Date   

Re: Distinetz -- perhaps Disna? #lithuania

sbloom@...
 

I might also add to my previous suggestion, Disna,
which I believe was in the same region.

Subject: Distinetz?
From: "Steven Bloom" <sbloom@hsc.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Aug 2006 10:32:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Maybe Dusetos, NE Lithuania


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Distinetz -- perhaps Disna? #lithuania

sbloom@...
 

I might also add to my previous suggestion, Disna,
which I believe was in the same region.

Subject: Distinetz?
From: "Steven Bloom" <sbloom@hsc.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Aug 2006 10:32:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Maybe Dusetos, NE Lithuania


Re: Distinetz? #lithuania

Carol Baker
 

Try Disna. Contact Batya Olsen at batyao@netsynthesis.com

Carol Baker
Former Districts Research Groups Coordinator

Subject: Distinetz?
From: "Steven Bloom" <sbloom@hsc.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Aug 2006 10:32:36 -0400
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Batya Olsen is Coordinator of LitvakSIG's Disna Uyezd
Research Group.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania re: Distinetz? #lithuania

Carol Baker
 

Try Disna. Contact Batya Olsen at batyao@netsynthesis.com

Carol Baker
Former Districts Research Groups Coordinator

Subject: Distinetz?
From: "Steven Bloom" <sbloom@hsc.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Aug 2006 10:32:36 -0400
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Batya Olsen is Coordinator of LitvakSIG's Disna Uyezd
Research Group.


Re: Distinetz, Lithuania #lithuania

Simon Tardell
 

Shlomo Yaakov Rapaport wrote:

1. Can anyone help me find where Distinetz, Lithuania is or was?
Maybe it exists with a different name today?? An internet search on
the JewishGen site and a general internet search, as well as a look
over old and new maps of Lithuania have not helped up to now.
[...]

My Grandfather was
born in Distinetz, Lithuania. This is the way the name of the town was
remembered by his siblings and children and this is backed up in official
papers that he wrote the name after he left Lithuania and is published
even in a number of books published where our family roots and tree are
explored.

Sounds a lot like Wistinetz (Vishtinetz), in Vilkaviskis uyezd, Suwalki
gubernia. In Lithuanian it is called Vištytis and is now on the border
to the Kaliningrad enclave. 170 km west of Vilna.

Regards,

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Distinetz, Lithuania #lithuania

Simon Tardell
 

Shlomo Yaakov Rapaport wrote:

1. Can anyone help me find where Distinetz, Lithuania is or was?
Maybe it exists with a different name today?? An internet search on
the JewishGen site and a general internet search, as well as a look
over old and new maps of Lithuania have not helped up to now.
[...]

My Grandfather was
born in Distinetz, Lithuania. This is the way the name of the town was
remembered by his siblings and children and this is backed up in official
papers that he wrote the name after he left Lithuania and is published
even in a number of books published where our family roots and tree are
explored.

Sounds a lot like Wistinetz (Vishtinetz), in Vilkaviskis uyezd, Suwalki
gubernia. In Lithuanian it is called Vištytis and is now on the border
to the Kaliningrad enclave. 170 km west of Vilna.

Regards,

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.


Re: Zabludow #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

The Zabludow project had a very successful presentation, "Wooden
Synagogues of Poland", at the Vilna Shul on Beacon Hill in Boston last
night. The Vilna Shul is the oldest synagogue in Boston and it's
undergoing some restoration. The event was sponsored by the Boston
Center for Jewish Heritage. Dr. Eleonora Bergman, Deputy Director of the
Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw spoke as well as Thomas Hubka,
Professor of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin and Author of
"Resplendent Wooden Synagogue, Architecture and Worship in a
Eighteenth-Century Polish Community". The model of the Zabludow Wooden
Synagogue remains on exhibit at the Vilna Shul until at least January,
and soon thereafter will likely be going to Brandies University.

Handshouse Studio's Rick Brown have been awarded the Fulbright Scholars
Research Award. With this award, Rick and his wife, Laura, will spend
four months in 2007 in Poland researching the architecture and art of
the Zabludow Wooden Synagogue. They will study archived historic
photographs and architectural drawings of the 17th and 18th century
wooden synagogues of Poland and produce additional drawings >from direct
observation and documentation of interior and exterior architectural
details, artistic embellishments and construction details of many intact
significant wooden churches >from the same region and period of
construction. Rick Brown and Laura Brown will analyze where principles
and theories of art and architecture meet head to head with tools,
materials and processes in the actualization of building practice, and
create a comprehensive compilation of information that includes a
particular focus on materials, process and details utilized by artists,
architects, builders, and craftsmen in the original construction of the
Zabludow Synagogue.

There is a great deal of interest in locating any former Jewish
residents of Zabludow who may have memories of its wooden synagogue who
would be willing to be interviewed. Current or former residents of
Zabludow who are not Jewish would also be welcomed. The purpose of this
activity is to create as comprehensive and complete architectural and
historical documentation of the Zabludow wooden synagogue as is
possible. If anyone has knowledge of such people wherever they may be
I'd be interested in learning about them.

Though such a project contains many obstacles and challenges, there
remains a great deal of interest in eventually building a full size
replica of the Zabludow wooden synagogue in Poland. There's been some
discussion that the new Jewish Museum in Warsaw (it will be built right
nearby the Ghetto memorial) may contain a recreation of the interior of
a Polish wooden synagogue.

Best Regards,

Tilford Bartman


Re: Translation from Hebrew - two tombstones #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 4:47 AM -0300 8/24/06, Eliana Aizim wrote:

Dear Genners,
I would like to ask for a translation >from Hebrew of the inscriptions
on two tombstones that I've posted at ViewMate. File numbers are
VM8360 and VM8361 for the following address:
Please respond privately to me: aizim@uol.com.br
Thanks very much.
Once again, these two stones have features that
are of general interest (and in one respect
rather puzzling) so I am bringing these to the
group's attention.

Eliana states that these two ladies were (1) her
greatgrandmother (who died on 18th Iyyar --
which is Lag Ba'Omer though the stone does not
say so -- of the year 5713/1953) and (2) her
grandmother's sister, in other words, Eliana's
great-aunt (who died on 1st of Adar Sheni
(i.e., Rosh Hodesh Adar Sheni) of the year 5719 =
1959)

The inscriptions on these two stones identify the
great-grandmother as Zlate bas Mosheh, "wife of
the late R Fishel Averbach" and the great-aunt
as Tovah "daughter of Fishel Averbach" and
"wife of the late Fishel Neuberger." (No doubt
the family took the unusual step of including the
men's surnames in order to avoid confusion. This,
by the way, is the first time I have seen the
term ha-manoaH ("the late...") on a stone. Is
this as rare as it strikes me -- or whether it
was customary in particular communities?

Both stones -- which incidentally have the
clearest inscriptions I've ever seen! -- spell
the surname AVERBACH, though Eliana gives the
spelling as AVERBUCH)

To me the most interesting -- and puzzling --
thing is that the great--grandmother Zlate is
described as "ishah kesherah" (literally a
"kosher" woman -- meaning a fitting or suitable
woman ) -- which strikes me as a rather odd
choice of adjective, while her great-aunt Tovah
is described more normally as "ishah yesharah"
(meaning "an upright woman").

I am wondering whether the adjective kesherah was
selected deliberately for the great-grandmother
-- or whether they had really intended to
describe her as ishah yesharah but they wrote
the yod very large -- which could have led the
stone-mason to misread it as a kaf and to carve
the adjective kesherah instead of the adjective
yesharah!

Can anyone shed light on why a family might
actually describe a deceased member as ishah
kesherah? Is it a technical term of some kind?

Judith Romney Wegner


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland RE:Zabludow #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

The Zabludow project had a very successful presentation, "Wooden
Synagogues of Poland", at the Vilna Shul on Beacon Hill in Boston last
night. The Vilna Shul is the oldest synagogue in Boston and it's
undergoing some restoration. The event was sponsored by the Boston
Center for Jewish Heritage. Dr. Eleonora Bergman, Deputy Director of the
Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw spoke as well as Thomas Hubka,
Professor of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin and Author of
"Resplendent Wooden Synagogue, Architecture and Worship in a
Eighteenth-Century Polish Community". The model of the Zabludow Wooden
Synagogue remains on exhibit at the Vilna Shul until at least January,
and soon thereafter will likely be going to Brandies University.

Handshouse Studio's Rick Brown have been awarded the Fulbright Scholars
Research Award. With this award, Rick and his wife, Laura, will spend
four months in 2007 in Poland researching the architecture and art of
the Zabludow Wooden Synagogue. They will study archived historic
photographs and architectural drawings of the 17th and 18th century
wooden synagogues of Poland and produce additional drawings >from direct
observation and documentation of interior and exterior architectural
details, artistic embellishments and construction details of many intact
significant wooden churches >from the same region and period of
construction. Rick Brown and Laura Brown will analyze where principles
and theories of art and architecture meet head to head with tools,
materials and processes in the actualization of building practice, and
create a comprehensive compilation of information that includes a
particular focus on materials, process and details utilized by artists,
architects, builders, and craftsmen in the original construction of the
Zabludow Synagogue.

There is a great deal of interest in locating any former Jewish
residents of Zabludow who may have memories of its wooden synagogue who
would be willing to be interviewed. Current or former residents of
Zabludow who are not Jewish would also be welcomed. The purpose of this
activity is to create as comprehensive and complete architectural and
historical documentation of the Zabludow wooden synagogue as is
possible. If anyone has knowledge of such people wherever they may be
I'd be interested in learning about them.

Though such a project contains many obstacles and challenges, there
remains a great deal of interest in eventually building a full size
replica of the Zabludow wooden synagogue in Poland. There's been some
discussion that the new Jewish Museum in Warsaw (it will be built right
nearby the Ghetto memorial) may contain a recreation of the interior of
a Polish wooden synagogue.

Best Regards,

Tilford Bartman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Translation from Hebrew - two tombstones #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 4:47 AM -0300 8/24/06, Eliana Aizim wrote:

Dear Genners,
I would like to ask for a translation >from Hebrew of the inscriptions
on two tombstones that I've posted at ViewMate. File numbers are
VM8360 and VM8361 for the following address:
Please respond privately to me: aizim@uol.com.br
Thanks very much.
Once again, these two stones have features that
are of general interest (and in one respect
rather puzzling) so I am bringing these to the
group's attention.

Eliana states that these two ladies were (1) her
greatgrandmother (who died on 18th Iyyar --
which is Lag Ba'Omer though the stone does not
say so -- of the year 5713/1953) and (2) her
grandmother's sister, in other words, Eliana's
great-aunt (who died on 1st of Adar Sheni
(i.e., Rosh Hodesh Adar Sheni) of the year 5719 =
1959)

The inscriptions on these two stones identify the
great-grandmother as Zlate bas Mosheh, "wife of
the late R Fishel Averbach" and the great-aunt
as Tovah "daughter of Fishel Averbach" and
"wife of the late Fishel Neuberger." (No doubt
the family took the unusual step of including the
men's surnames in order to avoid confusion. This,
by the way, is the first time I have seen the
term ha-manoaH ("the late...") on a stone. Is
this as rare as it strikes me -- or whether it
was customary in particular communities?

Both stones -- which incidentally have the
clearest inscriptions I've ever seen! -- spell
the surname AVERBACH, though Eliana gives the
spelling as AVERBUCH)

To me the most interesting -- and puzzling --
thing is that the great--grandmother Zlate is
described as "ishah kesherah" (literally a
"kosher" woman -- meaning a fitting or suitable
woman ) -- which strikes me as a rather odd
choice of adjective, while her great-aunt Tovah
is described more normally as "ishah yesharah"
(meaning "an upright woman").

I am wondering whether the adjective kesherah was
selected deliberately for the great-grandmother
-- or whether they had really intended to
describe her as ishah yesharah but they wrote
the yod very large -- which could have led the
stone-mason to misread it as a kaf and to carve
the adjective kesherah instead of the adjective
yesharah!

Can anyone shed light on why a family might
actually describe a deceased member as ishah
kesherah? Is it a technical term of some kind?

Judith Romney Wegner


Researching Surname Change #poland

Michel Heyman <mheyman@...>
 

When my great uncle immigrated to New York in 1913 he changed his last name
from Checinski to Hyman. The question I have been unable to answer after
years of wondering and questioning is why my great uncle chose the last name
Hyman?

Secondly, my grandfather (younger brother of my great uncle) travelled
to South Africa in the 1920's >from Pitorikow, Poland (and where he was
naturalized in 1924) changed his last name to Heyman not Hyman. I have
documentation >from the South African archives showing the name change and
naturalization papers, but to no trace as to why name change to Heyman or
if there was a previous family connection in the US or South Africa? I am
trying to find out why my great uncle chose Hyman 11 years earlier and why
my grand father chose Heyman in 1924. Can anyone recommend some creative
means of researching this objective other than simply posting to South
Africa newsgroup? Thank you.

Michel Heyman


JRI Poland #Poland Researching Surname Change #poland

Michel Heyman <mheyman@...>
 

When my great uncle immigrated to New York in 1913 he changed his last name
from Checinski to Hyman. The question I have been unable to answer after
years of wondering and questioning is why my great uncle chose the last name
Hyman?

Secondly, my grandfather (younger brother of my great uncle) travelled
to South Africa in the 1920's >from Pitorikow, Poland (and where he was
naturalized in 1924) changed his last name to Heyman not Hyman. I have
documentation >from the South African archives showing the name change and
naturalization papers, but to no trace as to why name change to Heyman or
if there was a previous family connection in the US or South Africa? I am
trying to find out why my great uncle chose Hyman 11 years earlier and why
my grand father chose Heyman in 1924. Can anyone recommend some creative
means of researching this objective other than simply posting to South
Africa newsgroup? Thank you.

Michel Heyman


Seeking descendants of Morris MARSHALL from CA #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi, Genners.

I just discovered that an ancestor of mine changed his last name. (His
brothers all kept the original name).

I'm looking for descendants of Morris MARSHALL, whose name was
originally Morris MAILSHANKER.

He lived in the Los Angeles area as of the 1950s and died (death
reported to LA County) in 1960. His wife was named Annie.

They had 2 sons, Leon and Irvin. I don't know if the sons changed
their surnames as well; the sons were born between approximately 1915
and 1920. All were originally >from Philadelphia.
--
Henoch Duboff <hduboff@gmail.com>
Mequon, Wisconsin, USA

Researching: DUBNITZKY (Aliksandriya, Kherson, Ukr.); FAERSTEIN,
TICHNER; (Skala, Austria-Hungary / Ukraine); MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER
(Grading/Gorodok Podol., Dnipropetrovsk, and B. Aires - Argentina);
MARSHALL (Los Angeles, CA); OBLETZ (Any); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk -
Russia); ZEMBLE (Lushnitz - Russia);


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking descendants of Morris MARSHALL from CA #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi, Genners.

I just discovered that an ancestor of mine changed his last name. (His
brothers all kept the original name).

I'm looking for descendants of Morris MARSHALL, whose name was
originally Morris MAILSHANKER.

He lived in the Los Angeles area as of the 1950s and died (death
reported to LA County) in 1960. His wife was named Annie.

They had 2 sons, Leon and Irvin. I don't know if the sons changed
their surnames as well; the sons were born between approximately 1915
and 1920. All were originally >from Philadelphia.
--
Henoch Duboff <hduboff@gmail.com>
Mequon, Wisconsin, USA

Researching: DUBNITZKY (Aliksandriya, Kherson, Ukr.); FAERSTEIN,
TICHNER; (Skala, Austria-Hungary / Ukraine); MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER
(Grading/Gorodok Podol., Dnipropetrovsk, and B. Aires - Argentina);
MARSHALL (Los Angeles, CA); OBLETZ (Any); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk -
Russia); ZEMBLE (Lushnitz - Russia);


Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities in Romania #romania

Mark Lewis <mark@...>
 

I have come across this book on JewishGen
(http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html)

I am trying to research the Jewish communities in Ploesti, and other places
in Prahova Country near Ploesti.

Can anyone tell me how I can access/order this book in English, or more
relevantly the specific area I am interested in?

Many thanks!

Mark Lewis
London
mark@terrafirma.co.uk


Romania SIG #Romania Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities in Romania #romania

Mark Lewis <mark@...>
 

I have come across this book on JewishGen
(http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html)

I am trying to research the Jewish communities in Ploesti, and other places
in Prahova Country near Ploesti.

Can anyone tell me how I can access/order this book in English, or more
relevantly the specific area I am interested in?

Many thanks!

Mark Lewis
London
mark@terrafirma.co.uk


Springs Advertiser #southafrica

Eric Horwitz <horwitzclan@...>
 

Hi
Good Morning
If I want an article that was in the Springs Advertiser in 1938
How can I go about getting it?
Many thanks
Eric Horwitz


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Springs Advertiser #southafrica

Eric Horwitz <horwitzclan@...>
 

Hi
Good Morning
If I want an article that was in the Springs Advertiser in 1938
How can I go about getting it?
Many thanks
Eric Horwitz


Surname Kantor #southafrica

Miriam Mason <ashrink@...>
 

Dear Group,
My maternal grandmother was Minnie Kantor.
She was born in Vienna or Lemberg, depending on the information on
different papers.
Her father was a baker. Her mother died when she was very young.

Minnie married Sam Jugend (Yugend) and they lived in France for a few
years where the couple had cousins.
In 1888 they came to the US. They lived in New York for about 10 years on
Allen Street......then in New Jersey for a year......and then to Minnesota
where the couple lived until their deaths. They had 10 living children.
Yetta, Dorothy, Lena, Jennie, Rosie, Eva, Frieda, Ida, Sarah and Sidney.
It is said that one of Minnie's brothers......surname Kantor, immigrated
to South Africa. I am assuming this to be in the 1880's or 1890's. I do not
have a town..I do not have a first name......I am just hoping by chance that
some of this may sound familiar to someone.

If there is a Kantor in this Sig could they please contact me?

Miriam Mason
Succasunna, New Jersey USA
ashrink@optonline.net


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Surname Kantor #southafrica

Miriam Mason <ashrink@...>
 

Dear Group,
My maternal grandmother was Minnie Kantor.
She was born in Vienna or Lemberg, depending on the information on
different papers.
Her father was a baker. Her mother died when she was very young.

Minnie married Sam Jugend (Yugend) and they lived in France for a few
years where the couple had cousins.
In 1888 they came to the US. They lived in New York for about 10 years on
Allen Street......then in New Jersey for a year......and then to Minnesota
where the couple lived until their deaths. They had 10 living children.
Yetta, Dorothy, Lena, Jennie, Rosie, Eva, Frieda, Ida, Sarah and Sidney.
It is said that one of Minnie's brothers......surname Kantor, immigrated
to South Africa. I am assuming this to be in the 1880's or 1890's. I do not
have a town..I do not have a first name......I am just hoping by chance that
some of this may sound familiar to someone.

If there is a Kantor in this Sig could they please contact me?

Miriam Mason
Succasunna, New Jersey USA
ashrink@optonline.net