Date   

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "In Search of a Shtetl " ~ Towns of Baisogala, Dunilovichy, Janova and Kedainiai #lithuania

Stacye <GreensAndNettles@...>
 

The program can be heard @ http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00vc51h

Here begins an extraordinary journey to Lithuania and Belarus for
broadcaster and writer Michael Freedland and his son, Guardian
journalist and best-selling author, Jonathan.

These two countries once thronged with Jewish life, a life that was
all but extinguished by successive regimes- Russian Czarists, Soviets
and then the Nazis who, with the help of some Lithuanians, managed to
totally decimate many towns and villages, or shtetls. Knowing that
their forebears settled in the UK in the late 19th century they set
off to try to find any trace of the Freedlands who came >from Baisogala
in Lithuania and the Mindels >from Dunilovichy in Belarus. As the
journey progresses, it becomes a broader search- a search for Jewish
life. They are taken to Janova and Kedainiai, both once busy shtetls,
alive with Jewish businesses, shops and culture. Sadly in such places
where there was once a high proportion of Jews, few now remain and
synagogues have disappeared or fallen into disrepair.

In Kaunas, an interview with Professor Egidius Aleksandrovicius lays
out the entire history of Jewry in Lithuania. In Vilnius, the family
focus is re-established as they visit the National Archives where they
learn a lot about the Freedlands and the Mindels, discovering
crumbling nineteenth century archives that refer to what could be
Michael's ancestors. The trail now points clearly to Baisogala, what
was once a tiny shtetl in the Lithuanian countryside. Simon the guide
knows of a Jewish cemetery on the outskirts, but it's a cemetery he
hasn't seen for ten years, as it's been flooded for a reservoir, but
by an amazing stroke of luck, the team tries a wooded hillside
and...there it is, remnants of old and mostly illegible Jewish tombs,
where, no doubt, Michael and Jonathan's ancestors are buried."
(Producer: Neil Rosser //A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4).

Stacye Mehard
Virginia

Studying the Families of
Alperovich of Kurenets; Ipp of Kaunas; Krokin / Krokinovsky /
Crockin of Crockin of Kaunas and Baltimore and Norfolk, Va;
Lewitan of Kobylnik, Dokshits-Dokkshytsy, Lithuania and Belarus;
Luloff / Lulow / Lulove of Dokshits-Dokkshytsy and Minsk;
Piastunovich of Kurenets & Dokshits-Dokkshytsy;
Rapoport of Kaunas; Rosenthal / Roszental of Dokshits-Dokkshytsy;
Sass / Zess of Lithuania and Poland; Smigelsky of Grodno and
Shenandoah, Pennsylvania


"In Search of a Shtetl " ~ Towns of Baisogala, Dunilovichy, Janova and Kedainiai #lithuania

Stacye <GreensAndNettles@...>
 

The program can be heard @ http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00vc51h

Here begins an extraordinary journey to Lithuania and Belarus for
broadcaster and writer Michael Freedland and his son, Guardian
journalist and best-selling author, Jonathan.

These two countries once thronged with Jewish life, a life that was
all but extinguished by successive regimes- Russian Czarists, Soviets
and then the Nazis who, with the help of some Lithuanians, managed to
totally decimate many towns and villages, or shtetls. Knowing that
their forebears settled in the UK in the late 19th century they set
off to try to find any trace of the Freedlands who came >from Baisogala
in Lithuania and the Mindels >from Dunilovichy in Belarus. As the
journey progresses, it becomes a broader search- a search for Jewish
life. They are taken to Janova and Kedainiai, both once busy shtetls,
alive with Jewish businesses, shops and culture. Sadly in such places
where there was once a high proportion of Jews, few now remain and
synagogues have disappeared or fallen into disrepair.

In Kaunas, an interview with Professor Egidius Aleksandrovicius lays
out the entire history of Jewry in Lithuania. In Vilnius, the family
focus is re-established as they visit the National Archives where they
learn a lot about the Freedlands and the Mindels, discovering
crumbling nineteenth century archives that refer to what could be
Michael's ancestors. The trail now points clearly to Baisogala, what
was once a tiny shtetl in the Lithuanian countryside. Simon the guide
knows of a Jewish cemetery on the outskirts, but it's a cemetery he
hasn't seen for ten years, as it's been flooded for a reservoir, but
by an amazing stroke of luck, the team tries a wooded hillside
and...there it is, remnants of old and mostly illegible Jewish tombs,
where, no doubt, Michael and Jonathan's ancestors are buried."
(Producer: Neil Rosser //A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4).

Stacye Mehard
Virginia

Studying the Families of
Alperovich of Kurenets; Ipp of Kaunas; Krokin / Krokinovsky /
Crockin of Crockin of Kaunas and Baltimore and Norfolk, Va;
Lewitan of Kobylnik, Dokshits-Dokkshytsy, Lithuania and Belarus;
Luloff / Lulow / Lulove of Dokshits-Dokkshytsy and Minsk;
Piastunovich of Kurenets & Dokshits-Dokkshytsy;
Rapoport of Kaunas; Rosenthal / Roszental of Dokshits-Dokkshytsy;
Sass / Zess of Lithuania and Poland; Smigelsky of Grodno and
Shenandoah, Pennsylvania


family may have relocated? #poland

Aimee Shulman <hikari_no_makoto@...>
 

I have just begun trying to find out information about my great
grandparents and their family/families; according to my father and uncle
the great grandparents came to the US >from Bialystok around 1918, but they
changed their name when they came here (to Shevitz); their original Polish
name, which my uncle told me he had never seen written out, only heard
spoken, was pronounced like Kataszewski (this was my great grandfather's
family name; I don't know what my great grandmother's maiden name was.)

Now, I have been looking into this a little and I haven't found any
records bearing the name Kataszewski, or any of the variant spellings
with similar pronunciation, >from Bialystok; however, I have found quite
a number with similar names >from Lodz; most of these records were >from
the 1940's, so I am wondering if the family perhaps relocated to Lodz
at some point after my great grandparents left.

If anyone knows anything about a Kataszewski/Katuszewski/Katoszewski
family which left Bialystok for Lodz, or anything about a
Kataszewski/Katuszewski/Katoszewski family in Bialystok,I'd appreciate
your sharing it; I haven't got much to go on right now.

Aimee Shulman

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you haven't already done so, you'll want to
search for -- and enter -- the name in the JewishGen Family Finder
at www.jewishgen.org/jgff


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland family may have relocated? #poland

Aimee Shulman <hikari_no_makoto@...>
 

I have just begun trying to find out information about my great
grandparents and their family/families; according to my father and uncle
the great grandparents came to the US >from Bialystok around 1918, but they
changed their name when they came here (to Shevitz); their original Polish
name, which my uncle told me he had never seen written out, only heard
spoken, was pronounced like Kataszewski (this was my great grandfather's
family name; I don't know what my great grandmother's maiden name was.)

Now, I have been looking into this a little and I haven't found any
records bearing the name Kataszewski, or any of the variant spellings
with similar pronunciation, >from Bialystok; however, I have found quite
a number with similar names >from Lodz; most of these records were >from
the 1940's, so I am wondering if the family perhaps relocated to Lodz
at some point after my great grandparents left.

If anyone knows anything about a Kataszewski/Katuszewski/Katoszewski
family which left Bialystok for Lodz, or anything about a
Kataszewski/Katuszewski/Katoszewski family in Bialystok,I'd appreciate
your sharing it; I haven't got much to go on right now.

Aimee Shulman

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you haven't already done so, you'll want to
search for -- and enter -- the name in the JewishGen Family Finder
at www.jewishgen.org/jgff


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Finding my grandmother in the Lodz Cemetery #lodz #poland

Joan Abramson <joan@...>
 

My husband and I just returned >from a trip to Poland. Lodz was the most
productive part of the trip and I have to thank JRI-Poland and the Lodz
Area Research Group for enabling the research that made this possible.

Together with my cousin, who lives in Warsaw, we traveled to Zarki,
where my cousin and I can both trace family roots to the late 18th
Century and beyond; to Czestochowa, where our families moved in the
mid-19th Century; and to Lodz, where they began to put down roots in
the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.

Together, we were able to locate many of the apartment buildings where
our family members had lived before World War Two, the remnants of some
of the buildings where they were crammed together in the Lodz Ghetto
during the Holocaust, the moving memorial at Radegast, where many were
sent off to the death camps and where, we are sure, the names of
many family members are located somewhere among the thousands of names
in the meticulous lists that were kept of those who were transported to
the death camps.

Most moving of all was the time we spent walking through the Bracka
Street Lodz Cemetery with cemetery manager Yankel Mitelman. We had
sent Mr. Mitelman lists of family members we believed could be found
in the cemetery. He warned us, at the start of our visit, that it might
not be possible to find every grave site we sought. Even if the cemetery
found records of the the section numbers where our ancestors were buried,
the records did not always allow for finding an exact plot. And even if
we were able to find a plot, he warned, it would not always be marked --
there has been too much vandalism and neglect over the years. The
cemetery, though it is run and protected by the small Jewish community
that remains in Lodz, is too large and too underfunded to maintain its
grounds or do much to restore or update its record keeping.

Nevertheless, we were able to find the graves of a number of family
members as we tramped through the dense weeds in the older sections
of the cemetery. We even managed to find the site where one of my aunts
had been buried in 1936, though it took us over rutted ground strewn with
rocks and pieces of headstones and though thick underbrush that towered
over our heads and obscured the pathway and its obstacles.

Most moving of all, I was able to locate the grave of my grandmother in
the ghetto field. After years of searching, I had finally located and
obtained a copy of my grandmother's death certificate. She died of
"unknown causes" just six months after the Nazis began forcing the Jews
of Lodz into the ghetto. Her grave site was unmarked -- the German rulers
of the ghetto did not allow headstones, just small metal or concrete
markers, and most of those long ago sank beneath the earth.

But recently the Israeli Defense Force undertook the task of surveying
and marking the ghetto field, where more than 45,000 Jews who died in
Lodz are buried in individual, closely crowded graves: In the main room
of the cemetery funeral home we found a huge pile of numbered markers the
Israelis were storing, soon to be placed on specific plots.

Standing near where my grandmother's headstone should be and gazing out
across that vast ghetto field was an important moment and one filled
with emotion. The moment brought a measure of closure for me and for my
family -- after years of searching, my father died never knowing when or
where his mother had perished. And it brought, anew, a visceral sense of
the horror of the Holocaust.

Joan Abramson


Finding my grandmother in the Lodz Cemetery #lodz #poland

Joan Abramson <joan@...>
 

My husband and I just returned >from a trip to Poland. Lodz was the most
productive part of the trip and I have to thank JRI-Poland and the Lodz
Area Research Group for enabling the research that made this possible.

Together with my cousin, who lives in Warsaw, we traveled to Zarki,
where my cousin and I can both trace family roots to the late 18th
Century and beyond; to Czestochowa, where our families moved in the
mid-19th Century; and to Lodz, where they began to put down roots in
the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.

Together, we were able to locate many of the apartment buildings where
our family members had lived before World War Two, the remnants of some
of the buildings where they were crammed together in the Lodz Ghetto
during the Holocaust, the moving memorial at Radegast, where many were
sent off to the death camps and where, we are sure, the names of
many family members are located somewhere among the thousands of names
in the meticulous lists that were kept of those who were transported to
the death camps.

Most moving of all was the time we spent walking through the Bracka
Street Lodz Cemetery with cemetery manager Yankel Mitelman. We had
sent Mr. Mitelman lists of family members we believed could be found
in the cemetery. He warned us, at the start of our visit, that it might
not be possible to find every grave site we sought. Even if the cemetery
found records of the the section numbers where our ancestors were buried,
the records did not always allow for finding an exact plot. And even if
we were able to find a plot, he warned, it would not always be marked --
there has been too much vandalism and neglect over the years. The
cemetery, though it is run and protected by the small Jewish community
that remains in Lodz, is too large and too underfunded to maintain its
grounds or do much to restore or update its record keeping.

Nevertheless, we were able to find the graves of a number of family
members as we tramped through the dense weeds in the older sections
of the cemetery. We even managed to find the site where one of my aunts
had been buried in 1936, though it took us over rutted ground strewn with
rocks and pieces of headstones and though thick underbrush that towered
over our heads and obscured the pathway and its obstacles.

Most moving of all, I was able to locate the grave of my grandmother in
the ghetto field. After years of searching, I had finally located and
obtained a copy of my grandmother's death certificate. She died of
"unknown causes" just six months after the Nazis began forcing the Jews
of Lodz into the ghetto. Her grave site was unmarked -- the German rulers
of the ghetto did not allow headstones, just small metal or concrete
markers, and most of those long ago sank beneath the earth.

But recently the Israeli Defense Force undertook the task of surveying
and marking the ghetto field, where more than 45,000 Jews who died in
Lodz are buried in individual, closely crowded graves: In the main room
of the cemetery funeral home we found a huge pile of numbered markers the
Israelis were storing, soon to be placed on specific plots.

Standing near where my grandmother's headstone should be and gazing out
across that vast ghetto field was an important moment and one filled
with emotion. The moment brought a measure of closure for me and for my
family -- after years of searching, my father died never knowing when or
where his mother had perished. And it brought, anew, a visceral sense of
the horror of the Holocaust.

Joan Abramson


Latvia SIG #Latvia Marriage records. Liepaja. 1895/ 1899 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Marriage records. Liepaja. 1895/ 1899 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Hungarian translation or interpretation needed #general

Roberta Solit <rsolit@...>
 

I've posted two images (VM 16995 & 16996) of the handwritten name
Bela Weisz, followed in one case by a word that I do not know the
meaning of, and in the other case a possible address. These words
appear on the inside covers of a textbook printed in Vienna in 1920 in
both Hungarian and Hebrew. Would appreciate your help in translating
or interpreting the words. The book was acquired in a town in the sub-
Carpathain area that is now in the Ukraine.
For a direct link to the images go to-

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16995

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16996

Thank you,
Roberta Solit
Potomac, MD

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hungarian translation or interpretation needed #general

Roberta Solit <rsolit@...>
 

I've posted two images (VM 16995 & 16996) of the handwritten name
Bela Weisz, followed in one case by a word that I do not know the
meaning of, and in the other case a possible address. These words
appear on the inside covers of a textbook printed in Vienna in 1920 in
both Hungarian and Hebrew. Would appreciate your help in translating
or interpreting the words. The book was acquired in a town in the sub-
Carpathain area that is now in the Ukraine.
For a direct link to the images go to-

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16995

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16996

Thank you,
Roberta Solit
Potomac, MD

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Russian translation #general

Michael Tobias <michael@...>
 

I am trying to help another researcher (a non-Jewishgenner) here in Glasgow,
Scotland.

I have uploaded a very short Russian document onto viewmate. Can anybody
help with a translation?

Many thanks.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17004
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17005

Michael Tobias
Glasgow, Scotland

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian translation #general

Michael Tobias <michael@...>
 

I am trying to help another researcher (a non-Jewishgenner) here in Glasgow,
Scotland.

I have uploaded a very short Russian document onto viewmate. Can anybody
help with a translation?

Many thanks.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17004
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17005

Michael Tobias
Glasgow, Scotland

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


1897 Russian Census Rokiskis #general

Marcella S
 

Hi
I am trying to find Rokiskis on the 1897 Census in Jewishgen and I keep
getting a response that there are too many entries to list (1300)

I am able to list more than that number on any other search -

If I search in the actual census link - it tells me there is no town
called Rokiskis in the list - which I know is not correct

Has anyone else had this problem?
What I am doing wrong here - unfortunately I can't refine the search
because it seems that the surname I am looking for has been spelled
incorrectly on the census

Thanks
Marcella Shames

OSIPOVICH/OSIPOWITZ/OSOPOVICH


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1897 Russian Census Rokiskis #general

Marcella S
 

Hi
I am trying to find Rokiskis on the 1897 Census in Jewishgen and I keep
getting a response that there are too many entries to list (1300)

I am able to list more than that number on any other search -

If I search in the actual census link - it tells me there is no town
called Rokiskis in the list - which I know is not correct

Has anyone else had this problem?
What I am doing wrong here - unfortunately I can't refine the search
because it seems that the surname I am looking for has been spelled
incorrectly on the census

Thanks
Marcella Shames

OSIPOVICH/OSIPOWITZ/OSOPOVICH


New Website #general

Dany Tal <dtal@...>
 

Hello everyone,
I opened a new website displaying family letters.
The letters were sent to my aunt Frieda Shapira immigrated to New York
at 1935, the letters were sent >from the family in Lithuania and Israel.
the site address:

www.dannytal.com

If anyone heard or know people mentioned in the letters, please write to
me.
You may pass on the site address for anyone who looks you know something
about it.
Thanks in advance,
Danny Tal.

Danny and Maya Tal
Ramat Hashofet 19238
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Website #general

Dany Tal <dtal@...>
 

Hello everyone,
I opened a new website displaying family letters.
The letters were sent to my aunt Frieda Shapira immigrated to New York
at 1935, the letters were sent >from the family in Lithuania and Israel.
the site address:

www.dannytal.com

If anyone heard or know people mentioned in the letters, please write to
me.
You may pass on the site address for anyone who looks you know something
about it.
Thanks in advance,
Danny Tal.

Danny and Maya Tal
Ramat Hashofet 19238
Israel


Re: Isaac Goldberg / Hebrew Free Burial Society / Silver Lake / New York #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

David Goldberg asked about obtaining a death certificate for
Isaac Goldberg, who died October 25, 1931 at age 83 and was buried
at Silver Lake Cemetery in Staten Island, N.Y. by the Hebrew Free
Burial Society.

Almost all burials at that cemetery by that society were of New
York City residents, and I venture that the remainder were >from
nearby. A quick look of the New York City death indices via Steve
Morse's portal shows that there was an Isaac Goldberg who died on
that date at 83. His death certificate was K20074 and it can be
obtained via the New York City Municipal Archives at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/death.shtml
or at a Family History Library on microfilm #2069667.

Regards,

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


More SHATIL-REJKHZELIGMAN #general

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

Further to my posting of the other day regarding information about Yosel SHATIL
family and descendants, I have now found on the ALD Revision List Database Part
3, in 1874 Ginda SHATIL, head of household, lives in house of REJKHZELIGMAN, 1st
husband A. Yu. NEVYAZHSKIJ; 2nd husband Shatil. It says: "father - Iosel?"

1. If she was living in the REJKHZELIGMAN house, does that mean she is their
child? a relative? a servant??

2. According to the record, in 1874 she was married to SHATIL (and they had a
child in 1877) why would it say: Head of household? (referring to Ginda). They
were living in Kaunas.

3. On ALD Revision List, it says 1st husband: A. Yu. NEVYAZHSKIJ. Would the
A. Yu. stand for Aharon Yehoshua? or something else?

Thanks in advance for any help/suggestions
Regards
Angie Elfassi
Israel

Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Isaac Goldberg / Hebrew Free Burial Society / Silver Lake / New York #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

David Goldberg asked about obtaining a death certificate for
Isaac Goldberg, who died October 25, 1931 at age 83 and was buried
at Silver Lake Cemetery in Staten Island, N.Y. by the Hebrew Free
Burial Society.

Almost all burials at that cemetery by that society were of New
York City residents, and I venture that the remainder were >from
nearby. A quick look of the New York City death indices via Steve
Morse's portal shows that there was an Isaac Goldberg who died on
that date at 83. His death certificate was K20074 and it can be
obtained via the New York City Municipal Archives at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/death.shtml
or at a Family History Library on microfilm #2069667.

Regards,

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More SHATIL-REJKHZELIGMAN #general

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

Further to my posting of the other day regarding information about Yosel SHATIL
family and descendants, I have now found on the ALD Revision List Database Part
3, in 1874 Ginda SHATIL, head of household, lives in house of REJKHZELIGMAN, 1st
husband A. Yu. NEVYAZHSKIJ; 2nd husband Shatil. It says: "father - Iosel?"

1. If she was living in the REJKHZELIGMAN house, does that mean she is their
child? a relative? a servant??

2. According to the record, in 1874 she was married to SHATIL (and they had a
child in 1877) why would it say: Head of household? (referring to Ginda). They
were living in Kaunas.

3. On ALD Revision List, it says 1st husband: A. Yu. NEVYAZHSKIJ. Would the
A. Yu. stand for Aharon Yehoshua? or something else?

Thanks in advance for any help/suggestions
Regards
Angie Elfassi
Israel

Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds