Date   

Poland's Partitions and origin of the Jewish surnames #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Galitzyaners,

As continuation on the Poland's Partitions subject, please allow me to
initiate discussion on the origin of the Jewish surnames in Galicia and
lands that were under the Prussia and Austria rules, since they are closely
related.

All of us have been always interested with the issue of the origin of the
Jewish surnames since this is our only link to the written genealogical
records.

Galicia

As it is generally known, Galician Jews have been compelled to adopt German
sounding surnames in 1787 during Joseph II, Empress Maria Theresa's son
rule, following the introduction in 1781 the first genuine reforms in
Central Europe - Judenreformen und Toleranzpatent (Jew-reforms and Edicts of
Tolerance).

When in 1772 during the 1st Partition, Austria has captured new lands, which
covered all of Western and Eastern Galicia, the Empire 1787 rule of surname
adoption was extended to the all territories. This also included parts of
Wolyn and Podolia that have captured by Austria at the same time.

This rule was extended to the regions of Sandomierz, Lublin and Radom
acquired by Austria on 1795.

Prussia

Prussia introduced similar to the Austrian law in 1797 known as
Judenregelment and forced the
use of Germanic surnames on the Jewish population of captured during three
Partitions:

Pomorze (Gdansk), Chelmno, Warmia part of Wielkopolska with Bydgoszcz,
Torun and Malbork
were captured in 1772. This territory became known as West Prussia.

Following Prussian 1793 acquisitions (2nd Partition) the rest of
Wielkopolska (Gniezno, Poznan), Plock, Lodz, Czestochowa regions were also
incorporated and became known as South Prussia.

1795 (3rd Partition) Prussian new acquisitions of Mazowsze (included
Warsaw) became known as Mazovia, and NW region west of Niemen River
(Bialystok) was named New East Prussia.
The new territory located south of Czestochowa was named New Silesia.

[E.T.A ( Ernest Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, a vicious anti-Semitic Prussian
law officer was placed in charge of the enforcing Germanic sounding surnames
through the new Prussian territories.

Hoffmann developed a list of an 'acceptable' for Jews surnames, and he and
his malignant staff clerks foisted unpleasant surnames on the poor Jews, who
were unable to came up with a bribe to secure a 'pleasant' surname.
Hoffmann became later famous after the publication of opera "The Tales of
Hoffmann".]

Russia

Russia has introduce law for surnames use for Jews in 1804 during but in
reality start enforcing this policy only in 1834.

And this is my point - Jewish people that have been under Austrian or
Prussian reign prior to 1815 Vienna Congress have been already given German
sounding surnames which have been later accepted by the Russian
administration.
And this is a main reason for the Jews having German sounding surnames
through the Congress Poland.


References:

[1] Karl Emil Franzos, "Namensstudien", 1880
[2] Erwin Manuel Dreifuss, Die Familiennamen der jude, 1927
[3] Dietz Bering "The Stigma of Names. Antisemitism in German Daily Life,
1812-1933", Cambridge 1992

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Poland's Partitions and origin of the Jewish surnames #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Galitzyaners,

As continuation on the Poland's Partitions subject, please allow me to
initiate discussion on the origin of the Jewish surnames in Galicia and
lands that were under the Prussia and Austria rules, since they are closely
related.

All of us have been always interested with the issue of the origin of the
Jewish surnames since this is our only link to the written genealogical
records.

Galicia

As it is generally known, Galician Jews have been compelled to adopt German
sounding surnames in 1787 during Joseph II, Empress Maria Theresa's son
rule, following the introduction in 1781 the first genuine reforms in
Central Europe - Judenreformen und Toleranzpatent (Jew-reforms and Edicts of
Tolerance).

When in 1772 during the 1st Partition, Austria has captured new lands, which
covered all of Western and Eastern Galicia, the Empire 1787 rule of surname
adoption was extended to the all territories. This also included parts of
Wolyn and Podolia that have captured by Austria at the same time.

This rule was extended to the regions of Sandomierz, Lublin and Radom
acquired by Austria on 1795.

Prussia

Prussia introduced similar to the Austrian law in 1797 known as
Judenregelment and forced the
use of Germanic surnames on the Jewish population of captured during three
Partitions:

Pomorze (Gdansk), Chelmno, Warmia part of Wielkopolska with Bydgoszcz,
Torun and Malbork
were captured in 1772. This territory became known as West Prussia.

Following Prussian 1793 acquisitions (2nd Partition) the rest of
Wielkopolska (Gniezno, Poznan), Plock, Lodz, Czestochowa regions were also
incorporated and became known as South Prussia.

1795 (3rd Partition) Prussian new acquisitions of Mazowsze (included
Warsaw) became known as Mazovia, and NW region west of Niemen River
(Bialystok) was named New East Prussia.
The new territory located south of Czestochowa was named New Silesia.

[E.T.A ( Ernest Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, a vicious anti-Semitic Prussian
law officer was placed in charge of the enforcing Germanic sounding surnames
through the new Prussian territories.

Hoffmann developed a list of an 'acceptable' for Jews surnames, and he and
his malignant staff clerks foisted unpleasant surnames on the poor Jews, who
were unable to came up with a bribe to secure a 'pleasant' surname.
Hoffmann became later famous after the publication of opera "The Tales of
Hoffmann".]

Russia

Russia has introduce law for surnames use for Jews in 1804 during but in
reality start enforcing this policy only in 1834.

And this is my point - Jewish people that have been under Austrian or
Prussian reign prior to 1815 Vienna Congress have been already given German
sounding surnames which have been later accepted by the Russian
administration.
And this is a main reason for the Jews having German sounding surnames
through the Congress Poland.


References:

[1] Karl Emil Franzos, "Namensstudien", 1880
[2] Erwin Manuel Dreifuss, Die Familiennamen der jude, 1927
[3] Dietz Bering "The Stigma of Names. Antisemitism in German Daily Life,
1812-1933", Cambridge 1992

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Re: Western/Eastern Galicia (again) #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Lancy Spalter wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Thank you, Alexander, for this interesting account. With your permission,
though, I would like to point out that, to the best of my understanding,
although Radom, Lublin and Sandomierz were annexed to Austria during the
third partition, in the Vienna Congress they were integrated into the
Congress Poland Autonomy ruled by the Czar. They were part of Austria for
only 20 years, >from 1795 to 1815.
Thank you , Lancy for the comment.

This exactly what I had in mind when I wrote previously that Austria has
lost to Russia nearly all lands acquired in 1795:

It should be noted again, that there were territorial readjustment made
during 1815 Vienna Congress when Austria has lost to the victorious Russia
Zamosc region, parts of Wolyn and Podolia and nearly all lands acquired in
1795 with exception of the City of Krakow.
Nevetheless, those 20 years when Austria ruled over the parts of Podolia,
Wolynia, Lublin, Radom, Lublin and Prussia ruled over Warsaw, Bialystok,
Lomza and Suwalki had a significant influence on the Jewish people.

I will continue on the Poland Partitions subject in the next thread:
Germanic names


Alexander Sharo
Clagary, Alberta


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Re:Western/Eastern Galicia (again) #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Lancy Spalter wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Thank you, Alexander, for this interesting account. With your permission,
though, I would like to point out that, to the best of my understanding,
although Radom, Lublin and Sandomierz were annexed to Austria during the
third partition, in the Vienna Congress they were integrated into the
Congress Poland Autonomy ruled by the Czar. They were part of Austria for
only 20 years, >from 1795 to 1815.
Thank you , Lancy for the comment.

This exactly what I had in mind when I wrote previously that Austria has
lost to Russia nearly all lands acquired in 1795:

It should be noted again, that there were territorial readjustment made
during 1815 Vienna Congress when Austria has lost to the victorious Russia
Zamosc region, parts of Wolyn and Podolia and nearly all lands acquired in
1795 with exception of the City of Krakow.
Nevetheless, those 20 years when Austria ruled over the parts of Podolia,
Wolynia, Lublin, Radom, Lublin and Prussia ruled over Warsaw, Bialystok,
Lomza and Suwalki had a significant influence on the Jewish people.

I will continue on the Poland Partitions subject in the next thread:
Germanic names


Alexander Sharo
Clagary, Alberta


1877~1881 Lwow Birth Record Form-Cyrillic #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding the question Mark Halpern posed recently:

<<Lwow researcher Feige Stern has posted three Lwow birth records to
ViewMate. They are:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6138
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6139
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6140

I have personally never seen this exact form. The headings of the form are
the normal Polish and German ones, but there is an third Cyrillic language.
Can anyone tell me what language this is and why a third language is
included here. My understanding is that the Austrian Government required
only Polish and German and that the record itself had to be recorded in one
of these two languages.

Thanks for any thought you may have about this.>>

Here are some answers I've gathered >from two native speakers of Ukrainian
and Russian:

This Cyrillic writing represents some sort of official language: an
"absolutely awful mixture of mainly
Ukrainian with a little Russian additions." It was used in the
Austrian-Hungarian Empire primarily for documents, but is absolutely NOT a
"living" language. This "language" was even used in Czechoslovakia (court,
notary's office etc) until the World War II.

An example of what is found in this text: in the heading of column 7, the
fourth word (split between 2 lines) is "Matepbl," which in the Latin script
is "Mater" and the last two letters are not really letters at all, but
rather a "hard sound" sign. This sign doesn't exist in Ukrainian, but does
in Russian. Both languages use the opposite "soft sound" sign, b, like our
lowercase b (called a mee-yak-ees-nok).

Although Galician metrical records were usually written in Latin, Polish and
German, in the middle of the 19th century, as nationalism began to take
shape, one could see more Polish and Ukrainian in these records. It's
interesting to think of an empire that encompassed so many different
countries and nationalities trying to balance the different languages used
by the populace against their own political interests...which eventually
resulted in this hodgepodge compendium of Ukrainian and Russian officialese,
showing up in these Lvov records posted to Viewmate.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia 1877~1881 Lwow Birth Record Form-Cyrillic #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding the question Mark Halpern posed recently:

<<Lwow researcher Feige Stern has posted three Lwow birth records to
ViewMate. They are:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6138
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6139
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6140

I have personally never seen this exact form. The headings of the form are
the normal Polish and German ones, but there is an third Cyrillic language.
Can anyone tell me what language this is and why a third language is
included here. My understanding is that the Austrian Government required
only Polish and German and that the record itself had to be recorded in one
of these two languages.

Thanks for any thought you may have about this.>>

Here are some answers I've gathered >from two native speakers of Ukrainian
and Russian:

This Cyrillic writing represents some sort of official language: an
"absolutely awful mixture of mainly
Ukrainian with a little Russian additions." It was used in the
Austrian-Hungarian Empire primarily for documents, but is absolutely NOT a
"living" language. This "language" was even used in Czechoslovakia (court,
notary's office etc) until the World War II.

An example of what is found in this text: in the heading of column 7, the
fourth word (split between 2 lines) is "Matepbl," which in the Latin script
is "Mater" and the last two letters are not really letters at all, but
rather a "hard sound" sign. This sign doesn't exist in Ukrainian, but does
in Russian. Both languages use the opposite "soft sound" sign, b, like our
lowercase b (called a mee-yak-ees-nok).

Although Galician metrical records were usually written in Latin, Polish and
German, in the middle of the 19th century, as nationalism began to take
shape, one could see more Polish and Ukrainian in these records. It's
interesting to think of an empire that encompassed so many different
countries and nationalities trying to balance the different languages used
by the populace against their own political interests...which eventually
resulted in this hodgepodge compendium of Ukrainian and Russian officialese,
showing up in these Lvov records posted to Viewmate.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Re: ENSHEIM and BRISAC, Metz in 1739 #france

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Le 02:55 27/05/2005,Pierre Hahn écrit:

So are the above mentioned Joseph Cerf BRISAC and Joseph Cerf ENSHEIM also
the same person ?
Dear Pierre,
In spite of your experience, you don't know all the tricks of Pierre-André
Meyer's Tables !!
Please have a look at the end of these tables. In my edition, it is page
452. You will read that BRISAC is also listed under different names such as
ALSACE, BLOK RIXHEIM, BRISAC-CHARRY, and ENSHEIM. Actually, two pages
earlier, when P.A.M. explains what he means, he gives BRISAC as an example.

I must confess that a week ago, I had to send a message to P.A.M. because I
could not find a Jacob BRISAC who was listed as BRISAC-CHARRY.

So, be confident, your two Joseph Cerf are the same guy.

Amitiés,

Georges GRANER
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
Paris, France


French SIG #France Re: ENSHEIM and BRISAC, Metz in 1739 #france

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Le 02:55 27/05/2005,Pierre Hahn écrit:

So are the above mentioned Joseph Cerf BRISAC and Joseph Cerf ENSHEIM also
the same person ?
Dear Pierre,
In spite of your experience, you don't know all the tricks of Pierre-André
Meyer's Tables !!
Please have a look at the end of these tables. In my edition, it is page
452. You will read that BRISAC is also listed under different names such as
ALSACE, BLOK RIXHEIM, BRISAC-CHARRY, and ENSHEIM. Actually, two pages
earlier, when P.A.M. explains what he means, he gives BRISAC as an example.

I must confess that a week ago, I had to send a message to P.A.M. because I
could not find a Jacob BRISAC who was listed as BRISAC-CHARRY.

So, be confident, your two Joseph Cerf are the same guy.

Amitiés,

Georges GRANER
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
Paris, France


TEDESCO and CERF, Paris early 1800 #france

Susan Edel
 

TEDESCO in Paris

I am looking for information about Giacomo TEDESCO and his wife Therese
Yiras nee CERF who lived in Paris in the early 1800s. I believe Giacomo was
one of the founders of the Rue Cadet Shul in Paris and also of another two
Shuls.

I hope to hear >from anyone who can help me.

With best wishes,

Susan EDEL, Petach Tikva, Israel


French SIG #France TEDESCO and CERF, Paris early 1800 #france

Susan Edel
 

TEDESCO in Paris

I am looking for information about Giacomo TEDESCO and his wife Therese
Yiras nee CERF who lived in Paris in the early 1800s. I believe Giacomo was
one of the founders of the Rue Cadet Shul in Paris and also of another two
Shuls.

I hope to hear >from anyone who can help me.

With best wishes,

Susan EDEL, Petach Tikva, Israel


Re: Kinuim for Yechezkeyl #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Alter Solomon posted to LitvakSig Mailing List as follows:

"Looking through the All-Lithuania
Database for my family town (Zagare) I saw the given name Fayvush.
Can this be a kinnui for Yechezkiel?"

The books "Jewish Personal Names" edited by Chaim Freedman (written by Rabbi
Shmuel Gorr) and "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire"
by Alexander Beider do not include this combination. However Boris
Feldblyum's book "Russian Jewish Given Names" does specifically mention
this association.

In traditional circles in the shtetl were kinnuim fairly loosely associated
in the way that secular names and their Hebrew equivalents are used nowadays,
or were there more rigid naming conventions and if so how do we determine
what applied at that time?"


Names in the Fayvush family of Yiddish names were kinuim for the Hebrew
name Yechezkeyl in only the following countries: Austria, Germany, and
Holland. To my knowledge, Fayvush was not a kinui for Yechezkeyl in
Lithuania.

One of the reasons for these variations >from region to region in Europe for
where kinuim were used with specific Hebrew names, was that the Yiddish
dialects were different across Europe. Thus in Western Europe, the Yiddish
dialect was the Western European dialect (including Germany and Holland),
in a transitional region (which included Bohemia, Moravia, parts of
Hungary, and other regions) transitional dialects between Western and the
Eastern European dialects were used, the Litivsh dialect was spoken in
Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, NE Ukraine and NE Poland, while in most of
Poland and Galicia the Polish/Galician dialect was spoken, and in most of
Ukraine, parts of Eastern Galicia, Romania, and SE Poland the Ukrainian
dialect was spoken.

This topic of Hebrew name/Kinui relationship was the subject of intense
research by rabbis throughout Europe for a number of centuries, as the
Yiddish dialects slowly changed and moved around. Their research results
were compiled in Jewish law books for Divorce procedures, such as the
"Aruch Hashulchan" which applied to the regions where the Litvish dialect
was spoken, and the "Get Mesudar" which was mainly applicable to the
regions of Germany, with additions for Hungary, and Poland.

For their region and time period, the rabbis' research consisted of
gathering name data >from Divorce Rabbis (those who wrote the Get for a
couple who were divorcing) and analyzing these data statistically for names
which must be written in the Gitin. The results of their data analysis
showed clearly what were the Hebrew-name/Kinui relationships which were
chosen by Jews on a statistical basis. The rabbis summarized these results
in their books of Hilchot Gitin (Laws of Divorce) and these books were
guidebooks for the Divorce Rabbis.

One must not be rigid in using these regionalized Hilchot Gitin books, for
Jews moved around >from region to region for a wide variety of reasons,
including finding a marriage partner, and also forced migrations as a
result of persecution. So, it is possible to find exceptions to the rules
listed in one region's book. Still, this exception only allows
genealogists to adopt a trial hypothesis which much be proven by further
research.

One can obtain more information by reading the discussions included in the
JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site at this address:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames > .

A new update is due in the next few months.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Kinuim for Yechezkeyl #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Alter Solomon posted to LitvakSig Mailing List as follows:

"Looking through the All-Lithuania
Database for my family town (Zagare) I saw the given name Fayvush.
Can this be a kinnui for Yechezkiel?"

The books "Jewish Personal Names" edited by Chaim Freedman (written by Rabbi
Shmuel Gorr) and "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire"
by Alexander Beider do not include this combination. However Boris
Feldblyum's book "Russian Jewish Given Names" does specifically mention
this association.

In traditional circles in the shtetl were kinnuim fairly loosely associated
in the way that secular names and their Hebrew equivalents are used nowadays,
or were there more rigid naming conventions and if so how do we determine
what applied at that time?"


Names in the Fayvush family of Yiddish names were kinuim for the Hebrew
name Yechezkeyl in only the following countries: Austria, Germany, and
Holland. To my knowledge, Fayvush was not a kinui for Yechezkeyl in
Lithuania.

One of the reasons for these variations >from region to region in Europe for
where kinuim were used with specific Hebrew names, was that the Yiddish
dialects were different across Europe. Thus in Western Europe, the Yiddish
dialect was the Western European dialect (including Germany and Holland),
in a transitional region (which included Bohemia, Moravia, parts of
Hungary, and other regions) transitional dialects between Western and the
Eastern European dialects were used, the Litivsh dialect was spoken in
Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, NE Ukraine and NE Poland, while in most of
Poland and Galicia the Polish/Galician dialect was spoken, and in most of
Ukraine, parts of Eastern Galicia, Romania, and SE Poland the Ukrainian
dialect was spoken.

This topic of Hebrew name/Kinui relationship was the subject of intense
research by rabbis throughout Europe for a number of centuries, as the
Yiddish dialects slowly changed and moved around. Their research results
were compiled in Jewish law books for Divorce procedures, such as the
"Aruch Hashulchan" which applied to the regions where the Litvish dialect
was spoken, and the "Get Mesudar" which was mainly applicable to the
regions of Germany, with additions for Hungary, and Poland.

For their region and time period, the rabbis' research consisted of
gathering name data >from Divorce Rabbis (those who wrote the Get for a
couple who were divorcing) and analyzing these data statistically for names
which must be written in the Gitin. The results of their data analysis
showed clearly what were the Hebrew-name/Kinui relationships which were
chosen by Jews on a statistical basis. The rabbis summarized these results
in their books of Hilchot Gitin (Laws of Divorce) and these books were
guidebooks for the Divorce Rabbis.

One must not be rigid in using these regionalized Hilchot Gitin books, for
Jews moved around >from region to region for a wide variety of reasons,
including finding a marriage partner, and also forced migrations as a
result of persecution. So, it is possible to find exceptions to the rules
listed in one region's book. Still, this exception only allows
genealogists to adopt a trial hypothesis which much be proven by further
research.

One can obtain more information by reading the discussions included in the
JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site at this address:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames > .

A new update is due in the next few months.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Ostroleka Yiskor book #poland

Jeff Miller
 

I have learned >from a presentation by Yale Reisner that an 800-page Yiskor
book for Ostroleka was translated >from Yiddish into Polish. A copy of the
book, according to Stan Diamond, is at the Jewish Public Library in
Montreal. It is likely available in various places in both Yiddish and
Polish. I can read neither Yiddish nor Polish.

A few short selections >from the Ostroleka Yiskor book are on the JewishGen
website.

I would greatly appreciate if someone could check for lists of surnames to
see if any entries exist for the following names:
MLYNARZ, BRZEZINSKI, and SPIVACK.

Please respond privately.

Jeff Miller
Maryland
SingingTM@comcast.net


JRI Poland #Poland Ostroleka Yiskor book #poland

Jeff Miller
 

I have learned >from a presentation by Yale Reisner that an 800-page Yiskor
book for Ostroleka was translated >from Yiddish into Polish. A copy of the
book, according to Stan Diamond, is at the Jewish Public Library in
Montreal. It is likely available in various places in both Yiddish and
Polish. I can read neither Yiddish nor Polish.

A few short selections >from the Ostroleka Yiskor book are on the JewishGen
website.

I would greatly appreciate if someone could check for lists of surnames to
see if any entries exist for the following names:
MLYNARZ, BRZEZINSKI, and SPIVACK.

Please respond privately.

Jeff Miller
Maryland
SingingTM@comcast.net


JRI-Poland success story re: cemetery discovery in Poland #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

Yad LeZehava in Kedumim Israel is working in tandem with other
Holocaustinstitutes and organizations to restore and reclaim Jewish
communal property in Poland and E. Europe, such as Jewish cemeteries.

Student volunteers >from Israel are being assisted by Polish non-Jews and
local government officials in this important work and it can bring
surprising results in discoveries and self-discovery. Finding the grave
of an ancestor by physically searching cemeteries is a very painstaking
task requiring much money, time and effort as anyone trying to index
cemetery names on tombstones knows. It is a daunting task for anyone
without cooperative help, thus I was pleased to read of a wonderful
success story involving JRI-Poland and the use of their online database
which contains information about the Warsaw cemetery

See the English magazine Mishpacha Jewish Family Weekly (Jerusalem) for
May 25, 2005 (Issue 58), pages 38-41 (incl. photos). "Discovering the
Kever of the Alexander Rebbe's Ancestor" by Avi Gordon.
(info@mishpachaw.com )

I have heard of this Hasidic dynasty in my research on Polish ancestors,
but didn't know of any gravesites still left mostly intact. The article
shouldbe widely read as it shows the great usefulness of genealogical
research work and the wonderful help of JRI-Poland as a facilitator
for Web access to otherwise inaccessible information.

Please note that there is no website yet for Mishpacha magazine and
I cannotpromise to provide a copy of the article without permission
from the publisher to upload this important article. Then, too, there
may be a fee involved so I don't know if I will be able to do it at all.
The magazine is for sale altho I have nothing to do with it's promotion
or business. Those interested, may write to:

Mishpacha Jewish Family Weekly
7 Beit HaDfus Street
Jerusalem, Israel 95483

or in the USA at:
5314 16th Avenue
POB 259
Brooklyn, NY 11204

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Special Projects Director
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim

RUDKIEWICZ, SOLARZ, NURZYC, SUSMAN


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Poland success story re: cemetery discovery in Poland #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

Yad LeZehava in Kedumim Israel is working in tandem with other
Holocaustinstitutes and organizations to restore and reclaim Jewish
communal property in Poland and E. Europe, such as Jewish cemeteries.

Student volunteers >from Israel are being assisted by Polish non-Jews and
local government officials in this important work and it can bring
surprising results in discoveries and self-discovery. Finding the grave
of an ancestor by physically searching cemeteries is a very painstaking
task requiring much money, time and effort as anyone trying to index
cemetery names on tombstones knows. It is a daunting task for anyone
without cooperative help, thus I was pleased to read of a wonderful
success story involving JRI-Poland and the use of their online database
which contains information about the Warsaw cemetery

See the English magazine Mishpacha Jewish Family Weekly (Jerusalem) for
May 25, 2005 (Issue 58), pages 38-41 (incl. photos). "Discovering the
Kever of the Alexander Rebbe's Ancestor" by Avi Gordon.
(info@mishpachaw.com )

I have heard of this Hasidic dynasty in my research on Polish ancestors,
but didn't know of any gravesites still left mostly intact. The article
shouldbe widely read as it shows the great usefulness of genealogical
research work and the wonderful help of JRI-Poland as a facilitator
for Web access to otherwise inaccessible information.

Please note that there is no website yet for Mishpacha magazine and
I cannotpromise to provide a copy of the article without permission
from the publisher to upload this important article. Then, too, there
may be a fee involved so I don't know if I will be able to do it at all.
The magazine is for sale altho I have nothing to do with it's promotion
or business. Those interested, may write to:

Mishpacha Jewish Family Weekly
7 Beit HaDfus Street
Jerusalem, Israel 95483

or in the USA at:
5314 16th Avenue
POB 259
Brooklyn, NY 11204

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Special Projects Director
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim

RUDKIEWICZ, SOLARZ, NURZYC, SUSMAN


Re: MASH and LION #general

mhlcswc2@...
 

There are MASH and LION families in Baltimore who are Jewish.

Marcia Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

In a message dated 5/27/2005 3:03:50 AM Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

Shalom!
As a French person, I'm not really familiar with the Jewish names in America since
many immigrants changed their names. I would like to know if the names MASH, LION
and KENNEDY can be Jewish (for example, do you know any Jewish family with this
name)? Thank you very much!
Claire Sztern, Paris, France
Claire.sztern@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: MASH and LION #general

mhlcswc2@...
 

There are MASH and LION families in Baltimore who are Jewish.

Marcia Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

In a message dated 5/27/2005 3:03:50 AM Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

Shalom!
As a French person, I'm not really familiar with the Jewish names in America since
many immigrants changed their names. I would like to know if the names MASH, LION
and KENNEDY can be Jewish (for example, do you know any Jewish family with this
name)? Thank you very much!
Claire Sztern, Paris, France
Claire.sztern@gmail.com


Re: mystery niece - Sandovitch, 1917, London #general

Kevin Bean <Kevin@...>
 

"Harvey" < harvey@hkaplan.freeserve.co.uk > wrote in message
news:008d01c563cd$40cab880$cf764d51@homekaplan...

My great-great grandfather, Abraham Jacob TROPP, died in London in May
1917. His death was registered by:

"Annie SANDOVITCH, niece"

Anyone know anything about this lady?

thanks

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
There was an Annie SANDOVITCH born abt Apr/Jun 1900, birth registered in
Whitechapel, London, England (see www.FreeBMD.org.uk).

I believe the family was in Mile End New Town at the time of the 1901 Census
(surname possibly mis-transcribed as SANDORITCH ?)

Harry SANDORITCH, 25, Korna, Russia, Tailor
Rachael SANDORITCH, 24, Aldgate, London
Annie SANDORITCH, 11m, Mile End, London

The is also: Fanny SANDORITCH, 13, Mile End, London, who may be unrelated or
a niece/sister of Harry SANDORITCH etc.

(see www.1901census.nationalarchives.gov.uk)

The parents were possibly Harris SANDOVITCH and Rachel GOULD, married abt
Apr/Jun 1897 in City, London (see FreeBMD)

*** Please note that all of the above needs to be verified ***

MODERATOR NOTE: Please note that detailed information and images on
the 1901census site are fee based.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: mystery niece - Sandovitch, 1917, London #general

Kevin Bean <Kevin@...>
 

"Harvey" < harvey@hkaplan.freeserve.co.uk > wrote in message
news:008d01c563cd$40cab880$cf764d51@homekaplan...

My great-great grandfather, Abraham Jacob TROPP, died in London in May
1917. His death was registered by:

"Annie SANDOVITCH, niece"

Anyone know anything about this lady?

thanks

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
There was an Annie SANDOVITCH born abt Apr/Jun 1900, birth registered in
Whitechapel, London, England (see www.FreeBMD.org.uk).

I believe the family was in Mile End New Town at the time of the 1901 Census
(surname possibly mis-transcribed as SANDORITCH ?)

Harry SANDORITCH, 25, Korna, Russia, Tailor
Rachael SANDORITCH, 24, Aldgate, London
Annie SANDORITCH, 11m, Mile End, London

The is also: Fanny SANDORITCH, 13, Mile End, London, who may be unrelated or
a niece/sister of Harry SANDORITCH etc.

(see www.1901census.nationalarchives.gov.uk)

The parents were possibly Harris SANDOVITCH and Rachel GOULD, married abt
Apr/Jun 1897 in City, London (see FreeBMD)

*** Please note that all of the above needs to be verified ***

MODERATOR NOTE: Please note that detailed information and images on
the 1901census site are fee based.