Date   

Ukraine Town Interpretation.- Viewmate Help #ukraine

ms nodrog
 

Town Name Interpretation Please....

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=32086

I know that the town listed >from a manifest says Torchin / Tortzyn.
Torchin was in the Volhynia gubernia of the Ukraine.
I can not figure out the second word after Torchin/Torczyn.
Please click on image to enlarge if necessary.

Any help would be appreciated. My email msnodrog@yahoo.com
Thanks in advance,
Hannah

Moderator's Note: Please reply either in the Viewmate form or privately.
I would say that the word that Hannah can't read is an abbreviated form of Volhynia, the province that Torchin was located in.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ukraine Town Interpretation.- Viewmate Help #ukraine

ms nodrog
 

Town Name Interpretation Please....

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=32086

I know that the town listed >from a manifest says Torchin / Tortzyn.
Torchin was in the Volhynia gubernia of the Ukraine.
I can not figure out the second word after Torchin/Torczyn.
Please click on image to enlarge if necessary.

Any help would be appreciated. My email msnodrog@yahoo.com
Thanks in advance,
Hannah

Moderator's Note: Please reply either in the Viewmate form or privately.
I would say that the word that Hannah can't read is an abbreviated form of Volhynia, the province that Torchin was located in.


Researching Oksengendler (Oxenhandler) Roisen ( Rosen) #ukraine

sales@michitrading.com <dmorland@...>
 

Hi Everyone,

My Maternal Grandmother was Esther ROSEN, the daughter of Michael Rosen and
Henrietta OXENHANDLER. She was born in Odessa in 1878. I have found the
birth records for some of her siblings in the Kremenets records, but I can't
find her birth record anywhere. Apparently at some point they moved to
Izyaslav. The records show that is where her family is >from and his family
was >from Rakhmanov. The records also show that my Great-Great Paternal
Grandfather was Joseph Rosen and my Maternal Great-Grandfather was
Hirsh/Gersh Oksengendler. I was happy to find this info, but I don't know
who their spouses were.


Esther married Isidore SCHUTTE ( eventually SCHULTZ) and came to the US in
1903, first to Philadelphia where he had family and then to New Orleans
where there were some members of her Rosen family. My Mother was born
there. I have trying to find more info on the Rosens' and the
Oksengendlers', but there is a lack of info on Rakhmanov and Izyaslav. If
anyone can help, or if any of my details ring a bell, please let me know? I
really appreciate any help. Thanks so much.

Marilynn Bloom
Researcher # 405842
Houston, TX


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Researching Oksengendler (Oxenhandler) Roisen ( Rosen) #ukraine

sales@michitrading.com <dmorland@...>
 

Hi Everyone,

My Maternal Grandmother was Esther ROSEN, the daughter of Michael Rosen and
Henrietta OXENHANDLER. She was born in Odessa in 1878. I have found the
birth records for some of her siblings in the Kremenets records, but I can't
find her birth record anywhere. Apparently at some point they moved to
Izyaslav. The records show that is where her family is >from and his family
was >from Rakhmanov. The records also show that my Great-Great Paternal
Grandfather was Joseph Rosen and my Maternal Great-Grandfather was
Hirsh/Gersh Oksengendler. I was happy to find this info, but I don't know
who their spouses were.


Esther married Isidore SCHUTTE ( eventually SCHULTZ) and came to the US in
1903, first to Philadelphia where he had family and then to New Orleans
where there were some members of her Rosen family. My Mother was born
there. I have trying to find more info on the Rosens' and the
Oksengendlers', but there is a lack of info on Rakhmanov and Izyaslav. If
anyone can help, or if any of my details ring a bell, please let me know? I
really appreciate any help. Thanks so much.

Marilynn Bloom
Researcher # 405842
Houston, TX


Re: Helpful researchers in Germany and The Obermayer Awards #germany

Leo Hoenig
 

Hello again GerSiG,

I'm a long-time German Jewish researcher but just joined Gersig.

I'm glad to learn that the German Jewish SIG is a co-sponsor of the
Obermayer German Jewish History Awards program.

A few years ago, I was one of a group who helped to successfully
nominate my good friend Hans-Dieter Arntz of Euskirchen for this
prestigious award.

[ http://www.obermayer.us/award/awardees/arntz-eng.htm ]

Ms. Cordula Kappner of Hassfurt, Bavaria was a recipient of the award in 2004.
She had corresponded with me about my Friedsam/Friesem questions.

[ http://www.obermayer.us/award/awardees/kappner-eng.htm ]

And I had the honor of working with another researcher in Germany who
could surely have been an Obermayer Awardee. Klaus H.S. Schulte of
Enkirch, was a good friend.

Sadly, before I had a chance to nominate him, Klaus died of a massive
heart attack in September, 2001, just days after calling me on 9/11
find out if we were all right.

Leo Hoenig, NY 1.7 miles >from the Word Trade Center <hoenig453@aol.com>

[Moderator Note: Welcome to GerSIG Mr. Hoenig. With "over 40 years"
as a German Jewish researcher you probably have other colleagues
whom you think are deserving of recognition. Please let GerSIG know
about them and their work. Other Forum readers may share your
appreciation. Through GerSIG, you could connect and join in
submitting nominations.

http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm ]


German SIG #Germany Re: Helpful researchers in Germany and The Obermayer Awards #germany

Leo Hoenig
 

Hello again GerSiG,

I'm a long-time German Jewish researcher but just joined Gersig.

I'm glad to learn that the German Jewish SIG is a co-sponsor of the
Obermayer German Jewish History Awards program.

A few years ago, I was one of a group who helped to successfully
nominate my good friend Hans-Dieter Arntz of Euskirchen for this
prestigious award.

[ http://www.obermayer.us/award/awardees/arntz-eng.htm ]

Ms. Cordula Kappner of Hassfurt, Bavaria was a recipient of the award in 2004.
She had corresponded with me about my Friedsam/Friesem questions.

[ http://www.obermayer.us/award/awardees/kappner-eng.htm ]

And I had the honor of working with another researcher in Germany who
could surely have been an Obermayer Awardee. Klaus H.S. Schulte of
Enkirch, was a good friend.

Sadly, before I had a chance to nominate him, Klaus died of a massive
heart attack in September, 2001, just days after calling me on 9/11
find out if we were all right.

Leo Hoenig, NY 1.7 miles >from the Word Trade Center <hoenig453@aol.com>

[Moderator Note: Welcome to GerSIG Mr. Hoenig. With "over 40 years"
as a German Jewish researcher you probably have other colleagues
whom you think are deserving of recognition. Please let GerSIG know
about them and their work. Other Forum readers may share your
appreciation. Through GerSIG, you could connect and join in
submitting nominations.

http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm ]


MORRIS WILNER, HORODESKY, LASHANSKY, SILVERBERG #ukraine

faegankatz <faegankatz@...>
 

Searching MORRIS WILNER, HORODESKY, LASHANSKY, SILVERBERG or any variant,
particularly close to Kiev. Some of the family emigrated and settled in
chicago and Wisconsin and some became Gordon's in Kenosha. Morris Wilner,
was the "adoptive father" of Baila..? Who married David Horodesky. Baila
and David came to chicago late 1800's. David supposedly returned to
Russia, but there is a death certificate online that fits. Baila (d. 1926)
was mother of Judah, Anna, Nathan. Judah married Rose Silverberg in or
near Kiev or Priluky, emigrated to chicago with their children, Albert,
Sarah, Ruth and Gertrude. I'm particularly searching for more information
on Rose Silverburg, and Baila. Poland, Belarus, Ukraine show up to large
degrees in DNA.

Shelley Corwin
santa monica ca 90403
Faegankatz@gmail.com

Moderator's Note: Please be sure to use a Subject heading that tells the reader what the post is about.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine MORRIS WILNER, HORODESKY, LASHANSKY, SILVERBERG #ukraine

faegankatz <faegankatz@...>
 

Searching MORRIS WILNER, HORODESKY, LASHANSKY, SILVERBERG or any variant,
particularly close to Kiev. Some of the family emigrated and settled in
chicago and Wisconsin and some became Gordon's in Kenosha. Morris Wilner,
was the "adoptive father" of Baila..? Who married David Horodesky. Baila
and David came to chicago late 1800's. David supposedly returned to
Russia, but there is a death certificate online that fits. Baila (d. 1926)
was mother of Judah, Anna, Nathan. Judah married Rose Silverberg in or
near Kiev or Priluky, emigrated to chicago with their children, Albert,
Sarah, Ruth and Gertrude. I'm particularly searching for more information
on Rose Silverburg, and Baila. Poland, Belarus, Ukraine show up to large
degrees in DNA.

Shelley Corwin
santa monica ca 90403
Faegankatz@gmail.com

Moderator's Note: Please be sure to use a Subject heading that tells the reader what the post is about.


Obermayer German Jewish History Awards - Present and future #germany

John Paul Lowens <jplowens@...>
 

In conjunction with the Obermayer Award presentations last weekend,
I've placed new messages of thanks to other German Jewish historians
on the JewishGen Wall of honor.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/

These messages recognize a few people who have been helpful to my own
research during the past several weeks. I will add other thanks and honor
messages soon.

Donations for Wall of Honor plaques go to the JewishGen General Fund.
They are important to GerSIG because they help pay for our website and
our Email list and, perhaps most importantly, the JewishGen ViewMate service.

In the past few weeks, translations I've received through ViewMate
and GerSIG's Forum have brought me a 37 page genealogy of one related
family, fascinating new information about some ongoing Jewish history
research projects in Germany, and, sadly, the tragic Holocaust
histories of five heretofore unknown relatives.

The translation help came >from Jewish GerSIG members in the USA and
Israel as well as >from non-Jewish historians in Germany. I'm not
alone in owing thanks and support to these generous colleagues and to
the volunteers at ViewMate whose work is so vital to us all.

Please join me in supporting GerSIG and ViewMate with your financial
contributions - through the Wall of Honor messages, or donations to the GerSIG
Speakers' Bureau Fund and other funds at JewishGen.

Please also help in recognizing others who, like the 2014 Awardees,
have done outstanding work in Germany. Nominations for the 2015 German
Jewish History Awards are open.

http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm

With thanks to all of you who have been generous with help to me and GerSIG,

John Paul Lowens, GerSIG Co-founder JPL25@Cornell.edu


German SIG #Germany Obermayer German Jewish History Awards - Present and future #germany

John Paul Lowens <jplowens@...>
 

In conjunction with the Obermayer Award presentations last weekend,
I've placed new messages of thanks to other German Jewish historians
on the JewishGen Wall of honor.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/

These messages recognize a few people who have been helpful to my own
research during the past several weeks. I will add other thanks and honor
messages soon.

Donations for Wall of Honor plaques go to the JewishGen General Fund.
They are important to GerSIG because they help pay for our website and
our Email list and, perhaps most importantly, the JewishGen ViewMate service.

In the past few weeks, translations I've received through ViewMate
and GerSIG's Forum have brought me a 37 page genealogy of one related
family, fascinating new information about some ongoing Jewish history
research projects in Germany, and, sadly, the tragic Holocaust
histories of five heretofore unknown relatives.

The translation help came >from Jewish GerSIG members in the USA and
Israel as well as >from non-Jewish historians in Germany. I'm not
alone in owing thanks and support to these generous colleagues and to
the volunteers at ViewMate whose work is so vital to us all.

Please join me in supporting GerSIG and ViewMate with your financial
contributions - through the Wall of Honor messages, or donations to the GerSIG
Speakers' Bureau Fund and other funds at JewishGen.

Please also help in recognizing others who, like the 2014 Awardees,
have done outstanding work in Germany. Nominations for the 2015 German
Jewish History Awards are open.

http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm

With thanks to all of you who have been generous with help to me and GerSIG,

John Paul Lowens, GerSIG Co-founder JPL25@Cornell.edu


INTRO- Seek early records from Friesheim (now part of Erfstadt) Germany #germany

Leo Hoenig
 

Hello GerSIG,

I am searching for the following items related to Friesheim (now part of
Erftstadt), Germany:

1. The 1808 Jewish name change list for Friesheim.

2. The French census of Jews living in Friesheim in 1774 when its
Jews consisted of five families who lived in two houses.

3. Other censuses and lists of Jews living in Friesheim between the
late 1600s and 1780.

While my ancestors left Friesheim long before 1808, they would have
appeared in the earlier lists.

Among the names in Friesheim I am seeking are Andreas, Moses
Andreas and Hirsch.

I have been researching my family history for over 40 years. I think I have already
looked for these records in most obvious places.

I would be interested in "outside the box" ideas for finding these elusive documents.

Leo Hoenig, New York, New York hoenig453@aol.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO- Seek early records from Friesheim (now part of Erfstadt) Germany #germany

Leo Hoenig
 

Hello GerSIG,

I am searching for the following items related to Friesheim (now part of
Erftstadt), Germany:

1. The 1808 Jewish name change list for Friesheim.

2. The French census of Jews living in Friesheim in 1774 when its
Jews consisted of five families who lived in two houses.

3. Other censuses and lists of Jews living in Friesheim between the
late 1600s and 1780.

While my ancestors left Friesheim long before 1808, they would have
appeared in the earlier lists.

Among the names in Friesheim I am seeking are Andreas, Moses
Andreas and Hirsch.

I have been researching my family history for over 40 years. I think I have already
looked for these records in most obvious places.

I would be interested in "outside the box" ideas for finding these elusive documents.

Leo Hoenig, New York, New York hoenig453@aol.com


Re: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

Igor Holyboroda
 

A first-guild merchant and probably educated professional also had
the right to take with him outside the Pale of Settlement a certain
number of Jewish servants/servantess/assistants. The Number of Jews of
every occupation/ profession/cathegory in every big city outside the
Pale of Settlement was limited.
There were many other limitations - for example, the Jews were
abolished to serve in Russian Navy, etc. At the same time, it is
supposed, that say in Finland (a part of Russian Empire till 1917),
the first Jews who settled here were retired Russian soldiers.
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

Igor Holyboroda
 

A first-guild merchant and probably educated professional also had
the right to take with him outside the Pale of Settlement a certain
number of Jewish servants/servantess/assistants. The Number of Jews of
every occupation/ profession/cathegory in every big city outside the
Pale of Settlement was limited.
There were many other limitations - for example, the Jews were
abolished to serve in Russian Navy, etc. At the same time, it is
supposed, that say in Finland (a part of Russian Empire till 1917),
the first Jews who settled here were retired Russian soldiers.
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine


Yizkor Book Project, January 2014 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

During January quite a few updates were made to a number of our existing
Yizkor Book projects and I believe our unsung heroes - our htmlers, Jason
Hallgarten, Max Heffler and Osnat Ramaty - burned quite a lot of midnight
during the last month to take care of the large number of updates we
received. You'll see by the long list of updates below that their hard work
bore fruit.

And on bearing fruit, I am pleased to announce the completion of the
translation of the Turka, Ukraine Yizkor book and I would like to express my
gratitude to the following people who brought about this notable achievement
- Mary Seeman, Aytan and Boaz Ben-Pelech and, finally, Jerrold Landau who
translated the entire book. We were very fortunate to have these people
behind this project but there are so many other books just waiting for some
kind person or persons to come along and adopt them.

Over time, I receive quite a few messages >from people asking why there is
only the table of contents of a particular book and where are the
translations hiding? My usual reply to these queries is that this is because
no volunteer has stepped forward to coordinate the translation of this book.
I also explain that all the projects in the Yizkor Book site make their
progress with the financial support of volunteers and also volunteer
translations. Now without a volunteer to coordinate these projects,
unfortunately, they will remain as just bare bone projects. So what are you
waiting for?

During the past week, the International Holocaust day was commemorated to
honor the memory of Holocaust victims. In the Yizkor Book Project we
endeavor, on every day of the year to honor their memories and make sure
that the stories of these people and the lost communities remains available
to all.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in two new projects:

- Szczekociny, Poland (A memorial book to the Jewish community of
Szczekociny) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szczekociny/Szczekociny.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

We have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Horodenka, Ukraine (The Book of Horodenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project, January 2014 #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

During January quite a few updates were made to a number of our existing
Yizkor Book projects and I believe our unsung heroes - our htmlers, Jason
Hallgarten, Max Heffler and Osnat Ramaty - burned quite a lot of midnight
during the last month to take care of the large number of updates we
received. You'll see by the long list of updates below that their hard work
bore fruit.

And on bearing fruit, I am pleased to announce the completion of the
translation of the Turka, Ukraine Yizkor book and I would like to express my
gratitude to the following people who brought about this notable achievement
- Mary Seeman, Aytan and Boaz Ben-Pelech and, finally, Jerrold Landau who
translated the entire book. We were very fortunate to have these people
behind this project but there are so many other books just waiting for some
kind person or persons to come along and adopt them.

Over time, I receive quite a few messages >from people asking why there is
only the table of contents of a particular book and where are the
translations hiding? My usual reply to these queries is that this is because
no volunteer has stepped forward to coordinate the translation of this book.
I also explain that all the projects in the Yizkor Book site make their
progress with the financial support of volunteers and also volunteer
translations. Now without a volunteer to coordinate these projects,
unfortunately, they will remain as just bare bone projects. So what are you
waiting for?

During the past week, the International Holocaust day was commemorated to
honor the memory of Holocaust victims. In the Yizkor Book Project we
endeavor, on every day of the year to honor their memories and make sure
that the stories of these people and the lost communities remains available
to all.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in two new projects:

- Szczekociny, Poland (A memorial book to the Jewish community of
Szczekociny) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szczekociny/Szczekociny.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

We have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Horodenka, Ukraine (The Book of Horodenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Yizkor Book Project, January 2014 #lodz #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

During January quite a few updates were made to a number of our existing
Yizkor Book projects and I believe our unsung heroes - our htmlers, Jason
Hallgarten, Max Heffler and Osnat Ramaty - burned quite a lot of midnight
during the last month to take care of the large number of updates we
received. You'll see by the long list of updates below that their hard work
bore fruit.

And on bearing fruit, I am pleased to announce the completion of the
translation of the Turka, Ukraine Yizkor book and I would like to express my
gratitude to the following people who brought about this notable achievement
- Mary Seeman, Aytan and Boaz Ben-Pelech and, finally, Jerrold Landau who
translated the entire book. We were very fortunate to have these people
behind this project but there are so many other books just waiting for some
kind person or persons to come along and adopt them.

Over time, I receive quite a few messages >from people asking why there is
only the table of contents of a particular book and where are the
translations hiding? My usual reply to these queries is that this is because
no volunteer has stepped forward to coordinate the translation of this book.
I also explain that all the projects in the Yizkor Book site make their
progress with the financial support of volunteers and also volunteer
translations. Now without a volunteer to coordinate these projects,
unfortunately, they will remain as just bare bone projects. So what are you
waiting for?

During the past week, the International Holocaust day was commemorated to
honor the memory of Holocaust victims. In the Yizkor Book Project we
endeavor, on every day of the year to honor their memories and make sure
that the stories of these people and the lost communities remains available
to all.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in two new projects:

- Szczekociny, Poland (A memorial book to the Jewish community of
Szczekociny) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szczekociny/Szczekociny.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

We have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Horodenka, Ukraine (The Book of Horodenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Yizkor Book Project, January 2014 #lodz #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

During January quite a few updates were made to a number of our existing
Yizkor Book projects and I believe our unsung heroes - our htmlers, Jason
Hallgarten, Max Heffler and Osnat Ramaty - burned quite a lot of midnight
during the last month to take care of the large number of updates we
received. You'll see by the long list of updates below that their hard work
bore fruit.

And on bearing fruit, I am pleased to announce the completion of the
translation of the Turka, Ukraine Yizkor book and I would like to express my
gratitude to the following people who brought about this notable achievement
- Mary Seeman, Aytan and Boaz Ben-Pelech and, finally, Jerrold Landau who
translated the entire book. We were very fortunate to have these people
behind this project but there are so many other books just waiting for some
kind person or persons to come along and adopt them.

Over time, I receive quite a few messages >from people asking why there is
only the table of contents of a particular book and where are the
translations hiding? My usual reply to these queries is that this is because
no volunteer has stepped forward to coordinate the translation of this book.
I also explain that all the projects in the Yizkor Book site make their
progress with the financial support of volunteers and also volunteer
translations. Now without a volunteer to coordinate these projects,
unfortunately, they will remain as just bare bone projects. So what are you
waiting for?

During the past week, the International Holocaust day was commemorated to
honor the memory of Holocaust victims. In the Yizkor Book Project we
endeavor, on every day of the year to honor their memories and make sure
that the stories of these people and the lost communities remains available
to all.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in two new projects:

- Szczekociny, Poland (A memorial book to the Jewish community of
Szczekociny) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szczekociny/Szczekociny.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

We have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Horodenka, Ukraine (The Book of Horodenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Yizkor Book Project, January 2014 #lithuania

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

During January quite a few updates were made to a number of our existing
Yizkor Book projects and I believe our unsung heroes - our htmlers, Jason
Hallgarten, Max Heffler and Osnat Ramaty - burned quite a lot of midnight
during the last month to take care of the large number of updates we
received. You'll see by the long list of updates below that their hard work
bore fruit.

And on bearing fruit, I am pleased to announce the completion of the
translation of the Turka, Ukraine Yizkor book and I would like to express my
gratitude to the following people who brought about this notable achievement
- Mary Seeman, Aytan and Boaz Ben-Pelech and, finally, Jerrold Landau who
translated the entire book. We were very fortunate to have these people
behind this project but there are so many other books just waiting for some
kind person or persons to come along and adopt them.

Over time, I receive quite a few messages >from people asking why there is
only the table of contents of a particular book and where are the
translations hiding? My usual reply to these queries is that this is because
no volunteer has stepped forward to coordinate the translation of this book.
I also explain that all the projects in the Yizkor Book site make their
progress with the financial support of volunteers and also volunteer
translations. Now without a volunteer to coordinate these projects,
unfortunately, they will remain as just bare bone projects. So what are you
waiting for?

During the past week, the International Holocaust day was commemorated to
honor the memory of Holocaust victims. In the Yizkor Book Project we
endeavor, on every day of the year to honor their memories and make sure
that the stories of these people and the lost communities remains available
to all.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in two new projects:

- Szczekociny, Poland (A memorial book to the Jewish community of
Szczekociny) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szczekociny/Szczekociny.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

We have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Horodenka, Ukraine (The Book of Horodenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Yizkor Book Project, January 2014 #lithuania

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

During January quite a few updates were made to a number of our existing
Yizkor Book projects and I believe our unsung heroes - our htmlers, Jason
Hallgarten, Max Heffler and Osnat Ramaty - burned quite a lot of midnight
during the last month to take care of the large number of updates we
received. You'll see by the long list of updates below that their hard work
bore fruit.

And on bearing fruit, I am pleased to announce the completion of the
translation of the Turka, Ukraine Yizkor book and I would like to express my
gratitude to the following people who brought about this notable achievement
- Mary Seeman, Aytan and Boaz Ben-Pelech and, finally, Jerrold Landau who
translated the entire book. We were very fortunate to have these people
behind this project but there are so many other books just waiting for some
kind person or persons to come along and adopt them.

Over time, I receive quite a few messages >from people asking why there is
only the table of contents of a particular book and where are the
translations hiding? My usual reply to these queries is that this is because
no volunteer has stepped forward to coordinate the translation of this book.
I also explain that all the projects in the Yizkor Book site make their
progress with the financial support of volunteers and also volunteer
translations. Now without a volunteer to coordinate these projects,
unfortunately, they will remain as just bare bone projects. So what are you
waiting for?

During the past week, the International Holocaust day was commemorated to
honor the memory of Holocaust victims. In the Yizkor Book Project we
endeavor, on every day of the year to honor their memories and make sure
that the stories of these people and the lost communities remains available
to all.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in two new projects:

- Szczekociny, Poland (A memorial book to the Jewish community of
Szczekociny) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szczekociny/Szczekociny.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

We have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Horodenka, Ukraine (The Book of Horodenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com

129181 - 129200 of 668936