Date   

JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County March 1 Program: Janette Silverman Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: The Lives Our Ancestors Led #ukraine

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura
County(JGSCV) will hold a general meeting, co-sponsored with Temple Adat
Elohim, on Sunday, March 1, 2015 1:30-3:30 PM at Temple Adat Elohim 2420 E.
Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

The Topic: Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: The Lives Our
Ancestors Led

Program: The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York is often off the radar
screen for many genealogists but the library is home to almost half a
million volumes including manuscripts, rare books and archives. The
archives are a treasure yet to be explored by so many of us and yet it is a
rich repository of records of Jewish communities, institutions and prominent
individuals in the US and Europe. We will take a digital trip and explore
some of the treasures that can be found at JTS. Included in these archives
are transcriptions of notes, memos and correspondence between the State
Department and offices in Vienna, St. Petersburg, Warsaw and Bucharest from
1863-1906 that concern the legal position and persecution of Jews; and
correspondence and notes about the Jewish community in France >from 1700's
until after WWII. We will also explore a variety of ketubot and mohel books
and talk about the way all of these materials help us in our research.

Speaker: Dr. Janette Silverman is the JewishGen Ukraine SIG Coordinator.
She was the president of the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Society for 5 years,
and is active on the IAJGS Membership Development Committee. Since 2007 she
has served as a Moderator for the JewishGen Discussion Group. Her doctoral
dissertation, "In Living Memory" is about Jewish genealogical research.
Janette has been researching family history for almost 30 years. Janette is
the Outreach Director for the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish
Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York.

The Schmoozing Corner: which is held starting 1:10PM will be facilitated by
JGSCV founding member and board member, Warren Blatt The Schmoozing Corner
is available if you would like individual insights for your genealogical
pursuits >from an experienced JGSCV member 20 minutes before each meeting.

We return with our 5-minute genealogical hint which is at the beginning of
the meeting. JGSCV treasurer, Karen Lewy will be talking on Finding
Interesting Information on Death Certificates

Our traveling library will be available starting at 1:00PM. To see which
books are in our traveling library see our website under library- traveling
(www.jgscv.org )

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history. There is no
charge to attend the meeting. Anyone may join JGSCV.

The 2015 Membership Drive is well on its way. Annual dues paid now are good
through December 2015. Forms are available at the meeting, on the JGSCV
website-under Membership- and in the JGSCV newsletter, Venturing Into Our
Past.

For more information, including directions, please see the JGSCV website:
www.jgscv.org


Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County March 1 Program: Janette Silverman Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: The Lives Our Ancestors Led #ukraine

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura
County(JGSCV) will hold a general meeting, co-sponsored with Temple Adat
Elohim, on Sunday, March 1, 2015 1:30-3:30 PM at Temple Adat Elohim 2420 E.
Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

The Topic: Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: The Lives Our
Ancestors Led

Program: The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York is often off the radar
screen for many genealogists but the library is home to almost half a
million volumes including manuscripts, rare books and archives. The
archives are a treasure yet to be explored by so many of us and yet it is a
rich repository of records of Jewish communities, institutions and prominent
individuals in the US and Europe. We will take a digital trip and explore
some of the treasures that can be found at JTS. Included in these archives
are transcriptions of notes, memos and correspondence between the State
Department and offices in Vienna, St. Petersburg, Warsaw and Bucharest from
1863-1906 that concern the legal position and persecution of Jews; and
correspondence and notes about the Jewish community in France >from 1700's
until after WWII. We will also explore a variety of ketubot and mohel books
and talk about the way all of these materials help us in our research.

Speaker: Dr. Janette Silverman is the JewishGen Ukraine SIG Coordinator.
She was the president of the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Society for 5 years,
and is active on the IAJGS Membership Development Committee. Since 2007 she
has served as a Moderator for the JewishGen Discussion Group. Her doctoral
dissertation, "In Living Memory" is about Jewish genealogical research.
Janette has been researching family history for almost 30 years. Janette is
the Outreach Director for the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish
Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York.

The Schmoozing Corner: which is held starting 1:10PM will be facilitated by
JGSCV founding member and board member, Warren Blatt The Schmoozing Corner
is available if you would like individual insights for your genealogical
pursuits >from an experienced JGSCV member 20 minutes before each meeting.

We return with our 5-minute genealogical hint which is at the beginning of
the meeting. JGSCV treasurer, Karen Lewy will be talking on Finding
Interesting Information on Death Certificates

Our traveling library will be available starting at 1:00PM. To see which
books are in our traveling library see our website under library- traveling
(www.jgscv.org )

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history. There is no
charge to attend the meeting. Anyone may join JGSCV.

The 2015 Membership Drive is well on its way. Annual dues paid now are good
through December 2015. Forms are available at the meeting, on the JGSCV
website-under Membership- and in the JGSCV newsletter, Venturing Into Our
Past.

For more information, including directions, please see the JGSCV website:
www.jgscv.org


Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV


Railway Travel in Eastern Europe to ports of emigration #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Apropos of recent postings and queries about train routes through
Eastern and Central Europe to various emigration ports, I wanted to
remind researchers about three excellent, historical railway maps on
the Gesher Galicia Map Room. Click the links and zoom in to see the
various possible routes. These maps are a joy to review and you'll be
surprised by how many different ways there were for getting >from small
towns to various ports.

Although the focus of the map room is on the Austro-Hungarian Empire,
you can still get a sense of where these trains might have come from
and/or continued even if they originated in Russia during the 19th and
20th centuries and continued on to France, Germany, Holland or
England. The direct links are below, but the website has more
specialty maps beyond these that you might be interested in. The home
page is: http://maps.geshergalicia.org.

Artaria Railway & Postal Communications Map of Austria-Hungary 1887

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/austro-hungary-rail-1887/

A railway and postal route map of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy
published by Artaria of Vienna in 1887. The map shows region borders
(highlighting Galicia), towns, rail lines, and postal routes, with a
detailed legend of communication lines by color and symbols.
Additional features include suburban rail lines around Vienna and
Budapest at roughly 5x greater scale, plus a more detailed rail
network map of northern Bohemia.

Kornman Road, Rail & Waterway Transport Map of Galicia & Bukovina 1890

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

A transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions.

Cram's Railway System Atlas of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy 1901

A railway map of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, >from George F. Cram's
"Standard American Railway System Atlas Of The World" (1901), showing
towns, rail lines, and major geographic landmarks, with a listing of
major cities at the top. Includes the note, "Foreign Maps Are Compiled
Largely >from Charts of The Royal Geographical Society."

A side note on analyzing travel >from personal experience: in my early
days of research, because my grandmother, lived in northeastern
Hungary, I posited that she would have traveled to Budapest and then
onward to a port. The discovery of her passport, which was stamped
"Kassa" (today Kosice on the border to Slovakia, not far >from her
town) lead me to a Hungarian railway map at a Budapest Transportation
Museum which showed a train line >from Debrecen, Hungary, passing
through Kassa, then to Krakow and continuing up to Libau, one of the
main ports of the Russian Empire, today Liepaja, Latvia. >from there
she caught a Danish steamer to Liverpool and departed for the United
States on the White Star Line. She had a common surname, a
mis-transcribed given name and searching for her passenger record was
difficult since the family listed their last place of residence as
"Libau" and I knew them to be >from Hungary. The railway info was
instrumental in identifying the correct record. Her sister, traveling
earlier on the same route, caught a steamer >from Libau to Glasgow,
then on the U.S.

Sometimes the ports and shipping lines were chosen based on which
ticket agent covered the shtetls where your ancestors lived. Some
communities in Galicia all seemed to leave >from Rotterdam on the
Holland America Line, but I'm guessing it wasn't a preference for the
Netherlands -- other German ports would have been closer -- but simply
someone selling the right ticket at the right time or different ticket
agents having territorial rights. Once one relative was a satisfied
customer, others followed.

You can read more about transmigration via British ports here:

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/transmigration.shtml

And an article by Nicholas Evans, who has spoken at many IAJGS
conferences on this topic here:

http://www.norwayheritage.com/articles/templates/voyages.asp?articleid=28&zoneid=6

Historical railway maps are important to review because train lines
came and went. Depending on the era, choices for emigrants varied.
For example, during the late 19th - early 20th century there was a
rail spur terminus at my grandfather's town of Grzymalow, Galicia
providing easy transit to Tarnopol and Lviv (including a regally
decked-out private car for the Polish magnate) but it is no more.
Reviewing present-day maps will only provide part of the story.

If you have publication rights to maps which you think we should
include in the GG map room, please contact me privately.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Railway Travel in Eastern Europe to ports of emigration #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Apropos of recent postings and queries about train routes through
Eastern and Central Europe to various emigration ports, I wanted to
remind researchers about three excellent, historical railway maps on
the Gesher Galicia Map Room. Click the links and zoom in to see the
various possible routes. These maps are a joy to review and you'll be
surprised by how many different ways there were for getting >from small
towns to various ports.

Although the focus of the map room is on the Austro-Hungarian Empire,
you can still get a sense of where these trains might have come from
and/or continued even if they originated in Russia during the 19th and
20th centuries and continued on to France, Germany, Holland or
England. The direct links are below, but the website has more
specialty maps beyond these that you might be interested in. The home
page is: http://maps.geshergalicia.org.

Artaria Railway & Postal Communications Map of Austria-Hungary 1887

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/austro-hungary-rail-1887/

A railway and postal route map of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy
published by Artaria of Vienna in 1887. The map shows region borders
(highlighting Galicia), towns, rail lines, and postal routes, with a
detailed legend of communication lines by color and symbols.
Additional features include suburban rail lines around Vienna and
Budapest at roughly 5x greater scale, plus a more detailed rail
network map of northern Bohemia.

Kornman Road, Rail & Waterway Transport Map of Galicia & Bukovina 1890

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

A transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions.

Cram's Railway System Atlas of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy 1901

A railway map of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, >from George F. Cram's
"Standard American Railway System Atlas Of The World" (1901), showing
towns, rail lines, and major geographic landmarks, with a listing of
major cities at the top. Includes the note, "Foreign Maps Are Compiled
Largely >from Charts of The Royal Geographical Society."

A side note on analyzing travel >from personal experience: in my early
days of research, because my grandmother, lived in northeastern
Hungary, I posited that she would have traveled to Budapest and then
onward to a port. The discovery of her passport, which was stamped
"Kassa" (today Kosice on the border to Slovakia, not far >from her
town) lead me to a Hungarian railway map at a Budapest Transportation
Museum which showed a train line >from Debrecen, Hungary, passing
through Kassa, then to Krakow and continuing up to Libau, one of the
main ports of the Russian Empire, today Liepaja, Latvia. >from there
she caught a Danish steamer to Liverpool and departed for the United
States on the White Star Line. She had a common surname, a
mis-transcribed given name and searching for her passenger record was
difficult since the family listed their last place of residence as
"Libau" and I knew them to be >from Hungary. The railway info was
instrumental in identifying the correct record. Her sister, traveling
earlier on the same route, caught a steamer >from Libau to Glasgow,
then on the U.S.

Sometimes the ports and shipping lines were chosen based on which
ticket agent covered the shtetls where your ancestors lived. Some
communities in Galicia all seemed to leave >from Rotterdam on the
Holland America Line, but I'm guessing it wasn't a preference for the
Netherlands -- other German ports would have been closer -- but simply
someone selling the right ticket at the right time or different ticket
agents having territorial rights. Once one relative was a satisfied
customer, others followed.

You can read more about transmigration via British ports here:

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/transmigration.shtml

And an article by Nicholas Evans, who has spoken at many IAJGS
conferences on this topic here:

http://www.norwayheritage.com/articles/templates/voyages.asp?articleid=28&zoneid=6

Historical railway maps are important to review because train lines
came and went. Depending on the era, choices for emigrants varied.
For example, during the late 19th - early 20th century there was a
rail spur terminus at my grandfather's town of Grzymalow, Galicia
providing easy transit to Tarnopol and Lviv (including a regally
decked-out private car for the Polish magnate) but it is no more.
Reviewing present-day maps will only provide part of the story.

If you have publication rights to maps which you think we should
include in the GG map room, please contact me privately.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org


tulchin journey #ukraine

Marjorie Short <giltrip202@...>
 

According to my cousin her family moved to Rovno to get ship passage to US. They didn't know when their tickets would be available ... the next day, week, or month... so had to be available to go when their dated tickets arrived. Rovno was the central rail station in their Volhynia area to connect to ship passage. The train took the families to Bremen or Hamburg where they boarded to England and then to the US.

Marjorie J Short


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Fwd: tulchin journey #ukraine

Marjorie Short <giltrip202@...>
 

According to my cousin her family moved to Rovno to get ship passage to US. They didn't know when their tickets would be available ... the next day, week, or month... so had to be available to go when their dated tickets arrived. Rovno was the central rail station in their Volhynia area to connect to ship passage. The train took the families to Bremen or Hamburg where they boarded to England and then to the US.

Marjorie J Short


Frazin book #poland

brdbrain7@...
 

Judith R. Frazin's award winning book is available through the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois (www.jgsi.org).

Robin B. Seidenberg
Co-president, JGSI

Subject: Translation of 1875 death record of Czyzewo Osada
From: Suzanne Scheraga <sjscheraga@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 00:40:10 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Judith Diamond requested help in translating what I think are
Polish documents. I highly recommend the book "A Translation
Guide to 19th-Century Polish-Language Civil-Registration
Documents" by Judith R. Frazin. She gives step by step instructions
on how to translate these documents without knowing any Polish.
It takes patience but I did it for some documents I found in
Czyzewo Osada during that same time period. Good luck!

Suzanne Scheraga

-----Original Message----

Subject: Translation of 1875 death record of Czyzewo Osada
From: Suzanne Scheraga <sjscheraga@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 00:40:10 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Judith Diamond requested help in translating what I think are
Polish documents. I highly recommend the book "A Translation
Guide to 19th-Century Polish-Language Civil-Registration
Documents" by Judith R. Frazin. She gives step by step instructions
on how to translate these documents without knowing any Polish.
It takes patience but I did it for some documents I found in
Czyzewo Osada during that same time period. Good luck!

Suzanne Scheraga

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Selections >from Judith Frazin's extremely
helpful book may be found on the JRI-Poland website at
http://www.jri-poland.org/frazin.htm


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Frazin book #poland

brdbrain7@...
 

Judith R. Frazin's award winning book is available through the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois (www.jgsi.org).

Robin B. Seidenberg
Co-president, JGSI

Subject: Translation of 1875 death record of Czyzewo Osada
From: Suzanne Scheraga <sjscheraga@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 00:40:10 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Judith Diamond requested help in translating what I think are
Polish documents. I highly recommend the book "A Translation
Guide to 19th-Century Polish-Language Civil-Registration
Documents" by Judith R. Frazin. She gives step by step instructions
on how to translate these documents without knowing any Polish.
It takes patience but I did it for some documents I found in
Czyzewo Osada during that same time period. Good luck!

Suzanne Scheraga

-----Original Message----

Subject: Translation of 1875 death record of Czyzewo Osada
From: Suzanne Scheraga <sjscheraga@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 00:40:10 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

Judith Diamond requested help in translating what I think are
Polish documents. I highly recommend the book "A Translation
Guide to 19th-Century Polish-Language Civil-Registration
Documents" by Judith R. Frazin. She gives step by step instructions
on how to translate these documents without knowing any Polish.
It takes patience but I did it for some documents I found in
Czyzewo Osada during that same time period. Good luck!

Suzanne Scheraga

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Selections >from Judith Frazin's extremely
helpful book may be found on the JRI-Poland website at
http://www.jri-poland.org/frazin.htm


ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland

Scott Meyer
 

I've posted a birth record in Russian for which I need a translation
of the full names of the child and parents, as well as the town where
the mother was from.

The document is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38248
L
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thanks,

Scott E. Meyer
scottemeyer@gmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland

Scott Meyer
 

I've posted a birth record in Russian for which I need a translation
of the full names of the child and parents, as well as the town where
the mother was from.

The document is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38248
L
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thanks,

Scott E. Meyer
scottemeyer@gmail.com


ViewMate translation requests - Polish #poland

Steven Taubman <taubman@...>
 

I posted five vital records on ViewMate that I believe are written in
Polish.

If possible, I would greatly appreciate direct translations of each of
these documents (but even partial translations would be much
appreciated). The records are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38154
(surnames of BRAJTER, SALBE or SALBA >from Radom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38155
(surname of ZELMANOWA >from Kosow Lacki)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38156
(surname of SALBE or SALBA >from Radom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38157
(surnames of DESSAU, SZPERLING or SPERLING >from Tomaszow Mazowieckie
Lodz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38158
(surname of SZPERLING or SPERLING >from Tomaszow Mazowieckie, Lodz)

Please respond using the ViewMate form. Thank you for your help.

Steve Taubman
Pacifica, CA



Researching:

TAUBMANN, TAUBMAN >from Bucharest, Romania; ALADJEM >from Sofiya,
Bulgaria;
KOSSOFF, KUCHEL, MARKMAN, ISENBEY >from Pavoloch, Fastov and/or Kiev
Region, Ukraine;
ALTSZYLER, SALBE, TENENBAUM, SILVER >from Radom, Poland; BRAJTER >from
Lublin, Poland; FINKELSZTEJN, SZAFRAN, TAMRES >from Nasielsk, Poland;
KADISH, KADISCH, FISHKIN, REIKES, RIEKES, SOLOVEICHIK >from Minsk,
Russia; ETKIN, SAPERSTEIN, SHAPIRO >from Kaunas, Lithuania;
KOBLINTZ, MOSKOWITZ, ROSENFELD >from Russia; TABAKIERKA, TAMIR, KLEINMAN,
KRAMER >from Korets, Berezdov and/or Rivne, Ukraine;
RZESZKOWSKI, SPERLING, SZPERLING, SZPIEWAK >from Lodz, Poland


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation requests - Polish #poland

Steven Taubman <taubman@...>
 

I posted five vital records on ViewMate that I believe are written in
Polish.

If possible, I would greatly appreciate direct translations of each of
these documents (but even partial translations would be much
appreciated). The records are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38154
(surnames of BRAJTER, SALBE or SALBA >from Radom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38155
(surname of ZELMANOWA >from Kosow Lacki)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38156
(surname of SALBE or SALBA >from Radom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38157
(surnames of DESSAU, SZPERLING or SPERLING >from Tomaszow Mazowieckie
Lodz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38158
(surname of SZPERLING or SPERLING >from Tomaszow Mazowieckie, Lodz)

Please respond using the ViewMate form. Thank you for your help.

Steve Taubman
Pacifica, CA



Researching:

TAUBMANN, TAUBMAN >from Bucharest, Romania; ALADJEM >from Sofiya,
Bulgaria;
KOSSOFF, KUCHEL, MARKMAN, ISENBEY >from Pavoloch, Fastov and/or Kiev
Region, Ukraine;
ALTSZYLER, SALBE, TENENBAUM, SILVER >from Radom, Poland; BRAJTER >from
Lublin, Poland; FINKELSZTEJN, SZAFRAN, TAMRES >from Nasielsk, Poland;
KADISH, KADISCH, FISHKIN, REIKES, RIEKES, SOLOVEICHIK >from Minsk,
Russia; ETKIN, SAPERSTEIN, SHAPIRO >from Kaunas, Lithuania;
KOBLINTZ, MOSKOWITZ, ROSENFELD >from Russia; TABAKIERKA, TAMIR, KLEINMAN,
KRAMER >from Korets, Berezdov and/or Rivne, Ukraine;
RZESZKOWSKI, SPERLING, SZPERLING, SZPIEWAK >from Lodz, Poland


Finding documents #france

Pierre HAHN
 

I will be going to Paris in early April. I would like to obtain
copies of two French documents, where and how are what I need and any
other guidance to obtain them will be welcome.

The first document is the one that directed all the Jews to obtain
patronymic names in 1808.

The second document is the declaration by the king of 1 July 1766 foru
registering personal loans.

Please reply directly to the writer.

--
Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


French SIG #France Finding documents #france

Pierre HAHN
 

I will be going to Paris in early April. I would like to obtain
copies of two French documents, where and how are what I need and any
other guidance to obtain them will be welcome.

The first document is the one that directed all the Jews to obtain
patronymic names in 1808.

The second document is the declaration by the king of 1 July 1766 foru
registering personal loans.

Please reply directly to the writer.

--
Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


Viewmate Translation Request Polish/German #galicia

Susan Rosin
 

Dear Genners,

I've posted two vital records in Polish (or German?) for which I need
a translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38257
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38258

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you very much.

Susan Rosin
Brea, CA

Researching: Oher, Bardach, Allerhand, Morgenstern (Boryslaw,
Schodnica, Stryj, Knihynicze)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Viewmate Translation Request Polish/German #galicia

Susan Rosin
 

Dear Genners,

I've posted two vital records in Polish (or German?) for which I need
a translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38257
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38258

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you very much.

Susan Rosin
Brea, CA

Researching: Oher, Bardach, Allerhand, Morgenstern (Boryslaw,
Schodnica, Stryj, Knihynicze)


Nadvorna Rebbe #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to find the name of the father of R. Issachar Ber Leifer,
Admur Nadvorna-Banya whose daughter married Michoel Silberberg (whose
mother Rikva Henia died last month) and how Rabbi Leifer fits into the
Nadvorna lienage. .
--
Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Nadvorna Rebbe #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to find the name of the father of R. Issachar Ber Leifer,
Admur Nadvorna-Banya whose daughter married Michoel Silberberg (whose
mother Rikva Henia died last month) and how Rabbi Leifer fits into the
Nadvorna lienage. .
--
Neil Rosenstein


Long Lost Family-- Another Genealogy Program Premieres March 1 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Learning Channel which also hosts Who Do You Think You Are ( which returns
March 8, 2015 10PM/9PM Central on TLC) is also hosting a new series of adoptees
trying to find their biological parents, called Long Lost Family. The same
producers as WDYTUA and sponsor, Ancestry.com is bringing to television in the US
Long Lost Family. Long Lost Family premieres on Sunday March 1, 2015 10PM/9PM
Central viewers will watch adoptees go through the ups and downs of trying to track
down loved ones they're so anxious to meet. The program has appeared on British
television for several years. >from reading the blurb about the program,
http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2015/02/19/new-special-long-lost-family-to-premiere-sunday-march-1-on-tlc/365552/
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/loljlpj )
it appears that one session is scheduled and depending on interest more may be
forthcoming-this is an assumption on my part >from the way it is written. To see a
brief preview go to http://www.tlc.com/schedule/ and go to March 1 and the 10 PM
time slot.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com, Who Do You Think You Are, Shed Media, or
TLC.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Long Lost Family-- Another Genealogy Program Premieres March 1 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Learning Channel which also hosts Who Do You Think You Are ( which returns
March 8, 2015 10PM/9PM Central on TLC) is also hosting a new series of adoptees
trying to find their biological parents, called Long Lost Family. The same
producers as WDYTUA and sponsor, Ancestry.com is bringing to television in the US
Long Lost Family. Long Lost Family premieres on Sunday March 1, 2015 10PM/9PM
Central viewers will watch adoptees go through the ups and downs of trying to track
down loved ones they're so anxious to meet. The program has appeared on British
television for several years. >from reading the blurb about the program,
http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2015/02/19/new-special-long-lost-family-to-premiere-sunday-march-1-on-tlc/365552/
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/loljlpj )
it appears that one session is scheduled and depending on interest more may be
forthcoming-this is an assumption on my part >from the way it is written. To see a
brief preview go to http://www.tlc.com/schedule/ and go to March 1 and the 10 PM
time slot.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com, Who Do You Think You Are, Shed Media, or
TLC.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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