography for Yiddish
transliteration for the following reasons:

1. This method uses a set Roman character or characters for each Yiddish
sound, so the two alphabets (or alefbets) can be somewhat
interchangeable, eliminating a lot of guesswork.

2. Even though YIVO has adopted its standard, there does not seem to be
any one Yiddish/English transliteration standard orthography in wide
general use, so I am in favor of adopting one, and YIVO is my choice.

David Rothman wrote:

Is there some "best" way to spell in English the following
Jewish female names: Chaie, Temma, Brucha?
In David's examples, the names would therefore be spelled Khaya (or
Khaye, depending on the original Yiddish spelling), Tema, and Brokha.

Having said this, however, there are a number of Yiddish names which
have found their way into the English dictionaries using Germanized
spellings, such as "Chaim" instead of "Khayim." It's hard to buck this
trend, but my preference would still be to use "Khayim."

I highly recommend Uriel Weinreich's (er..Vaynraykh's) "College Yiddish"
and "Modern English-Yiddish Yiddish-English Dictionary" both published
by YIVO and Schocken Books, and the YIVO website at
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/yivo/ for an extensive treatment of this
subject.

Also, I would highly recommend the study of the Yiddish language to
anyone seriously interested in researching Jewish genealogy! This can
be a highly rewarding pursuit--even though the language is regrettably
now almost moribund as native speakers pass >from this earth. The two
above-mentioned texts are a good staring point, plus there are
audiotapes available. Besides being very useful to the Jewish
genealogist, Yiddish study gives one a warm "heymishe" feeling. This is
a language that you already know!

Don Mopsick, researching MOPSIK, MEKLER, GORELIK, ZARCHIN, GROBSHTEYN,
KANTAROVICH, ZEITLIN, SELIGMAN all Bobruisk District, Belarus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: English Transliteration of Jewish Names #general

Don Mopsick <mophandl@...>
 

One can approach this subject assuming either a Yiddish or Hebrew
spelling and pronounciation. It's interesting that the choice sometimes
has to do with the outlook of the ancestor him/herself: Zionist, Bundist
(Yiddishist), religious, or whatever.

Both are of course equally valid >from a genealogy point of view,
although the Yiddish approach may be more helpful for identifying an
ancestor's name as it appears on steamship or census records (a
knowledge of the Russian version also helps: i.e. Berka for Dov Ber,
Yevsey for Yeshia, Girsh for Tsvi Hersh, etc. The rest of this message
concerns the Yiddish approach:

In general, I prefer to use the standard YIVO orthography for Yiddish
transliteration for the following reasons:

1. This method uses a set Roman character or characters for each Yiddish
sound, so the two alphabets (or alefbets) can be somewhat
interchangeable, eliminating a lot of guesswork.

2. Even though YIVO has adopted its standard, there does not seem to be
any one Yiddish/English transliteration standard orthography in wide
general use, so I am in favor of adopting one, and YIVO is my choice.

David Rothman wrote:

Is there some "best" way to spell in English the following
Jewish female names: Chaie, Temma, Brucha?
In David's examples, the names would therefore be spelled Khaya (or
Khaye, depending on the original Yiddish spelling), Tema, and Brokha.

Having said this, however, there are a number of Yiddish names which
have found their way into the English dictionaries using Germanized
spellings, such as "Chaim" instead of "Khayim." It's hard to buck this
trend, but my preference would still be to use "Khayim."

I highly recommend Uriel Weinreich's (er..Vaynraykh's) "College Yiddish"
and "Modern English-Yiddish Yiddish-English Dictionary" both published
by YIVO and Schocken Books, and the YIVO website at
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/yivo/ for an extensive treatment of this
subject.

Also, I would highly recommend the study of the Yiddish language to
anyone seriously interested in researching Jewish genealogy! This can
be a highly rewarding pursuit--even though the language is regrettably
now almost moribund as native speakers pass >from this earth. The two
above-mentioned texts are a good staring point, plus there are
audiotapes available. Besides being very useful to the Jewish
genealogist, Yiddish study gives one a warm "heymishe" feeling. This is
a language that you already know!

Don Mopsick, researching MOPSIK, MEKLER, GORELIK, ZARCHIN, GROBSHTEYN,
KANTAROVICH, ZEITLIN, SELIGMAN all Bobruisk District, Belarus


BENIAMIN, BENIEMINOWICZ #lithuania

SBenj2219@...
 

Dear LitvakSig mates, Thank you very much for your prompt responses and
help. I previously asked for information on the names BENJAMIN, BENJAMINOVITZ
and BINYAMIN in the shtetls of Kretinga (Krottingen) and Shkud (Skuodas). I am
now informed that there is another spelling of that name, BENIAMIN. There may
be some connections in the shtetls of Dobrian (Darabenai), Leckava, Kurschini,
Vieksniai, and Kowna. The Kowna connection has a surname of Benieminowicz. The
plot is thickening. Any more suggestions and connections will be greatly
appreciated. Thank you very much. Sincerely, Sam Benjamin sbenj2219@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania BENIAMIN, BENIEMINOWICZ #lithuania

SBenj2219@...
 

Dear LitvakSig mates, Thank you very much for your prompt responses and
help. I previously asked for information on the names BENJAMIN, BENJAMINOVITZ
and BINYAMIN in the shtetls of Kretinga (Krottingen) and Shkud (Skuodas). I am
now informed that there is another spelling of that name, BENIAMIN. There may
be some connections in the shtetls of Dobrian (Darabenai), Leckava, Kurschini,
Vieksniai, and Kowna. The Kowna connection has a surname of Benieminowicz. The
plot is thickening. Any more suggestions and connections will be greatly
appreciated. Thank you very much. Sincerely, Sam Benjamin sbenj2219@aol.com


Update: The Given-Names Project #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Hi LitvakSIGers,

David Curwin and I recently announced to you our project to prepare a
computer data base of given names for Jews born in Eastern Europe
(right now, for Lithuania and Latvia), some of whom may have emigrated
to other countries.

Our intent is to provide a research tool allowing one to learn about
our ancestors' given names, the names' origins, how different types of
given names & their variations were linked together (Hebrew, Yiddish,
Secular, & their nicknames), how these names translated into
foreign-language given names/nicknames when our ancestors left their
ancestral homes and immigrated to foreign countries like the U.S.,
South Africa, England, Palestine, Argentina, and so on. I think that
you can imagine how such a data base would be useful in your research!

The above data is now being inputted with a concentration on Lithuania
and Latvia, on the one hand, and the U.S. on the other. We want to
extend these data to other English-speaking countries (South Africa,
England, Canada, Australia/New Zealand), as well as to other countries
which received our ancestors in large numbers, countries where Spanish,
Portuguese, Swedish, Dutch, and other languages were spoken.

So far, we have a data base of about 650 records, each one including
the type of linked data described above. Of course, these data are not
complete for each record -- we still have much research to do for the
existing records -- and we need to add other name sets. The sources of
these data are quite varied. The Eastern Europe data cover the
earliest periods up to about 1910-20, and we are particularly
interested now in linked name sets for the period 1880 to 1910-20, when
massive emigration >from Lithuania and Latvia took place.

We realize that the linkage or equivalence between the Eastern European
data and the foreign country data will have to be statistical. That
is, we expect that a given name (say, Yehuda Leib) will translate into
a number of different English (or other language) names (say, Judah) in
a statistical way -- such as a certain fraction for this English name,
another fraction for that one, etc. And this linkage will be dependent
on the time period of emigration (and/or birth in the foreign country)
as well as the particular shtetlach or origin and the ultimate foreign
city of immigration. There were name fads on both sides of the ocean
and these fads changed >from time to time. That's life!

Dave and I are asking for your help. Please do look at your own
information, no matter how modest in scope, and submit it to us. The
kind of information we most want for each person or group of persons,
is as follows:

o the complete Hebrew/Yiddish/Secular given names/kinuim >from Europe
(ALL of them)
o the foreign-language given names & nicknames (ALL of them)
o Shtetl/country of origin, & approximate date of emigration
o Foreign city/country of immigration, & approx. date of entry

Even if your data are not as detailed as this list suggests, please DO
send it to us -- we can certainly use it.

It is our intent to publish this data base on the web so that it is
freely available to all. And we hope also to make it available to
users by download for personal viewing via a data base or spreadsheet
program, or a browser.

How about it?! Please help us -- you would be helping us all and
Jewish Genealogy!

Regards,

Jerry

--
Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel E-mail: jerry@vms.huji.ac.il
Researching:
AIZIKOWITZ, MARCUS, MICHELOVICH, MIRVIS Baisogala/Datnuva Lithuania
ESTERSON, NORINSKY
BerdichevUkraine
KRETZMER, SWEETGALL Zhaimel/Birzai Lithuania
HELL, WAGENHEIM
Riga/Bauske Latvia
Visit the ESRA web site:
<http://www.esra.org.il/>


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Update: The Given-Names Project #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Hi LitvakSIGers,

David Curwin and I recently announced to you our project to prepare a
computer data base of given names for Jews born in Eastern Europe
(right now, for Lithuania and Latvia), some of whom may have emigrated
to other countries.

Our intent is to provide a research tool allowing one to learn about
our ancestors' given names, the names' origins, how different types of
given names & their variations were linked together (Hebrew, Yiddish,
Secular, & their nicknames), how these names translated into
foreign-language given names/nicknames when our ancestors left their
ancestral homes and immigrated to foreign countries like the U.S.,
South Africa, England, Palestine, Argentina, and so on. I think that
you can imagine how such a data base would be useful in your research!

The above data is now being inputted with a concentration on Lithuania
and Latvia, on the one hand, and the U.S. on the other. We want to
extend these data to other English-speaking countries (South Africa,
England, Canada, Australia/New Zealand), as well as to other countries
which received our ancestors in large numbers, countries where Spanish,
Portuguese, Swedish, Dutch, and other languages were spoken.

So far, we have a data base of about 650 records, each one including
the type of linked data described above. Of course, these data are not
complete for each record -- we still have much research to do for the
existing records -- and we need to add other name sets. The sources of
these data are quite varied. The Eastern Europe data cover the
earliest periods up to about 1910-20, and we are particularly
interested now in linked name sets for the period 1880 to 1910-20, when
massive emigration >from Lithuania and Latvia took place.

We realize that the linkage or equivalence between the Eastern European
data and the foreign country data will have to be statistical. That
is, we expect that a given name (say, Yehuda Leib) will translate into
a number of different English (or other language) names (say, Judah) in
a statistical way -- such as a certain fraction for this English name,
another fraction for that one, etc. And this linkage will be dependent
on the time period of emigration (and/or birth in the foreign country)
as well as the particular shtetlach or origin and the ultimate foreign
city of immigration. There were name fads on both sides of the ocean
and these fads changed >from time to time. That's life!

Dave and I are asking for your help. Please do look at your own
information, no matter how modest in scope, and submit it to us. The
kind of information we most want for each person or group of persons,
is as follows:

o the complete Hebrew/Yiddish/Secular given names/kinuim >from Europe
(ALL of them)
o the foreign-language given names & nicknames (ALL of them)
o Shtetl/country of origin, & approximate date of emigration
o Foreign city/country of immigration, & approx. date of entry

Even if your data are not as detailed as this list suggests, please DO
send it to us -- we can certainly use it.

It is our intent to publish this data base on the web so that it is
freely available to all. And we hope also to make it available to
users by download for personal viewing via a data base or spreadsheet
program, or a browser.

How about it?! Please help us -- you would be helping us all and
Jewish Genealogy!

Regards,

Jerry

--
Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel E-mail: jerry@vms.huji.ac.il
Researching:
AIZIKOWITZ, MARCUS, MICHELOVICH, MIRVIS Baisogala/Datnuva Lithuania
ESTERSON, NORINSKY
BerdichevUkraine
KRETZMER, SWEETGALL Zhaimel/Birzai Lithuania
HELL, WAGENHEIM
Riga/Bauske Latvia
Visit the ESRA web site:
<http://www.esra.org.il/>


Illegible soundex cards - not. #general

SelmaN@...
 

Lois Sernoff JGLois@aol.com writes:
I am intrigued because for a long time I have believed that the
microfilmed soundex, index, and manifest pages were at pretty
much the same level of legibility, whether viewed at NARA , FHC,
or via rental film. Although I have ultimately found the pages
I was searching (after 1900) I have viewed many an unreadable
soundex or index card and manifest page in passing.<<

Steve Snyder cat2steve@juno.com replied:
I'm really intrigued too. I was at the National Archives in DC
searching the 1897-1902 NYC passenger arrival indexes and these
films are so light that parts are almost impossible to read. The
Mormon FHC versions were no better. Even using various colored
papers to try to view the image, I just could not make out most of
the info that I needed. I could barely make out the person's name.
I was told by the staff at the DC National Archives that these
cards were destroyed after filming. <<

Is this true, or not? I have never had the time to act on this
information. A number of years ago I was told at the National
Archives in DC that if you are looking at a poor roll of film of a
ship manifest and/or census, ask the staff to get you another roll.
As to the index/soundex cards for NY ship manifests, I've looked at
them in DC and NY, and yes, mostly, they are impossible to read.
I always try to get ship info >from the immigrants' naturalization papers.
Let's keep this thread going -- perhaps others have other ideas!
Selma Neubauer
Philadelphia, PA
SelmaN@aol.com


Re: Yankl #lithuania

Michael Trapunsky <mtrap@...>
 

Hi Herb,

Yankl is the Yiddish name for Yakov, so I would say a probable English name
would be Jacob or Jack.

Regards,

Michael Trapunsky
Queens, NY
mtrap@idt.net



Moderator's Note: This thread is ended.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Illegible soundex cards - not. #general

SelmaN@...
 

Lois Sernoff JGLois@aol.com writes:
I am intrigued because for a long time I have believed that the
microfilmed soundex, index, and manifest pages were at pretty
much the same level of legibility, whether viewed at NARA , FHC,
or via rental film. Although I have ultimately found the pages
I was searching (after 1900) I have viewed many an unreadable
soundex or index card and manifest page in passing.<<

Steve Snyder cat2steve@juno.com replied:
I'm really intrigued too. I was at the National Archives in DC
searching the 1897-1902 NYC passenger arrival indexes and these
films are so light that parts are almost impossible to read. The
Mormon FHC versions were no better. Even using various colored
papers to try to view the image, I just could not make out most of
the info that I needed. I could barely make out the person's name.
I was told by the staff at the DC National Archives that these
cards were destroyed after filming. <<

Is this true, or not? I have never had the time to act on this
information. A number of years ago I was told at the National
Archives in DC that if you are looking at a poor roll of film of a
ship manifest and/or census, ask the staff to get you another roll.
As to the index/soundex cards for NY ship manifests, I've looked at
them in DC and NY, and yes, mostly, they are impossible to read.
I always try to get ship info >from the immigrants' naturalization papers.
Let's keep this thread going -- perhaps others have other ideas!
Selma Neubauer
Philadelphia, PA
SelmaN@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Yankl #lithuania

Michael Trapunsky <mtrap@...>
 

Hi Herb,

Yankl is the Yiddish name for Yakov, so I would say a probable English name
would be Jacob or Jack.

Regards,

Michael Trapunsky
Queens, NY
mtrap@idt.net



Moderator's Note: This thread is ended.


Re: HARRIS #lithuania

Martin Fischer
 

Jill,
My wife had an ancestor whose family name was Harris, but their original
surname was Krewianski or Krivyonski. How did they get Harris >from that?
When they came to America, they took their father's first name and made
it a last name! So Harry Krewianski was the father of Golda Leah Harris,
Moomie Chave Harris and Gershon Harris.
Martin Fischer
Oak Park, ILL.


----Original Message Follows----
I was wondering if anyone would have any good ideas about last
names...my family in Lithuania apparently had a name like
Heir...Ger...but when they came to America it was Harris...would anyone
know which surname would be most likely? I haven't been able to find
out any more information.
Thanks in advance for your help,
Jill Kamenetz
Hyattsville, MD


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: HARRIS #lithuania

Martin Fischer
 

Jill,
My wife had an ancestor whose family name was Harris, but their original
surname was Krewianski or Krivyonski. How did they get Harris >from that?
When they came to America, they took their father's first name and made
it a last name! So Harry Krewianski was the father of Golda Leah Harris,
Moomie Chave Harris and Gershon Harris.
Martin Fischer
Oak Park, ILL.


----Original Message Follows----
I was wondering if anyone would have any good ideas about last
names...my family in Lithuania apparently had a name like
Heir...Ger...but when they came to America it was Harris...would anyone
know which surname would be most likely? I haven't been able to find
out any more information.
Thanks in advance for your help,
Jill Kamenetz
Hyattsville, MD


Re: Yankl #lithuania

richard_wolpoe@...
 

Yank is the Yiddsish diminutive for Yaakov - Jacob. James is a form of jackob,
so is Jack, Jake, etc.

Rich Wolpoe
Teaneck, NJ

Richard_Wolpoe@ibi.com
researching Max (Nachum Mendel) Levin - Bialystok


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re[2]: Yankl #lithuania

richard_wolpoe@...
 

Yank is the Yiddsish diminutive for Yaakov - Jacob. James is a form of jackob,
so is Jack, Jake, etc.

Rich Wolpoe
Teaneck, NJ

Richard_Wolpoe@ibi.com
researching Max (Nachum Mendel) Levin - Bialystok


Jewish (or Yiddish) name #general

Frieda Libaw <fbl2@...>
 

Can anybody out there tell me what would be a Jewish or Yiddish
rendering of the name Jeremy?

Thanks.

Frieda Libaw


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish (or Yiddish) name #general

Frieda Libaw <fbl2@...>
 

Can anybody out there tell me what would be a Jewish or Yiddish
rendering of the name Jeremy?

Thanks.

Frieda Libaw