Date   
Re: French words in Viennese #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Re the discussion of French words in Viennese - I think it most unlikely that the
Viennese would adopt the words of an unpopular enemy in the early 1800s as
suggested by Robert Fraser.

I have the correspondence of my gt-gt-gt uncle Leon BIACH [Pressburg 1806 -
Vienna 1868] and his fiancee, and soon-to-be wife, Minna DIAMANT [incidentally a
relative of the genealogist Paul DIAMANT who was discussed in previous postings
and also of Heinrich HEINE and Theodor HERZL].

Minna [born, Pressburg 1815 - died, Vienna 1840, after giving birth to three
daughters] was a very precocious child and could write in fluent French and
Italian when she was a teenager.

Both Leon and Minna are buried in Wahringerfriedhof, Vienna, where their graves
can still be seen today.

The letters, starting in the early 1830s, are peppered with words such as:

ennuiren .... being bored
excusieren ... to make excuses
Visite machen ...to visit
Excuse ... an apology
Frappiert ... to fall out
presence d'esprit ... presence of mind

We can all think of others, I am sure.

A young woman would not have such a free and easy way with French-derived words
had they not been established in common usage for many, many years.

Hence, I am quite sure that Phil Lederer's father is correct in his statement
that French words had been used in Austrian Court circles many years before
Napoleon.

Here is some bona-fide historical back-up for French-Viennese philology which
I based on my own family history:

http://m.wjms.jordan.k12.ut.us/hapsburg/maria%20theresa

Francis Stephen I - born in Nancy, France was the son of Leopold of Lorraine &
Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans - married Maria Theresia, daughter of Habsburg
emperor Charles VI, 12 February 1736 ... They had 16 children together including:
Joseph II, Leopold II & Marie Antoinette.

In 1745, Francis Stephen I was elected to the Imperial throne. After Maria
Theresia inherited the lands of Habsburg, she made Francis co-regent..... During
his reign he helped improve French culture and language at the Viennese court.

Hence, French probably became well-established in this era, namely 70 years before
Minna DIAMANT was born and also some 25 years before the birth of Napoleon
Bonaparte.

Celia Male [UK]

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: French words in Viennese #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Re the discussion of French words in Viennese - I think it most unlikely that the
Viennese would adopt the words of an unpopular enemy in the early 1800s as
suggested by Robert Fraser.

I have the correspondence of my gt-gt-gt uncle Leon BIACH [Pressburg 1806 -
Vienna 1868] and his fiancee, and soon-to-be wife, Minna DIAMANT [incidentally a
relative of the genealogist Paul DIAMANT who was discussed in previous postings
and also of Heinrich HEINE and Theodor HERZL].

Minna [born, Pressburg 1815 - died, Vienna 1840, after giving birth to three
daughters] was a very precocious child and could write in fluent French and
Italian when she was a teenager.

Both Leon and Minna are buried in Wahringerfriedhof, Vienna, where their graves
can still be seen today.

The letters, starting in the early 1830s, are peppered with words such as:

ennuiren .... being bored
excusieren ... to make excuses
Visite machen ...to visit
Excuse ... an apology
Frappiert ... to fall out
presence d'esprit ... presence of mind

We can all think of others, I am sure.

A young woman would not have such a free and easy way with French-derived words
had they not been established in common usage for many, many years.

Hence, I am quite sure that Phil Lederer's father is correct in his statement
that French words had been used in Austrian Court circles many years before
Napoleon.

Here is some bona-fide historical back-up for French-Viennese philology which
I based on my own family history:

http://m.wjms.jordan.k12.ut.us/hapsburg/maria%20theresa

Francis Stephen I - born in Nancy, France was the son of Leopold of Lorraine &
Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans - married Maria Theresia, daughter of Habsburg
emperor Charles VI, 12 February 1736 ... They had 16 children together including:
Joseph II, Leopold II & Marie Antoinette.

In 1745, Francis Stephen I was elected to the Imperial throne. After Maria
Theresia inherited the lands of Habsburg, she made Francis co-regent..... During
his reign he helped improve French culture and language at the Viennese court.

Hence, French probably became well-established in this era, namely 70 years before
Minna DIAMANT was born and also some 25 years before the birth of Napoleon
Bonaparte.

Celia Male [UK]

Searching for Ingeborg PFLEGER / POROMBKA #austria-czech

Chantal Auerbach <chantal.auerbach@...>
 

Dear All,

This is the first time I have posted anything so I hope I am doing it
correctly!

I started to research my family tree in October, and have managed to
find out an amazing amount of information. However, amongst my research
I have found that my father's first cousin had an illegitimate child.
The child was born in 1925 and after WW2 ended this "child" made contact
with my father via the Jewish Refugees Committee. I have correspondence
which belonged to my father between the two of them. It has also come to
light that this "child" herself had a child who was looking for members
of her family as recently as 1994. I have tried everything I can to
track both women and I have come up against a brick wall. I am hoping
that maybe someone somewhere can help.

My father's cousin's name was Max Mendel WASSERMANN born July 1895 in
Radymno Poland. He moved to Germany - Metz / Berlin / Leipzig and
Hamburg.
His illegitimate daughter was born April 1925 and her name was Ingeborg
POROMBKA. I don't know where she was born whether in Germany or Austria,
but the correspondence relates to Bregenz and Innsbruck.
Ingeborg POROMBKA had a daughter called Ingeborg PFLEGER. She was

looking for members of the WASSERMANN family in 1994 via the Jewish
committee in London. Correspondence has been passed to me relating to
her search. She used to work for Austrian Television as a freelance
journalist. She must be in her late 40's early 50's.

Does anyone know of her? or heard of her? I have tried the telephone
directories and she is not listed.

Thank you so much.

Chantal Auerbach

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Searching for Ingeborg PFLEGER / POROMBKA #austria-czech

Chantal Auerbach <chantal.auerbach@...>
 

Dear All,

This is the first time I have posted anything so I hope I am doing it
correctly!

I started to research my family tree in October, and have managed to
find out an amazing amount of information. However, amongst my research
I have found that my father's first cousin had an illegitimate child.
The child was born in 1925 and after WW2 ended this "child" made contact
with my father via the Jewish Refugees Committee. I have correspondence
which belonged to my father between the two of them. It has also come to
light that this "child" herself had a child who was looking for members
of her family as recently as 1994. I have tried everything I can to
track both women and I have come up against a brick wall. I am hoping
that maybe someone somewhere can help.

My father's cousin's name was Max Mendel WASSERMANN born July 1895 in
Radymno Poland. He moved to Germany - Metz / Berlin / Leipzig and
Hamburg.
His illegitimate daughter was born April 1925 and her name was Ingeborg
POROMBKA. I don't know where she was born whether in Germany or Austria,
but the correspondence relates to Bregenz and Innsbruck.
Ingeborg POROMBKA had a daughter called Ingeborg PFLEGER. She was

looking for members of the WASSERMANN family in 1994 via the Jewish
committee in London. Correspondence has been passed to me relating to
her search. She used to work for Austrian Television as a freelance
journalist. She must be in her late 40's early 50's.

Does anyone know of her? or heard of her? I have tried the telephone
directories and she is not listed.

Thank you so much.

Chantal Auerbach

Seeking Prof. Louis Oppenheimer in the Netherlands #germany

Red McVittie <red@...>
 

Several years ago I corresponded with Louis Oppenheimer of the Netherlands
at this address: op_oppenheimer@.... There is an underline
between op and oppenheimer, thus: op_oppenheimer. (The rest of the
underlining is a function of the copy and paste command). My recent mail to
him bounced. If anyone has a current address for Prof. Oppenheimer, please
contact me privately.

Renate McVittie, Seattle. red@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Nobody by this name or with this email address is subscribed
to any JewishGen SIG mailing list.

German SIG #Germany Seeking Prof. Louis Oppenheimer in the Netherlands #germany

Red McVittie <red@...>
 

Several years ago I corresponded with Louis Oppenheimer of the Netherlands
at this address: op_oppenheimer@.... There is an underline
between op and oppenheimer, thus: op_oppenheimer. (The rest of the
underlining is a function of the copy and paste command). My recent mail to
him bounced. If anyone has a current address for Prof. Oppenheimer, please
contact me privately.

Renate McVittie, Seattle. red@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Nobody by this name or with this email address is subscribed
to any JewishGen SIG mailing list.

Re: Jewish vital registers in Baden-Wuerttemberg #germany

Dottie Miller
 

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion is not of interest to the entire
membership and should be conducted off-list. Periodic brief summaries
can be posted here. We need to hear immediately >from a volunteer
"discussion leader" for the proposed **** Family Register Project ****
Dottie Miller - will you accept this job? I regret that I am not able to
do it myself. MOD 1

The following is an excellent review of the Jewish vital registers in
Baden-Wuerttemberg sent to me by a well-recommended genealogist in
Germany, with his permission to share it with you in this forum.

Dottie Miller, San Antonio, TX USA

Oberdischingen, 10th March 2005

Thank you for your note. I remember the visit with Mr. Allan Hirsh to
the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart and our conversation with Ms. Bolsinger,
the director of the photo department of this institution.

The following facts ought to me mentioned:

1. These microfilms were made in 1944 and 1945 or Jewish vital registers
which had been centralized in Rathsfeld Castle, Thuringia, and were lost
soon after. Microfilming was at that time an undeveloped technology, and
the films were taken with an amateur camera and are thus of poor
quality. Reproductions were made in the 1950s (on photo paper) and given
to the Jewish community centers in Stuttgart and Karlsruhe. In the
1990s, the old little film rolls were again used to make reproductions
which are now at the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart.

2. When these films were taken, the camera operator first filmed all the
left pages of a book and then all the right pages, so an entry spreading
over a whole double-side space is on two different rolls of microfilm.
After reproductions >from the films were made, these pertinent pages were
joined and bound into volumes. There are now two possibilities of reproduction:

a. Buy copies of the microfilms >from the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart at
a relatively low price. In this case, the buyer has to make
reproductions himself and organize them in the correct sequence of pages
- an ugly job which requires a lot of skill.

b. Buy paper reproductions (xerox copies) >from the reproductions held at
the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart. This would be more expensive, but would
yield the pages as they followed each others in the original book.

3. The term "Stuttgart Jewish family registers" is misleading. The
family register of the Jews in the city of Stuttgart has always been at
the Stuttgart Vital Registration Office (Standesamt) and is still there.
It has not been microfilmed and is not included in the discussion below.

4. The following Jewish vital registers are being discussed here:

a. Kingdom of Wuerttemberg.

Jewish vital registers were required >from 1828 onwards until 1875 (state
vital registration started in 1876). Many writers added up earlier
entries, and in some towns previously under Austrian sovereignty, the
books start in 1784. Family registers were to be established in 1828 for
all families then in existence, so if old people were alive, one can
sometimes get data back to the 1750 and even 1740s. These family
registers were continued into the 1930s but are not available for all
communities after 1876.

b. Grandduchy of Baden.

Jewish vital registers were required >from 1811 onwards until 1869 (state
vital registration started in 1870). Second writings of all these books
are being preserved in the state archives of Karlsruhe (for northern
Baden) and Freiburg (for southern Baden). About two thirds of these
books (court districts Achern to Offenburg) are available on microfilm.

These films were made since the 1960s >from the original paper copies in
the state archives and are thus much better than the films of 1944 and
1945. If copies of such books are needed, it is adviced to use these
recent films, rather than those made in 1944 and 1945.

Family registers were not required in the Grandduchy of Baden.

c. Principality, later Prussian province of Hohenzollern.

A few large Jewish communities were here whose registers have only
survived on those old microfilms. However, compilations of the families
for Hechingen and Dettensee have been recently made. There is not much
need to struggle with the contents of the original registers any longer,
except for a few other towns whose Jewish families may get reconstructed
some day, too.

5. Methods of evaluation.

I am currently not aware what the term digitalization, as used by Ms.
Miller, actually means. It this just typing the contents of the vital
registers into the computer, or does it mean to store pictorials of
these pages and make them available through the internet? The latter
would require permission by the archives administration which owns the
copyright (the books prior to 1876 or 1870, respectively, were written
upon state laws and have never been Jewish property, as far as I know).

Only a small part of the contemporary people can read the old script
used in these books, and even here in Germany, it is difficult to find
someone who can transcribe them. Many words and numbers are hard to read
or illegible. So just putting these pages into the internet would not be
of great help to the researchers worldwide.

Did anyone ever calculate how many hours are needed to transcribe all
those many pages?

6. Additional sources.

There are many additional sources which may add up to the contents of
these books. I am mainly thinking about probate record which are
available for the 1828 to 1899 period in Wuerttemberg (Jews were now
required to have their probate records made by officials before 1828),
and >from 1865 onwards for most court districts in Baden. Many details
about the families are included in emigration records and other types of
files. In addition, the 1828 lists of the adoption of Jewish family
names in Wuerttemberg and the entries in the local citizenship
registers yield data which are not included, or not legible in the famiy
registers. (By the way, I started to compile these 1828 data for all
Jewish communities in Wuerttemberg in order to publish the lists plus
biographical data for all Jews then alive).

So, as a summary, just transcribing the Jewish vital registers will be
of great help, but still leave many questions open which can be answered
by the use of other sources.

7. The best approach.

The best approach, to my opinion, is to form workgroups who compile
Jewish family books for one community by another, starting with Achern
and ending with Zwingenberg. Each such workgroup can dive deeply into
the local sources, including tombstones, and thus produce better results
than could be achieved by just the evaluation of one single source, or
by a researcher who just copes with one family.

There are still many people in Germany who are interested in the history
and fates of the Jews, and I think one can find retired people anywhere
who are willing to undertake such a project, and who are able to read
the old script or learn it. The largest problem for us Germans are the
cemetery inscriptions.

Such a book of Jewish families for every town would be a very good
argument against those who still deny the existence, or the extension of
the Shoah. A project of this type might even join (Christian) German and
Jewish researchers and resume conversation of groups who have not talked
with each others for two generations. I even imagine state or community
funds can be raised here if a Jewish organization is behind the whole
thing.

This is all for the moment. Please tell my greetings to Mr. Allan Hirsh.
I spent a week with him, visiting the archives of his ancestral towns
and the dedication of a memorial sign for the Jews in Bonfeld. I think
we were both impressed of these days.

[Contact Dottie Miller <dottiem@...> for more information.]

German SIG #Germany Re: Jewish vital registers in Baden-Wuerttemberg #germany

Dottie Miller
 

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion is not of interest to the entire
membership and should be conducted off-list. Periodic brief summaries
can be posted here. We need to hear immediately >from a volunteer
"discussion leader" for the proposed **** Family Register Project ****
Dottie Miller - will you accept this job? I regret that I am not able to
do it myself. MOD 1

The following is an excellent review of the Jewish vital registers in
Baden-Wuerttemberg sent to me by a well-recommended genealogist in
Germany, with his permission to share it with you in this forum.

Dottie Miller, San Antonio, TX USA

Oberdischingen, 10th March 2005

Thank you for your note. I remember the visit with Mr. Allan Hirsh to
the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart and our conversation with Ms. Bolsinger,
the director of the photo department of this institution.

The following facts ought to me mentioned:

1. These microfilms were made in 1944 and 1945 or Jewish vital registers
which had been centralized in Rathsfeld Castle, Thuringia, and were lost
soon after. Microfilming was at that time an undeveloped technology, and
the films were taken with an amateur camera and are thus of poor
quality. Reproductions were made in the 1950s (on photo paper) and given
to the Jewish community centers in Stuttgart and Karlsruhe. In the
1990s, the old little film rolls were again used to make reproductions
which are now at the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart.

2. When these films were taken, the camera operator first filmed all the
left pages of a book and then all the right pages, so an entry spreading
over a whole double-side space is on two different rolls of microfilm.
After reproductions >from the films were made, these pertinent pages were
joined and bound into volumes. There are now two possibilities of reproduction:

a. Buy copies of the microfilms >from the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart at
a relatively low price. In this case, the buyer has to make
reproductions himself and organize them in the correct sequence of pages
- an ugly job which requires a lot of skill.

b. Buy paper reproductions (xerox copies) >from the reproductions held at
the Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart. This would be more expensive, but would
yield the pages as they followed each others in the original book.

3. The term "Stuttgart Jewish family registers" is misleading. The
family register of the Jews in the city of Stuttgart has always been at
the Stuttgart Vital Registration Office (Standesamt) and is still there.
It has not been microfilmed and is not included in the discussion below.

4. The following Jewish vital registers are being discussed here:

a. Kingdom of Wuerttemberg.

Jewish vital registers were required >from 1828 onwards until 1875 (state
vital registration started in 1876). Many writers added up earlier
entries, and in some towns previously under Austrian sovereignty, the
books start in 1784. Family registers were to be established in 1828 for
all families then in existence, so if old people were alive, one can
sometimes get data back to the 1750 and even 1740s. These family
registers were continued into the 1930s but are not available for all
communities after 1876.

b. Grandduchy of Baden.

Jewish vital registers were required >from 1811 onwards until 1869 (state
vital registration started in 1870). Second writings of all these books
are being preserved in the state archives of Karlsruhe (for northern
Baden) and Freiburg (for southern Baden). About two thirds of these
books (court districts Achern to Offenburg) are available on microfilm.

These films were made since the 1960s >from the original paper copies in
the state archives and are thus much better than the films of 1944 and
1945. If copies of such books are needed, it is adviced to use these
recent films, rather than those made in 1944 and 1945.

Family registers were not required in the Grandduchy of Baden.

c. Principality, later Prussian province of Hohenzollern.

A few large Jewish communities were here whose registers have only
survived on those old microfilms. However, compilations of the families
for Hechingen and Dettensee have been recently made. There is not much
need to struggle with the contents of the original registers any longer,
except for a few other towns whose Jewish families may get reconstructed
some day, too.

5. Methods of evaluation.

I am currently not aware what the term digitalization, as used by Ms.
Miller, actually means. It this just typing the contents of the vital
registers into the computer, or does it mean to store pictorials of
these pages and make them available through the internet? The latter
would require permission by the archives administration which owns the
copyright (the books prior to 1876 or 1870, respectively, were written
upon state laws and have never been Jewish property, as far as I know).

Only a small part of the contemporary people can read the old script
used in these books, and even here in Germany, it is difficult to find
someone who can transcribe them. Many words and numbers are hard to read
or illegible. So just putting these pages into the internet would not be
of great help to the researchers worldwide.

Did anyone ever calculate how many hours are needed to transcribe all
those many pages?

6. Additional sources.

There are many additional sources which may add up to the contents of
these books. I am mainly thinking about probate record which are
available for the 1828 to 1899 period in Wuerttemberg (Jews were now
required to have their probate records made by officials before 1828),
and >from 1865 onwards for most court districts in Baden. Many details
about the families are included in emigration records and other types of
files. In addition, the 1828 lists of the adoption of Jewish family
names in Wuerttemberg and the entries in the local citizenship
registers yield data which are not included, or not legible in the famiy
registers. (By the way, I started to compile these 1828 data for all
Jewish communities in Wuerttemberg in order to publish the lists plus
biographical data for all Jews then alive).

So, as a summary, just transcribing the Jewish vital registers will be
of great help, but still leave many questions open which can be answered
by the use of other sources.

7. The best approach.

The best approach, to my opinion, is to form workgroups who compile
Jewish family books for one community by another, starting with Achern
and ending with Zwingenberg. Each such workgroup can dive deeply into
the local sources, including tombstones, and thus produce better results
than could be achieved by just the evaluation of one single source, or
by a researcher who just copes with one family.

There are still many people in Germany who are interested in the history
and fates of the Jews, and I think one can find retired people anywhere
who are willing to undertake such a project, and who are able to read
the old script or learn it. The largest problem for us Germans are the
cemetery inscriptions.

Such a book of Jewish families for every town would be a very good
argument against those who still deny the existence, or the extension of
the Shoah. A project of this type might even join (Christian) German and
Jewish researchers and resume conversation of groups who have not talked
with each others for two generations. I even imagine state or community
funds can be raised here if a Jewish organization is behind the whole
thing.

This is all for the moment. Please tell my greetings to Mr. Allan Hirsh.
I spent a week with him, visiting the archives of his ancestral towns
and the dedication of a memorial sign for the Jews in Bonfeld. I think
we were both impressed of these days.

[Contact Dottie Miller <dottiem@...> for more information.]

Ethnographic question: hats & yarmulkes, Bessarabia, ca. 1900 #romania

Marc L. Greenberg <marek4@...>
 

Hello, all,
I would like to know the name(s) -- Yiddish, Hebrew,
Russian, English -- and significance, if any, of the
particularly type of headgear worn by the bearded man
in these two pictures:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5639

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5640

Were these any particular kind of yarmulke and hat or
were they standard-issue for this place and time
(Kishinev, Bessarabia, ca. 1900) for a middle-aged
Jewish man? Do they signify anything about the
profession of the wearer?

Please reply directly to me. If interest is expressed,
I'd be happy to post a summary.
Sincerely,
Marc L. Greenberg

Researching: KLEIN - Kishinev / Chisinau; BLAU -
Tiszakarad / Karad, Zemplen County; LERNER - Bucharest
/ Bucuresti; HARRIS - Odessa / Odesa; BILANSKY,
GREENBERG, HERMAN - Novograd Volynskij
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your location.

Romania SIG #Romania Ethnographic question: hats & yarmulkes, Bessarabia, ca. 1900 #romania

Marc L. Greenberg <marek4@...>
 

Hello, all,
I would like to know the name(s) -- Yiddish, Hebrew,
Russian, English -- and significance, if any, of the
particularly type of headgear worn by the bearded man
in these two pictures:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5639

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5640

Were these any particular kind of yarmulke and hat or
were they standard-issue for this place and time
(Kishinev, Bessarabia, ca. 1900) for a middle-aged
Jewish man? Do they signify anything about the
profession of the wearer?

Please reply directly to me. If interest is expressed,
I'd be happy to post a summary.
Sincerely,
Marc L. Greenberg

Researching: KLEIN - Kishinev / Chisinau; BLAU -
Tiszakarad / Karad, Zemplen County; LERNER - Bucharest
/ Bucuresti; HARRIS - Odessa / Odesa; BILANSKY,
GREENBERG, HERMAN - Novograd Volynskij
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your location.

Re: Book by Lars Menk #germany

Gary Mokotoff (Optonline) <garymokotoff@...>
 

Comments about the planned Lars Menk book in response to
a recent posting to this Discussion Group.

1. The book covers all of the pre-World War I German Empire except Alsace.
from the Westfalen to East Pruissia, >from Baden/ Wuertemberg/Bavaria to
Schleswig-Holstein.

2. Mr. Menk used about 300 sources to compile the list of about 20,000 surnames,
including name adoption lists. Yes, it would be improper to make these lists
available to be posted to JewishGen. Of course, Ger-SIG can independently
do the work.

3. The book will go to the printer in about 30 days. At that time, we will
formally announce it.

Gary Mokotoff Avotaynu Northern New Jersey <garymokotoff@...>

German SIG #Germany Re: Book by Lars Menk #germany

Gary Mokotoff (Optonline) <garymokotoff@...>
 

Comments about the planned Lars Menk book in response to
a recent posting to this Discussion Group.

1. The book covers all of the pre-World War I German Empire except Alsace.
from the Westfalen to East Pruissia, >from Baden/ Wuertemberg/Bavaria to
Schleswig-Holstein.

2. Mr. Menk used about 300 sources to compile the list of about 20,000 surnames,
including name adoption lists. Yes, it would be improper to make these lists
available to be posted to JewishGen. Of course, Ger-SIG can independently
do the work.

3. The book will go to the printer in about 30 days. At that time, we will
formally announce it.

Gary Mokotoff Avotaynu Northern New Jersey <garymokotoff@...>

Re: Proposed name adoption list project for GerSIG website #germany

Lars E. Menk <Lmenk@...>
 

Dear friends, dear fellow Gersiggers,

My friend, Barbara Algaze is right about Avotaynu going to publish "A
Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames". That book will be released in May or
June 2005.

The book covers all territories which belonged to the German Empire in 1871
(with exclusion of the Alsace and Lorraine territories), i.e. the
territories which today belong to the Federal Republic of Germany, plus the
former Prussian territories east of the rivers Oder and Neisse which today
belong to Poland, Russia and Lithuania (Neumark, Pomerania, Silesia, Posen
province, West Prussia, East Prussia).

In that book, among other sources, all available naturalisation and name
adoption lists >from German territories, printed or not, have been evaluated.
However, everyone must keep in mind that the book gives the researcher just
the surnames, locations and years, and not the individuals' first names. It
does not contain the transcription of any of these naturalisation and name
adoption lists.

Most of the printed Prussian naturalisation lists are easily available to
me, as I've made Xerox copies of them (with a partly rather poor quality),
but they are not digitalized or transcribed in any form. Anyone interested
in any person who was naturalized in Prussia during the official
naturalisation period (which differed >from region to region) may send me
their questions. But I have to ask you to be patient, as my free time is
rather limited...

Kindest regards and Shalom to all of you,

Lars Menk Lmenk@... Berlin, Germany

German SIG #Germany Re: Proposed name adoption list project for GerSIG website #germany

Lars E. Menk <Lmenk@...>
 

Dear friends, dear fellow Gersiggers,

My friend, Barbara Algaze is right about Avotaynu going to publish "A
Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames". That book will be released in May or
June 2005.

The book covers all territories which belonged to the German Empire in 1871
(with exclusion of the Alsace and Lorraine territories), i.e. the
territories which today belong to the Federal Republic of Germany, plus the
former Prussian territories east of the rivers Oder and Neisse which today
belong to Poland, Russia and Lithuania (Neumark, Pomerania, Silesia, Posen
province, West Prussia, East Prussia).

In that book, among other sources, all available naturalisation and name
adoption lists >from German territories, printed or not, have been evaluated.
However, everyone must keep in mind that the book gives the researcher just
the surnames, locations and years, and not the individuals' first names. It
does not contain the transcription of any of these naturalisation and name
adoption lists.

Most of the printed Prussian naturalisation lists are easily available to
me, as I've made Xerox copies of them (with a partly rather poor quality),
but they are not digitalized or transcribed in any form. Anyone interested
in any person who was naturalized in Prussia during the official
naturalisation period (which differed >from region to region) may send me
their questions. But I have to ask you to be patient, as my free time is
rather limited...

Kindest regards and Shalom to all of you,

Lars Menk Lmenk@... Berlin, Germany

"digitized" defined, regarding family registers at Stuttgart #germany

Dottie Miller
 

My use of "digitized" in the earlier discussion of how to make the
family registers at Stuttgart available to www.jewishgen.org apparently
has confused some readers. What I meant was, rather than make physical
copies of the existing registers, any copies should be in a digital form
so that the registers can become a jewishgen.org searchable database online.

I have received an excellent review of what this collection actually
comprises and suggestions for processing them, a review that I will
share as soon as I get the reviewer's permission to share the letter
with this discussion group.

Dottie Miller San Antonio, TX USA <dottiem@...>

MODERATOR NOTE: A volunteer is needed to collect the email addresses of
GerSIG members who are interested in the
***** Family Registers Project *******.
Messages such as this one should be collected and distributed to those
interested parties, not to the entire list.

German SIG #Germany "digitized" defined, regarding family registers at Stuttgart #germany

Dottie Miller
 

My use of "digitized" in the earlier discussion of how to make the
family registers at Stuttgart available to www.jewishgen.org apparently
has confused some readers. What I meant was, rather than make physical
copies of the existing registers, any copies should be in a digital form
so that the registers can become a jewishgen.org searchable database online.

I have received an excellent review of what this collection actually
comprises and suggestions for processing them, a review that I will
share as soon as I get the reviewer's permission to share the letter
with this discussion group.

Dottie Miller San Antonio, TX USA <dottiem@...>

MODERATOR NOTE: A volunteer is needed to collect the email addresses of
GerSIG members who are interested in the
***** Family Registers Project *******.
Messages such as this one should be collected and distributed to those
interested parties, not to the entire list.

Danzig Community Archives at CAHJP - Comment and SITE CITE #germany

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

A list of items in the Danzig Community Archives at The Central Archives for
the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem is now online at
http://sites.huji.ac.il/archives/GERMANY-LISTS/Danzig%201.htm. (It is also
accessible >from the "What's New" link on the CAHJP homepage
http://www.sites.huji.ac.il/cahjp/.)

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who knows of published research based
on this collection, has examined this collection, plans to examine this
collection, or might be interested in some of the contents of this collection.

Thanks and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks kleinwaks@... near Washington, D.C.

German SIG #Germany Danzig Community Archives at CAHJP - Comment and SITE CITE #germany

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

A list of items in the Danzig Community Archives at The Central Archives for
the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem is now online at
http://sites.huji.ac.il/archives/GERMANY-LISTS/Danzig%201.htm. (It is also
accessible >from the "What's New" link on the CAHJP homepage
http://www.sites.huji.ac.il/cahjp/.)

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who knows of published research based
on this collection, has examined this collection, plans to examine this
collection, or might be interested in some of the contents of this collection.

Thanks and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks kleinwaks@... near Washington, D.C.

INTRO - Seek Gertraud GOTTLIEB, born ca. 1828-1839 in Bosen & many more #germany

Bobmar37
 

Hi Genners,
I've been researching my German family for about 14 years and have amassed
quite a database. Of course, there are some missing people that maybe some of
you can help me with. Both sides of my mother's family came >from the area
south of Trier and some of the records are actually French as this area was
French during the Napoleonic times. The relatives who came to the US came to
the midwest. My mother, for example, was >from Pleasanton, Kansas.

Here are the names I'm researching and their locations in Europe:

GOTTLIEB >from Bosen; LION >from Soetern and Steinbach
CAHEN >from Koenen (near Trier), Freudenberg, and Buding (now in France)
NEUMARK / NEYMARK / NEYMARC / NEYMARCK >from Gonnesweiler (and on to France)
KAHN >from Gonnesweiler; HERZ >from Nahbollenbach and Ockenheim
SENDER >from Soetern; LEVY / LEVI >from Beaumarais; STERN & WOLF >from Oberreidenbach

I'm trying to find the whereabouts of the sisters of my GGGF who are never
seen in civil records after their births: Dorothea, Sophia, Karolina, and
Gertraud GOTTLIEB, born in 1828-1839 in Bosen. Did they marry and live elsewhere?

Marian Price - Rensselaer, NY <Bobmar37@...>

German SIG #Germany INTRO - Seek Gertraud GOTTLIEB, born ca. 1828-1839 in Bosen & many more #germany

Bobmar37
 

Hi Genners,
I've been researching my German family for about 14 years and have amassed
quite a database. Of course, there are some missing people that maybe some of
you can help me with. Both sides of my mother's family came >from the area
south of Trier and some of the records are actually French as this area was
French during the Napoleonic times. The relatives who came to the US came to
the midwest. My mother, for example, was >from Pleasanton, Kansas.

Here are the names I'm researching and their locations in Europe:

GOTTLIEB >from Bosen; LION >from Soetern and Steinbach
CAHEN >from Koenen (near Trier), Freudenberg, and Buding (now in France)
NEUMARK / NEYMARK / NEYMARC / NEYMARCK >from Gonnesweiler (and on to France)
KAHN >from Gonnesweiler; HERZ >from Nahbollenbach and Ockenheim
SENDER >from Soetern; LEVY / LEVI >from Beaumarais; STERN & WOLF >from Oberreidenbach

I'm trying to find the whereabouts of the sisters of my GGGF who are never
seen in civil records after their births: Dorothea, Sophia, Karolina, and
Gertraud GOTTLIEB, born in 1828-1839 in Bosen. Did they marry and live elsewhere?

Marian Price - Rensselaer, NY <Bobmar37@...>