Date   

Knowledge of German among Hasidim in Eastern Galicia #galicia

Carol Sicherman <csicher@...>
 

The central figure in the collection of 101 postcards with which I am
working was educated entirely by Hasidic rabbis. His wife grew up in
a Hasidic family, but as a girl had more social leeway. Nearly all the
cards that he wrote to her during World War I are in German in Gothic
script; Yiddish was their mother tongue, and he wrote three cards in
Yiddish and well as one in Hebrew. The postcards in Polish are all
written by women. As German was the official language of the
Austro-Hungarian Empire, many people would pick up an oral
knowledge. But how would he have learned to write German? Can
anyone explain the educational context for girls?

Thank you,

Carol Sicherman


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Knowledge of German among Hasidim in Eastern Galicia #galicia

Carol Sicherman <csicher@...>
 

The central figure in the collection of 101 postcards with which I am
working was educated entirely by Hasidic rabbis. His wife grew up in
a Hasidic family, but as a girl had more social leeway. Nearly all the
cards that he wrote to her during World War I are in German in Gothic
script; Yiddish was their mother tongue, and he wrote three cards in
Yiddish and well as one in Hebrew. The postcards in Polish are all
written by women. As German was the official language of the
Austro-Hungarian Empire, many people would pick up an oral
knowledge. But how would he have learned to write German? Can
anyone explain the educational context for girls?

Thank you,

Carol Sicherman


Surname Hosenrott #ukraine

Ada Glustein
 

Marilyn GINSBURG,Toronto wrote about the name HOSENROTT --
What comes to my mind immediately is the name ROSENROTT - meaning red rose.
Pronunciation of the initial "R", with a guttural accent, could very well
have been perceived as an "H".

Ada Glustein
Vancouver, B. C.
Searching: GLUSTEIN, GLUSHTEIN, GLUSSTEIN, GLUZSHTEYN (Uman, Kammenaya
Krinitsa), PLETZEL (Ternovka)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Surname Hosenrott #ukraine

Ada Glustein
 

Marilyn GINSBURG,Toronto wrote about the name HOSENROTT --
What comes to my mind immediately is the name ROSENROTT - meaning red rose.
Pronunciation of the initial "R", with a guttural accent, could very well
have been perceived as an "H".

Ada Glustein
Vancouver, B. C.
Searching: GLUSTEIN, GLUSHTEIN, GLUSSTEIN, GLUZSHTEYN (Uman, Kammenaya
Krinitsa), PLETZEL (Ternovka)


JGS of Montreal - next program meeting: Monday, September 21, 2015 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal,
in association with the Jewish Public Library,
is pleased to announce as our guest speaker:

David Bensoussan, PhD.

The Origin of Jewish Moroccan Names -
Discover the History of the Jews in Morocco by Their Names:
Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Berber, Arab, Spanish,
Portuguese & modern eras
---
Dr. Bensoussan is a member of the Academic Council of the
Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, has served as President of
la Communauté Sépharade Unifiée du Québec and has also
written a number of literary works.

The meeting will be held on Monday, September 21, 2015
7:30 pm, Gelber Conference Centre
5151 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal.

For all information on our upcoming meetings &
Sunday Morning Family Tree Workshops -
call the JGS of Montreal Hotline (24 hours a day):
514-484-0969
watch for our emails & 'friend' us on Facebook

Merle Kastner
JGS of Montreal, Programming
merlek@bell.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Montreal - next program meeting: Monday, September 21, 2015 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal,
in association with the Jewish Public Library,
is pleased to announce as our guest speaker:

David Bensoussan, PhD.

The Origin of Jewish Moroccan Names -
Discover the History of the Jews in Morocco by Their Names:
Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Berber, Arab, Spanish,
Portuguese & modern eras
---
Dr. Bensoussan is a member of the Academic Council of the
Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, has served as President of
la Communauté Sépharade Unifiée du Québec and has also
written a number of literary works.

The meeting will be held on Monday, September 21, 2015
7:30 pm, Gelber Conference Centre
5151 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal.

For all information on our upcoming meetings &
Sunday Morning Family Tree Workshops -
call the JGS of Montreal Hotline (24 hours a day):
514-484-0969
watch for our emails & 'friend' us on Facebook

Merle Kastner
JGS of Montreal, Programming
merlek@bell.net


Genealogical Research #lithuania

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

If you are in Cape Town this week, come along to the Jacob Gitlin
Library on Thursday 3 September at 6pm.

Get ideas on how to undertake genealogical research and how to record
your family stories.

See you there!

88 Hatfield Street
Gardens

Eli Rabinowitz
elirab.me


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Genealogical Research #lithuania

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

If you are in Cape Town this week, come along to the Jacob Gitlin
Library on Thursday 3 September at 6pm.

Get ideas on how to undertake genealogical research and how to record
your family stories.

See you there!

88 Hatfield Street
Gardens

Eli Rabinowitz
elirab.me


Voter Lists in 19th century Lithuania #lithuania

Judith Singer
 

Hi - I am researching the CHARNEY families that lived in Kavarskas,
Lithuania during part of the second half of the 19th century. The
particular branch I am interested in appears in the 1877 Box Taxpayers
List but not the 1880 or 1882 Voters Lists. However, I don't think I
can conclude that my branch moved away between 1877 and 1880 because
the Voters Lists contained less than a quarter of the names on the Box
Taxpayers List. Does anyone know what the qualifications were for
being included on the Voters Lists at that time?

thank you

Judith Singer (researching CHARNEY in Lithuania and Belarus, SORTMAN
in Poland and Lithuania)


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Voter Lists in 19th century Lithuania #lithuania

Judith Singer
 

Hi - I am researching the CHARNEY families that lived in Kavarskas,
Lithuania during part of the second half of the 19th century. The
particular branch I am interested in appears in the 1877 Box Taxpayers
List but not the 1880 or 1882 Voters Lists. However, I don't think I
can conclude that my branch moved away between 1877 and 1880 because
the Voters Lists contained less than a quarter of the names on the Box
Taxpayers List. Does anyone know what the qualifications were for
being included on the Voters Lists at that time?

thank you

Judith Singer (researching CHARNEY in Lithuania and Belarus, SORTMAN
in Poland and Lithuania)


Support your town! #poland

David Semmel <david@...>
 

Dear JRI-PLers -

In my experience, old photos, bobe's stories, and immigration
records all are useful for reconstructing the family tree, but
nothing unravels they mysteries of the past like birth, death,
and marriage records >from JRI-Poland.

Less than a month ago I exchanged emails with Judy Golan,
the town leader of Novy Korczyn. Impressed with her knowledge,
and armed with the fact that my Great grandmother Rozja Feiner
was >from there, I decided to support the records indexing
project. $180 donation and a signed a sharing agreement later,
I had the complete XL file.

Armed with easy to search and sift data, the next 3 days were
nothing short of magical. For the first time, I was able to name
not only 2 new GGGMothers, but 4 GGGGM/Fathers all the way back
to the late 1700s! Since then, I've been able to correct several
relationship errors and add countless cousins to my tree. One
discovery was particularly poignant: the records make crystal
clear that Rozja's first husband died when she was 4 months
pregnant with a son.

What makes the JRI-Poland data so valuable is that it also opens
up new avenues for research. A casual reference to a GGGF's birth
town pushed me to look at online records >from that place - and
identify a whole branch of my family that was sitting in JRI's
database just waiting to be found.

I don't like to spend money any more than the next person, but
I know that what JRI-Poland does - collecting, translating, coding,
and uploading data to the on-line database - involves hard work
from volunteers (like Judy) and hard cash - >from somewhere. Over
the past 10 years, I have joined/supported about half a dozen
indexing projects at $100-200 each. There is no better research
"bang for the buck" than the $100 per year I spend supporting
JRI-Poland.

Some records are forever lost, some places are missing whole
decades - thus, some projects have yielded amazing troves; others
not so much. But in the end, the way I think about these records
is that to someone, every record tells a story that needs to be
told.

Please support your town! The fun starts here:
http://jri-poland.org/index.htm

David Semmel
Bloomington, IN

Researching: Semmel, Zemel, Besser, Feiner, Friedenberg,
Rajch, Mant, Janklowicz, Silberman, Reifer, Metzger, Laufer,
Kern, Gottesman, Hecht, Perl, Malz, and dozens more.


JRI Poland #Poland Support your town! #poland

David Semmel <david@...>
 

Dear JRI-PLers -

In my experience, old photos, bobe's stories, and immigration
records all are useful for reconstructing the family tree, but
nothing unravels they mysteries of the past like birth, death,
and marriage records >from JRI-Poland.

Less than a month ago I exchanged emails with Judy Golan,
the town leader of Novy Korczyn. Impressed with her knowledge,
and armed with the fact that my Great grandmother Rozja Feiner
was >from there, I decided to support the records indexing
project. $180 donation and a signed a sharing agreement later,
I had the complete XL file.

Armed with easy to search and sift data, the next 3 days were
nothing short of magical. For the first time, I was able to name
not only 2 new GGGMothers, but 4 GGGGM/Fathers all the way back
to the late 1700s! Since then, I've been able to correct several
relationship errors and add countless cousins to my tree. One
discovery was particularly poignant: the records make crystal
clear that Rozja's first husband died when she was 4 months
pregnant with a son.

What makes the JRI-Poland data so valuable is that it also opens
up new avenues for research. A casual reference to a GGGF's birth
town pushed me to look at online records >from that place - and
identify a whole branch of my family that was sitting in JRI's
database just waiting to be found.

I don't like to spend money any more than the next person, but
I know that what JRI-Poland does - collecting, translating, coding,
and uploading data to the on-line database - involves hard work
from volunteers (like Judy) and hard cash - >from somewhere. Over
the past 10 years, I have joined/supported about half a dozen
indexing projects at $100-200 each. There is no better research
"bang for the buck" than the $100 per year I spend supporting
JRI-Poland.

Some records are forever lost, some places are missing whole
decades - thus, some projects have yielded amazing troves; others
not so much. But in the end, the way I think about these records
is that to someone, every record tells a story that needs to be
told.

Please support your town! The fun starts here:
http://jri-poland.org/index.htm

David Semmel
Bloomington, IN

Researching: Semmel, Zemel, Besser, Feiner, Friedenberg,
Rajch, Mant, Janklowicz, Silberman, Reifer, Metzger, Laufer,
Kern, Gottesman, Hecht, Perl, Malz, and dozens more.


Elinson or Elinski #belarus

Mitchell Elinson <mde13@...>
 

I recently received the translation of Mogilev Marriage Records. Among the
listings is the marriage of Zusia Elinski in 1903. I know that this is my
grandfather as his first name, father's name and his wife's name match my
information. He came to the US as Zusha Elinson. His uncle Yankel who is also
listed in the Marriage Records is recorded as Yankel Elinson. I understand that
Elinson and Elinski are related patronymics. Are they interchangeable? Might
someone be Elinson in Yiddish and Elinski in Russian?

Mitchell Elinson


Belarus SIG #Belarus Elinson or Elinski #belarus

Mitchell Elinson <mde13@...>
 

I recently received the translation of Mogilev Marriage Records. Among the
listings is the marriage of Zusia Elinski in 1903. I know that this is my
grandfather as his first name, father's name and his wife's name match my
information. He came to the US as Zusha Elinson. His uncle Yankel who is also
listed in the Marriage Records is recorded as Yankel Elinson. I understand that
Elinson and Elinski are related patronymics. Are they interchangeable? Might
someone be Elinson in Yiddish and Elinski in Russian?

Mitchell Elinson


Re: Burial Society #belarus

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

David Passman <dbpdallas@yahoo.com> wrote about JGS (New York)'s
"Burial Societies in the New York Metropolitan Area" database, which
used to be available at:
http://www.jgsny.org/ny-burial-society-database

As he notes, the database has been offline for a long time and there
is no indication when it will be back up. But you can still use an
older version of the data through the Internet Archive's Wayback
Machine. Here is the same page, as indexed back in 2010:
https://web.archive.org/web/20100218140546/http://www.jgsny.org/landsmanshaft

As you can see, it's not searchable, just long web pages with a lot of
text, but you can still just read through and hopefully find what
you're looking for. Good luck!


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


Re: Name of Hosenrott #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi Marilyn,

It is most likely a compound name >from two words:
Hosen - which is >from Hoysen - pants, trousers (Yiddish) or a second
possible is >from "Hoyz"- house.
Rott - which is >from Royt - red in Yiddish.

It could be an artificial name or an occupation name for a men's pans
tailor. There are many variations of surname derived >from Hoysen (Gozin,
Govzen, Goyzen, etc.)... or an artificial name >from "Red House"...

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, =
China



Hello fellow seekers,

My husband's grandmother, Esther ALBERT, was born in England in March,
1887.=A0 Her birth certificate, >from the district of Whitechapel, lists =
her
mother as Rachel ALBERT, formerly HOSENROTT. Subsequent U.S. census =
records
indicate that she was >from Russia, although my husband's mother thought =
she
was >from Poland.=A0 I have not been able to find the name HOSENROTT =
anywhere.=A0
Rachel spoke Yiddish so it was likely the registrar could not understand =
her
well. Can anyone come up with a possible alternative spelling to the =
name
HOSENROTT?=A0=20

Thanks very much,=A0=20

Marilyn GINSBURG,
Toronto


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Burial Society #belarus

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

David Passman <dbpdallas@yahoo.com> wrote about JGS (New York)'s
"Burial Societies in the New York Metropolitan Area" database, which
used to be available at:
http://www.jgsny.org/ny-burial-society-database

As he notes, the database has been offline for a long time and there
is no indication when it will be back up. But you can still use an
older version of the data through the Internet Archive's Wayback
Machine. Here is the same page, as indexed back in 2010:
https://web.archive.org/web/20100218140546/http://www.jgsny.org/landsmanshaft

As you can see, it's not searchable, just long web pages with a lot of
text, but you can still just read through and hopefully find what
you're looking for. Good luck!


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Name of Hosenrott #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi Marilyn,

It is most likely a compound name >from two words:
Hosen - which is >from Hoysen - pants, trousers (Yiddish) or a second
possible is >from "Hoyz"- house.
Rott - which is >from Royt - red in Yiddish.

It could be an artificial name or an occupation name for a men's pans
tailor. There are many variations of surname derived >from Hoysen (Gozin,
Govzen, Goyzen, etc.)... or an artificial name >from "Red House"...

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, =
China



Hello fellow seekers,

My husband's grandmother, Esther ALBERT, was born in England in March,
1887.=A0 Her birth certificate, >from the district of Whitechapel, lists =
her
mother as Rachel ALBERT, formerly HOSENROTT. Subsequent U.S. census =
records
indicate that she was >from Russia, although my husband's mother thought =
she
was >from Poland.=A0 I have not been able to find the name HOSENROTT =
anywhere.=A0
Rachel spoke Yiddish so it was likely the registrar could not understand =
her
well. Can anyone come up with a possible alternative spelling to the =
name
HOSENROTT?=A0=20

Thanks very much,=A0=20

Marilyn GINSBURG,
Toronto


Re: Name of Hosenrott #ukraine

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Geners,

I think with a Yiddish accent the name may have been pronounced Hoisenrot
, which means red hose (or pants). Also it could have been Rothoisen with
the two words reversed (think lederhosen). Another comment is that Poland
did not exist for a period of years - it was split between Germany and
Russia. My Warsaw family at times reported that they were >from Warsaw,
Russia. Once Poland came back into existence - their birth returned to
Warsaw, Poland. You might enjoy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecpIa7erMtI
Watch for 1000 years of European borders change in 5 minutes (Classical
music background).

Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen
Georgetown, TX
Researching: KART ARONSON EDELBERG EISENSTEIN SCHLAMOVITCH Argentina: DRIMER
ESRUBILSKY Ukraine US: BIRGARD(OVSKY) PERCHIK HITE (KHAIT/CHAIT/HEIT) US
New York: FISHMAN STERN, Poland, Israel, Canada US: ALPERN ANK(I)ER BIGOS
GELBFISZ HALBFINGER KAFRI KARMEL(EK) PASSENSTEIN PERLSTADT SZPILBAUM WAGNER
STOKFISZ


1. Name of Hosenrott

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Name of Hosenrott
From: mygins@sympatico.ca
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 11:14:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello fellow seekers,

My husband's grandmother, Esther ALBERT, was born in England in March,
1887. Her birth certificate, >from the district of Whitechapel, lists her
mother as Rachel ALBERT, formerly HOSENROTT. Subsequent U.S. census records
indicate that she was >from Russia, although my husband's mother thought she
was >from Poland. I have not been able to find the name HOSENROTT anywhere.
Rachel spoke Yiddish so it was likely the registrar could not understand her
well. Can anyone come up with a possible alternative spelling to the name
HOSENROTT?

Thanks very much,

Marilyn GINSBURG,
Toronto


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Name of Hosenrott #ukraine

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Geners,

I think with a Yiddish accent the name may have been pronounced Hoisenrot
, which means red hose (or pants). Also it could have been Rothoisen with
the two words reversed (think lederhosen). Another comment is that Poland
did not exist for a period of years - it was split between Germany and
Russia. My Warsaw family at times reported that they were >from Warsaw,
Russia. Once Poland came back into existence - their birth returned to
Warsaw, Poland. You might enjoy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecpIa7erMtI
Watch for 1000 years of European borders change in 5 minutes (Classical
music background).

Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen
Georgetown, TX
Researching: KART ARONSON EDELBERG EISENSTEIN SCHLAMOVITCH Argentina: DRIMER
ESRUBILSKY Ukraine US: BIRGARD(OVSKY) PERCHIK HITE (KHAIT/CHAIT/HEIT) US
New York: FISHMAN STERN, Poland, Israel, Canada US: ALPERN ANK(I)ER BIGOS
GELBFISZ HALBFINGER KAFRI KARMEL(EK) PASSENSTEIN PERLSTADT SZPILBAUM WAGNER
STOKFISZ


1. Name of Hosenrott

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Name of Hosenrott
From: mygins@sympatico.ca
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 11:14:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello fellow seekers,

My husband's grandmother, Esther ALBERT, was born in England in March,
1887. Her birth certificate, >from the district of Whitechapel, lists her
mother as Rachel ALBERT, formerly HOSENROTT. Subsequent U.S. census records
indicate that she was >from Russia, although my husband's mother thought she
was >from Poland. I have not been able to find the name HOSENROTT anywhere.
Rachel spoke Yiddish so it was likely the registrar could not understand her
well. Can anyone come up with a possible alternative spelling to the name
HOSENROTT?

Thanks very much,

Marilyn GINSBURG,
Toronto

81461 - 81480 of 654880