Date   

Rabbi MARKOWITZ of Yeshivat Slonim, Ramat Gan #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking for information and the family of -

Esther, married R. Samuel Markowitz, ABD Turzec, succeeding his
father-in-law in 1919. They perished with their children,
One son survived -
R. Zvi MARKOWITZ, Rosh Yeshivat Slonim in Ramat Gan, author of
chidushim (novellae) which appeared in Birkat Yitzchak.
Esther was daughter of R. Joseph Isaac Rabinowitz, born in Stolpce in
1844 and died on January 21st, 1919, married his first cousin, Blume,
daughter of Israel Rabinowitz

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbis Avraham LERMAN and Chaim MINTZ #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with these two brothers-in-law who married
daughters of Rav Chaim Dov Rabinowitz (1909-2001). They were
associated with yeshiva Tiferet Yerushalayim on Staten Island.
--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi MARKOWITZ of Yeshivat Slonim, Ramat Gan #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking for information and the family of -

Esther, married R. Samuel Markowitz, ABD Turzec, succeeding his
father-in-law in 1919. They perished with their children,
One son survived -
R. Zvi MARKOWITZ, Rosh Yeshivat Slonim in Ramat Gan, author of
chidushim (novellae) which appeared in Birkat Yitzchak.
Esther was daughter of R. Joseph Isaac Rabinowitz, born in Stolpce in
1844 and died on January 21st, 1919, married his first cousin, Blume,
daughter of Israel Rabinowitz

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbis Avraham LERMAN and Chaim MINTZ #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with these two brothers-in-law who married
daughters of Rav Chaim Dov Rabinowitz (1909-2001). They were
associated with yeshiva Tiferet Yerushalayim on Staten Island.
--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Shoshana GROSS, Melrose Park, PA #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to reestablish contact Shoshana GROSS on her work on the
ASHKENAZI rabbinical family of Kalisz and Zawichost.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Shoshana GROSS, Melrose Park, PA #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to reestablish contact Shoshana GROSS on her work on the
ASHKENAZI rabbinical family of Kalisz and Zawichost.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


New Sefer Torah for Brest after 75 years #rabbinic

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

Just as the new Brest Yiskor book is released, the Brest - Brisk
community celebrates a new Sefer Torah after 75 years.

Read the details and see the photos at:

http://elirab.me/2014/06/11/new-sefer-torah-for-brisk-after-75-years/

or on the Brest kehilalink:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/New_Torah.html

and

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/Yizkor_Book.html

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic New Sefer Torah for Brest after 75 years #rabbinic

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

Just as the new Brest Yiskor book is released, the Brest - Brisk
community celebrates a new Sefer Torah after 75 years.

Read the details and see the photos at:

http://elirab.me/2014/06/11/new-sefer-torah-for-brisk-after-75-years/

or on the Brest kehilalink:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/New_Torah.html

and

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/Yizkor_Book.html

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


Rabbi Eliaho GABAI #rabbinic

Andrea Tzadik <andrea@...>
 

Does anyone have any information on Rabbi Eliaho GABAI >from either
Rohaytn or Knyhinicze?
I know he was still alive in the 1920's.

Andrea Tzadik
andrea@tzadik.net


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Eliaho GABAI #rabbinic

Andrea Tzadik <andrea@...>
 

Does anyone have any information on Rabbi Eliaho GABAI >from either
Rohaytn or Knyhinicze?
I know he was still alive in the 1920's.

Andrea Tzadik
andrea@tzadik.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #yizkorbooks

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #yizkorbooks

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Visit Libau?? #latvia

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Hi everyone. As part of my cruise of the Baltics in July, I will be
taking a side trip to Plunge and Kretinga in Lithuania after
disembarking in Klaipeda. The plan is to then drive (with a guide
and driver) to Liepaja. >from there we would drive 4 hours (looking
at Googlemaps) to meet the ship in Riga the next day. We need to be
back on board at 2PM.

I did want to include Liepaja since my grandmother was born there,
and that is where the family left for America in 1900. I'm starting
to second guess myself and am wondering if I will get a good sense of
this city as it was when my grandmother with her family. I already
know that the street where my great-grandfather's shop was is now a
very big thoroughfare and that this is a modern city. I do wonder
if I am pushing this agenda, given the time constraints.

My guide comes very well-recommended, however, she has not been very
communicative. Has anyone made this journey? Wondering if I should
keep it a day trip to Plunge and Kretinga and forget the overnight
piece. If we do the 2-day trip, we would not have time to sight-see
in Riga. Worth the trade-off?

Thanks for any thoughts.

Elaine Bush


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #scandinavia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #sephardic

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latvia SIG #Latvia Visit Libau?? #latvia

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Hi everyone. As part of my cruise of the Baltics in July, I will be
taking a side trip to Plunge and Kretinga in Lithuania after
disembarking in Klaipeda. The plan is to then drive (with a guide
and driver) to Liepaja. >from there we would drive 4 hours (looking
at Googlemaps) to meet the ship in Riga the next day. We need to be
back on board at 2PM.

I did want to include Liepaja since my grandmother was born there,
and that is where the family left for America in 1900. I'm starting
to second guess myself and am wondering if I will get a good sense of
this city as it was when my grandmother with her family. I already
know that the street where my great-grandfather's shop was is now a
very big thoroughfare and that this is a modern city. I do wonder
if I am pushing this agenda, given the time constraints.

My guide comes very well-recommended, however, she has not been very
communicative. Has anyone made this journey? Wondering if I should
keep it a day trip to Plunge and Kretinga and forget the overnight
piece. If we do the 2-day trip, we would not have time to sight-see
in Riga. Worth the trade-off?

Thanks for any thoughts.

Elaine Bush


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #scandinavia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #sephardic

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #dna

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net

109661 - 109680 of 658779