Date   

Re: Book of Residents #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Regarding Fay Bussgang's mention of "Ksiegi Ludnosci," here is an example
drawn >from Czestochowa (south of Lodz):

http://tinyurl.com/do34c
or
http://www.benkazez.com/dan/Englender-Book-of-Residents/Census.html

Dan Kazez

TELMAN family in Lodz and Zgierz

........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, SZEWCZYK,
LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS, MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ,
SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH, FEYNER/FEINER/FAYNER, BORZYKOWSKI, SZEWCZYK,
SZWARCBERG, HILLER, FEDERMAN, WAJSHAUS, WAJSBERG, GELBART, FINGERHUT,
PLOTEK, FAJWLEWICZ, SZKLARCZYK, WAJCENBLUT, KRZESOWICZ/KRESOWICZ

Dear Tzilla Kratter,

Lodz Archives have very good records called Ksiegi Ludnosci
(until 1931) which list all legal residents of Lodz. A whole
family is listed on one page with birth date, place, names of
parents, occupation, where they last lived, etc.

In addition, they have Personnenblatt-Karty Meldunkowe from
1918-1920 with much the same information. You could write the
Lodz State Archives and ask someone to do the research.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland re: Book of Residents #lodz #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Regarding Fay Bussgang's mention of "Ksiegi Ludnosci," here is an example
drawn >from Czestochowa (south of Lodz):

http://tinyurl.com/do34c
or
http://www.benkazez.com/dan/Englender-Book-of-Residents/Census.html

Dan Kazez

TELMAN family in Lodz and Zgierz

........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, SZEWCZYK,
LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS, MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ,
SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH, FEYNER/FEINER/FAYNER, BORZYKOWSKI, SZEWCZYK,
SZWARCBERG, HILLER, FEDERMAN, WAJSHAUS, WAJSBERG, GELBART, FINGERHUT,
PLOTEK, FAJWLEWICZ, SZKLARCZYK, WAJCENBLUT, KRZESOWICZ/KRESOWICZ

Dear Tzilla Kratter,

Lodz Archives have very good records called Ksiegi Ludnosci
(until 1931) which list all legal residents of Lodz. A whole
family is listed on one page with birth date, place, names of
parents, occupation, where they last lived, etc.

In addition, they have Personnenblatt-Karty Meldunkowe from
1918-1920 with much the same information. You could write the
Lodz State Archives and ask someone to do the research.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Re: Lodz Book of Residents #lodz #poland

Fbussgang@...
 

------ Original message --------
<< If I visit the archive in person - will it be more efficient rather than
writing a letter to the archive?
Will I be able to search the books myself?>>

You can ask the Lodz Archives to do the search for about $30 initial payment
and $10 a page or you can do the search yourself if you are in Poland.

Lodz Archives have a large card index organized alphabetically. You can look
through the index, pick the books you want to look at and ask the archivist to
bring them to you >from the stacks. You can then either just copy down the
information or ask to have the pages reproduced (which may take another day).

If you are planning a visit, it is best to write ahead, so they can have the
boxes with the card index for the letters you want ready. Otherwise, you may
have to wait a day until they retrieve them >from the depository.

If you are coming to Las Vegas, my husband and I are giving a talk Thursday
at 2:00 and will show examples of Books of Residents and what marvelous
information they hold.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


ksiega ludnosci #lodz #poland

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

Dear Fellow Lodzers,

What would it take to organize a project to transcribe and publish on the web
the ksiega ludnosci entries for the Jewish population of our ancestral city?
I would volunteer some hours, even many perhaps.

Regards,

Simon Srebrny

(>from London, now in Berlin)


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Lodz Book of Residents #lodz #poland

Fbussgang@...
 

------ Original message --------
<< If I visit the archive in person - will it be more efficient rather than
writing a letter to the archive?
Will I be able to search the books myself?>>

You can ask the Lodz Archives to do the search for about $30 initial payment
and $10 a page or you can do the search yourself if you are in Poland.

Lodz Archives have a large card index organized alphabetically. You can look
through the index, pick the books you want to look at and ask the archivist to
bring them to you >from the stacks. You can then either just copy down the
information or ask to have the pages reproduced (which may take another day).

If you are planning a visit, it is best to write ahead, so they can have the
boxes with the card index for the letters you want ready. Otherwise, you may
have to wait a day until they retrieve them >from the depository.

If you are coming to Las Vegas, my husband and I are giving a talk Thursday
at 2:00 and will show examples of Books of Residents and what marvelous
information they hold.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland ksiega ludnosci #lodz #poland

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

Dear Fellow Lodzers,

What would it take to organize a project to transcribe and publish on the web
the ksiega ludnosci entries for the Jewish population of our ancestral city?
I would volunteer some hours, even many perhaps.

Regards,

Simon Srebrny

(>from London, now in Berlin)


LICHTERMAN and LICHMAN - Leviim? #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have evidence or tradition one way or the other that LICHTERMANs
or LICHMANs >from the Borisov area were (or were not) Leviim?

Israel Pickholtz


LICHTERMAN / LICHMAN - ROSENBLOOM #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have any overlap between LICHTERMAN or LICHMAN and ROSENBLOOM,
from the Borisov area?
Israel Pickholtz


Belarus SIG #Belarus LICHTERMAN and LICHMAN - Leviim? #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have evidence or tradition one way or the other that LICHTERMANs
or LICHMANs >from the Borisov area were (or were not) Leviim?

Israel Pickholtz


Belarus SIG #Belarus LICHTERMAN / LICHMAN - ROSENBLOOM #belarus

Israel P
 

Does anyone have any overlap between LICHTERMAN or LICHMAN and ROSENBLOOM,
from the Borisov area?
Israel Pickholtz


WILNER from Warsaw, Poland #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I am posting this for a friend who is looking for the siblings of Alexander
WILNER who was born in Warsaw in 1918 and came to the U.S. after WWII. He
had two brothers who lived in New York and whose first names are not known.

Please contact me privately if you have any information regarding this
specific family.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WILNER from Warsaw, Poland #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I am posting this for a friend who is looking for the siblings of Alexander
WILNER who was born in Warsaw in 1918 and came to the U.S. after WWII. He
had two brothers who lived in New York and whose first names are not known.

Please contact me privately if you have any information regarding this
specific family.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/5/2005 8:00:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, I wrote:

==This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the Julian
calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also required adjusting
dates by about 11 days. In France an entirely new calendar was created.
Either of these could explain the why of the date of the week.

I left out a few words about the creation of the new French calendar. It
was designed by the post-Bastille revolutionaries. The days and the months were
given new names (and, I believe, new durations). The change didn't go down t
oo well, and after a few years--certainly before 1811, they went back to the
gregorian calendar

Michael Bernet, New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Please keep the discussion grounded in genealogy.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 6/5/2005 8:00:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, I wrote:

==This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the Julian
calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also required adjusting
dates by about 11 days. In France an entirely new calendar was created.
Either of these could explain the why of the date of the week.

I left out a few words about the creation of the new French calendar. It
was designed by the post-Bastille revolutionaries. The days and the months were
given new names (and, I believe, new durations). The change didn't go down t
oo well, and after a few years--certainly before 1811, they went back to the
gregorian calendar

Michael Bernet, New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Please keep the discussion grounded in genealogy.


What's Nu with the -National Genealogical Society Convention? #general

jewishgen@juno.com <jewishgen@...>
 

By chance I learned early last week that the National Genealogical Society's
annual convention was being held at the Nashville Convention Center later in
the week.

I didn't know how much if any Jewish Genealogy involvement, if any, there
would be, so I did not register. But, since the exhibit area was open to
non-registrants, I was able to spend a hour or so there Saturday (yesterday)
afternoon.

It was worth more than the price of my (free) admission but "our" presence
still seemed to be missing (Would love to know if any of you were registered
and to how helpful the lectures, etc. were helpful to you) until someone told
me that Avotaynu had a booth there.)

Unfortunately, I learned this only as the exhibits were closing down and
apparently after the Avotaynu booth had been shuttered.

Did I miss winning a lifetime subscription?<G>

Stacy Harris
Nashville, TN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen What's Nu with the -National Genealogical Society Convention? #general

jewishgen@juno.com <jewishgen@...>
 

By chance I learned early last week that the National Genealogical Society's
annual convention was being held at the Nashville Convention Center later in
the week.

I didn't know how much if any Jewish Genealogy involvement, if any, there
would be, so I did not register. But, since the exhibit area was open to
non-registrants, I was able to spend a hour or so there Saturday (yesterday)
afternoon.

It was worth more than the price of my (free) admission but "our" presence
still seemed to be missing (Would love to know if any of you were registered
and to how helpful the lectures, etc. were helpful to you) until someone told
me that Avotaynu had a booth there.)

Unfortunately, I learned this only as the exhibits were closing down and
apparently after the Avotaynu booth had been shuttered.

Did I miss winning a lifetime subscription?<G>

Stacy Harris
Nashville, TN


Jewish genealogy #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners:

Yesterday in shul it crossed my mind that the idea of recording one's
genealogy for posterity goes back further than we may suppose.
For most of us, "doing our genealogy" is a pastime that began about
15-20 years ago. But yesterday's Torah portion, in which the Book of
Numbers opens with an account of Moses taking a census of the
Israelites "In the Wilderness" (that's the book's Hebrew name:
B'midbar), I noted the interesting Hebrew verb that means "giving
one's data to the census-taker."

Numbers 1:18 says (in the new JPS translation): "and on the first day
of he second month they convoked the whole community, who were
registered by the clans of their ancestral houses." The verb
translated: "they were registered" is va-yit-yal'du. And the NRSV --
a modern Christian translation -- actually follows the grammar even
more precisely: "they registered themselves."

But for JGenners the old-fashioned Hertz translation, which follows
the traditional King James Version, will have far greater appeal
because it comes closer to the true meaning: "they declared their
pedigrees." Depending on the conjugation, the root y-l-d can mean
"to give birth", "to beget", "to be born" , or, as in yesterday's
reading: "to declare one's pedigree."

So now we have an answer for those who tease us about wasting so much
time on this activity; we can quote a a good biblical precedent for
pursuing our "yihus." We can tell them that our ancestors had
already "been there, done that" before they ever got to the Promised
Land!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish genealogy #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear JGenners:

Yesterday in shul it crossed my mind that the idea of recording one's
genealogy for posterity goes back further than we may suppose.
For most of us, "doing our genealogy" is a pastime that began about
15-20 years ago. But yesterday's Torah portion, in which the Book of
Numbers opens with an account of Moses taking a census of the
Israelites "In the Wilderness" (that's the book's Hebrew name:
B'midbar), I noted the interesting Hebrew verb that means "giving
one's data to the census-taker."

Numbers 1:18 says (in the new JPS translation): "and on the first day
of he second month they convoked the whole community, who were
registered by the clans of their ancestral houses." The verb
translated: "they were registered" is va-yit-yal'du. And the NRSV --
a modern Christian translation -- actually follows the grammar even
more precisely: "they registered themselves."

But for JGenners the old-fashioned Hertz translation, which follows
the traditional King James Version, will have far greater appeal
because it comes closer to the true meaning: "they declared their
pedigrees." Depending on the conjugation, the root y-l-d can mean
"to give birth", "to beget", "to be born" , or, as in yesterday's
reading: "to declare one's pedigree."

So now we have an answer for those who tease us about wasting so much
time on this activity; we can quote a a good biblical precedent for
pursuing our "yihus." We can tell them that our ancestors had
already "been there, done that" before they ever got to the Promised
Land!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


STROMWASSEROWNA #general

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrumwasser@...>
 

Hi
I'm engaged in one-surname-research on the surname STROMWASSER (sometimes
SZTROMWASSER). I recently came across a woman whose name is given as Eliza
STROMWASSEROWNA. She was >from Zbarazh in eastern Galicia and was studying
in Krakow.

I have never come across this particular variant before, and Google does not
provide any instances of this name anywhere on the web. However, my
knowledge of Russian suffixes is not good. I had thought that the "owna" or
"ovna" suffix was typically applied to a woman's middle name and was the
form of patronymic used by women (as opposed to "ovitz" or "ovitch" which
was used by men). However, if this is correct, such suffixes in my
experience are only applied to the person's father's given name, not their
surname.

Does anyone know how I should interpret a surname of STROMWASSEROWNA?

Thanks for any and all help!

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrumwasser@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen STROMWASSEROWNA #general

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrumwasser@...>
 

Hi
I'm engaged in one-surname-research on the surname STROMWASSER (sometimes
SZTROMWASSER). I recently came across a woman whose name is given as Eliza
STROMWASSEROWNA. She was >from Zbarazh in eastern Galicia and was studying
in Krakow.

I have never come across this particular variant before, and Google does not
provide any instances of this name anywhere on the web. However, my
knowledge of Russian suffixes is not good. I had thought that the "owna" or
"ovna" suffix was typically applied to a woman's middle name and was the
form of patronymic used by women (as opposed to "ovitz" or "ovitch" which
was used by men). However, if this is correct, such suffixes in my
experience are only applied to the person's father's given name, not their
surname.

Does anyone know how I should interpret a surname of STROMWASSEROWNA?

Thanks for any and all help!

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrumwasser@comcast.net