Date   

Establishing when grandparents moved from Poland to London #unitedkingdom

Hazel Dakers
 

Dear Ann

The way I established when my Polish grandparents came to the UK was largely
through looking at the birth certificates of their children.
Married Lodz 25 Aug 1904
Eldest Berlin 7 July 1905
2nd London 6 July 1907
My Dad London 9 Feb 1911

I had some research done in Berlin and this threw up their eldest child's
date of birth and also through trade directories their Berlin addresses
1905/6. I did already know that they had first lived in Berlin after leaving
Poland. So they obviously arrived in London some time between 1906 and July
1907. There is good census detail for them in 1911.

My grandparents did not apply to naturalise in the UK. Had they done so
there would probably have been a wealth of information in an application
file at the National Archives (UK). By contrast the actual certificates say
next to nothing.

Good luck!

Hazel Dakers, London UK researching:

BIRNBAUM (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), GOLD (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), HEIMANN
(Luegde, Germany & South Africa), NORDEN (London and South Africa)
www.hazeldakers.co.uk


Subject: Question about researching when family moved >from Poland to London
and Dublin
From: myfamfinder@gmail.com
2. I am trying to find when my family came >from Poland and moved to London
and Dublin. This would also help me determine where my gg grandparents were
born. I haven't found many alien arrival records them. Is there a database
or other archive to research outside of JewishGen and ancestry that may have
this information?

My gg grandmother (Debbie BENJAMIN) was born around 1862. My gg grandfather
(Philip MYERS) was born (most likely in Poland) in 1860.

Any advice is welcome. Thank you for your help.

Regards,
Ann Lustig
New Jersey, USA


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Establishing when grandparents moved from Poland to London #unitedkingdom

Hazel Dakers
 

Dear Ann

The way I established when my Polish grandparents came to the UK was largely
through looking at the birth certificates of their children.
Married Lodz 25 Aug 1904
Eldest Berlin 7 July 1905
2nd London 6 July 1907
My Dad London 9 Feb 1911

I had some research done in Berlin and this threw up their eldest child's
date of birth and also through trade directories their Berlin addresses
1905/6. I did already know that they had first lived in Berlin after leaving
Poland. So they obviously arrived in London some time between 1906 and July
1907. There is good census detail for them in 1911.

My grandparents did not apply to naturalise in the UK. Had they done so
there would probably have been a wealth of information in an application
file at the National Archives (UK). By contrast the actual certificates say
next to nothing.

Good luck!

Hazel Dakers, London UK researching:

BIRNBAUM (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), GOLD (Zgierz & Lodz, Poland), HEIMANN
(Luegde, Germany & South Africa), NORDEN (London and South Africa)
www.hazeldakers.co.uk


Subject: Question about researching when family moved >from Poland to London
and Dublin
From: myfamfinder@gmail.com
2. I am trying to find when my family came >from Poland and moved to London
and Dublin. This would also help me determine where my gg grandparents were
born. I haven't found many alien arrival records them. Is there a database
or other archive to research outside of JewishGen and ancestry that may have
this information?

My gg grandmother (Debbie BENJAMIN) was born around 1862. My gg grandfather
(Philip MYERS) was born (most likely in Poland) in 1860.

Any advice is welcome. Thank you for your help.

Regards,
Ann Lustig
New Jersey, USA


IMPORTANT REQUEST BEFORE PASSOVER: HELP PRESERVE JEWISH CEMETERY RECORDS #belarus

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear Friends,

Last month, Jewish cemeteries were desecrated or sustained significant
damage throughout the world. Here in the USA, we were dismayed by the
hateful vandalism of cemeteries in Philadelphia, PA, Rochester, NY,
and St. Louis, MO. In addition, 5 tombstones were found toppled in a
Jewish cemetery in Brooklyn, NY, and in Paris, France, an unintentional
traffic accident resulted in the destruction of 13 Jewish graves.
ALL OF THIS HAPPENED IN JUST THE MONTH OF MARCH.

JewishGen.org has been fighting this battle for many years, and has a
solution to preserve cemetery records throughout the world,
particularly in places where the Jewish community is dwindling or no
longer exists. JewishGen created a global burial registry which now
contains more than 3 million Jewish burials >from cemeteries in 125
countries throughout the world.

But this is not enough, and we turn to you for assistance. Right now,
as Passover quickly approaches, there are two important ways you can
help ensure that the memory of those who preceded us will never be
forgotten or erased:

If you have a personal connection with the leadership or a member of
any Jewish organization or synagogue, we ask that you consider
immediately approaching them with the request that they view a brief
PowerPoint video created by Nolan Altman, our VP of Data Acquisition.
In this video, he describes how our community, and its friends, can
most effectively respond to the challenge of preserving the precious
information on cemetery headstones now threatened with permanent
destruction. Passover is a very appropriate time to discuss these
issues, and we hope you can help. Here is a link to the video:

https://youtu.be/fMHOLGodHP8

Join our efforts to photograph, transcribe and index cemetery
information. In many cases, a cemetery headstone may be the only
surviving record of our ancestors. Click here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm

Our goal is to receive cemetery and burial information which we can
then upload to our website, serving as a permanent memorial and
research tool for future generations wishing to discover and honor
their own Jewish family history. As with all JewishGen databases,
these records will be freely available, and will serve as a memorial
that can never be extinguished.

To demonstrate the importance of JewishGen preserving Jewish burial
information, consider the following:

In the case of the Menorah Park cemetery in Philadelphia, JewishGen
already had the tombstone information in our databases. What if the
stones had been defaced beyond recognition and repair? Due to
JewishGen's efforts, the information will always be available, since
JewishGen serves as a permanent memorial and testament to those who
came before us – despite the physical conditions on the ground.

Jewish cemeteries serve as a bridge between generations. Without
JOWBR's information, many families would lose the connection to their
ancestors within 2-3 generations. How many people know where their
great-great grandparents are buried? But JewishGen fosters a connection
across time and space. Once we have recorded burial information, it is
our goal that it will be available for all future generations.
The Hebrew patronymic names on headstones are incredibly valuable to
genealogists because patronymic names link generations by showing the
name of the deceased and their father.

The symbols and epithets on a tombstone often give guidance as to the
status of the individual during his/her lifetime.

For these reasons, as the holiday of Passover quickly approaches, we
urge you to help us preserve the memory of those who have no one else
to speak for them.

As Hillel said: If not now, when?
And we add: If not us, then who?

If you are able to introduce JewishGen to an organization or synagogue,
please click the following link to submit a brief form to let us know
which organization/synagogue you have approached and the relevant
contact information of those with whom we might follow-up.

https://tinyurl.com/HelpJewishGen

If you are interested in volunteering yourself, please click here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm

Thank you in advance. With your help, we will continue to preserve
our history for future generations.

Happy Passover and Chag Kosher V’Sameach.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Belarus SIG #Belarus IMPORTANT REQUEST BEFORE PASSOVER: HELP PRESERVE JEWISH CEMETERY RECORDS #belarus

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear Friends,

Last month, Jewish cemeteries were desecrated or sustained significant
damage throughout the world. Here in the USA, we were dismayed by the
hateful vandalism of cemeteries in Philadelphia, PA, Rochester, NY,
and St. Louis, MO. In addition, 5 tombstones were found toppled in a
Jewish cemetery in Brooklyn, NY, and in Paris, France, an unintentional
traffic accident resulted in the destruction of 13 Jewish graves.
ALL OF THIS HAPPENED IN JUST THE MONTH OF MARCH.

JewishGen.org has been fighting this battle for many years, and has a
solution to preserve cemetery records throughout the world,
particularly in places where the Jewish community is dwindling or no
longer exists. JewishGen created a global burial registry which now
contains more than 3 million Jewish burials >from cemeteries in 125
countries throughout the world.

But this is not enough, and we turn to you for assistance. Right now,
as Passover quickly approaches, there are two important ways you can
help ensure that the memory of those who preceded us will never be
forgotten or erased:

If you have a personal connection with the leadership or a member of
any Jewish organization or synagogue, we ask that you consider
immediately approaching them with the request that they view a brief
PowerPoint video created by Nolan Altman, our VP of Data Acquisition.
In this video, he describes how our community, and its friends, can
most effectively respond to the challenge of preserving the precious
information on cemetery headstones now threatened with permanent
destruction. Passover is a very appropriate time to discuss these
issues, and we hope you can help. Here is a link to the video:

https://youtu.be/fMHOLGodHP8

Join our efforts to photograph, transcribe and index cemetery
information. In many cases, a cemetery headstone may be the only
surviving record of our ancestors. Click here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm

Our goal is to receive cemetery and burial information which we can
then upload to our website, serving as a permanent memorial and
research tool for future generations wishing to discover and honor
their own Jewish family history. As with all JewishGen databases,
these records will be freely available, and will serve as a memorial
that can never be extinguished.

To demonstrate the importance of JewishGen preserving Jewish burial
information, consider the following:

In the case of the Menorah Park cemetery in Philadelphia, JewishGen
already had the tombstone information in our databases. What if the
stones had been defaced beyond recognition and repair? Due to
JewishGen's efforts, the information will always be available, since
JewishGen serves as a permanent memorial and testament to those who
came before us – despite the physical conditions on the ground.

Jewish cemeteries serve as a bridge between generations. Without
JOWBR's information, many families would lose the connection to their
ancestors within 2-3 generations. How many people know where their
great-great grandparents are buried? But JewishGen fosters a connection
across time and space. Once we have recorded burial information, it is
our goal that it will be available for all future generations.
The Hebrew patronymic names on headstones are incredibly valuable to
genealogists because patronymic names link generations by showing the
name of the deceased and their father.

The symbols and epithets on a tombstone often give guidance as to the
status of the individual during his/her lifetime.

For these reasons, as the holiday of Passover quickly approaches, we
urge you to help us preserve the memory of those who have no one else
to speak for them.

As Hillel said: If not now, when?
And we add: If not us, then who?

If you are able to introduce JewishGen to an organization or synagogue,
please click the following link to submit a brief form to let us know
which organization/synagogue you have approached and the relevant
contact information of those with whom we might follow-up.

https://tinyurl.com/HelpJewishGen

If you are interested in volunteering yourself, please click here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm

Thank you in advance. With your help, we will continue to preserve
our history for future generations.

Happy Passover and Chag Kosher V’Sameach.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


HAMMERMAN family in Yokneam, Israel #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Raisa Hammerman, daughter of
Gedaliah Babad, a prominent rabbinical family who lived in Yokneam and
posted a Page of Testimony for her uncle Moshe Babad in 1969.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: If providing contact information, please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HAMMERMAN family in Yokneam, Israel #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Raisa Hammerman, daughter of
Gedaliah Babad, a prominent rabbinical family who lived in Yokneam and
posted a Page of Testimony for her uncle Moshe Babad in 1969.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: If providing contact information, please respond privately.


Lookups in general - RE: Waldheim Cemetery, IL photo request #general

pweinthal
 

If you are unable to find someone on this list who can help you, I have two
suggestions:

Contact the findagrave contributor. She has offered to take requests and has
a link on her profile page.

Are you familiar with Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness (www.raogk.org)?

If not - bookmark it!

This is a terrific group of genealogical volunteers around the world who offer
all kinds of assistance, including photographing cemetery stones. I've called
on RAOGK volunteers in the past and have paid it forward by helping others.
There are volunteers in Illinois who might be able to help you. Consider doing
the same.

I refer you to Dick Eastman's blog for background. (Or search for the title)

Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness is Back Online
by Dick Eastman on January 4, 2015

https://blog.eogn.com/2015/01/04/random-acts-of-genealogical-kindness-is-back-online/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/4niuhD ]

Sincerely,
Pat Weinthal in Massachusetts

Researching WEINTHAL/WIJNTAL/WAJNTAL/WINTHAL and variations
ARNHEIM, STREEP, DRIESEN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lookups in general - RE: Waldheim Cemetery, IL photo request #general

pweinthal
 

If you are unable to find someone on this list who can help you, I have two
suggestions:

Contact the findagrave contributor. She has offered to take requests and has
a link on her profile page.

Are you familiar with Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness (www.raogk.org)?

If not - bookmark it!

This is a terrific group of genealogical volunteers around the world who offer
all kinds of assistance, including photographing cemetery stones. I've called
on RAOGK volunteers in the past and have paid it forward by helping others.
There are volunteers in Illinois who might be able to help you. Consider doing
the same.

I refer you to Dick Eastman's blog for background. (Or search for the title)

Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness is Back Online
by Dick Eastman on January 4, 2015

https://blog.eogn.com/2015/01/04/random-acts-of-genealogical-kindness-is-back-online/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/4niuhD ]

Sincerely,
Pat Weinthal in Massachusetts

Researching WEINTHAL/WIJNTAL/WAJNTAL/WINTHAL and variations
ARNHEIM, STREEP, DRIESEN


Passover Wishes #poland

חנה ועמנואל פורמן <ehfurman@...>
 

Happy and Kosher Pessach - Passover to you and all around you.
May the Idea of Freedom that the Haggadah teach us shall be
A base for a better world.

Shalom >from Israel,
Chana Furman
Kiryat Gat


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Passover Wishes #poland

חנה ועמנואל פורמן <ehfurman@...>
 

Happy and Kosher Pessach - Passover to you and all around you.
May the Idea of Freedom that the Haggadah teach us shall be
A base for a better world.

Shalom >from Israel,
Chana Furman
Kiryat Gat


INTRO - researching EICHENWALD, BIALIK et al. #germany

Micah Salb
 

Hello GerSig:

I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for several
decades and I consider myself to be very advanced.

I am primarily researching the following German families:

EICHENWALD >from (Billerbeck, Munster, Horstmar)
BIALIK, ELKAN, GANS, WOODROW

Warm regards to all, Micah Salb Washington, DC msalb@lsslawyers.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching EICHENWALD, BIALIK et al. #germany

Micah Salb
 

Hello GerSig:

I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for several
decades and I consider myself to be very advanced.

I am primarily researching the following German families:

EICHENWALD >from (Billerbeck, Munster, Horstmar)
BIALIK, ELKAN, GANS, WOODROW

Warm regards to all, Micah Salb Washington, DC msalb@lsslawyers.com


The Radautz Death Registers Database - A Rich New Web Resource for Jewish Heritage #romania

Edgar Hauster <bconcept@...>
 

Dear friends,

Even if final, but not trivial at all, death records are among the
most important of all vital records. Death Indices typically
contain the birth date of a person, date of death, cause of death
and other details that are helpful in genealogical and historical research.
As part TWO of our ongoing project, The Radautz Death Registers Database is a
rich web resource for Jewish heritage in Bukovina:

http://czernowitz.blogspot.de/2016/12/the-radautz-vital-records-index.html

http://www.reisch-family.net/SevenSealsRadautzDeathIndex/SearchForm.html

The Radautz Death Index Database contains over 7,500 properly indexed death
records for the period 1857-1929; some data refer back to births as early as
the middle of the 18th century. Copies of family death records are freely
available upon request. Our thanks go to Martina Lelgemann, who took care of the
transcription, and to Bruce Reisch, who developed The Radautz Death Registers
Database search engine and website. Lucas Reisch provided php search engine
expertise.

Whether you are looking for an ancestor or trying to find a lost classmate,
death records can provide a link to essential information and point you toward
important clues. The free search provided by The Radautz Death Registers Database
can jumpstart your research project. Please check it out and let us have your
comments?!

Edgar Hauster


Romania SIG #Romania The Radautz Death Registers Database - A Rich New Web Resource for Jewish Heritage #romania

Edgar Hauster <bconcept@...>
 

Dear friends,

Even if final, but not trivial at all, death records are among the
most important of all vital records. Death Indices typically
contain the birth date of a person, date of death, cause of death
and other details that are helpful in genealogical and historical research.
As part TWO of our ongoing project, The Radautz Death Registers Database is a
rich web resource for Jewish heritage in Bukovina:

http://czernowitz.blogspot.de/2016/12/the-radautz-vital-records-index.html

http://www.reisch-family.net/SevenSealsRadautzDeathIndex/SearchForm.html

The Radautz Death Index Database contains over 7,500 properly indexed death
records for the period 1857-1929; some data refer back to births as early as
the middle of the 18th century. Copies of family death records are freely
available upon request. Our thanks go to Martina Lelgemann, who took care of the
transcription, and to Bruce Reisch, who developed The Radautz Death Registers
Database search engine and website. Lucas Reisch provided php search engine
expertise.

Whether you are looking for an ancestor or trying to find a lost classmate,
death records can provide a link to essential information and point you toward
important clues. The free search provided by The Radautz Death Registers Database
can jumpstart your research project. Please check it out and let us have your
comments?!

Edgar Hauster


Re: Research Questions #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi Ann,

Thanks for the message. I think my message might be interesting to others too. I should tell you, that
I never hear such last name, I am sure that I did not know many of last names.

I looked up the Revision list and double checked with original, and the translation was done correctly.
The only thing I found that you wrote Yankel's father's name as Shakna, but in fact it is Shakhna.

Next thing what I did is tried to find an origin of that surname, and I did it at Aleksander Beider's book:
Bakhchalej (this is how it is written in the dictionary), but it is very close to what you wrote. It is said
that it was common in Kishinev (that is great), and the surname is a Toponymical origin (Geographical)
from a village called Bakchaliya (Bendery uezd)... and that village exists on the current Google maps it
is called Baccealia (written in Romanian). I am not sure now about Napoleonic soldier, but I would
suggest to try to find out more about that village, and about the name of the village.

All the best,

Hug Sameah,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
--------------------------
from Annie Lustig
Sent: Sunday, April 2, 2017 11:02 AM

Part of my research is to not only find facts about members in my tree, but to also track down some
family stories. One such story comes >from my great grandfather's family >from Kishinev.............


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia RE: Research Questions #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi Ann,

Thanks for the message. I think my message might be interesting to others too. I should tell you, that
I never hear such last name, I am sure that I did not know many of last names.

I looked up the Revision list and double checked with original, and the translation was done correctly.
The only thing I found that you wrote Yankel's father's name as Shakna, but in fact it is Shakhna.

Next thing what I did is tried to find an origin of that surname, and I did it at Aleksander Beider's book:
Bakhchalej (this is how it is written in the dictionary), but it is very close to what you wrote. It is said
that it was common in Kishinev (that is great), and the surname is a Toponymical origin (Geographical)
from a village called Bakchaliya (Bendery uezd)... and that village exists on the current Google maps it
is called Baccealia (written in Romanian). I am not sure now about Napoleonic soldier, but I would
suggest to try to find out more about that village, and about the name of the village.

All the best,

Hug Sameah,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
--------------------------
from Annie Lustig
Sent: Sunday, April 2, 2017 11:02 AM

Part of my research is to not only find facts about members in my tree, but to also track down some
family stories. One such story comes >from my great grandfather's family >from Kishinev.............


Re: Location of Bajovagar #hungary

tom
 

the closest name i could find is bajorva'ga's in saros megye,
which is bajerovce in present-day slovakia.
the jewshgen gazetteer does not list it as having a jewish community,
but there are 5 smaller communities within a 10-mile radius.


....... tom klein, toronto


albie.hochhauser@gmail.com wrote:

In the 1867 census, my great-grandfather is listed as having been
born in Bajovagar or Bajovagas in 1841. The handwriting on the census
record makes it difficult to distinguish the last letter of the
location.
In a house sale contract dated 1844, my great-great-grandfather is
shown as living in Berwager. I assume these are the same place and
that Berwager is the German equivalent of Bajovagar/s.
Any suggestions as to its present day location? It's probably in
Northern Slovakia, near Brezovice, but I can't find anything close to
either spelling.
Albert Hochhauser
Moderator: Unless someone has new info, this thread is ended.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Location of Bajovagar #hungary

tom
 

the closest name i could find is bajorva'ga's in saros megye,
which is bajerovce in present-day slovakia.
the jewshgen gazetteer does not list it as having a jewish community,
but there are 5 smaller communities within a 10-mile radius.


....... tom klein, toronto


albie.hochhauser@gmail.com wrote:

In the 1867 census, my great-grandfather is listed as having been
born in Bajovagar or Bajovagas in 1841. The handwriting on the census
record makes it difficult to distinguish the last letter of the
location.
In a house sale contract dated 1844, my great-great-grandfather is
shown as living in Berwager. I assume these are the same place and
that Berwager is the German equivalent of Bajovagar/s.
Any suggestions as to its present day location? It's probably in
Northern Slovakia, near Brezovice, but I can't find anything close to
either spelling.
Albert Hochhauser
Moderator: Unless someone has new info, this thread is ended.


Completeness of birth and marriage records #hungary

jrmilch@...
 

I have made great use of the Hungarian birth and marriage records in
building my family tree. However, I find that they are very
sparse--it appears that only certain records have been transcribed and
indexed. For example, there are many children that I know were born
near Rajec, Slovakia, but they don't appear in the records. Also,
it is rare to find both birth and marriage records for the same
person.

Can anyone help me understand the gaps? Were many births and
marriages never recorded? Are these records >from distributed
archives, and many have been lost? Are there more records on
microfilm at LDS, which have never been put into the online index?

thank you, Jim Milch

Moderator: You did not mention the years that the births
and marriages took place but I assume they happened when Rajecz was
in Trencsen megye, Hungary. The vital records database includes close
to 3000 BMD records >from Rajecz, including 70 births, 23 marriages, and
14 deaths but there are many reasons why you are not finding some that
you need:
1. Register was not filmed by Family Search;
2. Register has not been indexed by H-SIG volunteers;
3. Events were not reported;
4. Names are misspelled in the Jewish register;
5. Event took place in another place;
6. Marriages were often not reported.
Others can probably think of more reasons but there are also remedies.
1. Check FamilySearch.org to see if register images are available on-line or
can be borrowed for use at a nearby library branch (this may require browsing
through many images);
2. If FamilySearch has the register but it has not been indexed, volunteer as
as an indexer!


Hungary SIG #Hungary Completeness of birth and marriage records #hungary

jrmilch@...
 

I have made great use of the Hungarian birth and marriage records in
building my family tree. However, I find that they are very
sparse--it appears that only certain records have been transcribed and
indexed. For example, there are many children that I know were born
near Rajec, Slovakia, but they don't appear in the records. Also,
it is rare to find both birth and marriage records for the same
person.

Can anyone help me understand the gaps? Were many births and
marriages never recorded? Are these records >from distributed
archives, and many have been lost? Are there more records on
microfilm at LDS, which have never been put into the online index?

thank you, Jim Milch

Moderator: You did not mention the years that the births
and marriages took place but I assume they happened when Rajecz was
in Trencsen megye, Hungary. The vital records database includes close
to 3000 BMD records >from Rajecz, including 70 births, 23 marriages, and
14 deaths but there are many reasons why you are not finding some that
you need:
1. Register was not filmed by Family Search;
2. Register has not been indexed by H-SIG volunteers;
3. Events were not reported;
4. Names are misspelled in the Jewish register;
5. Event took place in another place;
6. Marriages were often not reported.
Others can probably think of more reasons but there are also remedies.
1. Check FamilySearch.org to see if register images are available on-line or
can be borrowed for use at a nearby library branch (this may require browsing
through many images);
2. If FamilySearch has the register but it has not been indexed, volunteer as
as an indexer!

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