Date   

entirely devoted to the Jews of Alsace. Issue 118 of Genealo-J, journal of the French JGS #germany

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 118, Summer 2014 has just been published.

This issue is entirely devoted to the Jews of Alsace.

Bernard Wils studies the community of Wittenheim, a small village of
Haut-Rhin, >from which come several of his ancestors. The community grew
from 7 families and 22 people in 1751 to a maximum of 22 families and 78
people in 1808. Then it declined slowly for economical reasons but the
deathblow was given by the German annexation of Alsace. A large
proportion of the Jews chose the French citizenship and left the
village. Only 5 Jews were left in 1900. The author follows in detail the
fate of members of the community: a large number of them were called
Grumbach but also Schwob or Lehmann.

Pierre-Andre Meyer published a few years ago in our journal two long and
very well documented articles about the Aron family of Phalsbourg. Some
genealogical information by Aaron Worms (1754-1836), chief rabbi of
Metz, about his ancestors Aron Isaac and Elle Cahen, and the discovery
of the tombstone of Ella Cahen in the cemetery of Saverne let Pascal
Faustini expose new elements about this couple who had thousands of
descendants.

The rabbi Abraham Bloch (1859-1914) is well known because he was the
first rabbi killed during the first World War while bringing a crucifix
to an expiring christian soldier. His grandparents are well known but
his published genealogy beyond that point is wrong, as shown by
Pierre-Andre Meyer. The confusion is due to the fact that three David
Bloch were living in Uttenheim in 1784. Meyer finds which one is the
actual g-g-g-father of Abraham Bloch and is therefore able to draw the
genealogical tree until the beginning of the 18th century.

Anne-Marie Fribourg was puzzled by the numerous unions between her Blum
ancestors >from Niederroedern (Bas-Rhin) and another Blum family >from
Vorderweidenthal, in Germany, not far >from the French border. She was
able to build the family tree which explains the connexions between
these two families.

The family name Wertenschlag has a mysterious origin. Bernard Lyon-Caen
quotes many explanations and many spellings. Although most people
bearing this name are Alsatian, Lyon-Caen adds a post-scriptum : “In
Wien around 1880 lived a Miss Werthenschlag who had a wart on the chin
and thick black eyebrows. She was the headmistress of a small Jewish
school which had among its pupils Martha, the future Mrs Freud”.

Eliane Roos Schuhl had in hands a curious list. It is a list written in
Hebrew which gives the names of thirty one Jewish communities of
Bas-Rhin and the amount of money they have to pay for a common charity
fund. It is not always easy to recognize the actual name of the village
since the Hebrew spelling is purely phonetic. If Ditlenheïm is clearly
Duttlenheim, would you guess that Tibkheis Duppigheim ?The list has been
written around 1800 by Rabbi Jacob aka Jeqel Meyer.whose family history
is also analyzed by the author.

At last, we find in this issue a short (only 5 pages) paper by
Pierre-Andre Meyer on “Judeo-Alsatian genealogy: the bases for a good
start”. These pages are an extract of a 28-pages brochure which has just
been published by the same author on the Jewish genealogy in Alsace and
in Lorraine. It gives an amazing list of sources, both printed and
numerical, to help the searcher in his quest. This brochure is available
for a modest price >from our office.

Georges Graner (Paris-France) georges.graner@...


German SIG #Germany entirely devoted to the Jews of Alsace. Issue 118 of Genealo-J, journal of the French JGS #germany

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 118, Summer 2014 has just been published.

This issue is entirely devoted to the Jews of Alsace.

Bernard Wils studies the community of Wittenheim, a small village of
Haut-Rhin, >from which come several of his ancestors. The community grew
from 7 families and 22 people in 1751 to a maximum of 22 families and 78
people in 1808. Then it declined slowly for economical reasons but the
deathblow was given by the German annexation of Alsace. A large
proportion of the Jews chose the French citizenship and left the
village. Only 5 Jews were left in 1900. The author follows in detail the
fate of members of the community: a large number of them were called
Grumbach but also Schwob or Lehmann.

Pierre-Andre Meyer published a few years ago in our journal two long and
very well documented articles about the Aron family of Phalsbourg. Some
genealogical information by Aaron Worms (1754-1836), chief rabbi of
Metz, about his ancestors Aron Isaac and Elle Cahen, and the discovery
of the tombstone of Ella Cahen in the cemetery of Saverne let Pascal
Faustini expose new elements about this couple who had thousands of
descendants.

The rabbi Abraham Bloch (1859-1914) is well known because he was the
first rabbi killed during the first World War while bringing a crucifix
to an expiring christian soldier. His grandparents are well known but
his published genealogy beyond that point is wrong, as shown by
Pierre-Andre Meyer. The confusion is due to the fact that three David
Bloch were living in Uttenheim in 1784. Meyer finds which one is the
actual g-g-g-father of Abraham Bloch and is therefore able to draw the
genealogical tree until the beginning of the 18th century.

Anne-Marie Fribourg was puzzled by the numerous unions between her Blum
ancestors >from Niederroedern (Bas-Rhin) and another Blum family >from
Vorderweidenthal, in Germany, not far >from the French border. She was
able to build the family tree which explains the connexions between
these two families.

The family name Wertenschlag has a mysterious origin. Bernard Lyon-Caen
quotes many explanations and many spellings. Although most people
bearing this name are Alsatian, Lyon-Caen adds a post-scriptum : “In
Wien around 1880 lived a Miss Werthenschlag who had a wart on the chin
and thick black eyebrows. She was the headmistress of a small Jewish
school which had among its pupils Martha, the future Mrs Freud”.

Eliane Roos Schuhl had in hands a curious list. It is a list written in
Hebrew which gives the names of thirty one Jewish communities of
Bas-Rhin and the amount of money they have to pay for a common charity
fund. It is not always easy to recognize the actual name of the village
since the Hebrew spelling is purely phonetic. If Ditlenheïm is clearly
Duttlenheim, would you guess that Tibkheis Duppigheim ?The list has been
written around 1800 by Rabbi Jacob aka Jeqel Meyer.whose family history
is also analyzed by the author.

At last, we find in this issue a short (only 5 pages) paper by
Pierre-Andre Meyer on “Judeo-Alsatian genealogy: the bases for a good
start”. These pages are an extract of a 28-pages brochure which has just
been published by the same author on the Jewish genealogy in Alsace and
in Lorraine. It gives an amazing list of sources, both printed and
numerical, to help the searcher in his quest. This brochure is available
for a modest price >from our office.

Georges Graner (Paris-France) georges.graner@...


SITE CITE - Jewish cemetery of Bad Neustadt an der Saale #germany

Andreas J Schwab, Dr <andreas.schwab@...>
 

I have transcribed the grave stones of the Jewish cemetery of Bad Neustadt
an der Saale, Lower Franconia. The stones were photographed by Moshecaine
(Jerusalem), eyal tagar and Anna and uploaded to the Billion Graves web site
:
http://billiongraves.com/pages/cemeteries/Judenfriedhof-Bad-Neustadt/180656
http://tinyurl.com/lwqphm3

There are a few stones in Hebrew only that still need to be transcribed.

Andreas Schwab, Beaconsfield, Canada <andreas.schwab@...>


German SIG #Germany SITE CITE - Jewish cemetery of Bad Neustadt an der Saale #germany

Andreas J Schwab, Dr <andreas.schwab@...>
 

I have transcribed the grave stones of the Jewish cemetery of Bad Neustadt
an der Saale, Lower Franconia. The stones were photographed by Moshecaine
(Jerusalem), eyal tagar and Anna and uploaded to the Billion Graves web site
:
http://billiongraves.com/pages/cemeteries/Judenfriedhof-Bad-Neustadt/180656
http://tinyurl.com/lwqphm3

There are a few stones in Hebrew only that still need to be transcribed.

Andreas Schwab, Beaconsfield, Canada <andreas.schwab@...>


logistics of matching with a specific person #dna

Helen Gardner
 

Hello there.

I am in email contact with a person who may be related to me.
Neither of us has our data on your system. He knows nothing
beyond his father, and I know nothing beyond my grandmother,
but his family came >from Warsaw, as did mine, and his surname,
Mlynarz, is almost identical to that of my grandmother, Mlynasz.
Since it is not a common name, there does seem to be a
possibility of a relationship.

It seems we would need to use MtDNA and we may need to use the
full sequencing because we cross gender lines.

In practical terms, how would we use DNA sequencing to test
whether we are related? We both live in Australia, about 150
miles apart. We are meeting on July 8, but I suspect that's too
soon to get anything going, as I haven't even asked him yet
whether he would be interested in doing the matching. Would we
need to submit our samples together? If the samples need to be
sent to the US, is there a problem with how long they may take
to arrive (4 days to a week using airmail, and if we need to send
them together, add a few days for post >from one of us to the other
for sending on together)? I assume we get a report giving us the
likelihood of us being related.

Could you please advise me on the best sequencing plan, and the
logistics of managing the process.

regards
Helen Gardner


DNA Research #DNA logistics of matching with a specific person #dna

Helen Gardner
 

Hello there.

I am in email contact with a person who may be related to me.
Neither of us has our data on your system. He knows nothing
beyond his father, and I know nothing beyond my grandmother,
but his family came >from Warsaw, as did mine, and his surname,
Mlynarz, is almost identical to that of my grandmother, Mlynasz.
Since it is not a common name, there does seem to be a
possibility of a relationship.

It seems we would need to use MtDNA and we may need to use the
full sequencing because we cross gender lines.

In practical terms, how would we use DNA sequencing to test
whether we are related? We both live in Australia, about 150
miles apart. We are meeting on July 8, but I suspect that's too
soon to get anything going, as I haven't even asked him yet
whether he would be interested in doing the matching. Would we
need to submit our samples together? If the samples need to be
sent to the US, is there a problem with how long they may take
to arrive (4 days to a week using airmail, and if we need to send
them together, add a few days for post >from one of us to the other
for sending on together)? I assume we get a report giving us the
likelihood of us being related.

Could you please advise me on the best sequencing plan, and the
logistics of managing the process.

regards
Helen Gardner


Korban Nesanel #rabbinic

Bernard Weill
 

Dear colleagues,

Can someone advise me how to find out if the Korban Nesanel (Rabbi Nesanel
Weill) of Karlshrue was a Levi?

Thank you,
Bezalel Weill
Brooklyn, NY


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Korban Nesanel #rabbinic

Bernard Weill
 

Dear colleagues,

Can someone advise me how to find out if the Korban Nesanel (Rabbi Nesanel
Weill) of Karlshrue was a Levi?

Thank you,
Bezalel Weill
Brooklyn, NY


GENIESLAW family #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of . Mordechai Yeshaya
GENIESLAW of Brooklyn, NY., born February 5th, 1929, married Sarah,
born in Nowy Sacz, daughter of Chaim Alter and Esther Gross. Issue,
Rivke Chaya, born September 8th, 1962, Chaim Alter, born August 15th,
196?, Machi, born December 19th, 1968 and Leah, born August 27th,
1970.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic GENIESLAW family #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of . Mordechai Yeshaya
GENIESLAW of Brooklyn, NY., born February 5th, 1929, married Sarah,
born in Nowy Sacz, daughter of Chaim Alter and Esther Gross. Issue,
Rivke Chaya, born September 8th, 1962, Chaim Alter, born August 15th,
196?, Machi, born December 19th, 1968 and Leah, born August 27th,
1970.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbi Baruch KORFF #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the children of
R. Baruch KORFF, born in 1914, Admur Zvil of Boston and later retired
to live in Providence, RI, where he died on July 26, 1995.
He became known as President Nixon's Rabbi. Was married twice - to whom?
He was married twice and his children were
Joy Weber of NYC
Marilyn Marsden of NYC
Zamira of Boston
--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Baruch KORFF #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the children of
R. Baruch KORFF, born in 1914, Admur Zvil of Boston and later retired
to live in Providence, RI, where he died on July 26, 1995.
He became known as President Nixon's Rabbi. Was married twice - to whom?
He was married twice and his children were
Joy Weber of NYC
Marilyn Marsden of NYC
Zamira of Boston
--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


The ReMA's daughters #rabbinic

Cyril Fox <c-fox4@...>
 

I would like to know whether the sister of Dreizel ISSERLES, namely Malka
Isserles, was without issue?
Did she die childless?
Her marriage was to Eliezer GUNZBURG.
Does anyone know?

Bella Fox


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic The ReMA's daughters #rabbinic

Cyril Fox <c-fox4@...>
 

I would like to know whether the sister of Dreizel ISSERLES, namely Malka
Isserles, was without issue?
Did she die childless?
Her marriage was to Eliezer GUNZBURG.
Does anyone know?

Bella Fox


FRIEDENSOHN in Paris #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact or get information on

Asher FRIEDENSOHN, who married his first cousin, Ela Ernestina and
settled in Paris.
Their three children -
1. Olga, born 1902, lived in Paris.
2. Ruth, born 1911 in Rumania, lived in Paris.
3. Alexander Friedensohn, born 1907, married Dora, lived in Paris.
(parents of Patrick Friedensohn, born 1944 in Paris and George
Friedensohn, born 1945 in Paris.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic FRIEDENSOHN in Paris #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact or get information on

Asher FRIEDENSOHN, who married his first cousin, Ela Ernestina and
settled in Paris.
Their three children -
1. Olga, born 1902, lived in Paris.
2. Ruth, born 1911 in Rumania, lived in Paris.
3. Alexander Friedensohn, born 1907, married Dora, lived in Paris.
(parents of Patrick Friedensohn, born 1944 in Paris and George
Friedensohn, born 1945 in Paris.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rav GORDON of Yeshivat Lomza in Petach Tikva. #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact anyone who knows of this rabbi and his family.
A son-in-law was Yehoshua Eizik KOSTIKOWSKY.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rav GORDON of Yeshivat Lomza in Petach Tikva. #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact anyone who knows of this rabbi and his family.
A son-in-law was Yehoshua Eizik KOSTIKOWSKY.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


One name: one person or two? #general

Dave Strausfeld <davestra@...>
 

Hi all,

I have a puzzler for you. Would it be reasonable for there to be
two Jewish women of the same name in a certain shtetl in the late
nineteenth century?

The shtetl in question is Frampol, which had a Jewish population in
1900 of somewhere around 1,000, according to Jewishgen.

So here are my two records:

1) I have a translated birth record for a Sluwa Krikszer born in
Frampol in 1878. In this record, the father's name is Majer.

2) I also have a 1910 passenger manifest for a Sluwa Brenner (nee
Krikszer) >from Frampol that lists her father's name as Moshe.

I have many more records for her and I'm sure her maiden name was
Krikszer.

Both women would have been about the same age, which makes me wonder
whether I truly have two different people. Clearly, one of the records
could be in error about the father's name, most likely the passenger
manifest.

What I'm wondering is, how likely would it be for there to be two
roughly-the-same-age Jewish women of the same name in this shtetl?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Dave Strausfeld

P.S. Complicating things a bit, I also have an 1889 Frampol birth
record for a Krikszer son that says the father's name was Moshe.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen One name: one person or two? #general

Dave Strausfeld <davestra@...>
 

Hi all,

I have a puzzler for you. Would it be reasonable for there to be
two Jewish women of the same name in a certain shtetl in the late
nineteenth century?

The shtetl in question is Frampol, which had a Jewish population in
1900 of somewhere around 1,000, according to Jewishgen.

So here are my two records:

1) I have a translated birth record for a Sluwa Krikszer born in
Frampol in 1878. In this record, the father's name is Majer.

2) I also have a 1910 passenger manifest for a Sluwa Brenner (nee
Krikszer) >from Frampol that lists her father's name as Moshe.

I have many more records for her and I'm sure her maiden name was
Krikszer.

Both women would have been about the same age, which makes me wonder
whether I truly have two different people. Clearly, one of the records
could be in error about the father's name, most likely the passenger
manifest.

What I'm wondering is, how likely would it be for there to be two
roughly-the-same-age Jewish women of the same name in this shtetl?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Dave Strausfeld

P.S. Complicating things a bit, I also have an 1889 Frampol birth
record for a Krikszer son that says the father's name was Moshe.

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